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Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

Caviar in First class, seemingly endless seat-back touchscreen entertainment and route networks that can fly passengers to almost any destination around the world on just a single ticket, all for a cost that makes air travel cheaper than it has ever been.

Today could be seen as the true golden age of travel. The Compass Lexicon study shows that domestic air travel in the U.S. costs 40% less today than in 1990, despite rising fuel costs.

Many airline reviews point to the quality of airline seats, food and beverages and even onboard bars. However, I think that flight attendants remain the most important part of a flight experience, where cabin crew can either make or break a passengers experience.

Today In: Lifestyle

Skytrax published their list of the world’s best airline cabin crew which measure everything from friendliness and enthusiasm to efficiency and attention.

Granted, being a flight attendant is not an easy job. Dealing with hundreds of passengers inside a confined space, where many human norms seem to dissipate along with the ground below can be challenging to say the least.

There are individual situations where the below ratings can vary widely and on any given day. It’s a part of life that people, including flight attendants, have good and bad days, however, the consistent brilliance of crew at the top of the list is tough to argue with.

The first thing many people will notice about the top-10 on the list is that every single airline, except for Qatar Airways, is Asian carriers. The flight attendants on many Asian carriers are certainly outstanding, however, it is a surprise to see Qatar further down the list, after also being rated the Number 1 Airline by Skytrax this year.

No U.S. carriers feature in the top 20, and although I strongly feel service has improved on American carriers over the last few years, there is still a way to go to compete with many of the Asian airlines.

Singapore Airlines at Number 1 is very difficult to argue with, as the Singapore flag carrier does offer consistently outstanding. Consistency is where many other airlines may squander their hopes. Lots of other carriers have split fleets, that passengers may seldom notice when flying, but with variations in training and crew schedules between internal fleets, such as that of British Airways, this can be reflected on different routes for the same airline.

Garuda Indonesia makes it to second on the list of the world’s best cabin crew but has recently faced controversy after banning inflight photos of the cabin. This was the airline’s response to receiving a poor review from an airline vlogger where business class menus were scribbled down in handwriting after the airline also ran out of wine in business class. After threatening to take legal action against the vlogger, Garuda has since backed down, but the situation could well make it difficult for the airline to retain a top spot next year, after management’s strategy, despite the actual cabin crew doing their best in a difficult situation.

The highest-rated European airline on the list is Austrian Airlines, shortly followed by British Airways and Lufthansa. Another lesser-known airline to make the list is Bangkok Airways who operate a relatively small fleet of just 40 aircraft across Thailand, but do deserve a spot in the top 20.

The Skytrax list features just one low-cost airline, Air Asia, who despite offering budget prices for travelers, has not cut the quality of high service offered. For such a well-known brand, Emirates only comes in at number 19 on the list, and similar to other airlines such as British Airways and Lufthansa, has a reputation amongst passenger reviews of offering a varied service and quality, depending on the route and given day, which is why the airline is likely not coming inside the top-10, for now.

Below is the full list of the top 20 airlines based on cabin crew:

  1. Singapore Airlines
  2. Garuda Indonesia
  3. ANA All Nippon Airlines
  4. Thai Airways
  5. EVA Airways
  6. Cathay Pacific
  7. Hainan Airlines
  8. Japan Airlines
  9. Qatar Airways
  10. China Airlines
  11. Philippine Airlines
  12. Austrian Airlines
  13. British Airways
  14. Asiana Airlines
  15. Bangkok Airways
  16. Lufthansa
  17. Flynas
  18. AirAsia
  19. Emirates
  20. Fiji Airways

I spend 360 days a year on the road traveling for work discovering new experiences at every turn, trying out the best and the worst airlines around the world. I set the Guinness World record for being the youngest person to travel to all 196 countries in the world by the age of 25, and you could perhaps say I caught the travel bug over that 6-year journey. I now take over 100 flights every year and I am still discovering many new places, both good and bad, whilst writing about my experiences along the way. In addition to rediscovering known destinations, I visit some of the World’s least frequented regions such as Yemen to highlight untold stories. Join me on an adventure from economy to first-class flights, the best and worst airports, and from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Source: Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

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Try Dashlane here: https://www.dashlane.com/sam Get 10% off now with promotion code “sam” on Dashlane premium! Watch this video for the World’s Top 10 Airline Cabin Crew by Sam Chui. Enjoy the flight attendant interaction with Sam and other passengers. You will see flight attendant working in galley and their crew rest area. Count down from Number 10 to 1 for the best airline flight attendants, watch out for many surprises! Note: The ranking is strictly based on personal experience and preference. Cover Image by A Fly Guy https://internationalflyguy.com/ 12:07 Follow Cherag https://www.instagram.com/cheragdubash/ 13:47 Follow Mayur https://www.instagram.com/mayurkashya… 16:15 Follow Skywardfreak https://www.instagram.com/skywardsfreak/ This video is sponsored by Dashlane — Enjoy an informative, nostalgic and personal insight in to my top 10 favourite airlines in this video based on the superb on-board customer experience that they provide. Meet the airline stewards and stewardesses who make it all happen and see the hectic activity that goes on backstage in the aeroplane’s galley to make sure that your pillows are plumped, your privacy is protected, your food is tasty and hot and that cocktail is sublime! In this video, we meet the kind and friendly staff of South African Airways, the vibrant staff of Philippine Airlines and the fun, loving and outgoing staff of Air Asia, as well as the more reserved staff, but certainly no less professional and courteous, of Qantas, Qatar Airways and Emirates. We also meet the staff of Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines and Eva Air and recall special, unforgettable moments spent in the air with this group of airlines at times such as Christmas, as well as seeing the little personal touches that all the airlines in this video provide that make them worthy of inclusion in this top 10. You’ll be astonished at the lengths that the airline staff in this video go to in order to ensure a hospitable and comfortable flight, both in business class and economy class, and their ability to adapt to the specific challenges presented by the different models of aeroplane they fly in such as the A350 1000 of Qatar Airways, the Boeing 777 of Emirates and the SQ21 of Singapore Airlines. Which airline has your loyalty and is your number 1? Let me know your opinions in the comments and thanks as always for watching.

 

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The 2019 List Of The Most Dangerous Airlines In The World

LONDON – JANUARY 19: Investigators inspect wreckage and debris from grounded British Airways flight 038 from China at Heathrow Airport on January 19, 2008 in London, England. Investigators continue to examine the wreckage of the Boeing 777

The last 40 years have seen continual engineering advancement that solidifies aviation as the safest form of transportation. However, with the actual numbers of air passengers and flights increasing at an exponential rate, you could be forgiven for questioning the statistical evidence.

Recent years have seen multiple aircraft hull losses in the news headlines. British Airways are considered a very safe airline but a relatively short memory will remember images of flight BA38 from Beijing that crash landed at Heathrow in 2008, or the stark images of a British Airways 777 on fire at Las Vegas in 2015. Emirates are another airline who have quietly moved on from the negative PR they received after a Boeing 777 crash landing at Dubai In 2016.

Despite these incidents, major airlines remain relatively very safe. However, there are some airlines that have a safety record that scales from average to absolutely terrible. If you find yourself on the airlines below, ignore everything written above, and assume you’re either flying to a very remote location where you had no other choice, or that you just wanted to book the cheapest fare. Many of the world’s most dangerous airlines are banned from flying into both the USA and the EU, and if the aviation authorities are telling you this, it’s probably with justified reasoning.

AirlineRatings.com have published their list of the most dangerous airlines in the world based on a rating system of seven stars. Factors such as fatalities over the last decade, country blacklists and International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit certificates (IOSA) all play a factor in how the airlines are rated. None of the airlines below attained any more than two out of seven stars.

Tara Air

Tara Air managed to accumulate just one out of seven stars. Multiple fatal accidents in 2010 and 2011 have not assisted this Nepalese based carrier’s rating which operates a fleet of eight aircraft in and out of the dangerous mountainous approaches in Nepal.

Nepal Airlines

Nepal has seen nine fatal accidents over the last eight years. Statistically, flying in the mountainous kingdom is relatively dangerous. Nepal Airlines has been flying since 1958 under the name Royal Nepal Airlines, and its safety record leaves a lot to be desired. Accumulating just one star, Nepal Airlines is banned from flying to the EU. Although the last 20 years has seen a vast improvement in the airline’s safety record, a fatal accident in 2014 resulted in 18 fatalities.

Ariana Afghan Airlines

Serving as Afghanistan’s national carrier, Ariana has just five aircraft in their current fleet and a disproportionately stagering record of 19 aircraft being written off during its history, including seven fatal incidents.

Bluewing Airlines

Bluewing are based in the small South American nation of Suriname. The loss of three different Antonov An-28 aircraft over a three year period has found the airline banned over European airspace, which includes neighbouring French territory French Guiana.

Kam Air

Kam Air finds itself in exclusive company at the bottom of this safety list, with just 3 other one star airlines for company. This Afghanistan based airline finds itself banned from US airspace, and when Kam attempted to fly to the EU in 2010 they found themselves banned from there too after incidents that included a fatal accident and a seperate bomb threat.

Trigana Air Service

With 10 hull losses and 14 accidents involving Trigana operated aircraft, it is no wonder that the Indonesian airline was only awarded a one star rating. Like it’s peers on this list, Trigana is also banned from EU and US airspace.

SCAT Airlines

This Kazakhstan based airline has an unimpressive safety record, however it has not seen a fatal accident since 2013. Although SCAT doesn’t operate with an internationally recognized safety audit certificate, the airline is making huge improvements to be internationally recognized and operate safely.

Source: The 2019 List Of The Most Dangerous Airlines In The World

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Get more Tips here! http://www.destinationtips.com Sometimes we also want to know which are the most dangerous airlines in order to avoid them when we are organizing our trip, so here are The 10 Most Dangerous Airlines in the World rated by AirlineRatings.com, non certified by the IOSA 10) Southwest Airlines This is a major United States airline established in 1967. Ironically, this was considered among the ten safest in the world in 2012, what happened then? apart from the lack of minimum standards and certification, of course… 9) AirAsia Thailand This is a joint venture of Malaysian low-fare airline AirAsia and Thailand’s Asia Aviation. This was the only low-cost airline operating both domestic and international flights from Suvarnabhumi Airport. It’s not certified by the IOSA, but, at least it’s allowed to enter in the EU. 8) Iraqi Airways This is the national carrier of Iraq, being the second oldest airline in the Middle East, and a member of the Arab Air Carriers Organization. It has had several incidents, accidents and hijackings since it began operations in 1945. And it’s not certified by the IOSA nor allowed to enter the EU. 7) Kam Air This one is headquartered in Kabul and it was founded in 2003. It operates 90 percent of domestic flights in Afghanistan. But it’s not certified by the IOSA, not allowed in the EU and not even follows the ICAO, so… 6) Ariana Afghan Airlines Also known simply as Ariana, it is the largest airline of Afghanistan and serves as the country’s national carrier. Founded in 1955, it has been on the list of air carriers banned in the European Union since October 2006. And it has had 13 incidents and accidents, so not the best option. 5) Blue Wing This airline from Suriname, started in 2002, but after three accidents and legal problems, now it performs cargo as well as commercial flights to the interior of Suriname and the surrounding region. At least, it follows the ICAO, not the other certifications but this one yes. 4) Airlines PNG PNG Air is an airline from Port Moresby, that operates scheduled domestic and international flights, as well as contract corporate charter work. It started in 1987, but it has had seven accidents since then. It’s allowed to enter the EU, but… there’s no need, really… 3) NOK Air This is a low-cost airline in Thailand operating mostly domestic services, the second largest in the country. It’s free of fatalities, but it’s not certified by the IOSA, ICAO or endorsed by FAA. So, maybe, it’s not the best option. 2) Yeti Airlines This airline is based in Kathmandu since 1998. This airline is only endorsed by the FAA. Togetherwith Tara Air, form the largest domestic flight operator in Nepal, and during its short history has had 4 accidents that bring it to the second place in safety. 1) Nepal Airlines Formerly known as Royal Nepal Airlines, the airline operates domestic services. Founded in 1958, the airline has been banned in the European Union since 2013. It has had 15 incidents and accidents. And it’s only certified by FAA. So it really is the most dangerous airline rated in 2018. Do you think any other airline should be on this list? Comment below!

This Airline Has Just Put Its Flight Attendants On A Low-Fat Diet

The aviation sector in India has a history of being challenging and controversial. Earlier this year India’s second largest airline, Jet Airways, ceased trading which left Air India as the sole major international carrier in India. With debts mounting to over $8 billion, Air India has a tough uphill challenge to turn its fortunes around.

Now the airline is putting its flight attendants on low-fat diet meals inflight. You would be mistaken for thinking that this could be another controversial move aimed at maintaining specific weight limits for crew. In 2009 Air India dismissed 10 female cabin crew for being “overweight” after moving them to ground crew roles.

However, the latest move may be more about saving money rather than keeping crew “in shape.” Air India declined to comment on reports that the new meals, which are mostly vegetarian, will reduce each meal cost by up to 65%.

Today In: Lifestyle

Despite this, there will still be a debate about whether or not the move by Air India is in fact to prevent staff putting on weight. After firing 10 employees in 2009 the Indian carrier again came into the spotlight in 2015 when the airline insisted that 125 flight attendants should lose weight or face the prospect of ground roles.

The airline maintains that the rationale in the past has been “safety issues”, but with the new low-fat meals completely replacing the current options for flight attendants, this latest shift doesn’t seem like an additional option for crew wellbeing but perhaps a split between saving cash and shedding weight, literally and metaphorically.

I spend 360 days a year on the road traveling for work discovering new experiences at every turn, trying out the best and the worst airlines around the world. I set the Guinness World record for being the youngest person to travel to all 196 countries in the world by the age of 25, and you could perhaps say I caught the travel bug over that 6-year journey. I now take over 100 flights every year and I am still discovering many new places, both good and bad, whilst writing about my experiences along the way. In addition to rediscovering known destinations, I visit some of the World’s least frequented regions such as Yemen to highlight untold stories. Join me on an adventure from economy to first-class flights, the best and worst airports, and from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Source: This Airline Has Just Put Its Flight Attendants On A Low-Fat Diet

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NEAR BIRD STRIKE shown on this video!! See below:- Take a ride with me on this short 45 minute hop from Mumbai to the beachside city of Goa, India. This flight is filmed in seat 1A on the Jet Airways Boeing 737-800 and includes the airport scenes, lounge, boarding, cabin, inflight service, descent and landing including a NEAR BIRD STRIKE! For the bird strike view from 6:10 . Please visit my blog at www.aussieflyer.net and subscribe to my channel!

United Airlines Kicks Retired Professors Off Late-Night Flight

A married couple, Jessie Au, 68, and her husband M.G. (“Guill”) Wientjes, 66, both PhDs, were kicked off a late-night United flight from Washington, DC to Los Angeles earlier this summer.

To add insult to injury, Au, a 5’3” grandmother, says an internal United committee called her “belligerent” and “threatening” after she stood up for her rights as a passenger. Although not physically beaten or dragged, Dr. Au says the intimidating experience reminded her of the treatment Dr. David Dao received in a notorious United incident in 2017.

(Full disclosure: I own stock in American, JetBlue and Southwest Airlines.)

The incident apparently began when Dr. M. G. Wientjes and another passenger were issued boarding passes with duplicate seat assignments. While trying to sort out the mess, the couple says a flight attendant dropped Wientjes’ boarding pass several rows back, then denied they had ever given it to her. Although the pass was ultimately returned to the Wientjes, they say by that time the situation had become confrontational, with the flight attendant screaming “You’re coming out.”

I contacted United Airlines multiple times to hear their side of the story, but did not receive an on-the-record response before publication. On September 13, we received the following statement from a United spokesperson. “At United, we hold ourselves to the highest standards of professionalism. Following this issue, we reached out to our customers and our team to find out what happened.” Sources within the airline also note that they spoke to the Wientjes in July to talk through the incident.

Today In: Lifestyle

Jessie Au and Guil Wientjes retired as professors of pharmaceutics from The Ohio State University. The couple met in San Francisco as young researchers and have been married nearly forty years. But rather than stay home and dote on their three grandchildren, the pair remain active in scientific research with their Carlsbad-based company Optimum Therapeutics, currently working on a time-release medication that attaches itself to tumors.

On June 24, they were at Washington Dulles (IAD), having completed visits to the National Institute of Health and the Food and Drug Administration in search of a research grant. They checked in on UA1448 at 7PM, three hours ahead of their scheduled 10:15PM departure to LAX. The couple planned to drive to San Diego after their early-morning arrival the next day.

They got boarding passes with assigned seats 21A (Wientjes) and 21C (Au) in the exit row. The couple boarded in the first two boarding groups, stowed carry-ons and relaxed in their seats. About 20 minutes later, another passenger in the 5th boarding group appeared with a boarding pass for 21A. A flight attendant took both boarding passes and headed to the back of the plane, apparently to try to resolve the situation. But then, according to Au, she dropped the pass and denied that Au and Wientjes had given it to her.

By this time a gate agent had arrived to assist the flight attendant, and the other person assigned the same seat had been seated elsewhere. When another passenger handed them the dropped boarding pass, the Wientjes say, they tried to get the attention of the flight attendant. They were ignored.

“They had their back to me. I said,“We have the pass here it is,” says Dr. Au. They ignored her “until I tapped her elbow from her seat. “’I just want to show you.’”

Au says, “The flight attendant and gate agent both yelled at us. We were traumatized. You could hear them screaming throughout the plane. “Don’t touch me! You are coming out! I’m going to kick you off the plane.”

The elbow tap may be what led a United internal review committee to call Au “physically threatening.” Ultimately United sent another flight attendant and three ground personnel to deal with the Wientjes. “They didn’t resolve the issue,” said Dr. Au. “They abuse us for no good reason.” What is unclear is if the elderly couple were considered a threat, why air marshals, TSA, local police or other security personnel were not contacted.

“Jessie didn’t curse or yell. We think the flight attendant overreacted,” says Dr. M.G. Wientjes. He says “United made all these promises” about how passengers would be treated after the Dr. Dao beating. Yet Wientjes says the flight attendant, the ground personnel and even the pilot were “menacing and unpleasant.”

The Wientjes, who say they were sitting in their assigned seats and felt “abused” by United, refused to leave. A 40-minute impasse resulted, in which three ground personnel boarded the plane to “discuss” the situation with the Wientjes, which they found intimidating. Ultimately, the pilot went on the intercom. He said there was a “situation” on the aircraft and all the passengers would have to deplane.

At this point, the Wientjes reluctantly left the plane so the other passengers could fly. Although United put them up for the night and put them on a plane the following day, the United Mileage Plus members were warned that they were on an internal watch list. Au says she has been repeatedly questioned on subsequent flights.

Hong Kong-born Au, who is 5’ 3 and a non-drinker, was subsequently accused of being “belligerent” and “physically threatening” by an internal United panel. The United Airlines Passenger Incident Review Committee, (PIRC) had previously demanded she produce a substantial written response within 96 hours or face a lifetime ban from United.

“This event was caused by mistakes of two UA employees, the gate agent who double-assigned the same seat to two passengers and the flight attendant who misplaced our boarding pass,” claims Dr. Au. “But no one apologized for the UA mistakes nor acknowledged that UA violated their Contract of Carriage that a seated passenger cannot be removed unless the passenger presents a security or safety risk.”

The former professor believes that United employees and the PIRC “greatly exaggerated a light tap on their employee’s elbow as being physically threatening.” To the Wientjes, the internal review “was nothing more than an exercise in putting more blame on the passengers.”

“Being removed from our flight, in addition to being delayed, was humiliating and hurtful,” say the Wientjes. They feel that since the “infamous incident of Dr. Dao” being forcefully dragged off a United Airlines flight two years ago, “the CEO and President of UA have repeatedly vowed to improve their service and make passengers feel good. We would like them to live up to their words and revise their policy and procedures so that what happened to us cannot happen to other passengers.”

I’ve won several journalism awards, and my writing on travel has appeared in The Los Angeles Times, American Way, Southwest Airlines Spirit, Successful Meetings and United Hemispheres. At home in the middle seat, I’ve got a fistful of travel reward credit cards, have spent more than six months of my life in Las Vegas hotels and I’ve traveled extensively across the world. Yet one of my favorite travel destinations is Independence, KS, a great American small town, where my work as a playwright was performed at the William Inge Festival.

Source: United Airlines Kicks Retired Professors Off Late-Night Flight

A passenger was forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight by law enforcement on Sunday after refusing to give up his seat. According to a person who says they were on the flight, the airline needed room on the overbooked aircraft to reposition crew for another flight. But when it couldn’t find enough volunteers, even after offering $800, the airline selected the man, who is a doctor, and several other passengers to deplane. The video quickly made its way around the internet and social media. In a statement to Business Insider, United Airlines said: “Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville was overbooked. After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate. We apologize for the overbook situation. Further details on the removed customer should be directed to authorities.” ————————————————– Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ————————————————– Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

Won’t You Please Buy A Used Airbus A380?

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Are you looking for a great new entrepreneurial opportunity? Why not buy some used Airbus A380s and start your own airline? Second-hand aircraft have been a launching pad for billionaires from Sir Richard Branson, who started Virgin Atlantic with a used 747, to the late Kirk Kerkorian, who turned a used DC-3 into an airline asset he later parlayed into ownership of MGM.

Such an opportunity may be here again for the right (and well-financed) entrepreneur. Since Airbus announced the coming end of A380 manufacture, airlines like Singapore, Lufthansa and most recently Air France have been rushing towards the exits of A380 ownership. Recent reports about possible wing cracks in early models (again) may provide added impetus. Reports are that seven Airbus A380 aircraft are in storage in France, almost 3% of the total of 238 manufactured. A pair have reportedly been scrapped.

Still, all the potential airline mogul needs to do is create a start-up airline (or charter, or, possibly, a freight carrier) with routes that can keep a 500-seat A380 or two packed full. With seven planes parked and more coming, (Lufthansa is returning its aircraft to the manufacturer as part of a deal for new aircraft) Airbus will no doubt cut you a sweet deal on a used A380, original list price $446 million.

There’s just one problem. The budding airline entrepreneur will need to figure out how to make money with the airplane, apparently something that neither most airlines or Airbus have figured out. (An exception may be Emirates, which owns 111 of the world’s 238 A380 aircraft and has aggressively used them to build traffic through Dubai Airport, which leads the world in annual international travelers with 88 million.)

Ironically, Virgin Atlantic, the creation of entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson, was a launch customer for the A380, ordering six in 2001. It finally canceled the order in 2018 without ever taking delivery.

While entrepreneurs willing to take a chance on the A380 can no doubt get a substantial discount off the $446 million list price, the plane’s costs of operation and maintenance remain substantial. You’ll still need a large crew (Qantas operates the plane with three in the cockpit, 21 in the cabin), and pay a cost of operation estimated at $26,000 to $29,000 an hour, one of the highest in the airline industry. Those four engines are thirsty; that cost included roughly $17, 467 worth of fuel.

Simple Flying quoted the Australian Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics , “To achieve break-even at 80% seat factor (440 seats occupied including first class and business class), average ticket price should be about $700 one way and $1400 return.”

Compounding the usability problem, only a relative handful of world airports are specifically designed to accommodate the A380. The Top 20 airport list is led, of course, by Dubai. Most of the world’s busiest airports are on it, including Los Angeles, Tokyo, London Heathrow, Paris, New York JFK, Beijing, Shanghai, and Frankfurt. Not on the list is the world’s busiest, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson, reflecting the fact that no US carrier has ever operated the A380.

Other airports can accommodate the A380, but at many, operations will create complications. Not only does the aircraft weigh more than a million pounds when fully loaded with passengers, luggage, cargo and fuel, it needs a special jet bridge to efficiently handle loading of its double-decker configuration.

The A380 was designed to fly huge numbers of passengers to various “hub” cities. The idea was that once they arrived, passengers going elsewhere would board another plane and fly to their destination. However, most passengers prefer flying point-to-point, which is now possible in much smaller, more efficient aircraft. Travelers heading from New York to Singapore, for example, no longer must fly to Los Angeles or San Francisco and switch to a different aircraft. Singapore Airlines now offers a 19-hour direct flight, using Airbus’ own twin-engine A350 900ULR.

While there is an almost non-existent used market for A380 aircraft, there is still demand for an even older jumbo, the Boeing 747. However, that market is driven by demand for dedicated air freighters. While a cargo version of the A380 was designed, production delays frustrated launch cargo customers FedEx and UPS to the point where they cancelled their orders.

Without freighter orders, Airbus decided to concentrate on the passenger craft, so no freighter was ever built. It is unclear whether conversion of existing passenger aircraft to freighter configuration would even be possible, let alone economic.

Just as no airline at this point seems to buy a new A380, few to want to buy, lease or rent a used one. But entrepreneurs won’t be stopped, so there is at least one exception, the Portuguese-based charter operator Hi Fly. Hi Fly became the first charter airline with an A380 in 2018.

The operator was busy last summer bailing out customers like Norwegian and Air Austral. Both airlines had similar problems; Boeing 787 Dreamliners grounded for engine checks during the height of the tourist season. Each contracted with Hi Fly to supply a “wet lease” A380, complete with crew and maintenance . But this summer, One Mile At A Time says the Hi Fly A380 is “Still Doing A Whole Lot Of Nothing.”

Nonetheless, the CEO of Hi Fly, Paulo Mirpuri, is sanguine about the future of the A380. He told Forbes.com, “The aircraft is performing well, flying all over the world, the main markets out of Europe so far being in Africa, USA, and South America. Other than for planned maintenance over the last winter, the aircraft has been operationally available with a high degree of dispatch reliability.”

Like a true entrepreneur, Mirpuri clearly believes in his product. “Hi Fly plans to expand further its fleet of A380s. It is a technically very advanced aircraft, loved by the passengers and it fits well in a number of missions and routes.”

Austrian Airlines The Quality Reliability of All Travel Experience

General

Austrian Airlines is Austria’s largest carrier and operates a global route network of approximately 130 destinations, being particularly dense in Central and Eastern Europe with 35 destinations.

Thanks to its favourable geographical location at the heart of Europe, the company’s hub at Vienna International Airport is the ideal gateway between East and West. Austrian Airlines is part of the Lufthansa Group, Europe’s largest airline group, and a member of the Star Alliance, the first global alliance of international airlines.

Austria established the world’s first regular international air connection on 1 April 1918, when it opened its route between Vienna and Kiev. Initially, this served only to transport post. In July 1918, the line from Vienna to Budapest was also opened.

On 14 May 1923, the first aircraft to be operated by ÖLAG (Österreichische Luftverkehrs AG) flew from Vienna to Munich. ÖLAG soon expanded to become the fourth-largest airline in Europe. Following the occupation of Austria in 1938, ÖLAG was forced to cease operations.

When Austria regained sovereignty over its airspace in 1955 with the signature of the State Treaty, two separate carriers were founded, Air Austria and Austrian Airways. Neither of the two began operating flights at this stage. On 4 April 1957, the two companies finally merged to form a single airline, Austrian Airlines.

On 30 September 1957, Austrian Airlines AG was founded, and the new company began to operate scheduled services on 31 March 1958.

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The fleet development announced in January 2019 is taking shape now: Austrian Airlines has now secured six additional A320 aircraft. The first of these jets is scheduled for delivery in August. Within the next few days, it will already receive the red-white-red Austrian color scheme in Jacksonville/USA. A total of ten additional jets are to replace the 18 Dash 8-400 turboprop aircraft by 2021. Austrian will thus increase its Airbus fleet from 36 to 46 aircraft. As of June 30, 2019, the entire Austrian Airlines fleet consisted of 82 aircraft.

“These six additional A320s should also be understood as a strong signal towards low cost competition. We are defending our market position and are determined to fight for our customers”, Austrian Airlines CCO Andreas Otto explains the strategic fleet development.

Four A320 aircraft from Avianca Brasil, two from Juneyao

Four of the six additional A320 jets are leased from Aviation Capital and previously flew at Avianca Brasil. In part, these aircraft are already being subject to the necessary delivery check. The first A320 plane is expected to be transferred to Austrian Airlines in the middle of August. Additional planes will be supplied at the end of August as well as in September and October. Following the necessary modifications and adaptations, the first aircraft should be put into operation on Austrian Airline’s behalf in December of this year. Austrian Airlines will take possession of two other Airbus jets purchased from CDB Aviation, which are currently operated by Star Alliance Connecting Partner Juneyao.

Quality, reliability and creation of a positive travel experience for our customers are the core competencies of the Austrian Airlines Group. Thus we aim at inspiring our passengers. In this regard Central Procurement plays an essential role: We are searching for suppliers and partners, who support us in satisfying our customers’ needs. However, this gets surpassed by a continuous cost optimization process, quality improvement and especially by innovation through which we enthuse and amaze our customers.

Source: https://www.austrianairlines.ag

British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

British Airways has gone to court to seek an injunction to prevent its pilots from striking after union members voted, by an overwhelming majority, to strike rather than accept the airline’s proposed pay increase.

British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) members voted 93% in favor of a strike on 90% turn out. British Airways is offering pilots a pay increase of 11.5% spread over three years, and said that both Unite and GMB trade unions—which represent almost 90% of BA staff—have recommended the airline’s offer to their members.

The three unions made a joint claim for better compensation in November of last year. They cited the airline’s improved financial performance —from a £230 million ($238 million) operating loss in 2009 to a £1.8 billion ($2.24 billion) profit in 2017 — as justification.

BA has said the threat of a pilot strike could disrupt summer holiday travel for thousands of its passengers. However, BALPA have not set dates for the strike and the airline has yet to make any changes to its schedule.

BALPA General Secretary, Brian Strutton, claims the aim is not to disrupt summer holidays and blames the airline for the timing of the breakdown in talks.

“We have tried to resolve this matter through negotiation starting last November – it is BA who has regrettably chosen to drag this out into the summer months,” he stated.

Headed to court

British Airways went to court today for an injunction against industrial action by BALPA members, but the court has decided against the airline.

The airline claimed that the union had failed to comply with balloting rules. This claim has previously brought BA success in court, but has also caused controversy with the decision reversed on appeal.

The decision to go to court had put a halt to negotiations, though both parties said they would like to avoid strike action through negotiations.

Brian Strutton, general secretary of the BALPA union, indicated they would like to return to negotiations after the court’s decision. “Although legally clear to do so, we have still not set any strike dates to give BA one last chance to commit to negotiating on pilots’ pay and rewards with us,” he said in a statement.

British Airways said it will return to negotiations but seems unwilling to compromise.

“We will continue to pursue every avenue to protect the holidays of thousands of our customers this summer,” the airline said in a statement. “Our proposed pay offer of 11.5% over three years is fair.”

Balancing the books

The union says that one day of strikes would cost BA more than BALPA members are asking for, and the airline industry faces a critical shortage of pilots, but labor is a significant portion of airline costs and European airlines face pressures on yields. IATA estimates that the European airline industry generated $12 billion in operating profits during 2018, with an average operating margin of only 6%.

Ryanair isn’t budging either

The court’s decision is still welcome news for BALPA, as they negotiate with BA competitor and European low-cost behemoth Ryanair.

The pilots’ union has also warned of potential industrial action against Ryanair and those talks are going worse than talks with British Airways.

Strutton said, “We have not been able to make any progress with Ryanair at all on any of our areas of concern. As usual with Ryanair, it’s their way or the highway, and we are not prepared to put up with that.”

Ryanair has a history of tackling industrial actions by adjusting service as needed, even if it means shutting down bases, but the airline has a strong base at Stansted Airport that is critical to its operations.

BALPA will issue a ballot to its members to decide on a strike tomorrow, and the results will be announced on August 7. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I worked in aviation from 1994-2010 before turning my experience to writing about airlines and airports for leading industry and consumer publications in 2013. I’ve spent months in the hangars of airlines and aircraft manufacturers, dressed aircraft seats by hand, and worked with crew at training centres around the world. I’ve negotiated with airline CEOs and worked with buyers, engineers, leading design firms, suppliers and aircraft manufacturers on the launch of new programs. I was the executive responsible to international regulators on the approval of cabin equipment, with oversight of production facilities, product testing laboratories, a maintenance center, and a certified hazardous materials repair station. I even hold a patent for a military-spec life raft. Now, I translate “aviation speak” into English, breaking barriers of acronyms and jargon to make the beautiful business of flight easier to value. I also really, really love being on a plane—even in the middle seat.

Source: British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

Southwest Airlines Is Flying To Hawaii. Here’s What Could Happen When It Arrives – Christopher Elliott

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When Southwest Airlines announced plans to start flying to Hawaii last year, Hawaiian Airlines was ready. Now, with the start of Southwest’s Hawaiian air service potentially only a few weeks away, Hawaii’s largest carrier is as ready as it will ever be. Hawaiian Airlines’ secret weapons? Its legendary customer service and a culture of constant improvement. If Southwest Airlines starts flying to Hawaii in 2019, as is widely expected, it might quickly find itself in a game of one-upmanship unlike any since airline deregulation in the 1970s………..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherelliott/2018/11/09/southwest-airlines-is-flying-to-hawaii-heres-what-could-happen-when-it-arrives/#3d3cf7222a0d

 

 

 

 

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Find Cheaper International Travel Fares Using This Decades Old Loophole – Alicia Adamczyk

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Airlines are not allowed to charter flights between two countries if they are not based out of either. That’s why you won’t find Delta selling trips between Canada and France, or Malaysia Airlines flying between the U.S. and England. Except, as the Wall Street Journal notes, when a 1944 treaty allows it. “Some airlines are allowed to carry customers between two non-native countries, usually when a fuel stop is involved,” writes Scott McCartney, the Journal’s Middle Seat columnist. “It’s called the fifth freedom. Established with an international treaty in 1944, the nine aviation freedoms lay out what commercial airlines can and can’t do throughout the world…….

Read more: https://twocents.lifehacker.com/find-cheaper-international-travel-fares-using-this-deca-1830152019

 

 

 

 

 

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What Happens If An Aircraft Climbs Too High – Mentour Pilot

What happens to an aircraft that climbs above its maximum altitude and how do pilots deal with a high and low-speed stall? Todays episode is PACKED with useful aviation information so make sure you watch the WHOLE episode to the end and ask your questions afterwards. I have also include undisputed proof that my dog is, in fact, alive but you will have to wait until the VERY end to see it. If you want to ask a question to me directly, download my FREE mobile application, Mentour aviation

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A huge thank you to the channels that were featured in todays episode. To watch the full videos, click the links below:

The Ultimate B737 Technical handbook (stall example) https://youtu.be/0e3z8z7Z6WI SciShow

(Why planes don’t fly higher) https://youtu.be/PkWQsGrRDts

Safran https://youtu.be/kz5kv0RfeUc

Dfan 315 (Shockwave) https://youtu.be/ugPJYJ-BKkU

Shashmeera de Fonseka https://youtu.be/WBXgZpjfTLg

 

 

 

 

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