$400M Fiction Giant Wattpad Wants To Be Your Literary Agent – Hayley C. Cuccinello

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It took a less than an hour in 2013 for Anna Todd to change her life. The Army wife and part-time babysitter had spent a lot of time reading fan fiction, stories by amateur writers about existing fictional universes and real-life celebrities. So her erotic tale about Tessa and Hardin—a wholesome college freshman and a tattooed bad boy who is a thinly veiled stand-in for singer Harry Styles—came together quickly when she sat down to typed the first chapter of After on her phone. Todd posted it to Wattpad, one of the world’s largest destinations for online reading and writing……

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/hayleycuccinello/2018/09/24/400m-fiction-giant-wattpad-wants-to-be-your-literary-agent/

 

 

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Digital Storytelling Lesson Ideas with Book Creator | Digital Storytelling Tools, Apps and Ideas

Book Creator is a powerful tool for digital storytelling lesson integration. Here are lots of classroom ideas to turn your students into creators.

Source: Digital Storytelling Lesson Ideas with Book Creator | Digital Storytelling Tools, Apps and Ideas

 

 

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Why I Owe Everything to Jonathan Gold — Discover

“Being a food writer is the most punk rock thing a person can do, and Jonathan Gold was the most punk rock of us all.” Javier Cabral pays homage to the legendary Los Angeles food writer, who was both his mentor and his role model.

via Why I Owe Everything to Jonathan Gold — Discover

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The Secret You Need to Know About Ebooks – Rick Ardman

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Earlier this year, the price on the blockbuster book, The Girl on the Train, was slashed from $11.99 to $1.99 for one day only.

Previously, Gone Girl was discounted from $9.99 to $2.99, and The Da Vinci Code was given away for free for one week. In all three cases, the discounts were only available for the ebook version.

Most people were completely unaware of these huge deals.

A select group of readers, however, had the inside scoop on all these deals and more. They were using our service here at BookBub: a daily email that alerts readers to free and deeply discounted ebooks that are available for a limited time.

Over 10 million people have signed up for BookBub’s free service. Readers sign up with just an email address, and then select their favorite genres. Each day, we send an email with free and discounted bestselling ebooks in the selected genres. Just click, download, and read on any device: Kindle, Nook, iPad, iPhone, Droid, & more.

Customized Categories

 

From romance to mystery, cookbooks to non-fiction, and literary to historical fiction there are more than 35 categories to choose from to customize your email.

 

Expert Editors

 

Each title is hand selected by our editorial team to ensure the highest quality – we do the work for you. In addition, each book is at least 75% off, and many are free, which makes it extremely low risk to try new authors and genres.

 

“It’s the Groupon of books,” Dominique Raccah, the publisher of Sourcebooks, told The New York Times about deal sites like BookBub. “For the consumer, it’s new, it’s interesting. It’s a deal and there isn’t much risk. And it works.”

Book lovers have now become practically obsessed with this concept. In many cases, they’ve downloaded hundreds of books and saved hundreds of dollars using the service.

“I now have more books than I can read in a lifetime,” said Suzie Miller of Auburn, WA. She said she has downloaded more than 350 free ebooks using the service.

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Tsundoku: The Art of Buying Books & Never Reading Them

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Do you have a habit of picking up books that you never quite get around to reading? If this sounds like you, you might be unwittingly engaging in tsundoku – a Japanese term used to describe a person who owns a lot of unread literature.

Prof Andrew Gerstle teaches pre-modern Japanese texts at the University of London. He explained to the BBC the term might be older than you think – it can be found in print as early as 1879, meaning it was likely in use before that.

The word “doku” can be used as a verb to mean “reading”. According to Prof Gerstle, the “tsun” in “tsundoku” originates in “tsumu” – a word meaning “to pile up”. So when put together, “tsundoku” has the meaning of buying reading material and piling it up.”The phrase ‘tsundoku sensei’ appears in text from 1879 according to the writer Mori Senzo,” Prof Gerstle explained. “Which is likely to be satirical, about a teacher who has lots of books but doesn’t read them.”

While this might sound like tsundoku is being used as an insult, Prof Gerstle said the word does not carry any stigma in Japan. Bibliomania is the title of a 19th Century novel by Thomas Frognall Dibdin which claimed to explore “book madness” – the act of being unable to stop collecting literature.

By his definition, those afflicted with bibliomania were obsessed with unique books such as first editions and illustrated copies. But two centuries later, the term would no longer be about obsession – according to Oxford University Press, it has been shifted to “passionate enthusiasm” about collecting.

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