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Won’t You Please Buy A Used Airbus A380?

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Are you looking for a great new entrepreneurial opportunity? Why not buy some used Airbus A380s and start your own airline? Second-hand aircraft have been a launching pad for billionaires from Sir Richard Branson, who started Virgin Atlantic with a used 747, to the late Kirk Kerkorian, who turned a used DC-3 into an airline asset he later parlayed into ownership of MGM.

Such an opportunity may be here again for the right (and well-financed) entrepreneur. Since Airbus announced the coming end of A380 manufacture, airlines like Singapore, Lufthansa and most recently Air France have been rushing towards the exits of A380 ownership. Recent reports about possible wing cracks in early models (again) may provide added impetus. Reports are that seven Airbus A380 aircraft are in storage in France, almost 3% of the total of 238 manufactured. A pair have reportedly been scrapped.

Still, all the potential airline mogul needs to do is create a start-up airline (or charter, or, possibly, a freight carrier) with routes that can keep a 500-seat A380 or two packed full. With seven planes parked and more coming, (Lufthansa is returning its aircraft to the manufacturer as part of a deal for new aircraft) Airbus will no doubt cut you a sweet deal on a used A380, original list price $446 million.

There’s just one problem. The budding airline entrepreneur will need to figure out how to make money with the airplane, apparently something that neither most airlines or Airbus have figured out. (An exception may be Emirates, which owns 111 of the world’s 238 A380 aircraft and has aggressively used them to build traffic through Dubai Airport, which leads the world in annual international travelers with 88 million.)

Ironically, Virgin Atlantic, the creation of entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson, was a launch customer for the A380, ordering six in 2001. It finally canceled the order in 2018 without ever taking delivery.

While entrepreneurs willing to take a chance on the A380 can no doubt get a substantial discount off the $446 million list price, the plane’s costs of operation and maintenance remain substantial. You’ll still need a large crew (Qantas operates the plane with three in the cockpit, 21 in the cabin), and pay a cost of operation estimated at $26,000 to $29,000 an hour, one of the highest in the airline industry. Those four engines are thirsty; that cost included roughly $17, 467 worth of fuel.

Simple Flying quoted the Australian Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics , “To achieve break-even at 80% seat factor (440 seats occupied including first class and business class), average ticket price should be about $700 one way and $1400 return.”

Compounding the usability problem, only a relative handful of world airports are specifically designed to accommodate the A380. The Top 20 airport list is led, of course, by Dubai. Most of the world’s busiest airports are on it, including Los Angeles, Tokyo, London Heathrow, Paris, New York JFK, Beijing, Shanghai, and Frankfurt. Not on the list is the world’s busiest, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson, reflecting the fact that no US carrier has ever operated the A380.

Other airports can accommodate the A380, but at many, operations will create complications. Not only does the aircraft weigh more than a million pounds when fully loaded with passengers, luggage, cargo and fuel, it needs a special jet bridge to efficiently handle loading of its double-decker configuration.

The A380 was designed to fly huge numbers of passengers to various “hub” cities. The idea was that once they arrived, passengers going elsewhere would board another plane and fly to their destination. However, most passengers prefer flying point-to-point, which is now possible in much smaller, more efficient aircraft. Travelers heading from New York to Singapore, for example, no longer must fly to Los Angeles or San Francisco and switch to a different aircraft. Singapore Airlines now offers a 19-hour direct flight, using Airbus’ own twin-engine A350 900ULR.

While there is an almost non-existent used market for A380 aircraft, there is still demand for an even older jumbo, the Boeing 747. However, that market is driven by demand for dedicated air freighters. While a cargo version of the A380 was designed, production delays frustrated launch cargo customers FedEx and UPS to the point where they cancelled their orders.

Without freighter orders, Airbus decided to concentrate on the passenger craft, so no freighter was ever built. It is unclear whether conversion of existing passenger aircraft to freighter configuration would even be possible, let alone economic.

Just as no airline at this point seems to buy a new A380, few to want to buy, lease or rent a used one. But entrepreneurs won’t be stopped, so there is at least one exception, the Portuguese-based charter operator Hi Fly. Hi Fly became the first charter airline with an A380 in 2018.

The operator was busy last summer bailing out customers like Norwegian and Air Austral. Both airlines had similar problems; Boeing 787 Dreamliners grounded for engine checks during the height of the tourist season. Each contracted with Hi Fly to supply a “wet lease” A380, complete with crew and maintenance . But this summer, One Mile At A Time says the Hi Fly A380 is “Still Doing A Whole Lot Of Nothing.”

Nonetheless, the CEO of Hi Fly, Paulo Mirpuri, is sanguine about the future of the A380. He told Forbes.com, “The aircraft is performing well, flying all over the world, the main markets out of Europe so far being in Africa, USA, and South America. Other than for planned maintenance over the last winter, the aircraft has been operationally available with a high degree of dispatch reliability.”

Like a true entrepreneur, Mirpuri clearly believes in his product. “Hi Fly plans to expand further its fleet of A380s. It is a technically very advanced aircraft, loved by the passengers and it fits well in a number of missions and routes.”

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Austrian Airlines The Quality Reliability of All Travel Experience

General

Austrian Airlines is Austria’s largest carrier and operates a global route network of approximately 130 destinations, being particularly dense in Central and Eastern Europe with 35 destinations.

Thanks to its favourable geographical location at the heart of Europe, the company’s hub at Vienna International Airport is the ideal gateway between East and West. Austrian Airlines is part of the Lufthansa Group, Europe’s largest airline group, and a member of the Star Alliance, the first global alliance of international airlines.

Austria established the world’s first regular international air connection on 1 April 1918, when it opened its route between Vienna and Kiev. Initially, this served only to transport post. In July 1918, the line from Vienna to Budapest was also opened.

On 14 May 1923, the first aircraft to be operated by ÖLAG (Österreichische Luftverkehrs AG) flew from Vienna to Munich. ÖLAG soon expanded to become the fourth-largest airline in Europe. Following the occupation of Austria in 1938, ÖLAG was forced to cease operations.

When Austria regained sovereignty over its airspace in 1955 with the signature of the State Treaty, two separate carriers were founded, Air Austria and Austrian Airways. Neither of the two began operating flights at this stage. On 4 April 1957, the two companies finally merged to form a single airline, Austrian Airlines.

On 30 September 1957, Austrian Airlines AG was founded, and the new company began to operate scheduled services on 31 March 1958.

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The fleet development announced in January 2019 is taking shape now: Austrian Airlines has now secured six additional A320 aircraft. The first of these jets is scheduled for delivery in August. Within the next few days, it will already receive the red-white-red Austrian color scheme in Jacksonville/USA. A total of ten additional jets are to replace the 18 Dash 8-400 turboprop aircraft by 2021. Austrian will thus increase its Airbus fleet from 36 to 46 aircraft. As of June 30, 2019, the entire Austrian Airlines fleet consisted of 82 aircraft.

“These six additional A320s should also be understood as a strong signal towards low cost competition. We are defending our market position and are determined to fight for our customers”, Austrian Airlines CCO Andreas Otto explains the strategic fleet development.

Four A320 aircraft from Avianca Brasil, two from Juneyao

Four of the six additional A320 jets are leased from Aviation Capital and previously flew at Avianca Brasil. In part, these aircraft are already being subject to the necessary delivery check. The first A320 plane is expected to be transferred to Austrian Airlines in the middle of August. Additional planes will be supplied at the end of August as well as in September and October. Following the necessary modifications and adaptations, the first aircraft should be put into operation on Austrian Airline’s behalf in December of this year. Austrian Airlines will take possession of two other Airbus jets purchased from CDB Aviation, which are currently operated by Star Alliance Connecting Partner Juneyao.

Quality, reliability and creation of a positive travel experience for our customers are the core competencies of the Austrian Airlines Group. Thus we aim at inspiring our passengers. In this regard Central Procurement plays an essential role: We are searching for suppliers and partners, who support us in satisfying our customers’ needs. However, this gets surpassed by a continuous cost optimization process, quality improvement and especially by innovation through which we enthuse and amaze our customers.

Source: https://www.austrianairlines.ag

British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

British Airways has gone to court to seek an injunction to prevent its pilots from striking after union members voted, by an overwhelming majority, to strike rather than accept the airline’s proposed pay increase.

British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) members voted 93% in favor of a strike on 90% turn out. British Airways is offering pilots a pay increase of 11.5% spread over three years, and said that both Unite and GMB trade unions—which represent almost 90% of BA staff—have recommended the airline’s offer to their members.

The three unions made a joint claim for better compensation in November of last year. They cited the airline’s improved financial performance —from a £230 million ($238 million) operating loss in 2009 to a £1.8 billion ($2.24 billion) profit in 2017 — as justification.

BA has said the threat of a pilot strike could disrupt summer holiday travel for thousands of its passengers. However, BALPA have not set dates for the strike and the airline has yet to make any changes to its schedule.

BALPA General Secretary, Brian Strutton, claims the aim is not to disrupt summer holidays and blames the airline for the timing of the breakdown in talks.

“We have tried to resolve this matter through negotiation starting last November – it is BA who has regrettably chosen to drag this out into the summer months,” he stated.

Headed to court

British Airways went to court today for an injunction against industrial action by BALPA members, but the court has decided against the airline.

The airline claimed that the union had failed to comply with balloting rules. This claim has previously brought BA success in court, but has also caused controversy with the decision reversed on appeal.

The decision to go to court had put a halt to negotiations, though both parties said they would like to avoid strike action through negotiations.

Brian Strutton, general secretary of the BALPA union, indicated they would like to return to negotiations after the court’s decision. “Although legally clear to do so, we have still not set any strike dates to give BA one last chance to commit to negotiating on pilots’ pay and rewards with us,” he said in a statement.

British Airways said it will return to negotiations but seems unwilling to compromise.

“We will continue to pursue every avenue to protect the holidays of thousands of our customers this summer,” the airline said in a statement. “Our proposed pay offer of 11.5% over three years is fair.”

Balancing the books

The union says that one day of strikes would cost BA more than BALPA members are asking for, and the airline industry faces a critical shortage of pilots, but labor is a significant portion of airline costs and European airlines face pressures on yields. IATA estimates that the European airline industry generated $12 billion in operating profits during 2018, with an average operating margin of only 6%.

Ryanair isn’t budging either

The court’s decision is still welcome news for BALPA, as they negotiate with BA competitor and European low-cost behemoth Ryanair.

The pilots’ union has also warned of potential industrial action against Ryanair and those talks are going worse than talks with British Airways.

Strutton said, “We have not been able to make any progress with Ryanair at all on any of our areas of concern. As usual with Ryanair, it’s their way or the highway, and we are not prepared to put up with that.”

Ryanair has a history of tackling industrial actions by adjusting service as needed, even if it means shutting down bases, but the airline has a strong base at Stansted Airport that is critical to its operations.

BALPA will issue a ballot to its members to decide on a strike tomorrow, and the results will be announced on August 7. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I worked in aviation from 1994-2010 before turning my experience to writing about airlines and airports for leading industry and consumer publications in 2013. I’ve spent months in the hangars of airlines and aircraft manufacturers, dressed aircraft seats by hand, and worked with crew at training centres around the world. I’ve negotiated with airline CEOs and worked with buyers, engineers, leading design firms, suppliers and aircraft manufacturers on the launch of new programs. I was the executive responsible to international regulators on the approval of cabin equipment, with oversight of production facilities, product testing laboratories, a maintenance center, and a certified hazardous materials repair station. I even hold a patent for a military-spec life raft. Now, I translate “aviation speak” into English, breaking barriers of acronyms and jargon to make the beautiful business of flight easier to value. I also really, really love being on a plane—even in the middle seat.

Source: British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

Southwest Airlines Is Flying To Hawaii. Here’s What Could Happen When It Arrives – Christopher Elliott

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When Southwest Airlines announced plans to start flying to Hawaii last year, Hawaiian Airlines was ready. Now, with the start of Southwest’s Hawaiian air service potentially only a few weeks away, Hawaii’s largest carrier is as ready as it will ever be. Hawaiian Airlines’ secret weapons? Its legendary customer service and a culture of constant improvement. If Southwest Airlines starts flying to Hawaii in 2019, as is widely expected, it might quickly find itself in a game of one-upmanship unlike any since airline deregulation in the 1970s………..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/christopherelliott/2018/11/09/southwest-airlines-is-flying-to-hawaii-heres-what-could-happen-when-it-arrives/#3d3cf7222a0d

 

 

 

 

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Find Cheaper International Travel Fares Using This Decades Old Loophole – Alicia Adamczyk

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Airlines are not allowed to charter flights between two countries if they are not based out of either. That’s why you won’t find Delta selling trips between Canada and France, or Malaysia Airlines flying between the U.S. and England. Except, as the Wall Street Journal notes, when a 1944 treaty allows it. “Some airlines are allowed to carry customers between two non-native countries, usually when a fuel stop is involved,” writes Scott McCartney, the Journal’s Middle Seat columnist. “It’s called the fifth freedom. Established with an international treaty in 1944, the nine aviation freedoms lay out what commercial airlines can and can’t do throughout the world…….

Read more: https://twocents.lifehacker.com/find-cheaper-international-travel-fares-using-this-deca-1830152019

 

 

 

 

 

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What Happens If An Aircraft Climbs Too High – Mentour Pilot

What happens to an aircraft that climbs above its maximum altitude and how do pilots deal with a high and low-speed stall? Todays episode is PACKED with useful aviation information so make sure you watch the WHOLE episode to the end and ask your questions afterwards. I have also include undisputed proof that my dog is, in fact, alive but you will have to wait until the VERY end to see it. If you want to ask a question to me directly, download my FREE mobile application, Mentour aviation

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👇🏻 https://www.patreon.com/mentourpilot

A huge thank you to the channels that were featured in todays episode. To watch the full videos, click the links below:

The Ultimate B737 Technical handbook (stall example) https://youtu.be/0e3z8z7Z6WI SciShow

(Why planes don’t fly higher) https://youtu.be/PkWQsGrRDts

Safran https://youtu.be/kz5kv0RfeUc

Dfan 315 (Shockwave) https://youtu.be/ugPJYJ-BKkU

Shashmeera de Fonseka https://youtu.be/WBXgZpjfTLg

 

 

 

 

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China’s C919: A Challenge to Airbus & Boeing – CGTN

On Friday, the first Chinese-built passenger jet C919 made its maiden flight, widely seen as a milestone for the Chinese aviation industry. The aircraft is expected to compete with the updated Airbus A320 and the new-generation Boeing B737 currently dominating the market. But it won’t start commercial operations till sometime between 2020 and 2022. How can it challenge the duopoly of passenger jet manufacturing? Turn to CGTN to learn more.

 

 

 

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Can You Gift Airline Miles to Someone Else – Johnny Jet

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You work hard to earn airline miles, but if you don’t use them fast enough, they might expire or devalue. Or, maybe you want to help a friend fly for free with your miles. Here lies the question. Can you gift airline miles? In many cases, yes. But, the answer isn’t always clear-cut. Like anything, it depends on the airline, plus, you might have to pay a transfer fee. Note that gifting airline miles can be different than transferring airline miles. If you need to think of a unique Christmas gift, this could be an option……

Read more:https://www.forbes.com/sites/johnnyjet/2018/10/16/can-you-gift-airline-miles-to-someone-else/#3cb5b797640e

 

 

 

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Top 10 Airplane Things You Don’t Know The Purpose Of – BE AMAZED

Airplanes have had wings, controls and some kind of motor but planes have evolved significantly. The commercial airliner you fly in now has features that Orville and Wilbur wouldn’t have dreamed of. Here are 10 things you might not know about modern aircraft. Subscribe for more!

http://bit.ly/BeAmazedSubscribe ◄ Stay updated ► http://bit.ly/BeAmazedFacebook https://twitter.com/BeAmazedVideos https://instagram.com/BeAmazedVideos

For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: beamazedvideos@gmail.com Credit: https://pastebin.com/V9KDxkG9 Be Amazed at… The mysterious triangle symbol over your seat –

When you board a modern jet aircraft, you’re probably looking for your seat number and for the nearest emergency exit. The flange sticking out of the wing – While you’re waiting to leave the gate, you’re probably staring out the window at the wings that are going to carry you off this Earth. The hum when you board the plane –

Have you noticed that there’s an omnipresent drone while you’re waiting for the last passenger to board the plane? Tomato juice – Do you find yourself ordering a tomato juice when you’re on a plane? Opening window shades for landings and take-offs – I bet you thought the window shades were installed on planes so you can sleep during long flights.

Winglets – Airplanes are always a tug-of-war between the thrust of the engines and aerodynamic drag. Sidestick – Back in the day of the first planes, pilots were known as “stick and rudder men”, steering the plane by the power of their arms and legs pushing on control cables. Bleed air system – While the Wright Brothers’ Flyer barely flew above the dunes at Kittyhawk, today jetliners fly higher than the tallest mountains.

The eye level indicator on cockpit window – Pilots come in all sizes – and just like your car, planes have adjustable seats for them. The hole in your window – Since cabin pressure is so important, you might not think a hole in your window is a good thing…..

 

 

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Airbus A380 SIMULATOR – Bird Strike Engine fire on Takeoff (ENG sub) – Aviation Hub

Captain Jürgen Raps and his co-pilot board the full-motion A380 simulator at the Airbus factory in Toulouse, and show us how to deal with a bird strike and subsequent engine fire on takeoff like cool-headed professionals. This small clip is part of a whole movie produced and owned by PilotsEye.tv…

 

 

 

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