How to Refocus Your Strategy and Reenergize Your Team – Stanley Meytin

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A person’s passion is the sincerest definition of who they are. Passion can manifest itself in a hobby, an aspiration, or if you’re really lucky, a career. Take two people, Joe and Jane, as an example. Joe has a passion outside of his career. He devotes a lot of his free time to this passion and naturally speaks about it to his peers.

When his peers think of him they probably define him as “person passionate about X.” Now take Jane, one of the lucky few who has made a career out of her passion. She devotes twice the amount of time, twice the amount of energy and twice the amount of conversation to her passion. How do you think her peers define her?

If you’ve read Simon Sinek’s bestseller Start With Why, then Jane will remind you of Herb Kelleher, co-founder of Southwest Airlines, or Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. Joe will remind you of the Wright Brothers. Each of these individuals built empires by undyingly following their passion. Sure, you can claim that these individuals are used as examples because of winner’s bias. But they succeeded because not only were they extremely passionate. They succeeded because they were able to clearly communicate their visions.

I consider myself extremely lucky. Like Jane, I’ve built a career out of my passion. When I first launched my film production company, my team asked the same questions regarding our clients that our competition was asking:

  • What is this client doing that’s different?
  • What do they bring to the table?
  • What problems are they solving for their customers?

While these questions helped us understand our clients, we realized they weren’t getting to the core of what defined them. We were part of the same old convention of business. We were focusing on what our clients were doing and not why they were doing it in the first place. Once we realized this, we began asking ourselves different questions:

  • How can we harness the passion that defines the client’s company to create a story?
  • Are their employees inspired by that passion?
  • Does the story align with their core values?
  • How can we align the story with the company’s brand mission?
  • How is that story going to connect with their audience?
  • How are we going to make the story authentic and engaging?

The biggest takeaway, however, didn’t come in the form of one of our clients’ videos going viral. It came in-house. 2016 was the first year we set a quantitative benchmark for the number of videos we wanted to produce. Not only did we not hit the benchmark, but with all the energy we put into hitting a quota we lost focus on creating a better product. We produced more videos, but they were watered down compared to previous years. We lost our own purpose.

We got rid of all quantity benchmarks in 2017 and as a team, we held a meeting to refocus. In this meeting, we asked ourselves the same questions that we asked our clients. We ended the meeting with a mission to create a video channel to tell impactful and authentic stories that inspire others.

That channel has been a remarkably accurate reflection of the meeting where it was first conceptualized. We’re now using the same techniques that helped us define our purpose in our core business for our corporate clients. Not only has it righted our ship and produced success but it has also provided us with an entirely new set of questions to ask our clients:

  • Is their organization helping others?
  • Is their mission connecting with others?
  • Are their customers genuinely understanding their mission?
  • Are employees buying into their mission, do they believe their roles play an important part in promoting the mission?
  • Are they building a community?
  • Are they staying true to their core values and the values of their customers and employees?

The beauty of these questions is that you can propose them to your clients, to your employees and even to yourself. They’re not specific to video production or any industry for that matter. If you already have the answers, that’s incredible. If not, then use them to refocus your strategy or reenergize your team.

Just swap “their” and “they” for “your” and “you.” Connecting to people on a deeper level, nurturing a human connection, evoking emotion and inspiring are key ingredients to building loyalty and bringing the best out in people.

Note, however, that not all ingredients are created equal. Like apples grown on two separate farms, the ingredients that I listed — those that were seeded and cared for with passion — will always taste better.

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How the European Union’s GDPR Rules Impact Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning – Mike Kaput

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This Regulation lays down rules relating to the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data and rules relating to the free movement of personal data.”

It’s no “We hold these truths to be self-evident…” but when the European Union (EU) drafted the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that goes into effect on May 25, 2018, they definitely had individual freedoms in mind.

In this case, it’s freedom of individuals to control their personal data.

The GDPR is a broad regulation that outlines how companies may legally collect and use individual personal data—and what rights EU citizens have concerning their data.

It’s a major regulation with major effects. Companies that collect data from EU citizens must follow a number of regulations around collecting that data in order to legally use it. They must also respond to citizen requests to alter that data in certain circumstances.

Notes Elizabeth Juran, a consultant at marketing agency PR 20/20 (which powers the Marketing AI Institute):

“The GDPR is a European privacy law that protects consumers from unfair, unclear and unethical uses of their data. You may have noticed updates in your automation software or data collection tools like the one below from Google Analytics:

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These aren’t your average skim-and-delete email notifications. The GDPR will change how we, as marketers, use data. Historically, companies haven’t been required to disclose information like the following:

  • What kinds of data they store about consumers.
  • What they’re using consumer data for.
  • Why they ask for (or require) the data they do.

Starting May 25, the rules about data will heavily favor the consumer. The law is specific to individuals who reside in the European Union (EU) and European Economic Community (EEC), but companies all over should be aware. If you have even one person on your contact list from the EU or EEC, your forms, privacy policy and email tactics will likely have to change to avoid breaking the rules for that contact.”

This is big for marketers of all stripes. But what effects might GDPR have on the use of artificial intelligence?

Turns out, a significant part of the regulation also deals with AI and algorithms. Like the rest of GDPR, the language may be construed broadly. No precedents have yet been set with the regulation. So a lot is up in the air as to what will actually be enforced and how it’ll be enforced.

GDPR and AI

According to the Brookings Institution, a US think tank:

The GDPR being implemented in Europe place severe restrictions on the use of artificial intelligence and machine learning. According to published guidelines, “Regulations prohibit any automated decision that ‘significantly affects’ EU citizens. This includes techniques that evaluates a person’s ‘performance at work, economic situation, health, personal preferences, interests, reliability, behavior, location, or movements.’” In addition, these new rules give citizens the right to review how digital services made specific algorithmic choices affecting people.

This statement alone creates substantial uncertainty if you know anything about artificial intelligence and machine learning.

Lots of AI systems run into the “black box” problem, in that they’re not very transparent about how their machine learning algorithms reach decisions. For consumers, this means you don’t necessarily know why AI may recommend what it recommends or take the actions it takes.

There’s no doubt the black box problem becomes troublesome the more AI is adopted in marketing and other industries. At some point, marketers will want some idea of how systems make decisions, especially as these systems recommend more sophisticated marketing actions.

For instance, if I have an AI system that prescribes how I should allocate my marketing budget, I’ll at least want some idea what inputs the system uses to make those decisions. (At least, I will if I need to explain any of this to my executive team or board.)

Does that mean you need to know exactly how the AI’s algorithms work? Probably not. But there’s a balance here that likely needs to be established.

Another problem, however, is that sometimes the creators of AI systems can’t always explain fully why AI makes its decisions. For sophisticated AI, like deep learning and neural networks, it is sometimes extremely difficult for the people who created these systems to pinpoint each and every step in the decision-making process.

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Says AI expert Pedro Domingos, author of The Master Algorithm:

“The best learning algorithms are these neural network-based ones inspired by what we find in humans and animals. These algorithms are very accurate as they can understand the world based on a lot of data at a much more complex level than we can. But they are completely opaque. Even we, the experts, don’t understand exactly how they work. We only know that they do. So, we should not allow only algorithms which are fully explainable. It is hard to capture the whole complexity of reality and keep things at the same time accurate and simple.”

Hard as it is to believe, he’s right. There may not be an easy way for an AI system’s creator to explain how the system works. In the meantime, regulations like GDPR that require such explanations may limit the amazing efficacy of these systems, Domingos points out:

“Let’s take the example of cancer research, where machine learning already plays an important role. Would I rather be diagnosed by a system that is 90 percent accurate but doesn’t explain anything, or a system that is 80 percent accurate and explains things? I’d rather go for the 90 percent accurate system.”

GDPR presents some interesting conflicts and considerations for the companies that build AI. Brookings notes that it could hold back AI development in the EU:

“If interpreted stringently, these rules will make it difficult for European software designers (and American designers who work with European counterparts) to incorporate artificial intelligence and high-definition mapping in autonomous vehicles. Central to navigation in these cars and trucks is tracking location and movements. Without high-definition maps containing geo-coded data and the deep learning that makes use of this information, fully autonomous driving will stagnate in Europe. Through this and other data protection actions, the European Union is putting its manufacturers and software designers at a significant disadvantage to the rest of the world.”

Now, a lot of the effects will utterly depend on how lawmakers within the EU interpret GDPR.

Somewhat ironically, it’s not at all clear how they’ll come to their decisions, as they operate in a bit of a black box of their own.

Disclaimer: We love talking about everything related to AI—even legal regulations—but we’re not lawyers, nor should this content be construed in any way as legal advice. We recommend all companies consult with legal counsel about GDPR-related questions and actions.

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Bounce Rate Analytics: How to Measure, Assess, and Audit to Increase Conversions

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Your bounce rate can be such a scary number, right?It’s common knowledge that a high bounce rate is bad and a low rate is good.Every time you log into your Google Analytics account, it’s right there waiting for you.

I understand the feeling when you see that number creeping up.But the problem is that numbers can be misleading.After all, how high is really too high?In this post, I’m going to show you how you can fully measure and assess your bounce rate. That way, you’ll know if it’s actually too high for your industry or if it’s perfectly normal.

I’ll share tips and tricks on how to audit your bounce rate and understand what’s driving it up.I’ll also tell you some of my secrets for lowering your bounce rate.But first, let’s talk about exactly what a bounce rate is and why you should care.

What is a bounce rate and why does it matter?

A “bounce” occurs when someone visits your website and leaves without interacting further with your site. Your bounce rate shows you the percentage of your visitors who bounce off of your site.

By default, Google Analytics considers a visitor to have interacted with your site if they visited at least one additional page.

The bounce rate you see in your overview report on Google Analytics is your site-wide bounce rate.

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It’s the average number of bounces across all of your pages divided by the total number of visits across all of those pages within the same period.

You can also track the bounce rate of a single page or a segment or section of your site.

I’ll show you how once we start looking at the different segment reports.

The bounce rate of a single page is exactly what it sounds like. It’s the total number of bounces divided by the total number of visits on a page.

If you run an e-commerce site that also has a blog, you may want to implement a segmented bounce rate.

Why?

Your blog posts may have a very different average bounce rate than your product pages.

We’ll get into the exact details later, but segmenting the two can make your numbers more meaningful when you’re looking at the data.

So, why is bounce rate important?

According to SEMrush, bounce rate is the 4th most important ranking factor on SERPs.

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However, according to Search Engine Journal, Google does not use bounce rate in its algorithm metrics.

Can they both be right?

Yes, and I’ll tell you why.

Google’s algorithm may not directly take bounce rate into account, but what it signifies is very important to it.

As of 2016, RankBrain was the third-most important ranking factor of Google’s algorithm.

If you’re not familiar with RankBrain, its main purpose is to improve search results for users by better understanding their search intent.

If a user clicks on your page and leaves without any interaction, that could signal to RankBrain that your site isn’t what they’re looking for.

It makes it look like your result doesn’t match the searcher intent well. As a result, RankBrain says, “Maybe this page shouldn’t be so high in the results.”

Can you see how these connect?

If you understand bounce rate properly, it can tell you if your marketing strategy is effective and if your visitors are engaging with your content.

The key is to understand what your “target” is and break down your bounce rate in a way that provides meaning.

What bounce rate is good?

Many different variables determine what a “good” bounce rate is.

Things like your business type, industry, country, and the types of devices your visitors are using all influence what a good average would be for your site.

For instance, Brafton found that the average bounce rate is 58.18%. However, their research shows that bounce rates are higher for B2B businesses than B2C businesses.

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These 2017 benchmarks show a wide range of average bounce rates across industries:

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If you’re still unsure about the bounce rate you should be targeting, Google Analytics can help you figure it out.

Google Analytics gives you a quick visualization of the average bounce rate for what it believes is your industry. It does this by benchmarking.

First, you need to set up benchmarking in Google Analytics.

Under the admin section, click on “Account Settings” and then check the “Benchmarking” box.

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Now you can compare industry averages.

Just navigate to your behavior reports. Click on “Site Content” and then “Landing Pages.”

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You’ll immediately see the average, site-wide bounce rate.

Of course, a site-wide average can be too broad to be a valuable benchmark.

You can drill down further to view section-specific bounce rates.

With either the Content Drilldown Report or the advanced filter feature, you can see the average bounce rates for sections of your site.

For example, now you can compare the industry average for just your blog or product pages.

In the “Audience” section of Google Analytics, go under “Behavior” then “Benchmarking.” Then, select “Channels.”

Now you can choose your vertical and compare whichever time period you want to review.

This should give you a better idea of your website’s bounce rate performance compared to the average by channel.

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The chart above compares your channel bounce rate against other Google Analytics accounts or properties in your industry.

If you want to look deeper, you can do so by going into “Acquisition,” then “All Traffic,” and then “Channels.”

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Then click the “Comparison” button on the right and filter by “Bounce Rate” to see which channels are above or below average.

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You can then dig even deeper into each one for further analysis.

Ultimately, a “good” bounce rate will be different for every site. It may even be different for every page on your site.

I suggest that you simply focus on your bounce rate trends over time and how you can improve the highest ones to boost conversions.

The focus should be on using this metric to find weaknesses in your site. Don’t worry about hitting a magic number.

Now, let’s look at how you can improve your bounce rates.

Modifying bounce rates

Your site-wide bounce rate is too broad to be anything but a vanity metric.

It’s too shallow to provide meaning.

To measure and assess your bounce rate, you need to narrow it down and group it by different variables.

You won’t be able to start lowering your bounce rate until you really understand what’s causing it to be high.

There are a couple of ways that you can modify the bounce rate metric you see in Google Analytics.

As I already mentioned above, the first way is by segmenting your bounce rate.

You can create all sorts of different segments in Google Analytics to better analyze your bounce rate. You can even create custom variables.

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We’ll look at nine different segment options that will help you assess and improve your bounce rate.

Segment by age

There are plenty of different demographics that Google Analytics tracks, which allows you to better segment and analyze your site traffic.

One of these is the age range of your visitors.

To look at bounce rate by age range, look under “Audience” and then “Demographics” on the left-hand sidebar. Then, click the “Age” option.

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The resulting report should look something like this.

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Now you can easily see if your bounce rate is higher with a certain age range.

You can see in the example above that seniors (65+) have a much higher rate than the rest of this site’s visitors.

If seniors are part of your ideal target market, make sure that you structure your web pages properly for marketing to them.

For example, avoid using jargon, trendy language, and slang.

Segment by gender

The “Gender” option is just below “Age” on that left-hand menu.

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This report tells you your bounce rate for males and females.

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You can now easily see if your site is better at retaining one gender over the other.

Gender targeting with tactics such as different language and colors can impact viewing and purchasing behavior.

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If you have a higher bounce rate with one gender, make sure you’re not accidentally creating the perception that you’re only targeting the other sex.

Segment by affinity

The next option in the “Audience” section is under “Interests” and then “Affinity Categories.”

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This groups bounce rate based on visitor interests.

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Check out which affinity categories have the highest bounce rates to see if you’re losing out on key marketing groups.

You can see in the example above that this site is engaging best with business professionals and shutterbugs.

Engagement with music lovers, movie lovers, and green living enthusiasts is the poorest.

This knowledge can now help you better target those groups with your imagery and content.

Segment by location

Still in “Audience,” just under “Interests,” you’ll find the “Geo” section. Within that, you can click on “Location” for another segment report.

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First, you’ll see a color-coded map that shows you where most of your visitors come from.

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Below that, you’ll see the table version breaking down your visitors by geographic region.

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This gives you your bounce rate by country.

In the example above, you can see that Australia and the UK have much higher bounce rates than the other countries.

You can drill further into it to see if there are certain provinces that are engaging worse than others. Then, you can adapt your marketing strategy to target areas where you want to see improvement.

Segment for new visitors

A good segment to check out is the “New Vs. Returning” breakdown. It’s also in the “Audience” section under “Behavior.”

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Now you can see if your new visitors are bouncing at a higher rate than your returning visitors.

google analytics new vs returning user

I would expect your new visitors to have a higher rate.

So, to get more value out of this segment, you can view the acquisition source as a secondary dimension.

Just click on the “Secondary Dimension” drop-down list at the top of the table and select “Source” from the list that appears below.

We’ll talk more about acquisition in a minute.

Segment by browser

The browser breakdown report is a good way to see if you have any technical issues that are causing your visitors to bounce.

In the “Audience” section under “Technology,” select “Browser & OS.”

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The report should look like this:

google analytics broswer breakdown

If one browser has a higher bounce rate than the others, that might indicate that you haven’t configured your site well for that browser.

You also need to consider versions of browsers. For example, don’t just check Internet Explorer. Check across versions 8.0, 9.0, and 11.0.

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If one has a noticeably higher bounce rate, your site might have bugs or UX issues with that browser.

Even if it’s an outdated browser, you will want to fix the issue if the browser is still bringing you traffic.

Segment by device

Underneath the “Technology” section, you can find the “Mobile” section. Select “Overview” to see your bounce rate across devices.

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This will give you a bounce rate comparison between desktop, mobile, and tablet.

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If you find out that your bounce rate is significantly higher on mobile or tablet, it may indicate that you haven’t properly optimized your site for those devices.

You can also view the “Devices” report. This further breaks it down by mobile brand and operating system.

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If you find, for example, that Apple users are bouncing at a higher rate than Android users, you might have some design issues.

Pay attention to individual device models as well.

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Focus on trends and device release dates. For example, you might discover that your bounce rate is fine for Apple devices in general, but it’s too high for the latest models.

This may indicate that your website isn’t compatible with the newest Apple OS.

Segment by acquisition

Now, let’s look at segmentation by acquisition rather than by audience.

Go to “Acquisition,” then “All Traffic,” and then “Source/Medium” in the left-hand menu.

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The table at the bottom of your screen should look like this.

google analytics traffic source

It will show you a breakdown of where all of your traffic is coming from and the associated bounce rates.

Take a look at the sources that have the highest bounce rates to see if there’s a trend.

Here’s an example where you can see that the paid advertising campaigns have a much higher bounce rate:

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Either your advertising targeting is too broad, or your landing pages are not lining up very well with your ads, resulting in a higher bounce rate.

Segment by landing page

The final option we’ll discuss is segmentation by landing pages.

In the left-hand menu under “Behavior,” click on “Site Content” and then “Landing Pages.”

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The resulting table shows you a breakdown of your landing pages and their average bounce rates.

You might find that one page has a much higher bounce rate than the others.

Visit that page and look for any design problems or issues that might be making it less effective than the others.

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Make sure you haven’t forgotten any key steps to optimize your landing pages for conversions.

Now that you know the different ways that you can segment your site traffic, I’ll show you how you can create adjusted bounce rates.

You can adjust what Google Analytics considers an interaction. This will directly impact your bounce rate.

For example, you might feel that a visitor has interacted on your site if they watched a video.

In Google Analytics, you have the option to set an event like playing a video, clicking a button, or completing a download as an interaction.

Then, users who complete these “events” will no longer count toward your bounce rate.

However, you need to careful with this. Make sure that automated events don’t skew your results.

If you’ve set up your videos to play automatically, you need don’t want to count video views as interactions.

The simple way to modify how Google records interactions is by sending events into your Google Analytics that tell you when a user spends a certain amount of time on a page, scrolls through a certain percentage of a page, or sees a specific element a the page.

You can send events from Google Tag Manager:

1. Adjust your bounce rate through scroll percentage events

The “Scroll Depth” trigger allows you to create custom events based on how far a visitor scrolls down a page.

First, you need to create a new tag.

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Then, name your tag, select “Universal Analytics” for tag type and choose “Event” for the track type.

Next, you need to type in the event category and event action.

To get the action, simply click the small plus sign beside the field and select “Page Path.”

For the event label, pick “Scroll Depth Threshold.”

If you don’t see this option available, go to your “Built-In Variables” screen and enable the scrolling variables:

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Now, select “Non-interaction Event” as “False,” and add in your UA tracking ID .

If you’ve completed all of those fields, it should look like this:

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For this tag, I recommend setting the scroll to 75% of the page. That means that Google will consider a visitor to have interacted on your site if they scroll 75% of the way through the page.

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Make sure you’ve selected “Scroll Depth” as the trigger type. Then, in percentages, put down “75 percent”.

Once done, you can save, preview, debug, and then publish.

2. Adjust your bounce rate through the timer function

You can also decide that Google should consider a visitor to have interacted on a page if they spend a minimum amount of time on it.

Create a new tag and give it a name, such as “UA — Adjusted Bounce Rate — Timer.”

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You can choose the length of time that you want to start with. I suggest trying 30 seconds.

To do this, add a new trigger and name it “Timer — 30 seconds”.

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The interval is in milliseconds. So, for 30 seconds, you need to put enter “30000.”

Select a limit of one. Then, in the conditions section, set it for “Page URL matches RegEx*.”

This will make it so that Google Analytics includes all of your pages in the tracking.

Make sure you save, preview, and debug before publishing.

Other methods for decreasing bounce rate

Here are some more ways to see where visitors are bouncing and how you can use that information to boost conversions.

Review top exit pages

Another report you should check out is your top exit page report.

You can find it right below the landing pages report in the left-hand menu.

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This report will show you which pages people most often abandon your website from.

Take a look at your top traffic pages and compare your bounce rate and your exit rate.

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This will show you who’s landing directly on that page and bouncing versus who’s arriving there from an internal link and exiting.

It can help you narrow down where you should spend your time testing and making improvements on your site.

Review in-page analytics

Another great report within Google Analytics is the in-page analytics report.

This is only available now via a Chrome plugin, but it is still very useful.

As you can see below, the report allows you to see the click-through rate for every link on a web page. Page Analytics by Google

This is a great way to evaluate a landing page, but it can be useful for any content on your site, including your homepage.

It will allow you to see which links in your content people are clicking on and which ones they skip right over.

This will help you determine which anchor texts you should reword or which calls-to-action you need to improve.

View Page Timings

Your pages may have high abandonment because they’re too slow.

You can check this with the Page Timings report.

In the “Behavior” section of the left-hand menu, click “Site Speed” and then “Page Timings.”

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The report will tell you how fast each page on your site is loading.

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You can sort by number of page views and average page speed. That way, you can start improving your pages with the highest traffic yet slowest load times first.

It also shows you your overall site average speed.

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In light of Google’s Speed Update that’s coming in July, site speed is becoming increasingly important. But even apart from that, it’s critical for improving bounce rates.

For example, the average page speed above means that our bounce rate is 123% higher than it could be.

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Google Analytics Site Speed reports

You can check out the other Site Speed reports for further analysis and options for improving your site speed.

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The Speed Suggestions report will not only indicate potential issues but also give you useful advice on how to resolve them, such as prioritizing visible content.

Utilize A/B testing

Throughout all of these report checks, you are hopefully pinpointing some specific areas you need to target for improvements.

It’s difficult to guarantee which changes will improve your bounce rate the most.

For instance, you may have identified a weak landing page. But what do you need to do to improve it?

Do you need to make it longer? Do you need a different call-to-action? What will increase your conversion rate?

A/B testing is a great way to test your improvement strategies.

It allows you to test things like different call-to-action wording, different landing page designs, and different target audiences.

A/B testing will make it easy to see what’s working and what isn’t since it allows you to show one version of your website to half of your visitors and another version to the other half.

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Just make sure you set a clear goal for your testing and follow the correct steps.

To better understand your A/B test results, you can also use a significance calculator.

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Make your pages easy to read

It’s easy to forget such a simple aspect of your pages, but readability is important.

There are lots of free tools that allow you to check the readability of your content and your website like the Yoast plugin for WordPress.

Be mindful of your font size and type, your sentence and paragraph length, and the amount of white space on the page.

Use subheadings and break your content up into chunks.

Also, consider other elements on your page that might be distracting like your color choices and ad placements.

Include clear CTAs and consider their placements

A great way to get people to engage and convert is by using compelling calls-to-action.

A call-to-action should compel someone to do something such as sign up for a newsletter or purchase a product.

There are many ways to improve your call-to-action buttons. Consider your copy, color, button size, placement on the page, and so much more.

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Apple suggests making sure that all CTA buttons are at least 44 pixels tall.

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Use videos and images to engage your audience

Humans are visual creatures.

We love imagery. We also retain it better.

If you hear something or read something, the chances are good that you’ll only remember 10% of it three days later. However, if you see a picture, you’re likely to remember 65% of it.

Adding images and videos is a great way to get your audience engaged with your content.

Short, catchy videos are increasing in popularity, and they can boost engagement.

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Infographics are also effective at drawing your visitors in.

In fact, over 41% of marketers said that infographics were their most engaging form of visual content.

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If you find that your audience isn’t engaging with a certain page, you may simply need to add more images, videos, and infographics.

Offer live chat support

Live chat is the fastest method for offering customer service support.

If people come to your page and don’t immediately find exactly what they want, live chat can help engage them before they give up and try the next site.

There are lots platforms out there today that can help you set up live chat services, such as Intercom.

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Live chat is one of the best tools you can implement on your website this year to decrease bounce and boost conversions.

Conclusion

Analyzing and improving your bounce rate can be intimidating.

But improving your bounce rate means a more engaged audience and more conversions.

If you follow the steps I’ve outlined in this post, you should see your bounce rate decrease in no time.

First, understand what a “good” bounce rate really is and narrow down your analysis to pinpoint exactly what your bounce rate metrics are telling you.

Remember that a site-wide bounce rate is simply a vanity metric. It’s too broad to provide actionable information.

Focus on the different segment reports and your other analytics tools to dive into the data.

Check out your top exit pages, page timings, and speed reports to understand what might be causing your bounce rates to be high.

To help people engage with your content, be sure to improve your site’s readability, add imagery, optimize your CTAs, and use live chat.

Do some A/B testing to see what works best for you and your audience.

Monitor your reports with each change to see where and how you’re improving

Remember: There is no magic number that you’re trying to hit.

The goal is to simply keep improving and offering your customers a better, more engaging experience.

What tools and tricks do you use to monitor and improve your bounce rate?

Website Analytics

Are you looking for ways to improve your business website? Want to know the key aspects you should measure to maximise performance? Website Analysis share their guide to analysing your site in this infographic. BONUS – Need a tool that can analyse your website from an SEO perspective? Check out our free website analyser. …

via Website Analytics: 7 Factors You Should Measure to Maximise Performance [Infographic] — Red Website Design Blog