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This Taiwan Airline Flew For 62 Years, But May Be Grounded Indefinitely

Far Eastern Air Transport, a six-decades-old Taiwanese airline catering to destinations within Asia, suddenly suspended its flights on December 12. The airline’s website said that as of December 13 it would cease to continue running because of unspecified “operational losses.”

On Friday, Chang Kang-wei, Far Eastern’s chairman, told a news conference that he had found new sources of investment and hoped to restart flights as soon as possible, although analysts expect more turbulence.

“Airlines such as Far Eastern are stuck in the strategic position that is unsustainable,” says John Grant, director of JG Aviation Consultants in the United Kingdom. “Neither a low-cost carrier nor a full service network airline, the carrier is challenged from all sides and unable to command a secure market position.”

The airline was founded in 1957 with domestic routes around Taiwan, where flights average just 30 minutes. But in 2008 it declared bankruptcy and flights stopped through early 2011. In 2007, Taiwan had launched a high-speed railway that reduced the demand for domestic flights.

Far Eastern Air Transport has struggled too because it relies heavily on McDonnell Douglas MD-82 and MD-83 aircraft, while other airlines, including the budget carriers, are buying newer planes made by Airbus and Boeing. Its fleet has a total of six aging MD-80 family aircraft and six ATR 72 turboprops.

More on Forbes: Asia’s Airline Groups Are On A Path To Increased Competition And Other Constraints

 

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Far Eastern Air Transport struggles too for lack of code sharing and membership in airline alliances, says Jeffrey Lowe, managing director of the Hong Kong aviation services firm Asian Sky Group. Its base at the smallish Taipei’s Songshan airport further constrained business because civil aviation authorities allow flights only to a couple dozen cities outside Taiwan, mostly in China. That base made it hard to set up connecting flights, Lowe says.

“FAT has a long history but has always struggled to survive,” Lowe says. “It has been in a financial crisis of one form or another since 2008, the last 12 years.”

Neither a budget carrier nor a full-service airline

Far Eastern Air Transport fails to fit into either of the two most viable types of airlines around Asia today, Grant says. The airline has just a 10% share of capacity for all Taiwanese airlines, he says. Four other Taiwanese carriers fly international routes and another, the ultra-high-end StarLux Airlines, will open three routes in January.

The two dominant international carriers Eva Airways and China Airlines have newer aircraft fitted with entertainment systems, while Eva focuses intently on cabin cleanliness. Budget carriers based offshore serve throngs of young, thrifty Taiwanese tourists bound for Japan, South Korea and parts of Southeast Asia. Budget travel is so popular in Southeast Asia that Kuala Lumpur and Singapore have opened budget-only terminals.

Occasionally airlines that are neither high nor low end survive because they have a “geographic niche,” Grant says. Far Eastern does not, he says.

The halt to flights on Friday affected 3,251 outbound group tourists, Taiwan’s tourism bureau says in a statement Thursday.

The airline would not say for this post how much capital its CEO had garnered but that the airline is ready to fly again if given regulatory approval. “We can’t say anything about the next few years,” an airline spokesperson said for this post. “We’re just waiting for the official approval to fly again.”

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As a news reporter I have covered some of everything since 1988, from my alma mater U.C. Berkeley to the Great Hall of the People in Beijing where I followed Communist officials for the Japanese news agency Kyodo. Stationed in Taipei since 2006, I track Taiwanese companies and local economic trends that resonate offshore. At Reuters through 2010, I looked intensely at the island’s awkward relations with China. More recently, I’ve studied high-tech trends in greater China and expanded my overall news coverage to surrounding Asia.

Source: This Taiwan Airline Flew For 62 Years, But May Be Grounded Indefinitely

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Taiwan’s Far Eastern Air Transport (FAT) has just announced it will cease all operations. This video covers the details regarding the ceasing of flights and a brief background of Far Eastern Air Transport. ✈ Ishrion Aviation is an Aviation Channel bringing you premium trip reports/reviews and the latest aviation news and developments to your fingertips. ▶️ If you enjoyed this video, make sure to subscribe for the latest aviation news and developments! https://www.youtube.com/c/IshrionAvia… 👍 Make sure to leave a like! Leave a comment down below! ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ SOCIAL MEDIA 📸 Follow Me On Instagram For Aviation Media & Pictures: https://www.instagram.com/ishrion.avi… (@ishrion.aviation) 🐤 Follow Me On Twitter: https://twitter.com/IshrionA (@IshrionA) ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ ✈ Support Me On Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IshrionAviation ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ About Me: Welcome! This is the Ishrion Aviation YouTube Channel featuring premium trip reports, the latest aviation news, and other aviation content! Make sure to subscribe if this is something you’re interested in! ‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒‒ Music: Keys of Moon – Morning Lights https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWtF… Video footage/images by Far Eastern Air Transport. MD-80 image by Jeffhuang0627: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi… Sources: https://www.ch-aviation.com/portal/ne… https://finance.technews.tw/2019/12/1… “Far Eastern Air Transport (FAT) suspended sales of tickets on December 12 and subsequently announced that it will cease all operations from December 13 onwards. The carrier said via its website that it had “difficulties raising funds due to long-term operating losses”. Initially, the airline said that ticket sales were only suspended due to “systems’ maintenance”. The airline reportedly suffered financially due to the poor reliability and high operating costs of its McDonnell Douglas (Long Beach) twinjets. According to the ch-aviation fleets advanced module, the airline operates six ATR 72-600s, four MD-82s, and three MD-83s (of which two have been inactive since mid-September and early November 2019). The MD-82s are 25.4 years old on average and the MD-83s – 23.4 years. The airline expected to start taking deliveries of eleven B737-8s from lessors in November 2019 but this was delayed due to the type’s grounding.” “Far East Airlines reported today that it will be closed. The Civil Aviation Bureau of the Ministry of Communications has not confirmed that it only said that a press conference will be held in the afternoon. The Ministry of Labor stated that it had contacted the Taipei Municipal Bureau of Labor, which has not received a large number of dismissal plans.” Translate: 遠東航空今天傳出將停業,交通部民航局未證實,只表示下午將開記者會。勞動部則表示,與台北市勞動局聯繫,勞動局目前未收到大量解僱計畫書。 遠東航空今天傳出將停業消息,交通部民航局並未證實,只回應下午將在民航局召開記者會,等時間確定後會通知。 遠航傳出停業消息,員工去留也受關注,勞動部則表示,與台北市勞動局聯繫,勞動局目前未收到大量解僱計畫書。 根據大量解僱勞工保護法規定,事業單位大量解僱勞工時,應於 60 日前將解僱計畫書通知主管機關及相關單位或人員. #FarEasternAirTransport #FATAirlines #AirlineBankruptcy

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Airplane Deicing: The How & Why

If you’ve traveled by air in wintry weather, you’ve probably looked out your window before takeoff and seen vehicles circling the plane, spraying deicing fluid on the wings. Passengers often ask me why it’s so important to make sure the aircraft is free of snow and ice accumulation.

Not just removing, but also preventing a build-up of snow and ice on the wings and tail of an airplane is crucial for a safe take-off. A plane’s wings and rear tail component are engineered with a very specific shape in order to provide proper lift for flight. Snow and ice on these areas in essence changes their shape and disrupts the airflow across the surface, hindering the ability to create lift.

Whenever snow, ice, or even frost has accumulated on the aircraft, the pilots call on the airport deicing facility to have it removed. Deicing fluid, a mixture of a chemical called glycol and water, is generally heated and sprayed under pressure to remove ice and snow on the aircraft.

While it removes ice and snow, deicing fluid has a limited ability to prevent further ice from forming. If winter precipitation is falling, such as snow, freezing rain or sleet, further action needs to be taken to prevent ice from forming again on the aircraft before takeoff.

In these cases, anti-icing fluid is applied after the deicing process is complete. This fluid is of a higher concentration of glycol than deicing fluid. It has a freezing point well below 32 degrees Fahrenheit or zero Celsius and therefore is able to prevent the precipitation that falls into it from freezing on the plane’s surface.

Anti-icing fluid also has an additive that thickens it more than deicing fluid to help it adhere to aircraft surfaces as it speeds down the runway during takeoff.

Pilots temporarily disable the aircraft’s ventilation system during the deicing/anti-icing process to prevent fluid fumes from entering the cabin. Although the fumes are considered nontoxic for inhalation, we try to keep the odor out of the cabin regardless. Sometimes the scent, similar to maple syrup, does find its way into the aircraft cabin.

As the anti-icing fluids lose their effectiveness in flight, the aircraft is still equipped with systems that prevent frozen precipitation from building on the wings, tail and various sensors around the airplane. These systems are not only important in the winter months, but also in the summer months, because at higher altitudes, the temperature is well below freezing year-round.

Typically aircraft systems prevent ice buildup in one of two ways. On most jet aircraft, hot air from the engines is routed through piping in the wings, tail and engine openings to heat their surfaces and prevent icing.

Preventing ice formation in the engine openings is important, as ice here could dislodge and cause damage as it’s ingested into the engine. This occurrence would be similar to throwing a rock into a running washing machine — clearly not a good idea.

On propeller driven aircraft, balloon-like devices attached to the wings and tail are inflated and deflated with air from the engines, breaking up any ice accumulation.

We can’t promise your trip to the airport will be ice-free, but there won’t be any icy buildup on the plane getting you to your holiday destination.

By Daniel E. Fahl

Source: Airplane deicing: The how and why

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A snowstorm left snow piled on top of this Norwegian 737-800 bound for Copenhagen, Denmark from Oslo, Norway. The video features pushback, taxi, de-ice, and takeoff. It’s certainly not something you see everyday. Enjoy! Please LIKE & SUBSCRIBE to support my channel!

Sad: Air France Quietly Retires First A380

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It’s another sad milestone for the Airbus A380, which hardly comes as a surprise, though…

Air France Retires First A380

Yesterday morning Air France quietly retired their very first Airbus A380, as they flew the plane from Paris to Malta, just shortly after it landed from Johannesburg. This plane had the registration code F-HPJB.

This makes Air France only the second airline in the world to retire the A380, after Singapore Airlines. So far a Singapore Airlines A380 has been scrapped, while another was taken over by Portuguese leasing company Hi-Fly (though seemingly not with much success).

The first Air France A380 to be retired was leased from Dr. Peters Group (the same company that leased Singapore Airlines their A380s), so the plane will now be stripped of the Air France livery, and then we’ll see what happens to it after that.

Air France’s A380 Retirement Plans

Unfortunately A380 production is ending in 2021, as over time we’ve learned that Emirates is the only airline delighted with the plane (and they claim other airlines just don’t use the plane correctly).

Over the summer Air France made the decision to retire all of their Airbus A380s by 2022. The airline has 10 of these planes in their fleet. This will make Air France the first airline in the world to retire their entire fleet of A380s.

Previously the airline had planned on phasing out some of their A380s in the next few years, but also keeping some after a refresh. They ultimately decided against this plan.

Why Did Air France Decide To Retire A380s?

What ultimately caused Air France to retire their A380s? Air France management explained that the current competitive environment limits the markets where A380s can be profitably flown, especially when you have smaller and more fuel efficient planes.

Beyond that, though:

  • Air France’s A380s have woefully outdated hard products, and refreshing the interiors of the A380s would cost somewhere around 45 million EUR per frame
  • Air France’s A380s have horrible dispatch reliability, meaning that flights with the A380s are often significantly delayed, or even canceled

Bottom Line

Air France will be retiring all 10 of their A380s in the next three years, with the first one having already been retired. It’s a sad development for what was once thought  to be the future of aviation. At the same time, given how Air France configured these planes, I can’t say it’s much of a loss.

About Ben (Lucky)
Ben Schlappig (aka Lucky) is a travel consultant, blogger, and avid points collector. He travels about 400,000 miles a year, primarily using miles and points to enhance his first class experiences. He chronicles his adventures, along with industry news, here at One Mile at a Time.

Source: https://onemileatatime.com/air-france-retires-a380/

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The first Airbus A380 with Air France has been retired. In today’s video, I take a look at the reasoning as to why and what the future holds for these Airbus A380s potentially! Social Media Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/djsaviation/ Personal Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mrdanielfow… Twitter: https://twitter.com/DjsAviation Support the Channel Merchandise: https://teespring.com/stores/djs-avia… Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/djsaviation Check out my Flight History! Flight History: https://my.flightradar24.com/DjsAviation Business Opportunities / Enquiries Email: contactdjsaviation@gmail.com Thanks to my Business Class and First Class Patrons Garrick Kwan, Big T, Anonymous, JurgenBelgium, Anonymous, Pattmat2, Julz, Anonymous, Robert Goldwein, Ian, CGE694, David S, Anonymous, Adrian, Joshua Moazami, JP, Jam, BKB, 747forever, SALMAN, Daniel Schmith, SB, James H, Stephie, Anonymous, Mike Chau, T-Pro, Pilotnick, Ryan, Martijnfgh, 747 king, A M Industrial (London), Somin, Necky16, Kristján Submit Video Ideas: http://bit.ly/DjsAviationIdeas Sources / Information / Images / More https://creativecommons.org/licenses/… Licensed under CC-BY-SA 2.0 • Airbus Broadcasting Room • https://www.flightglobal.com/news/art… • Anna Zvereva – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Fi… Outro Track: Krys Talk – Fly Away [NCS Release] Music provided by NoCopyrightSounds. Watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfDfb… Free Download / Stream http://ncs.io/flyaway Intro & Outro Creator: https://www.instagram.com/swawif/ Remembering 99carnot “Soaring to New Heights” – © Dj’s Aviation 2019

Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

Caviar in First class, seemingly endless seat-back touchscreen entertainment and route networks that can fly passengers to almost any destination around the world on just a single ticket, all for a cost that makes air travel cheaper than it has ever been.

Today could be seen as the true golden age of travel. The Compass Lexicon study shows that domestic air travel in the U.S. costs 40% less today than in 1990, despite rising fuel costs.

Many airline reviews point to the quality of airline seats, food and beverages and even onboard bars. However, I think that flight attendants remain the most important part of a flight experience, where cabin crew can either make or break a passengers experience.

Today In: Lifestyle

Skytrax published their list of the world’s best airline cabin crew which measure everything from friendliness and enthusiasm to efficiency and attention.

Granted, being a flight attendant is not an easy job. Dealing with hundreds of passengers inside a confined space, where many human norms seem to dissipate along with the ground below can be challenging to say the least.

There are individual situations where the below ratings can vary widely and on any given day. It’s a part of life that people, including flight attendants, have good and bad days, however, the consistent brilliance of crew at the top of the list is tough to argue with.

The first thing many people will notice about the top-10 on the list is that every single airline, except for Qatar Airways, is Asian carriers. The flight attendants on many Asian carriers are certainly outstanding, however, it is a surprise to see Qatar further down the list, after also being rated the Number 1 Airline by Skytrax this year.

No U.S. carriers feature in the top 20, and although I strongly feel service has improved on American carriers over the last few years, there is still a way to go to compete with many of the Asian airlines.

Singapore Airlines at Number 1 is very difficult to argue with, as the Singapore flag carrier does offer consistently outstanding. Consistency is where many other airlines may squander their hopes. Lots of other carriers have split fleets, that passengers may seldom notice when flying, but with variations in training and crew schedules between internal fleets, such as that of British Airways, this can be reflected on different routes for the same airline.

Garuda Indonesia makes it to second on the list of the world’s best cabin crew but has recently faced controversy after banning inflight photos of the cabin. This was the airline’s response to receiving a poor review from an airline vlogger where business class menus were scribbled down in handwriting after the airline also ran out of wine in business class. After threatening to take legal action against the vlogger, Garuda has since backed down, but the situation could well make it difficult for the airline to retain a top spot next year, after management’s strategy, despite the actual cabin crew doing their best in a difficult situation.

The highest-rated European airline on the list is Austrian Airlines, shortly followed by British Airways and Lufthansa. Another lesser-known airline to make the list is Bangkok Airways who operate a relatively small fleet of just 40 aircraft across Thailand, but do deserve a spot in the top 20.

The Skytrax list features just one low-cost airline, Air Asia, who despite offering budget prices for travelers, has not cut the quality of high service offered. For such a well-known brand, Emirates only comes in at number 19 on the list, and similar to other airlines such as British Airways and Lufthansa, has a reputation amongst passenger reviews of offering a varied service and quality, depending on the route and given day, which is why the airline is likely not coming inside the top-10, for now.

Below is the full list of the top 20 airlines based on cabin crew:

  1. Singapore Airlines
  2. Garuda Indonesia
  3. ANA All Nippon Airlines
  4. Thai Airways
  5. EVA Airways
  6. Cathay Pacific
  7. Hainan Airlines
  8. Japan Airlines
  9. Qatar Airways
  10. China Airlines
  11. Philippine Airlines
  12. Austrian Airlines
  13. British Airways
  14. Asiana Airlines
  15. Bangkok Airways
  16. Lufthansa
  17. Flynas
  18. AirAsia
  19. Emirates
  20. Fiji Airways

I spend 360 days a year on the road traveling for work discovering new experiences at every turn, trying out the best and the worst airlines around the world. I set the Guinness World record for being the youngest person to travel to all 196 countries in the world by the age of 25, and you could perhaps say I caught the travel bug over that 6-year journey. I now take over 100 flights every year and I am still discovering many new places, both good and bad, whilst writing about my experiences along the way. In addition to rediscovering known destinations, I visit some of the World’s least frequented regions such as Yemen to highlight untold stories. Join me on an adventure from economy to first-class flights, the best and worst airports, and from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Source: Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

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Try Dashlane here: https://www.dashlane.com/sam Get 10% off now with promotion code “sam” on Dashlane premium! Watch this video for the World’s Top 10 Airline Cabin Crew by Sam Chui. Enjoy the flight attendant interaction with Sam and other passengers. You will see flight attendant working in galley and their crew rest area. Count down from Number 10 to 1 for the best airline flight attendants, watch out for many surprises! Note: The ranking is strictly based on personal experience and preference. Cover Image by A Fly Guy https://internationalflyguy.com/ 12:07 Follow Cherag https://www.instagram.com/cheragdubash/ 13:47 Follow Mayur https://www.instagram.com/mayurkashya… 16:15 Follow Skywardfreak https://www.instagram.com/skywardsfreak/ This video is sponsored by Dashlane — Enjoy an informative, nostalgic and personal insight in to my top 10 favourite airlines in this video based on the superb on-board customer experience that they provide. Meet the airline stewards and stewardesses who make it all happen and see the hectic activity that goes on backstage in the aeroplane’s galley to make sure that your pillows are plumped, your privacy is protected, your food is tasty and hot and that cocktail is sublime! In this video, we meet the kind and friendly staff of South African Airways, the vibrant staff of Philippine Airlines and the fun, loving and outgoing staff of Air Asia, as well as the more reserved staff, but certainly no less professional and courteous, of Qantas, Qatar Airways and Emirates. We also meet the staff of Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines and Eva Air and recall special, unforgettable moments spent in the air with this group of airlines at times such as Christmas, as well as seeing the little personal touches that all the airlines in this video provide that make them worthy of inclusion in this top 10. You’ll be astonished at the lengths that the airline staff in this video go to in order to ensure a hospitable and comfortable flight, both in business class and economy class, and their ability to adapt to the specific challenges presented by the different models of aeroplane they fly in such as the A350 1000 of Qatar Airways, the Boeing 777 of Emirates and the SQ21 of Singapore Airlines. Which airline has your loyalty and is your number 1? Let me know your opinions in the comments and thanks as always for watching.

 

British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

British Airways has gone to court to seek an injunction to prevent its pilots from striking after union members voted, by an overwhelming majority, to strike rather than accept the airline’s proposed pay increase.

British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) members voted 93% in favor of a strike on 90% turn out. British Airways is offering pilots a pay increase of 11.5% spread over three years, and said that both Unite and GMB trade unions—which represent almost 90% of BA staff—have recommended the airline’s offer to their members.

The three unions made a joint claim for better compensation in November of last year. They cited the airline’s improved financial performance —from a £230 million ($238 million) operating loss in 2009 to a £1.8 billion ($2.24 billion) profit in 2017 — as justification.

BA has said the threat of a pilot strike could disrupt summer holiday travel for thousands of its passengers. However, BALPA have not set dates for the strike and the airline has yet to make any changes to its schedule.

BALPA General Secretary, Brian Strutton, claims the aim is not to disrupt summer holidays and blames the airline for the timing of the breakdown in talks.

“We have tried to resolve this matter through negotiation starting last November – it is BA who has regrettably chosen to drag this out into the summer months,” he stated.

Headed to court

British Airways went to court today for an injunction against industrial action by BALPA members, but the court has decided against the airline.

The airline claimed that the union had failed to comply with balloting rules. This claim has previously brought BA success in court, but has also caused controversy with the decision reversed on appeal.

The decision to go to court had put a halt to negotiations, though both parties said they would like to avoid strike action through negotiations.

Brian Strutton, general secretary of the BALPA union, indicated they would like to return to negotiations after the court’s decision. “Although legally clear to do so, we have still not set any strike dates to give BA one last chance to commit to negotiating on pilots’ pay and rewards with us,” he said in a statement.

British Airways said it will return to negotiations but seems unwilling to compromise.

“We will continue to pursue every avenue to protect the holidays of thousands of our customers this summer,” the airline said in a statement. “Our proposed pay offer of 11.5% over three years is fair.”

Balancing the books

The union says that one day of strikes would cost BA more than BALPA members are asking for, and the airline industry faces a critical shortage of pilots, but labor is a significant portion of airline costs and European airlines face pressures on yields. IATA estimates that the European airline industry generated $12 billion in operating profits during 2018, with an average operating margin of only 6%.

Ryanair isn’t budging either

The court’s decision is still welcome news for BALPA, as they negotiate with BA competitor and European low-cost behemoth Ryanair.

The pilots’ union has also warned of potential industrial action against Ryanair and those talks are going worse than talks with British Airways.

Strutton said, “We have not been able to make any progress with Ryanair at all on any of our areas of concern. As usual with Ryanair, it’s their way or the highway, and we are not prepared to put up with that.”

Ryanair has a history of tackling industrial actions by adjusting service as needed, even if it means shutting down bases, but the airline has a strong base at Stansted Airport that is critical to its operations.

BALPA will issue a ballot to its members to decide on a strike tomorrow, and the results will be announced on August 7. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I worked in aviation from 1994-2010 before turning my experience to writing about airlines and airports for leading industry and consumer publications in 2013. I’ve spent months in the hangars of airlines and aircraft manufacturers, dressed aircraft seats by hand, and worked with crew at training centres around the world. I’ve negotiated with airline CEOs and worked with buyers, engineers, leading design firms, suppliers and aircraft manufacturers on the launch of new programs. I was the executive responsible to international regulators on the approval of cabin equipment, with oversight of production facilities, product testing laboratories, a maintenance center, and a certified hazardous materials repair station. I even hold a patent for a military-spec life raft. Now, I translate “aviation speak” into English, breaking barriers of acronyms and jargon to make the beautiful business of flight easier to value. I also really, really love being on a plane—even in the middle seat.

Source: British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

The 17 Most Dangerous Airports In The World And Why You Must Experience Them – Jim Dobson

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I found myself gripping the armrest as my plane attempted a landing in Africa on a remote sandy airstrip, the landing was called off and we needed to circle around several times in order to scare off several resilient giraffes that were occupying the runway. Almost a month later I made a dramatic landing in Bhutan that was like a scene out of Star Wars where my commercial airliner had to bank dramatically to fit in between the narrow, remote mountain terrain………..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimdobson/2018/11/08/the-17-most-dangerous-airports-in-the-world-and-why-you-must-experience-them/#385fc5bd2a8f

 

 

 

 

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Turbulent Touchdowns – Selected (Attempted) Landings At BHX – flugsnug

Selected (attempted) landings at BHX this winter on the more difficult days for the pilots. As usual, the problems mainly come not from the wind speed and direction but sudden changes in these. A couple of the shots are actually from 2014 but emphasize the bumpiness of the approach over the City at times.

The pilot of one of the landings here kindly made the following comment: “The thing that makes BHX stand out from most other windy airports is the fact that the gusty, turbulent winds seem to persist all the way down to the runway. In most airports, the air seems to be a bit calmer once you enter the ground effect during the flare, but not in BHX.

I’m not sure if this is caused by a lack of trees or some other specific terrain features in the area, but it makes the landings there quite a bit more interesting. These landings might look scary from the outside and trust me, it’s a lot more challenging and stressful than landing in CAVOK wind calm conditions, but it’s also the most fun you can have as a pilot.”

 

 

 

 

 

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What Happens If An Aircraft Climbs Too High – Mentour Pilot

What happens to an aircraft that climbs above its maximum altitude and how do pilots deal with a high and low-speed stall? Todays episode is PACKED with useful aviation information so make sure you watch the WHOLE episode to the end and ask your questions afterwards. I have also include undisputed proof that my dog is, in fact, alive but you will have to wait until the VERY end to see it. If you want to ask a question to me directly, download my FREE mobile application, Mentour aviation

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A huge thank you to the channels that were featured in todays episode. To watch the full videos, click the links below:

The Ultimate B737 Technical handbook (stall example) https://youtu.be/0e3z8z7Z6WI SciShow

(Why planes don’t fly higher) https://youtu.be/PkWQsGrRDts

Safran https://youtu.be/kz5kv0RfeUc

Dfan 315 (Shockwave) https://youtu.be/ugPJYJ-BKkU

Shashmeera de Fonseka https://youtu.be/WBXgZpjfTLg

 

 

 

 

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Top 10 Highest Paying Jobs in Aviation -List Aviation

In an increasingly globalised world where the cost of air travel has become more affordable, millions of passengers take to the skies each and every day. Yet, regardless of where they have come from or where they are flying to, they all have one thing in common: at one point in their journey, they have all travelled through an airport.

With such a high turnover of daily visitors, it’s no surprise, therefore, that airports can sometimes experience a spot of friction. What keeps things moving, though, is the people that work there.

In every airport across the globe, workers from a wide variety of backgrounds and capabilities fulfil an eclectic mix of roles and responsibilities that are all vitally important to the bigger picture – and you could be one of them.

Indeed, if you want to embark on a career in this highly dynamic and fast-paced industry, then you’re in luck. We’ve compiled a handy breakdown of the most lucrative roles available, and the best part is that many of them don’t require any prior education.

So, whether you’re looking for a new job or you’re fresh out of school, read on – these are the highest paying aviation jobs in the world…

 

 

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China’s C919: A Challenge to Airbus & Boeing – CGTN

On Friday, the first Chinese-built passenger jet C919 made its maiden flight, widely seen as a milestone for the Chinese aviation industry. The aircraft is expected to compete with the updated Airbus A320 and the new-generation Boeing B737 currently dominating the market. But it won’t start commercial operations till sometime between 2020 and 2022. How can it challenge the duopoly of passenger jet manufacturing? Turn to CGTN to learn more.

 

 

 

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