Airlines Will Play Key Role In The Distribution of COVID-19 Vaccines

The airline industry will play a crucial role delivering coronavirus vaccines worldwide after pharmaceutical companies like Pfizer (PFE) win approval for their pandemic fighting inoculations. “This is sort of an all hands on deck for distribution,” Cowen Managing Director and senior research analyst Helane Becker told Yahoo Finance Live.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) recently urged governments worldwide to prepare for vaccine delivery. “Air cargo plays a key role in the distribution of vaccines in normal times through well established global time and temperature sensitive distribution systems.”

However, IATA cautions that “delivering billions of doses of vaccine to the entire world efficiently will involve hugely complex logistical and programmatic obstacles” such as building refrigeration storage units.

Pfizer announced earlier this week that its experimental vaccine, which proved 90% effective at preventing COVID-19 in recent trials, must be stored at sub-zero temperatures.

An airborne armada

Airlines like New York-based Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings (AAWW) will be among the global airborne armada eventually shipping billions of doses of vaccine, according to Becker. The cold storage requirements make it difficult.

“This is going to be one of the biggest challenges for the transportation industry,” Michael Steen, chief commercial officer at Atlas Air told the Wall Street Journal last month.

Atlas Air has the largest fleet of 747 freighters in the world but that alone won’t be enough. Becker said Atlas Air, FedEx (FDX) and United Parcel Service (UPS) will all be enlisted to deliver vaccines.

“UPS has the largest freezer farms I think in the world. They’ve got one big one at Louisville, Kentucky, which is their US Air hub, and they have one in the Netherlands,” which Becker said prepares them for the upcoming distribution task.

UPS (UPS) stock is up 42% year-to-date. FedEx (FDX) is up 77% and Atlas Air (AAWW) is up 87%. “We think Atlas has legs, the stocks really performed well,” Becker said.

IATA said the job ahead is enormous. “Just providing a single dose to 7.8 billion people would fill 8,000 747 cargo aircraft.”

U.S. carriers shipped 58,000 tons of cargo a day before the pandemic and passenger airlines like American Airlines (AAL) and United Airlines (UAL) will be needed, according to Becker. “American and United also have cold storage facilities. American in Philadelphia and United in New York, so they’ll be able to participate,” she said.

As the world anxiously awaits approval of effective coronavirus vaccines, IATA’s Director General and CEO Alexandre de Juniac described what lies ahead “Safely delivering COVID-19 vaccines will be the mission of the century for the global air cargo industry.”

Adam Shapiro is co-anchor of Yahoo Finance Live 3pm to 5pm.

By: Adam Shapiro

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British Airways Owner IAG To Operate Just 30% Of Flights For The Rest Of 2020

International Airlines Group (IAG), which owns British airways, the U.K.’s second largest airline by passenger numbers, fell far short of analysts’ expectations on Thursday as it recorded a loss of $1.5 billion (1.3 billion euros) in the third quarter and announced further cuts to its schedule amid a severe drop in demand for air travel.

Key Facts

Losses at IAG flew below forecasts of $1.1 billion (920 million euros) to report a 1.3 billion loss.

Revenue was down 83%, from $8.6 billion (7.3 billion euros) this time last year, to $1.4 billion (1.2 billion euros) in the three months to the end of September.

IAG blamed a rise in local lockdowns for impacting bookings as several of its key markets face a surge in new infections, while it added that governments had not adopted air travel corridors or new measures to replace quarantine periods as quickly as it had hoped. 

The group, which earlier this year was forced to cut 94% of its flights at the height of the first wave of the pandemic, now says it will operate up to 30% of its 2019 capacity in the fourth quarter, lower than the 40% that they had hoped.

But the group said liquidity remains strong, adding it had raised 2.74 billion euros in early October, helping it to maintain a strong pot of cash likely totalling 9.3 billion euros ($11 billion).

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IAG shares were down almost 2% on Thursday morning.

Key Background

IAG previously said it does not expect passenger demand to return to pre-pandemic levels until 2023. Like many global air travel firms, the group was severely hit by coronavirus restrictions introduced earlier this year and forced to dramatically slash the number of flights it operated during the first wave of the virus.

As of May, the firm, which also owns Iberia, Spain’s flagship airline, budget airline Vueling and Ireland’s flagship airline Aer Lingus, had received some $1.45 billion in government support from the U.K. and Spain. Industry veteran Willie Walsh, who stepped down as IAG CEO in September with ex-Iberia CEO Luis Gallego taking over, recently warned that the coming months would be “very tough” for the industry and that it would “never go back to the way it was”, but added that he foresees airlines becoming more efficient

Tangent

British Airways announced over the summer that it would press ahead to cut almost a third of its workforce—or 12,000 jobs—to offset the pandemic-induced downturn. 

Further Reading

IAG preliminary third quarter results and update (IAG)

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Isabel Togoh

Isabel Togoh

I am a breaking news reporter for Forbes in London, covering Europe and the U.S. Previously I was a news reporter for HuffPost UK, the Press Association and a night reporter at the Guardian. I studied Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics, where I was a writer and editor for one of the university’s global affairs magazines, the London Globalist. That led me to Goldsmiths, University of London, where I completed my M.A. in Journalism. Got a story? Get in touch at isabel.togoh@forbes.com, or follow me on Twitter @bissieness. I look forward to hearing from you.

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British Airways owner IAG cuts flight numbers again IAG, the owner of British Airways, has said it will operate fewer planes than planned for the rest of the year as the pandemic continues to hit demand. The airline group said it would fly no more than 30% of its usual flights compared to last year. The news came as the firm – which also owns the Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines – reported a €1.3bn (£1.17bn) loss for the period from July to September.

In the same period last year, the group reported a €1.4bn profit. IAG said revenue in the quarter plunged 83% to €1.2bn, compared to €7.3bn last year. “Recent overall bookings have not developed as previously expected due to additional measures implemented by many European governments in response to a second wave of Covid-19 infections,” IAG said. ►► Like and share more news! ►► Subscribe to 00Fast News! ►► See you in the next news! Goodbye! https://00fastnews.blogspot.comhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UClk2… Created By 00Fast News #news#00fastnews#breakingnews#latestnews#newsupdate

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United Airlines Is Getting Rid Of Fee To Change Flights, Permanently

United Airlines is getting rid of change fees on domestic flights, as a measure to give passengers more flexibility with scheduling during the current coronavirus pandemic.

On Sunday, August 30, the Chicago-based airline announced that it will permanently let customers change flights for free on all of its standard Economy and Premium cabin tickets for travel within the United States, effective immediately.

The new policy is applicable on these types of tickets for travel within all 50 states, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It is said in a media release that customers will not be limited in the number of times they adjust their flights.

This move by United is said to be in response to a top request from passengers.

“When we hear from customers about where we can improve, getting rid of this fee is often the top request,” said Scott Kirby, CEO of United Airlines, in a video message. “Following previous tough times, airlines made difficult decisions to survive, sometimes at the expense of customer service. United Airlines won’t be following that same playbook as we come out of this crisis. Instead, we’re taking a completely different approach – and looking at new ways to serve our customers better.” 

Flying on Standby for Free

United's removal of change fees is said to have come from being a top customer request.
United’s removal of change fees is said to have come from being a top customer request. United

Starting next year, United will enable passengers additionally to change their flights at no additional cost in another way — same-day standby.

Beginning on January 1, 2021, United customers can choose to add themselves to the standby list for free to travel on a different flight earlier or later on the same day as their original departure. If a seat opens up, they will be able to take that other flight instead.

United’s previous flight switch fee for domestic U.S. travel was $200, and the fee to be listed for standby travel was $75; however, the carrier’s Basic Economy cabin is not included in this new policy but with the pandemic its change fees have been waved.

Southwest Airlines has preceded United in not charging change fees, even before the pandemic hit.

Extending More Waivers

United is also extending its waiver for new tickets issued through the end of 2020, to permit unlimited changes with no fee and applying to both domestic and international ticket types issued after March 3, 2020.

For MilagePlus members, United will waive all redeposit fees on award travel for flights changed or cancelled more than 30 days before departure and allowing all MileagePlus Premier members to confirm a different flight on the day of their travel. On January 1, all Premier members will be able to confirm a seat for free on a different flight with the same departure and arrival cities as their original ticket. This expanded option will allow MileagePlus Silver members and above to confirm a new seat in the same ticket fare class if space is available.

Michele Herrmann

 Michele Herrmann

Michele Herrmann develops guides on U.S. and international destinations and writes about travel trends, food and culture for various print and digital media outlets and travel companies.

In A Twist On Loyalty Programs, Emirates Is Promising Travelers A Free Funeral If Infected With Covid19

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Last year, advertising spending in the insurance industry reached $7 billion. This is an incredible figure as it accounts for about 2.7% of all U.S. advertising spending, which is $240 billion. Overall, the acquisition cost is just about $20 per each person in the U.S. or about $60 for the typical insurance-purchasing single person, couple or family. The ROI on lifetime customer is exponential.

How can they afford such exorbitant ad outlays? Firstly, insurance companies have plenty of cash. And secondly, because it’s a mature category, insurers must steal share from each other to grow. Insurance isn’t a fun product – Millennials aren’t arguing whether Allstate or Progressive is cooler, the way they would for a Nike or an Adidas. It’s also a low-involvement product, one that is continually paid for without much consideration by the consumer. As long as nothing goes wrong retention rates are stay high without switching.

In 2000 GEICO broke with the insurance advertising tradition and introduced a zany campaign which the staid and conservative insurance industry had never seen before – filled with pigs, cavemen, googly eyes and, of course, a little green lizard that was first conceived on the back of a napkin. GEICO’s gambit of injecting humor into the sleepy and conservative category worked, propelling the insurer to yearly market-share gains and forcing competitors to step up their game. Insurer after insurer is now hitting the airwaves with character-driven campaigns, from “Mayhem,” to “Flo,” to “Professor Burke,” to “Emu and Stakeouts.” Some center their campaigns on celebrities, such as football players like Aaron Rodgers or Payton Manning.

The goal is to grab the attention of consumers who would rather not think about, or even care about, insurance, certainly not at age 25 or 30. Therefore, there is this enormous overlap on the advertising, making brands indistinguishable. And the zany humor, or the irrelevant celebrities, make the ads trivial. That is why the insurance companies have to advertise – all the time. They must buy share of mind to engage.

Contrast that consumer indifference with Emirates Airlines’ foray into the insurance industry, offering COVID-19 insurance. Airlines are trying all sorts of things – from  leaving middle seats empty, to requiring everyone to wear masks, to health checks at terminals – in order to instill confidence in passengers who may be leery of air travel amid the global pandemic.

Emirates’ insurance for travelers stipulates that if one of its passengers is diagnosed with COVID-19 during their journey, the Dubai-based airline will cover their medical expenses, up to €150,000 (about $176,000). It will pay €100 ($118) per day for quarantine costs – such as a hotel room – for up to two weeks.

And if the worst happens, Emirates will offer €1,500 (about $1,765) for a passenger’s funeral. The insurance is automatic with ticketing, effective immediately, and carries no fees for travelers.

It’s an interesting idea. It delivers share of mind on steroids. It demonstrates the integrity of the brand to the public, and it shows they have empathy for their customers and understand the current environment.

The premise of insurance for medical bills or quarantine is brave. It’s bold and cuts to the heart of the reluctance to travel. It doesn’t skirt the emotions surrounding COVID-19 but tackle them head on. However, the  fact that the  insurance includes a death coverage could be problematic. It could encourage the kind of mental imagery that an airline normally wouldn’t want associated with its brand.

This kind of insurance is simply untried and carries the risk of reputational damage if it’s not done well. There’s no precedent where a brand offers burial services as an incentive. However, I applaud Emirate for assuming the risk. When airlines are flying planes in 20-30% capacity and even cancel entirely to some airports, the strategy may be well timed. Risky times call for risky measures. The shock value of free funeral offer might be a clever strategy to prompt travelers start flying again, or at least think about it.

And yeah, it’s one campaign that nobody will complain if it’s underdelivers on its promises.

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The author is CEO of Avidan Strategies, a consultancy that specializes in advising marketers about optimizing agency practices. They help marketers improve agency relationships and manage agency search and RFPs. Avi Dan was board member at two top global agencies and  held leadership positions at WPP, Publicis, Saatchi, Havas and Y&R, partnering with iconic brands for P&G, Kraft, Bayer, GM, Pfizer, Mars, The Wall Street Journal, Sprint, Samsung, Ally and Coca-Cola. A native of Israel, Avi is a former army officer, and a Columbia MBA. He can be reached at avi@avidanstrategies.com

Source: https://www.forbes.com

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easyJet Inside the Cockpit Series

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easyJet is now Britain’s biggest airline, carrying nearly 90 million passengers last year. But in 2019, times have never been tougher. Staying top in these turbulent times means attracting more passengers, flying to more destinations and training up a new crop of rookie pilots.

easyJet: Inside the Cockpit is a returning primetime series, with unprecedented fixed rig camera access which follows more pilots as they are put through their paces. From cadets taking to the air for the first time at the controls of a passenger plane, to the most experienced pilots landing at Europe’s most demanding airports.

In episode one we meet the pilots who have to battle with delays, deal with a sick passenger and negotiate landing at one of the world’s most challenging airports in the heart of the Alps. Over a busy two days, Captain Emma Henderson will have to face technical breakdowns, severe turbulence and a medical emergency when a female passenger collapses in her arms.

Meanwhile, Captain Brij Kotecha is flying into Innsbruck and as he approaches the runway through a blanket of cloud, he only has seconds to decide whether to land or abort. Captain Gaurav Adwaney and Senior First Officer Iris De Kan and are piloting easyJet’s first ever flight on a new route to Aqaba in Jordan. After five and a half hours flying, they will be greeted by a party of local dignitaries – if they can park in the right place.

Inside the Cockpit takes you behind the flight deck door, revealing what a pilot’s life is really like six miles in the air.

Source: https://www.itv.com

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Flight Attendants Warn: The Airlines Need To Stop Flying Now

Should the airlines stop flying during the coronavirus pandemic? America’s flight attendants think so. In recent days, scenes of packed airplanes with passengers not wearing masks have made the news. And while major carriers are allowing passengers to switch seats to help with social distancing, they are not requiring passengers to wear masks or stay six feet away from each other.

The risky situation has prompted a strong reaction from the union of flight attendants, which is calling on the Department of Transportation, in coordination with the Department of Health and Human Services, to “end all leisure travel until the virus is contained”—the words of Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA (AFA), who penned an open letter to Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Health Secretary Alex Azar.

Nelson’s letter points out that flight attendants have been hard hit by the virus. “At airlines employing AFA member flight attendants, at least 250 have tested positive for the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, and flight attendants have died as a result of the virus too,” writes Nelson.

Nelson’s impassioned letter also says that flight attendants are questioning if they are “helping to spread the virus.”

In addition to calling for an end to leisure air travel, the letter makes other requests, including requiring masks in airports and on planes—for passengers, crew and employees. Nelson also indicates that the U.S. should be following the lead of Canada, which is taking much stronger precautions than this country.

“Canada encourages the use of masks on all modes of public transport and requires all air travelers to wear masks that ‘cover their mouth and nose … at screening checkpoints, … when they cannot physically distance from others, or as directed by the airline employees,’ writes Nelson.

READ MORE: “Some Airlines Are Changing Policies About Miles And Status—Here’s How You Can Cash In”

Nelson’s letter also calls on the U.S. government to do its part. “For air travelers, we recommend that the federal government provide all airports sufficient numbers of disposable cloth or paper masks that are more effective than homemade masks at limiting viral spread,” Nelson says in the letter. “These should be provided free to all members of the public entering airport buildings with the stipulation that they be worn at all times on airport property and on airplanes, and only removed momentarily when necessary for identity verification or food and drink.”

The letter underscores the risks that flight attendants face onboard planes—and beyond. Nelson describes a flight attendant’s schedule, which involves traveling from home to the airport (“often on public transportation”), followed by a bus or shuttle van from the parking lot, then passing by the airport check-in areas, going through security checkpoints, visiting a crew briefing room and heading on to the gate.

Onboard, flight attendants provide routine and emergency services while interacting frequently and in close proximity to passengers and other crew members. “On the airplane and at all of these public places, flight attendants come into repeated contact with the general and traveling public,” explained Nelson.

This is not the first time the AFA has called for an end to leisure travel during the coronavirus pandemic. On March 31, the AFA put out a press release asking the Department of Transportation to consider putting a pause on flights. But with this latest missive, the AFA is taking more extreme measures to get their voices heard and to protect flight attendants on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic.

READ MORE:

• “Coronavirus Career Advice: 27 Best Work From Home And Remote Jobs”

• “17 Ways You Can Make Money Online Right Now”

 “Ranked: The 20 Happiest Countries In The World”

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I’m a travel and lifestyle authority and a content strategist who works with brands to create powerful storytelling. In this column, “Transformative Travel,” I look at how travel can change women’s lives. I profile the doers and the disrupters and cover the trends and the destinations that appeal to women today. I have been writing about travel since the early days of my career, when I started off as a honeymoon editor, even though — ironically — I was single at the time. Since then, I have written for a number of publications, including Food & Wine, Wallpaper and The New York Times. I have been the editor-in-chief of Yahoo Travel, which was named the top online travel magazine under my leadership. Before that, I was deputy editor of Travel & Leisure. Throughout my career, I have appeared regularly on television, including Good Morning America and NBC Today. Journalism is part of my heritage: My great great grandfather was a Civil War correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. Follow me on Twitter (@laurabegley) and Instagram (@laurabegleybloom).

Source: Flight Attendants Warn: The Airlines Need To Stop Flying Now

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Airlines are slashing flights and parking planes to cope with coronavirus and a drop in air travel. For pilots and flight attendants, the near-halt of the industry is a shock, after years of record profits and full planes. Yet some are wondering why flights continue taking off nearly empty. Read more: https://wapo.st/2V61OtN. Subscribe to The Washington Post on YouTube: https://wapo.st/2QOdcqK Follow us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/washingtonpost Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/washingtonp… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/washingtonpost/

Emirates to Implement Thermal Screening on All US Bound Flights

 

DUBAI, UAE 12 March 2020: Emirates will be implementing thermal screening measures for all passengers travelling on US flights departing from Dubai International Airport, effective tonight, 12 March 2020. Thermal scanners will be placed at departure gates for all US gateways, starting with EK 231 to Washington Dulles International Airport. If a passenger is found to have a higher than normal temperature, they will undergo further testing. This is in addition to the thermal screenings done for all passengers on arrival as they pass through customs.

In addition, Emirates has suspended its flights between Dubai and Italy starting from today, with the final flight operating on 15th of March. The airline is working with the relevant authorities to monitor the developments closely as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

The measures are being taken as part of the airline’s overall response to the latest developments around the COVID-19 pandemic. Emirates has been coordinating efforts in conjunction with local health and regulatory authorities, including the Dubai Health Authority, so that the airline meets or exceeds local and international guidelines and directives around COVID-19. Emirates plans to gradually roll out thermal screening procedures for all of its flights departing Dubai to ensure the health and safety of its customers travelling abroad.

Passengers are advised to observe the general recommended time of arrival at the airport, which is 3 hours ahead of departure, to ensure seamless check-in procedures and to complete their immigration formalities.

In addition to thermal screening procedures at the airport, Emirates has also implemented proactive and voluntary measures to ensure a safe flying experience with enhanced cleaning and complete disinfection protocols in over 248 aircraft departing Dubai each day. The airline utilises high-grade cleaning chemicals proven to kill viruses and germs, leaving a long-lasting protective coating against viruses, bacteria and fungi on surfaces. The comprehensive cleaning process includes a thorough wiping down all cabin surfaces, in addition to other normal procedures such as changing head rest covers on all seats, replacement of reading materials, vacuuming, amongst other cleaning activities.

On any aircraft found to have transported a suspected or confirmed COVID-19 case, Emirates implements further deep cleaning including the defogging of cabin interiors and misting with disinfectant across all soft furnishings, and replacement of seat covers and cushions in the affected area. The aircraft’s state-of-the-art air circulation system, utilising HEPA cabin air filters, will also be replaced.

The airline has also offering passengers additional peace of mind with the ability to change their travel dates without change and reissuance fees on any bookings made prior to 31 March 2020. Cancellation and refund fees will also be waived for bookings made between 7 March and 31 March 2020, regardless of travel date. Visit emirates.com for more details on the waiver.

Source: Emirates to implement thermal screening on all US bound flights

Emirates has implemented thermal screening measures for all passengers travelling on US flights departing from Dubai International Airport. This is in addition to the thermal screenings done for all passengers on arrival as they pass through customs. Emirates plans to gradually roll out thermal screening procedures for all of its flights departing Dubai to ensure the health and safety of its customers travelling abroad. The measures are being taken as part of the airline’s overall response to the latest developments around the COVID-19 pandemic.

This Taiwan Airline Flew For 62 Years, But May Be Grounded Indefinitely

Far Eastern Air Transport, a six-decades-old Taiwanese airline catering to destinations within Asia, suddenly suspended its flights on December 12. The airline’s website said that as of December 13 it would cease to continue running because of unspecified “operational losses.”

On Friday, Chang Kang-wei, Far Eastern’s chairman, told a news conference that he had found new sources of investment and hoped to restart flights as soon as possible, although analysts expect more turbulence.

“Airlines such as Far Eastern are stuck in the strategic position that is unsustainable,” says John Grant, director of JG Aviation Consultants in the United Kingdom. “Neither a low-cost carrier nor a full service network airline, the carrier is challenged from all sides and unable to command a secure market position.”

The airline was founded in 1957 with domestic routes around Taiwan, where flights average just 30 minutes. But in 2008 it declared bankruptcy and flights stopped through early 2011. In 2007, Taiwan had launched a high-speed railway that reduced the demand for domestic flights.

Far Eastern Air Transport has struggled too because it relies heavily on McDonnell Douglas MD-82 and MD-83 aircraft, while other airlines, including the budget carriers, are buying newer planes made by Airbus and Boeing. Its fleet has a total of six aging MD-80 family aircraft and six ATR 72 turboprops.

More on Forbes: Asia’s Airline Groups Are On A Path To Increased Competition And Other Constraints

 

Do You Like To Be A Flight Attendant?

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Far Eastern Air Transport struggles too for lack of code sharing and membership in airline alliances, says Jeffrey Lowe, managing director of the Hong Kong aviation services firm Asian Sky Group. Its base at the smallish Taipei’s Songshan airport further constrained business because civil aviation authorities allow flights only to a couple dozen cities outside Taiwan, mostly in China. That base made it hard to set up connecting flights, Lowe says.

“FAT has a long history but has always struggled to survive,” Lowe says. “It has been in a financial crisis of one form or another since 2008, the last 12 years.”

Neither a budget carrier nor a full-service airline

Far Eastern Air Transport fails to fit into either of the two most viable types of airlines around Asia today, Grant says. The airline has just a 10% share of capacity for all Taiwanese airlines, he says. Four other Taiwanese carriers fly international routes and another, the ultra-high-end StarLux Airlines, will open three routes in January.

The two dominant international carriers Eva Airways and China Airlines have newer aircraft fitted with entertainment systems, while Eva focuses intently on cabin cleanliness. Budget carriers based offshore serve throngs of young, thrifty Taiwanese tourists bound for Japan, South Korea and parts of Southeast Asia. Budget travel is so popular in Southeast Asia that Kuala Lumpur and Singapore have opened budget-only terminals.

Occasionally airlines that are neither high nor low end survive because they have a “geographic niche,” Grant says. Far Eastern does not, he says.

The halt to flights on Friday affected 3,251 outbound group tourists, Taiwan’s tourism bureau says in a statement Thursday.

The airline would not say for this post how much capital its CEO had garnered but that the airline is ready to fly again if given regulatory approval. “We can’t say anything about the next few years,” an airline spokesperson said for this post. “We’re just waiting for the official approval to fly again.”

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As a news reporter I have covered some of everything since 1988, from my alma mater U.C. Berkeley to the Great Hall of the People in Beijing where I followed Communist officials for the Japanese news agency Kyodo. Stationed in Taipei since 2006, I track Taiwanese companies and local economic trends that resonate offshore. At Reuters through 2010, I looked intensely at the island’s awkward relations with China. More recently, I’ve studied high-tech trends in greater China and expanded my overall news coverage to surrounding Asia.

Source: This Taiwan Airline Flew For 62 Years, But May Be Grounded Indefinitely

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Taiwan’s Far Eastern Air Transport (FAT) has just announced it will cease all operations. This video covers the details regarding the ceasing of flights and a brief background of Far Eastern Air Transport. ✈ Ishrion Aviation is an Aviation Channel bringing you premium trip reports/reviews and the latest aviation news and developments to your fingertips. ▶️ If you enjoyed this video, make sure to subscribe for the latest aviation news and developments! https://www.youtube.com/c/IshrionAvia… 👍 Make sure to leave a like! Leave a comment down below! ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ SOCIAL MEDIA 📸 Follow Me On Instagram For Aviation Media & Pictures: https://www.instagram.com/ishrion.avi… (@ishrion.aviation) 🐤 Follow Me On Twitter: https://twitter.com/IshrionA (@IshrionA) ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ ✈ Support Me On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IshrionAviation ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ About Me: Welcome! This is the Ishrion Aviation YouTube Channel featuring premium trip reports, the latest aviation news, and other aviation content! Make sure to subscribe if this is something you’re interested in! ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ Music: Keys of Moon – Morning Lights https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWtF… Video footage/images by Far Eastern Air Transport. MD-80 image by Jeffhuang0627: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi… Sources: https://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/ne… https://finance.technews.tw/2019/12/1… “Far Eastern Air Transport (FAT) suspended sales of tickets on December 12 and subsequently announced that it will cease all operations from December 13 onwards. The carrier said via its website that it had “difficulties raising funds due to long-term operating losses”. Initially, the airline said that ticket sales were only suspended due to “systems’ maintenance”. The airline reportedly suffered financially due to the poor reliability and high operating costs of its McDonnell Douglas (Long Beach) twinjets. According to the ch-aviation fleets advanced module, the airline operates six ATR 72-600s, four MD-82s, and three MD-83s (of which two have been inactive since mid-September and early November 2019). The MD-82s are 25.4 years old on average and the MD-83s – 23.4 years. The airline expected to start taking deliveries of eleven B737-8s from lessors in November 2019 but this was delayed due to the type’s grounding.” “Far East Airlines reported today that it will be closed. The Civil Aviation Bureau of the Ministry of Communications has not confirmed that it only said that a press conference will be held in the afternoon. The Ministry of Labor stated that it had contacted the Taipei Municipal Bureau of Labor, which has not received a large number of dismissal plans.” Translate: 遠東航空今天傳出將停業,交通部民航局未證實,只表示下午將開記者會。勞動部則表示,與台北市勞動局聯繫,勞動局目前未收到大量解僱計畫書。 遠東航空今天傳出將停業消息,交通部民航局並未證實,只回應下午將在民航局召開記者會,等時間確定後會通知。 遠航傳出停業消息,員工去留也受關注,勞動部則表示,與台北市勞動局聯繫,勞動局目前未收到大量解僱計畫書。 根據大量解僱勞工保護法規定,事業單位大量解僱勞工時,應於 60 日前將解僱計畫書通知主管機關及相關單位或人員. #FarEasternAirTransport #FATAirlines #AirlineBankruptcy

Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

Caviar in First class, seemingly endless seat-back touchscreen entertainment and route networks that can fly passengers to almost any destination around the world on just a single ticket, all for a cost that makes air travel cheaper than it has ever been.

Today could be seen as the true golden age of travel. The Compass Lexicon study shows that domestic air travel in the U.S. costs 40% less today than in 1990, despite rising fuel costs.

Many airline reviews point to the quality of airline seats, food and beverages and even onboard bars. However, I think that flight attendants remain the most important part of a flight experience, where cabin crew can either make or break a passengers experience.

Today In: Lifestyle

Skytrax published their list of the world’s best airline cabin crew which measure everything from friendliness and enthusiasm to efficiency and attention.

Granted, being a flight attendant is not an easy job. Dealing with hundreds of passengers inside a confined space, where many human norms seem to dissipate along with the ground below can be challenging to say the least.

There are individual situations where the below ratings can vary widely and on any given day. It’s a part of life that people, including flight attendants, have good and bad days, however, the consistent brilliance of crew at the top of the list is tough to argue with.

The first thing many people will notice about the top-10 on the list is that every single airline, except for Qatar Airways, is Asian carriers. The flight attendants on many Asian carriers are certainly outstanding, however, it is a surprise to see Qatar further down the list, after also being rated the Number 1 Airline by Skytrax this year.

No U.S. carriers feature in the top 20, and although I strongly feel service has improved on American carriers over the last few years, there is still a way to go to compete with many of the Asian airlines.

Singapore Airlines at Number 1 is very difficult to argue with, as the Singapore flag carrier does offer consistently outstanding. Consistency is where many other airlines may squander their hopes. Lots of other carriers have split fleets, that passengers may seldom notice when flying, but with variations in training and crew schedules between internal fleets, such as that of British Airways, this can be reflected on different routes for the same airline.

Garuda Indonesia makes it to second on the list of the world’s best cabin crew but has recently faced controversy after banning inflight photos of the cabin. This was the airline’s response to receiving a poor review from an airline vlogger where business class menus were scribbled down in handwriting after the airline also ran out of wine in business class. After threatening to take legal action against the vlogger, Garuda has since backed down, but the situation could well make it difficult for the airline to retain a top spot next year, after management’s strategy, despite the actual cabin crew doing their best in a difficult situation.

The highest-rated European airline on the list is Austrian Airlines, shortly followed by British Airways and Lufthansa. Another lesser-known airline to make the list is Bangkok Airways who operate a relatively small fleet of just 40 aircraft across Thailand, but do deserve a spot in the top 20.

The Skytrax list features just one low-cost airline, Air Asia, who despite offering budget prices for travelers, has not cut the quality of high service offered. For such a well-known brand, Emirates only comes in at number 19 on the list, and similar to other airlines such as British Airways and Lufthansa, has a reputation amongst passenger reviews of offering a varied service and quality, depending on the route and given day, which is why the airline is likely not coming inside the top-10, for now.

Below is the full list of the top 20 airlines based on cabin crew:

  1. Singapore Airlines
  2. Garuda Indonesia
  3. ANA All Nippon Airlines
  4. Thai Airways
  5. EVA Airways
  6. Cathay Pacific
  7. Hainan Airlines
  8. Japan Airlines
  9. Qatar Airways
  10. China Airlines
  11. Philippine Airlines
  12. Austrian Airlines
  13. British Airways
  14. Asiana Airlines
  15. Bangkok Airways
  16. Lufthansa
  17. Flynas
  18. AirAsia
  19. Emirates
  20. Fiji Airways

I spend 360 days a year on the road traveling for work discovering new experiences at every turn, trying out the best and the worst airlines around the world. I set the Guinness World record for being the youngest person to travel to all 196 countries in the world by the age of 25, and you could perhaps say I caught the travel bug over that 6-year journey. I now take over 100 flights every year and I am still discovering many new places, both good and bad, whilst writing about my experiences along the way. In addition to rediscovering known destinations, I visit some of the World’s least frequented regions such as Yemen to highlight untold stories. Join me on an adventure from economy to first-class flights, the best and worst airports, and from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Source: Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

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Try Dashlane here: https://www.dashlane.com/sam Get 10% off now with promotion code “sam” on Dashlane premium! Watch this video for the World’s Top 10 Airline Cabin Crew by Sam Chui. Enjoy the flight attendant interaction with Sam and other passengers. You will see flight attendant working in galley and their crew rest area. Count down from Number 10 to 1 for the best airline flight attendants, watch out for many surprises! Note: The ranking is strictly based on personal experience and preference. Cover Image by A Fly Guy https://internationalflyguy.com/ 12:07 Follow Cherag https://www.instagram.com/cheragdubash/ 13:47 Follow Mayur https://www.instagram.com/mayurkashya… 16:15 Follow Skywardfreak https://www.instagram.com/skywardsfreak/ This video is sponsored by Dashlane — Enjoy an informative, nostalgic and personal insight in to my top 10 favourite airlines in this video based on the superb on-board customer experience that they provide. Meet the airline stewards and stewardesses who make it all happen and see the hectic activity that goes on backstage in the aeroplane’s galley to make sure that your pillows are plumped, your privacy is protected, your food is tasty and hot and that cocktail is sublime! In this video, we meet the kind and friendly staff of South African Airways, the vibrant staff of Philippine Airlines and the fun, loving and outgoing staff of Air Asia, as well as the more reserved staff, but certainly no less professional and courteous, of Qantas, Qatar Airways and Emirates. We also meet the staff of Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines and Eva Air and recall special, unforgettable moments spent in the air with this group of airlines at times such as Christmas, as well as seeing the little personal touches that all the airlines in this video provide that make them worthy of inclusion in this top 10. You’ll be astonished at the lengths that the airline staff in this video go to in order to ensure a hospitable and comfortable flight, both in business class and economy class, and their ability to adapt to the specific challenges presented by the different models of aeroplane they fly in such as the A350 1000 of Qatar Airways, the Boeing 777 of Emirates and the SQ21 of Singapore Airlines. Which airline has your loyalty and is your number 1? Let me know your opinions in the comments and thanks as always for watching.

 

The 2019 List Of The Most Dangerous Airlines In The World

LONDON – JANUARY 19: Investigators inspect wreckage and debris from grounded British Airways flight 038 from China at Heathrow Airport on January 19, 2008 in London, England. Investigators continue to examine the wreckage of the Boeing 777

The last 40 years have seen continual engineering advancement that solidifies aviation as the safest form of transportation. However, with the actual numbers of air passengers and flights increasing at an exponential rate, you could be forgiven for questioning the statistical evidence.

Recent years have seen multiple aircraft hull losses in the news headlines. British Airways are considered a very safe airline but a relatively short memory will remember images of flight BA38 from Beijing that crash landed at Heathrow in 2008, or the stark images of a British Airways 777 on fire at Las Vegas in 2015. Emirates are another airline who have quietly moved on from the negative PR they received after a Boeing 777 crash landing at Dubai In 2016.

Despite these incidents, major airlines remain relatively very safe. However, there are some airlines that have a safety record that scales from average to absolutely terrible. If you find yourself on the airlines below, ignore everything written above, and assume you’re either flying to a very remote location where you had no other choice, or that you just wanted to book the cheapest fare. Many of the world’s most dangerous airlines are banned from flying into both the USA and the EU, and if the aviation authorities are telling you this, it’s probably with justified reasoning.

AirlineRatings.com have published their list of the most dangerous airlines in the world based on a rating system of seven stars. Factors such as fatalities over the last decade, country blacklists and International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit certificates (IOSA) all play a factor in how the airlines are rated. None of the airlines below attained any more than two out of seven stars.

Tara Air

Tara Air managed to accumulate just one out of seven stars. Multiple fatal accidents in 2010 and 2011 have not assisted this Nepalese based carrier’s rating which operates a fleet of eight aircraft in and out of the dangerous mountainous approaches in Nepal.

Nepal Airlines

Nepal has seen nine fatal accidents over the last eight years. Statistically, flying in the mountainous kingdom is relatively dangerous. Nepal Airlines has been flying since 1958 under the name Royal Nepal Airlines, and its safety record leaves a lot to be desired. Accumulating just one star, Nepal Airlines is banned from flying to the EU. Although the last 20 years has seen a vast improvement in the airline’s safety record, a fatal accident in 2014 resulted in 18 fatalities.

Ariana Afghan Airlines

Serving as Afghanistan’s national carrier, Ariana has just five aircraft in their current fleet and a disproportionately stagering record of 19 aircraft being written off during its history, including seven fatal incidents.

Bluewing Airlines

Bluewing are based in the small South American nation of Suriname. The loss of three different Antonov An-28 aircraft over a three year period has found the airline banned over European airspace, which includes neighbouring French territory French Guiana.

Kam Air

Kam Air finds itself in exclusive company at the bottom of this safety list, with just 3 other one star airlines for company. This Afghanistan based airline finds itself banned from US airspace, and when Kam attempted to fly to the EU in 2010 they found themselves banned from there too after incidents that included a fatal accident and a seperate bomb threat.

Trigana Air Service

With 10 hull losses and 14 accidents involving Trigana operated aircraft, it is no wonder that the Indonesian airline was only awarded a one star rating. Like it’s peers on this list, Trigana is also banned from EU and US airspace.

SCAT Airlines

This Kazakhstan based airline has an unimpressive safety record, however it has not seen a fatal accident since 2013. Although SCAT doesn’t operate with an internationally recognized safety audit certificate, the airline is making huge improvements to be internationally recognized and operate safely.

Source: The 2019 List Of The Most Dangerous Airlines In The World

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Get more Tips here! http://www.destinationtips.com Sometimes we also want to know which are the most dangerous airlines in order to avoid them when we are organizing our trip, so here are The 10 Most Dangerous Airlines in the World rated by AirlineRatings.com, non certified by the IOSA 10) Southwest Airlines This is a major United States airline established in 1967. Ironically, this was considered among the ten safest in the world in 2012, what happened then? apart from the lack of minimum standards and certification, of course… 9) AirAsia Thailand This is a joint venture of Malaysian low-fare airline AirAsia and Thailand’s Asia Aviation. This was the only low-cost airline operating both domestic and international flights from Suvarnabhumi Airport. It’s not certified by the IOSA, but, at least it’s allowed to enter in the EU. 8) Iraqi Airways This is the national carrier of Iraq, being the second oldest airline in the Middle East, and a member of the Arab Air Carriers Organization. It has had several incidents, accidents and hijackings since it began operations in 1945. And it’s not certified by the IOSA nor allowed to enter the EU. 7) Kam Air This one is headquartered in Kabul and it was founded in 2003. It operates 90 percent of domestic flights in Afghanistan. But it’s not certified by the IOSA, not allowed in the EU and not even follows the ICAO, so… 6) Ariana Afghan Airlines Also known simply as Ariana, it is the largest airline of Afghanistan and serves as the country’s national carrier. Founded in 1955, it has been on the list of air carriers banned in the European Union since October 2006. And it has had 13 incidents and accidents, so not the best option. 5) Blue Wing This airline from Suriname, started in 2002, but after three accidents and legal problems, now it performs cargo as well as commercial flights to the interior of Suriname and the surrounding region. At least, it follows the ICAO, not the other certifications but this one yes. 4) Airlines PNG PNG Air is an airline from Port Moresby, that operates scheduled domestic and international flights, as well as contract corporate charter work. It started in 1987, but it has had seven accidents since then. It’s allowed to enter the EU, but… there’s no need, really… 3) NOK Air This is a low-cost airline in Thailand operating mostly domestic services, the second largest in the country. It’s free of fatalities, but it’s not certified by the IOSA, ICAO or endorsed by FAA. So, maybe, it’s not the best option. 2) Yeti Airlines This airline is based in Kathmandu since 1998. This airline is only endorsed by the FAA. Togetherwith Tara Air, form the largest domestic flight operator in Nepal, and during its short history has had 4 accidents that bring it to the second place in safety. 1) Nepal Airlines Formerly known as Royal Nepal Airlines, the airline operates domestic services. Founded in 1958, the airline has been banned in the European Union since 2013. It has had 15 incidents and accidents. And it’s only certified by FAA. So it really is the most dangerous airline rated in 2018. Do you think any other airline should be on this list? Comment below!
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