Advertisements

SFO Plans To Surround Airport With 10-Mile Wall To Protect Against Rising Bay Waters

MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: An egret hunts in the reeds of San Francisco Bay, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, near San Francisco International Airport in a view from Bayfront Park. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

Concerned that rising waves will flood runways and buildings in the coming years, officials at San Francisco International Airport are moving ahead with a $587 million plan to build a major new sea wall around the entire airport.

The plan, the latest example of the growing cost of climate change in California, involves driving steel pilings — sheets with interlocking edges — into the mud and also constructing concrete walls in some places around all of the airport’s 10-mile perimeter.

“This is something we’ve been looking at for many years,” said Doug Yakel, a spokesman for the airport. “What’s changed is the level of protection that is needed.”

The airport, built in 1927 in a cow pasture at the edge of San Francisco Bay, serves 55 million passengers a year, making it the nation’s seventh busiest. But its runways sit only about 10 feet above sea level.

Under the new project, whose fiscal plan was approved by the San Francisco County Board of Supervisors on Sept. 17, the airport will build five more feet of protection.

That should guard against 3 feet of sea level rise, plus another two feet for big waves during storms, airport planners said. And it should protect the airport through 2085, based on the most recent scientific estimates of sea level rise. Researchers project San Francisco Bay’s waters could rise 1 foot in the next 30 years and another 3 feet or more by 2100. Environmental studies are set to begin next fall, Yakel said, with construction starting in 2025.

MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: A jet lands at San Francisco International Airport, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in a view from Burlingame, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) 

The project will be funded with bonds and paid off through higher fees on airlines that fly in and out of SFO, according to airport officials. With interest on the bonds, the final price tag is estimated at $1.7 billion over 30 years.

Environmental groups, who successfully blocked SFO’s plans 20 years ago to build new runways into the bay, say they don’t have a problem with this project.

“We have no objection to this. The airport can’t be easily moved,” said David Lewis executive director of Save the Bay, in Oakland. “But adapting to climate change is going to be expensive. We can save ourselves a lot of money if we reduce the amount that we warm the planet, melt the ice caps, and raise the sea level.”

What’s happening at SFO is also an issue in other places.

Dozens of major airports around the world are located at the water’s edge. In some cases, parts of bays or harbors were filled in generations ago to construct new land for runways. In other places, the shoreline was chosen because it reduced noise problems from airplanes flying over neighborhoods.

“Nobody thought about sea level rise back then,” said Gary Griggs, a professor of earth sciences at UC Santa Cruz who has studied oceanography for more than 50 years. “They put in fill, got it a few feet above sea level and thought they were good. Now they don’t have a lot of options.”

At Oakland International Airport, construction is set to begin next year on a $46 million project to raise a 4-mile earthen dike by two feet to guard runways against rising bay waters.

“Sea level rise is a very big focus of airports both in the U.S. and globally,” said  Kristi McKenney, assistant director of aviation for the Port of Oakland, which owns the airport. “The recent hurricanes in the Caribbean shined a bright light on it. The airport industry takes this very seriously.”

San Jose’s airport is not facing the same threat. It sits nearly four miles inland from the bay.

The Earth’s temperature continues to rise as fossil fuels are burned and heat is trapped in the atmosphere. The 10 hottest years since 1880, when modern temperature records began, all have occurred since 1998, according to NASA and NOAA. The planet has warmed 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit in the last century, and is expected to warm another 2 to 4 degrees this century at the current rate.

“As you heat water, it expands, just like in your water heater,” Griggs said. “And the warmer it gets, the more ice melts. Ice melts at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. It doesn’t matter if you are a Democrat or Republican.”

According to tide gauges, San Francisco Bay has risen 8 inches since 1900. Scientists project it will rise another 1 foot by 2050 and another 3 feet or more by 2100. Heavy winter storms, especially during high tides, already cause flooding in some parts of the Bay Area. Waves have over-topped the berms and existing sea walls on occasion at SFO, causing minor flooding issues.

The trouble, scientists say, is that the rate of sea level rise has doubled in recent decades, and is expected to further accelerate. There is some uncertainty about just how high the oceans will go. It depends on how much more fossil fuel is burned in the coming decades and at what rate the ice sheets of Antarctica, Greenland and other ice-bound regions continue to melt, Griggs said.

Bay Area cities and counties have three choices, experts say. First, they can build and restore wetlands in some areas, like the former Cargill salt evaporation ponds in the South Bay. Wetlands buffer waves and storms, reducing flood impacts on the shorelines.

Bay Area voters in 2016 approved $500 million in new funding over the next 20 years for bay wetlands restoration and flood control projects when they passed Measure AA, a $12-per-year parcel tax in all nine Bay Area counties. The first grants went out last year.

Second, cities can build concrete seawalls and levees. That will be the option for important features that cannot be moved, such as airports, or the Embarcadero along the San Francisco waterfront. But it’s expensive.

San Francisco voters last year approved Proposition A, a $425 million bond measure to begin work on an enormous, 30-year, $5 billion project to rebuild the 3-mile long seawall along the city’s Embarcadero — which was built in the 1800s and is cracking and crumbling — all the way from Fisherman’s Wharf to the San Francisco Giants ballpark.

Finally, some areas are likely to be allowed to flood if the costs are too high to preserve them, like hay fields in the North Bay.

“From a global standpoint, there are parts of our world where we are going to adapt and parts where we are going to retreat,” said San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin. “And there are certain places our society is going to need to armor. SFO falls in that category. The airport is one of the most vital transportation links in the state, the country and the planet. There’s nowhere else for it to go.”

MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: A flock of birds flies near a jet on a taxi way at San Francisco International Airport, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in a view from Bayfront Park in Millbrae, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) 

Source: SFO plans to surround airport with 10-mile wall to protect against rising bay waters

8.02K subscribers
The next time your flight is delayed at San Francisco International Airport, you might have something besides the weather or maintenance problems to blame. It could be what scientists call “subsidence.” In simple terms, #SFO is sinking. Senior investigative reporter Stephen Stock has the story. #WeInvestigate #airports Stay connected: Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nbcbayarea Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nbcbayarea Follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/nbcbayarea Add us on Snapchat @NBCBayArea Catch up on all the day’s news: http://www.nbcbayarea.com Download our app: On iOS: http://nbcbay.com/R1BhqYM On Android: http://nbcbay.com/rUcA97h

Advertisements

The Amazing Ways Dubai Airport Uses Artificial Intelligence

As one of the world’s busiest airports, (ranked No. 3 in 2018 according to Airports Council International’s world traffic report), Dubai International Airport is also a leader in using artificial intelligence (AI). In fact, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) leads the Arab world with its adoption of artificial intelligence in other sectors and areas of life and has a government that prioritizes artificial intelligence including an AI strategy and Ministry of Artificial Intelligence with a mandate to invest in technologies and AI tools.

AI Customs Officials

The Emirates Ministry of the Interior said that by 2020, immigration officers would no longer be needed in the UAE. They will be replaced by artificial intelligence. The plan is to have people just walk through an AI-powered security system to be scanned without taking off shoes or belts or emptying pockets. The airport was already experimenting with a virtual aquarium smart gate. Travelers would walk through a small tunnel surrounded by fish. While they looked around at the fish that swim around them, cameras could view every angle of their faces. This allowed for quick identification.

AI Baggage Handling

Tim Clark, the president of Emirates, the world’s biggest long-haul carrier, believes artificial intelligence, specifically robots, should already be handling baggage service including identifying them, putting the bags in appropriate bins and then taking them out of the aircraft without any human intervention. He envisions these robots to be similar to the automation and robotics used at Amazon.com’s warehouses.

Air Traffic Management

In a partnership with Canada-based Searidge Technologies, the UAE General Civil Aviation Authority (GCAA) is researching the use of artificial intelligence in the country’s air traffic control process. In a statement announcing the partnership in 2018, the director-general of the GCAA confirmed that it is UAE’s strategy to explore how artificial intelligence and other new technologies can enhance the aviation industry. With goals to optimize safety and efficiency within air traffic management, this is important work that could ultimately impact similar operations worldwide.

Automated Vehicles

Self-driving cars powered by artificial intelligence and 100% solar or electrical energy will soon be helping the Dubai Airport increase efficiency in its day-to-day operations, including improvements between ground transportation and air travel. Imagine how artificial intelligence could orchestrate passenger movement from arrival to the airport to leaving your destination’s airport. In the future, autonomous vehicles (already loaded with your luggage) could meet you at the curb. Maybe AI could transform luggage carts to act autonomously to get your luggage to your hotel or home, eliminating any need for baggage carousels and the hassle of dealing with your luggage.

While much attention is given to the process of vetting passengers to ensure safe air travel, artificial intelligence can also improve the staff clearance process. Some airports see the most significant security threat airports, and airlines face is with airport personnel. An EgyptAir mechanic, baggage handler and two police officers were arrested in connection with the bombing of Metrojet Flight 9268 where all 224 people on board died. There have been several arrests in Australia of border force officers linked to international drug smugglers. Part of these efforts to improve the staff clearance process includes enhancing staff entrances to enable greater control with biometrics, advanced facial recognition and the use of artificial intelligence rather than just CCTV cameras and police monitoring which is used now. Artificial intelligence can look for areas of concerns with a staff member’s behavior and record for crime and violence even before they are hired. After they are hired, AI algorithms can continue to look for changes that could indicate a security problem.

AI Projects Being Explored for the Future

Emirates is developing AI projects in its lab at the Dubai Future Accelerators facility. Some of these include using AI to assist passengers when picking their onboard meals, scheduling a pickup by a taxi as well as personalizing the experience of every Emirates passenger throughout the entire journey. They are also exploring how AI can help Emirates teach cabin crew. We can expect that artificial intelligence will be put to work to solve the problems of airplane boarding by looking at the issue in a way humans have been unable to. The goal would be for AI to architect a queue-less experience.

AI at Other Airports

The first biometric airport terminal is already running at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, and a similar system is running at Dubai International Airport for first- and business-class passengers. Here are some other ways airports and airlines around the world are using artificial intelligence or plan to:

·         Cybersecurity: Airports and airlines have shifted from identifying cybersecurity to preventing cybersecurity threats with an AI assist in response to the expansion of digitalization across aviation.

·         Immersive experiences: Augmented reality might be the future of helping travelers find their way through an airport.

·         Voice recognition technology: At Heathrow Airport, passengers can already ask Alexa to get flight updates. United Airlines allows travelers to check in to their flight through Google Assistant by simply stating, “Hey Google, check in to my flight.”

As innovation gets pushed by the UAE, Dubai International Airport and other technology innovators around the world, there will be opportunities for abuse and privacy considerations when using these new AI tools and capabilities for air travel. But, if artificial intelligence can remove the biggest headaches from travel, some people (possibly most) will be more than ready to exchange a bit of privacy for a better experience when AI takes over.

 

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Bernard Marr is an internationally best-selling author, popular keynote speaker, futurist, and a strategic business & technology advisor to governments and companies. He helps organisations improve their business performance, use data more intelligently, and understand the implications of new technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, blockchains, and the Internet of Things. Why don’t you connect with Bernard on Twitter (@bernardmarr), LinkedIn (https://uk.linkedin.com/in/bernardmarr) or instagram (bernard.marr)?

Source: The Amazing Ways Dubai Airport Uses Artificial Intelligence

The 17 Most Dangerous Airports In The World And Why You Must Experience Them – Jim Dobson

1.jpg

I found myself gripping the armrest as my plane attempted a landing in Africa on a remote sandy airstrip, the landing was called off and we needed to circle around several times in order to scare off several resilient giraffes that were occupying the runway. Almost a month later I made a dramatic landing in Bhutan that was like a scene out of Star Wars where my commercial airliner had to bank dramatically to fit in between the narrow, remote mountain terrain………..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimdobson/2018/11/08/the-17-most-dangerous-airports-in-the-world-and-why-you-must-experience-them/#385fc5bd2a8f

 

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

 

 

Storm/Hurricane Friederike With Up To 63 Knots Crosswind & 20 Go Arounds Or Touch & Go – HvdH-Plane-Spotter

For me it was the most spectacular filming of aircrafts during a hard and gusty storm with amazing crosswind landings. This storm/hurricane Friederike with up to 63 Knots crosswind at DUS Düsseldorf airport in Germany was the hardest storm after 11 years in Europe/Germany and many airports was closed. Düsseldorf was open all the time, but about 20 planes aborted the landing go around or did a touch and go. Some pilots did a great job and landed the aircraft during these extreme conditions with spectacular and skilled handling.

Used Equipment and Cooperation: – Video cutting software: Magix Video Deluxe “PRO X” http://www.magix.com/de/video-pro-x/ – Wind Statistic from Windfinder.com https://www.windfinder.com/report/due… http://www.hvdh-plane-spotter.de http://www.hvdh-film.de http://www.hvdh-sport.de http://www.hvdh.info Planes in the crosswind storm video: Emirates A380, Delta B767, ANA Boeing 787, Dash8, A320 … Overview of all aircrafts: 00:00 Wind-statistic Storm Friederike at DUS from Windfinder.com 00:05 Storm at Düsseldorf airport in time-lapse 00:10 Moving Eurowings Dash turboprop approach in gusty storm 00:44 Spectacular crosswind sideways Dash 8-Q400 D-ABQD landing 00:55 Touch down Eurowings flight EW9203 from Bologna 01:00 Go around A320 at RWY 23R 01:20 Crosswind landing Eurowings Dash 8 at Runway 23R 01:38 Go around Eurowings Dash 8 Q400 D-ABQ? 02:00 Touch and go Dash 8-Q400 in former Air Berlin design 02:30 Approach Eurowings A320 RWA 23R 02:36 Go around Eurowings A320 02:46 Approach flybe Dash 8-Q400 RWY 23R 03:00 Go around flybe Dash 8 G-PRPB LCY-DUS 03:11 Go around Germanwings A320 03:29 Gusty approach and go around Eurowings A320 03:48 Stormy landing flybe Dash 8 flight BE1401 from London 03:58 Go around Dash 8-Q400 in former Air Berlin design 04:11 Stormy landing Dash 8 D-ABQE EW9181 from FLR Florence 04:34 Bumpy landing EW 9413 A320-214 D-AEWK from Lyon LYS-DUS 04:48 Safety run at RWY 23R 04:53 Go around Eurowings A320-214 at RWY 23L 05:06 Go around Pegasus A320 05:27 Stormy take-off Condor 05:42 Extreme stormy landing Eurowings A320 06:02 Go around A320 at RWY 23L 06:22 Go around EW9001 MUC-DUS Dash 8 D-ABQH at RWY 23L 06:32 Approach Delta Airlines 06:53 Delta Go away to FRA Frankfurt 07:08 Lufthansa A320 goes around at RWY 23L 07:28 Amazing rainbow ended at runway 23R 07:37 ANA B787 JA-877A NH209 from Tokyo with water spray 07:54 Taxi ANA B787-9 flight NH 209 NRT-DUS 08:03 Landing Emirates A380-800 08:14 A380 flight EK 55 DXB-DUS touch down at runway 23L 08:18 A380 reverse thrust with amazing water spray 08:52 Timelapse from storm Friederike in Düsseldorf

 

 

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

Beirut Duty Free Rocks Airport with Dabke Dance – Annahar TV

Whilst the idea of a flash mob isn’t a new thing, a Dabke / Hip-Hop flash mob in Beirut Rafic Hariri International Airport (Beirut Duty Free) at a time when the region is in flux is certainly a first.

On March 5th, 2011, passengers experienced something a little different. A flash mob performed a mix of Dabke and hip-hop to entertain and delight passengers and airport staff alike.

M&C Saatchi and Beirut Duty Free, created this vibrant event as part of their “Take Back More.” campaign. The aim was to literally create a wonderful memory of Lebanon that passengers could take with them on their journey.

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar