Despite The Crypto Crash, Bitcoin Still Has a Bright Future

You might call it the cable that changed history. In the mid-19th century there were various attempts to lay cables across the Atlantic Ocean between Britain (Ireland) and the US.

It took several failures, numerous bankruptcies and over ten years before they got it right. But eventually they did and on July 27 1866 Queen Victoria broadcast a message to US President Johnson…

Money is a form of communication technology

Here’s what the first transatlantic cable said:

Osborne, July 27, 1866 

To the President of the United States, Washington 

The Queen congratulates the President on the successful completion of an undertaking which she hopes may serve as an additional bond of Union between the United States and England.

Johnson replied:

Executive Mansion Washington, July 30, 1866 

To Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 

The President of the United States acknowledges with profound gratification the receipt of Her Majesty’s despatch and cordially reciprocates the hope that the cable which now unites the Eastern and Western hemispheres may serve to strengthen and perpetuate peace and amity between the governments of England and the Republic of the United States.

To send a message by ship could take ten days or more; now it was a matter of minutes. So somebody came up with the slogan “two weeks to two minutes”.

Transmission speeds improved rapidly; Morse code became words and it was soon possible to send multiple messages at once. By the end of the 19th century, Britain, France, Germany and the US were all linked by cable.

Personal, commercial and political relations were altered for all time.  Back then gold was money, of course, as were paper notes representing gold. You couldn’t send gold down the cable, however, nor paper. But you could send a promise.

And, within a fortnight of Queen Victoria’s message, that’s what two parties who trusted each other did. An exchange rate between the dollar and the pound was agreed and then published in the New York Times on 10 August. That is why, to this day, GBP/USD exchange rate is known as “cable”.

My purpose with this story is to illustrate a point: what is money, but a form of communication?

Look at a £20 note (if you still use them) and you will see the words “I promise to pay the bearer”.  Of course, promises disappear; gold doesn’t. The two are quite different forms of money: one is belief, the other is real.

Nevertheless, since the dawn of civilisation, we have been using promissory money. In Ancient Mesopotamia, people used mud tokens, representing sheep or barley, baked inside clay balls to log debts owed. They found it more efficient to draw pictures of the tokens in the mud for the same purpose, which is how the first system of writing developed.

In Ancient China, people recorded their debts on bits of leather; after the invention of printing they started using paper. Today the promises are recorded and exchanged between trusted third parties on computers.

Millions, probably billions, of promises are sent across the internet every second, transferring as quick as words, probably quicker. Not only does (promissory) money evolve with communication technology, it is often the spur, the impetus for communication technology to evolve.

Now bitcoin, with its blockchain, obviates the need for trusted third parties altogether – that is one of many reasons it is so special. Here is a money communication network backed instead by mathematical proof and the most powerful and resilient computer network ever known to man: the trusted third party is the blockchain.

Why would you not want to own a share of such a breakthrough technology? That, effectively, is what owning some bitcoin is – owning shares in a new monetary technology. And it’s not like they are doing any roll backs.

Money has evolved like language

I want to explore this idea of money as communication further.  It’s often said (by me at least) when considering politicians: look at what they do, not at what they say. What we do says more about us than what we say – what we do with our money says even more.

And what we do with our money communicates value, not just between buyer and seller, but across the economy. What is the price of this thing? What is its value? The answer is constantly being sent and received, digested and acted upon; and so does the economy constantly, incrementally evolve and develop with each new signal: the how, why and when, of what needs producing and where.

Money, then, is like a language, constantly evolving and changing. Nobody is really in charge – it wasn’t really planned, it has just constantly evolved. The architects of fiat money did not plan what we have today, they just used it to get out of a tight fiscal spot – extenuating circumstances at the time.

Similarly, nobody planned the language we speak today. Language is hard to plan and regulate, try as many have over the years – and still do. The English we speak today is a long way from the English of Chaucer, Shakespeare or Dickens. There are probably fewer words; certainly fewer tenses. Grammar is simpler. Yet English is far more widely spoken. The network has grown.

Mandarin may have three or four times more native speakers, but English is more widely spoken. There may well come a time when everybody in the world speaks it. It is the dominant linguistic network.

Meanwhile, other languages fade away. Cornish has gone. Few now speak Welsh or Gaelic. The local dialects of France and Italy are disappearing. Similarly, there are no doubt a plethora of African, Asian and American languages that are on the way out, if they haven’t already gone.

The question to ask is this: how scalable is the language? English has the potential to become the default language of the world. Despite having more native speakers, that’s unlikely to be the case with Mandarin. It’s certainly not going to happen to Gaelic, Neapolitan or Swahili.

How many different monies have there been in history? Shells, whale teeth, metals, paper, cigarettes, mackerel packs, cognac, Zimbabwe dollars, reichsmarks, denarii, farthings, shillings. Most have died. Only gold goes on.

But, as with transatlantic cables, you can’t send gold over the internet. Only golden promises between trusted parties.

Bitcoin is money for the internet

The US dollar is the global reserve currency. You can send that over the internet. But it’s hard for people who aren’t American to get US dollar bank accounts. Foreign exchange fees are expensive. Money transfers can take several days sometimes.

It’s a national currency that is used internationally. A country – and several do – could use it as their national currency, but they would be importing US monetary policy too, and so subjecting themselves to US political whims. Which is why most countries with their own political agenda issue their own currencies.

Thus, though “international”, as a national currency, the US dollar is limited by its national borders and its politics. The same goes for any national currency.

But language is not limited by national borders – or at least English isn’t. If only there was an apolitical, borderless currency for the borderless economy that is the internet, then that really would be scalable in a way that no national currency is. A network that has evolved organically, and is constantly growing.

You don’t need a bank account to start using bitcoin. You only need a phone with an internet connection. We are not far off that point when everyone who wants one has one. My argument is this: if money is language, then bitcoin is English. It has a potential to scale that no other currency has.

Just as an aside on how quickly money evolves – it’s worth remembering that as recently as the 19th century, the pound had greater global recognition than the dollar. In emulation of Jules Verne’s Phileas Fogg, who went Around The World in 80 Days, in 1889-1890 American journalist Nellie Bly went on a trip around the world in 72 days.

She took pounds, but she also brought some dollars, “as a test to see if American money was known outside of America”. She went east from New York, and did not see American money until Colombo, Sri Lanka, where $20 gold pieces were used as jewellery. They accepted her dollars – but only at a 60% discount.

It’s a bit of an ask – though possible – to get people to accept bitcoin in the physical world. But that is not what it is for. It is money for the internet.

Dominic Frisby author headshot

Source: Despite the crypto crash, bitcoin still has a bright future | MoneyWeek

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How To Buy Bitcoin At 26% Off The Regular Price

Here’s a scorecard on eight ways to own crypto. The most intriguing: a low-cost coin trust available at a nice discount.

Are you interested in virtual currency, now trading at half the price it had last fall? Shop around. Among the many ways to get a piece of the action, there are wide differences in ownership costs. My favorite: a somewhat obscure bitcoin trust to be found in Fairfield, Connecticut.

There are pros and cons to every means of getting cryptocurrency exposure, including the little outfit in Fairfield. This survey covers eight bitcoin bets in descending order of my views on their desirability. You may have a different ranking, especially if you are speculating on a quick turnaround.

#1. Osprey Bitcoin Trust

This quasi-fund (ticker: OBTC), created a little over a year ago, is a knockoff of the much better-known Grayscale Bitcoin Trust. Both trusts are closed-end, in that investors have no right to redeem shares in return for cash or underlying assets.

Osprey is a lot more cost-efficient, with an annual expense ratio of 0.8% versus Grayscale’s 2%. These expense figures incorporate both portfolio management and custody costs.

The trusts trade at discounts to the value of the bitcoins they hold: recently 26% at Osprey, 28% at Grayscale. With either, you are making a bet both on crypto and on that discount. If the discount widens, you’re worse off than you would have been with a coin purchase. If it narrows, you have a windfall.

What might widen the discounts: a continued fall in crypto prices. Bear markets have a way of doing double damage to closed-ends, depressing their share prices even faster than prices decline on the assets they hold. That’s been true of stock funds since the Great Depression and it’s likely to be true of crypto trusts.

It’s happening right now. A 12% fall in bitcoin between Friday afternoon on May 6 and Monday afternoon precipitated a 16% fall in Grayscale’s price.

But the discounts might go away. That would happen if the Securities & Exchange Commission permits exchange-traded funds to hold virtual currencies. Both Grayscale and Osprey have vowed to convert their closed-end trusts to ETFs as soon as such things are allowed.

The ETF structure allows market makers to cash in unwanted fund shares (or buy new shares when shares are sought after) via a swap for underlying assets. That sets up an arbitrage that keeps an ETF’s price close to the fund’s net asset value.

So far the agency has rejected every application for a coin ETF, although last year it did green-light an ETF that holds bitcoin futures contracts. Why the distinction? The futures trade on the heavily regulated Chicago Mercantile Exchange, while coins trade in somewhat murkier venues.

A bearish view of coin trusts comes from Tyler Odean, publisher of Something Interesting, an insightful Substack newsletter on crypto. “The time horizon [for an SEC approval] is long,” he says. “Between now and then the discount is likely to deepen as the number of competitive ways to hold bitcoin also deepens.”

Still, I think the bet in favor of an eventually favorable ruling from the regulators is a reasonable one. Risky, yes, but not as risky as the underlying asset. It’s far more likely that bitcoin will crash another 50% than that the discount will make a comparable move from 26% to 63% (meaning: Your trust collapses from 74 cents on the dollar to 37 cents).

One more concern: liquidity. Osprey has but $100 million of coins in its vault, and its average daily share volume over the past year would be worth $400,000 at today’s share price. Big bettors have to step in cautiously.

#2. Your wallet

You can purchase bitcoins on an exchange, then have them exported to your cold-storage wallet. Market analyst Odean has used this for his long-term bets.

Pros: No counterparty risk. No management fee. If you do it right, no hacker risk.

Con: You might not do it right.

Self-storage entails a fairly elaborate procedure to protect your private key from being lost or stolen. Next week you might walk into an open elevator shaft, so you need some mechanism for survivors to retrieve that key. The computer you use to generate the private and public keys for your coin repository has to be permanently isolated from the internet. The medium on which the secret is stored must be secure; Odean mentions an etched piece of metal as an option.

There are services (Casa, Ledger and others) that make this process less painful, but ease of use comes with some increment of risk.

#3. Exchange storage

You could leave your coins for safekeeping at a coin exchange. If you want that asset segregated, and thus safe from the exchange’s creditors, yours’ll have to pay a custody fee.

At Coinbase Global, where the minimum account size for this service is $500,000, the fee is 0.5% a year. Some customers get a better deal. Osprey, which recently switched its custody from Fidelity Investments to Coinbase, appears to be paying 0.25% or less (its financial statements don’t reveal an exact amount).

If you can stomach some counterparty risk, or you just want assets available for trading, you can leave your coins in a deposit account at no charge. This is the crypto equivalent of keeping your Tesla shares in a margin account. But, unlike stocks at a brokerage firm, coins left with an exchange have no Securities Investor Protection Corp. to back them if the middleman gets into financial trouble.

#4. Foreign ETF

While our SEC bides its time, the Canadian regulator has authorized exchange-traded funds that hold cryptocurrency. One of them is the Purpose Bitcoin ETF, which holds coins now worth just over $1 billion.

Pro: The fund trades at very close to net asset value. The shares that are quoted (in Toronto) in U.S. dollars see $4 million of average daily volume.

Cons: The 1.5% annual expense ratio is a lot higher than Osprey’s. It’s not easy to get your hands on these shares in the U.S., as most brokers will refuse the buy order. On the Fidelity platform you can find Purpose under the ticker BTCC_U:CA, but it takes some digging.

#5. Grayscale Bitcoin Trust

This entity (GBTC) is the elder cousin of Osprey.

Pro: Liquidity. This trust has $20 billion of coins and sees an average daily share volume now worth $140 million.

Con: The stiff fee, 2% a year.

#6. Futures

CME Group’s Chicago Mercantile Exchange lists bitcoin futures contracts, each for five coins. Trading volume, almost all of it in the nearest month, typically runs to $1 billion a day. Settlement is in dollars; no wallets are involved.

Pros: Good liquidity, minimal counterparty risk and the potential for leverage. You can control $2 of crypto by putting down $1 of cash.

Cons: Taxes, trading costs and contango. Bitcoin futures share these three afflictions with many commodity futures.

At tax time you have to declare paper gains and losses on futures, with 40% treated as short-term (at high tax rates).

Rolling over your futures position monthly, which you probably would do in order to stay in the most actively traded contract, will cost you 12 commissions and bid/ask spreads per year.

The contango is a big deal. It means that the futures price at which you’re buying is at a premium to the spot price. On bitcoins the contango is a volatile number usually falling between 3% and 6% annualized. Contango reflects both the cost of financing a stockpile of a commodity and the cost of securing it. In the case of crypto, securing the asset against hackers is not simple (see #2 above).

Futures aren’t bad for day-to-day trading. They are a poor choice for someone hoping to achieve a long-term gain.

#7. Futures ETF

The ProShares Bitcoin Strategy ETF (BITO) holds long positions in bitcoin futures. Here, atop the steep contango of the Chicago trading pits, you have the opportunity to fork over an additional fee: the 0.95% a year assessed by the fund.

ProShares has attracted $900 million for this product. From naïfs.

#8. MicroStrategy

Chairman Michael Saylor has turned this business analytics firm into a crypto betting parlor. The corporation has used mostly borrowed money to acquire 129,200 bitcoins.

The stock had an interesting day May 9. With bitcoin down 14% from where it was Friday afternoon, MicroStrategy shares went down 26%.

Tyler Odean sees these shares as a simultaneous bet on three things: crypto, a mediocre software business and Saylor’s ability to withstand margin calls. He likes the first bet but not the other two.

I aim to help you save on taxes and money management costs. I graduated from Harvard in 1973, have been a journalist for 45 years, and was editor of Forbes magazine from 1999 to

Source: How To Buy Bitcoin At 26% Off The Regular Price

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What You Should Know Before Investing In Fidelity’s Bitcoin Retirement Accounts

This morning crypto advocates and the crypto curious alike woke up to the news that asset management giant Fidelity will start allowing investors to put bitcoin into their 401(k) retirement savings accounts. On its surface this looks like an easy way for individuals to get access to this emerging asset class in an advantageous way from a tax perspective. However, there are still some important considerations to take into account.

Here is what you need to know.

The service will be available later this year to participants in employee-sponsored retirement plans offered by Fidelity—but only if an employer opts to offer it. Annual gains in a 401(k) are tax deferred, which eliminates the hassles associated with crypto investing and annual tax reporting. Withdrawals from a 401(k) in retirement are either taxed as ordinary income (if you contributed to a traditional pre-tax account) or tax-free (if you put after tax dollars into a Roth account).

According to The Wall Street Journal fees on these investments will range between 0.75%-0.90%, plus trading fees which falls within the mid-range of spot market trading fees offered by most major exchanges in the U.S. such as Coinbase, Gemini, Kraken, FTX.US, and Binance.US. Additionally, for now, employees will only be able to allocate a maximum of 20% of their currently account balances and new contributions to bitcoin.

The service is going to be slowly rolled out over the course of 2022. Currently the only firm to have publicly signed on is business analytics firm MicroStrategy. Led by billionaire bitcoin bull Michael Saylor, MicroStrategy is the world’s largest corporate holder of bitcoin with a treasury topping $5 billion worth of the asset. And again, your employer will have to agree to offer the service. Some may balk at the asset’s volatility.

Back in 2013 you could purchase a single bitcoin for under $300. As of this writing, a whole bitcoin will run you approximately $40,000. This is gargantuan growth, but it has not been smooth.

There have been multiple occasions where bitcoin and other leading crypto assets have lost well north of 50% of their value (many of which happened before the industry broke into the mainstream consciousness). However, many investors likely remember bitcoin approaching $20,000 in late 2017 before losing 75% of its value in the subsequent months.

We saw another such drop during the late fall when bitcoin fell from $69,000 to the low $30,000s. Bitcoiners will tell you that the asset more than recovers each time that it gets knocked down. In fact, many consider riding these boom and bust cycles as a rite of passage. But it might not be for everyone.

While there may have been cheering throughout #cryptotwitter that Fidelity is letting clients dip their toes in bitcoin, the government may not be as happy. For starters, federal regulators have been very reticent at letting investors get easy exposure to the crypto spot markets, even bitcoin.

Famously, the Securities and Exchange Commission is yet to approve a bitcoin spot ETF (it has approved a handful of products that offer exposure to bitcoin futures contracts), often citing the market’s vulnerability to fraud and manipulation.

When it comes to retirement planning, volatility again comes into play. Bitcoin is down nearly 40% from its all-time high of just under $70,000 last November, and retirees and those soon to retire may not have the funds or time to ride out these boom and bust cycles. In fact, last month the Department of Labor issued a notice expressing several concerns with investing retirement funds in crypto.

Chief among them were the market’s extreme volatility, its emerging (cloudy) regulatory status, the inability of investors to make informed decisions, as well as more basic concerns about the security of holding crypto assets, which have become juicy targets for hackers. Labor’s concerns matter because it has a say in the regulation of employer sponsored plans.

In addition, when news came out last July that Coinbase, the largest crypto exchange in the U.S., had partnered with a retirement firm to offer such services, David John, a senior policy advisor at AARP Policy Institute and the deputy director of the retirement security project at the Brookings Institution, told Forbes: “Crypto itself is fascinating, and intriguing as it starts to develop, but it’s still in its early phases.

And it is definitely not appropriate for retirement investing.” Added John: “The fact is that for retirement investing, you want growth, and you want a limited amount of volatility. The older you get, the less you want your portfolio to gyrate up and down, because it makes it very hard to plan your retirement income.”

While Fidelity is a world unto itself when it comes to asset management and retirement savings, there are other ways to get your retirement savings access to crypto. Firms such as Kingdom Trust, iTrust Capital and BitcoinIRA let investors purchase digital assets via exchanges and hold them in individual retirement accounts.

Additionally, Coinbase partnered with ForUsAll in June to let participants in employer sponsored plans purchase dozens of different crypto assets and hold them in tax deferred programs.

Finally, if you want exposure to the industry but don’t want to directly hold digital assets, there are plenty of stocks and ETFs that track companies operating in the crypto industry that are highly correlated to the underlying assets.

Saving for retirement is a personal decision, and your strategy – from what to hold to allocation percentages must —depend on your specific circumstances. Please seek out a Registered Investment Advisor or other professional advice before making any big decisions.

I am director of research for digital assets at Forbes. I was recently the Social Media/Copy Lead at Kraken, a cryptocurrency exchange based in the United States.

Source: What You Should Know Before Investing In Fidelity’s Bitcoin Retirement Accounts

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Massive 2022 ‘All-Time High’ Bitcoin Price Prediction Comes With A Serious Ethereum, BNB, XRP, Solana, Cardano, Luna And Avalanche Warning

Bitcoin and cryptocurrency prices have struggled this year, with the Federal Reserve’s plan to raise rates and potentially trim its balance sheet spooking investors.

The bitcoin price has lost around 40% of its value since hitting an all-time high of nearly $70,000 per bitcoin in November. Smaller cryptocurrencies, including ethereum, BNB BNB -0.9%, XRP XRP -2.7%, solana, cardano, luna and avalanche, have also fallen back—though some are on track to break records in 2022.

Now, a panel of cryptocurrency experts has predicted the bitcoin price will peak at almost $82,000 in 2022 before dropping to just above $65,000 by the end of the year—but warned a more advanced blockchain such as ethereum, BNB, XRP, solana, cardano, luna or avalanche could eventually eclipse bitcoin.

“There’s still plenty of uncertainty about the short-term bitcoin outlook,” Asher Tan, the chief executive of Australia-based crypto exchange CoinJar and panel member said in a statement. Tan has a more conservative outlook on the bitcoin price than the panel average.

“Given the macroeconomic headwinds, it would not surprise me to see bitcoin spend the whole year bouncing around between $30,000 to $60,000—the sort of conditions that are terrible for traders, but rewarding for accumulators with a multi-year timeframe.”

The panel, made up of 35 people from the world of crypto and put together by financial comparison website Finder, has returned a lower average bitcoin price prediction for the end of 2022 than it did in January—at the time predicting the bitcoin price would end December at just over $76,000.

The longer-term panel average has also dipped with bitcoin now forecast to be worth just over $420,000 by the end of 2030, down around 25% from an October forecast of $567,000.

However, some panel members have become more bullish since then. Martin Fröhler, the chief executive of ethereum-based trading platform Morpher gave one of the most bullish end-of-2022 predictions, pointing to “political uncertainty, inflation, and an ever increasing desire to own non-government controlled assets” as likely to push the bitcoin price to a new all-time high.

The continued success of ethereum and recent rallies for other top ten cryptocurrencies such as BNB, XRP, solana, cardano, luna and avalanche may have weighed on the panel’s outlook, with 50% predicting bitcoin will eventually be displaced as the most valuable cryptocurrency.

“Bitcoin is a one trick pony,” said Thomson Reuters technologist and futurist Joseph Raczynski who thinks ethereum has “far grander” potential than bitcoin as “a massive platform of the internet of value.”

“For now, bitcoin really only serves as another currency, akin to a dollar, euro, or pound. Other blockchains that serve a multitude of purposes will likely have a chance to take the throne.”

Others are even more downbeat about bitcoin’s prospects. John Hawkins, a senior lecturer at the University of Canberra, returned one of the bleakest bitcoin price predictions, forecasting bitcoin will be worth just $5,000 by the end of 2025 and dropping to a mere $100 per bitcoin by 2030 as it loses out to ethereum and state-backed alternatives.

“As well as private crypto being replaced by central bank digital currencies, and a general collapse of the speculative bubble, I think bitcoin will lose out to ethereum which has a stronger use case, especially if ethereum ever converts to proof-of-stake and so becomes more environmentally responsible.”

Ethereum’s long-awaited transition to the less energy-demanding proof-of-stake consensus mechanism, abandoning the proof-of-work system pioneered by bitcoin, was expected to happen over the next couple of months but has recently been delayed until the end of this year.

I am a journalist with significant experience covering technology, finance, economics, and business around the world. As the founding editor of Verdict.co.uk

Source: Massive 2022 ‘All-Time High’ Bitcoin Price Prediction Comes With A Serious Ethereum, BNB, XRP, Solana, Cardano, Luna And Avalanche Warning

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Bitcoin Cryptocurrency Price Chart May Show $30,000 as Floor

Bitcoin has been grinding lower in a trading range just above $30,000, prompting cryptocurrency insiders to flag the round number as a potential floor for the virtual coin.

Crypto prognostication is fraught with risk, not least because Bitcoin’s price has roughly halved from a record high three months ago. Even so, some in the industry are coalescing around $30,000 as a support point, citing clues from options activity and recent trading habits.

In options, $30,000 is the most-sold downside strike price for July and August, signaling confidence among such traders that the level will hold, according to Delta Exchange, a crypto derivatives exchange. It “should provide a strong support to the market,” Chief Executive Officer Pankaj Balani said.

Traders are also trying to take advantage of price ranges, including buying between $30,000 and $32,000 and selling in the $34,000 to $36,000 zone, Todd Morakis, co-founder of digital-finance product and service provider JST Capital, said in emailed comments, adding that “the market at the moment seems to paying attention more to bad news than good.”

Bitcoin has been hit by many setbacks of late, including China’s regulatory crackdown — partly over concerns about high energy consumption by crypto miners — and progress in central bank digital-currency projects that could squeeze private coins. The creator of meme-token Dogecoin recently lambasted crypto as basically a sham, and the appetite for speculation is generally in retreat.

Bitcoin traded around $31,600 as of 9:26 a.m. in London and is down about 6% so far this week. It’s still up more than 200% over the past 12 months, despite a rout in calendar 2021.

Konstantin Richter, chief executive officer and founder of Blockdaemon, a blockchain infrastructure provider, holds out hope for institutional demand, arguing Bitcoin would have to drop below $20,000 before institutions start questioning “the validity of the space.”

“If it goes down fast, it can go up fast,” he said in an interview. “That’s just what crypto is.”

— With assistance by Akshay Chinchalkar

Source: Bitcoin (BTC USD) Cryptocurrency Price Chart May Show $30,000 as Floor – Bloomberg

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Critics:

The dramatic pullback in bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies comes as a flurry of negative headlines and catalysts, from Tesla CEO Elon Musk to a new round of regulations by the Chinese government, have hit an asset sector that has been characterized by extreme volatility since it was created.

The flagship cryptocurrency fell to more than three-month lows on Wednesday, dropping to about $30,000 at one point for a pullback of more than 30% and continuing a week of selling in the crypto space. Ether, the main coin for the Ethereum blockchain network, was also down sharply and broke below $2,000 at one point, a more than 40% drop in less than 24 hours.

Part of the reason for bitcoin’s weakness seems to be at least a temporary reversal in the theory of broader acceptance for cryptocurrency.

Earlier this year, Musk announced he was buying more than $1 billion of it for his automaker’s balance sheet. Several payments firms announced they were upgrading their capabilities for more crypto actions, and major Wall Street banks began working on crypto trading teams for their clients. Coinbase, a cryptocurrency exchange company, went public through a direct listing in mid-April.

The weakness is not isolated in crypto, suggesting that the moves could be part of a larger rotation by investors away from more speculative trades.

Tech and growth stocks, many of which outperformed the broader market dramatically during the coronavirus pandemic, have also struggled in recent weeks.

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