Meet The World’s Newest And Youngest Self Made Billionaire Luminar’s Austin Russell

The race to commercialize self-driving car technology has attracted billions of dollars of investment but not created many billionaires. Luminar founder and CEO Austin Russell is among the rare exceptions. With the Nasdaq listing of the laser sensor company he founded at age 17, the optics prodigy is one of the first billionaires to emerge from the autonomous-vehicle world—and the youngest self-made billionaire in the world.

“It’s been insanely intense, grueling . . . everything through every day that we’ve had to go through, scaling this up. And of course it’s incredibly rewarding to have an opportunity to be able to get out there now and get into the public markets and scale through this IPO SPAC,” 25-year-old Russell tells Forbes in a video interview from his office in Palo Alto, California. “I’m still relatively young, but … a lot of blood, sweat and tears have gone into it. And I was fortunate enough to be able to retain a good enough stake.”

Good enough, indeed. Russell’s 104.7 million shares, about a third of Luminar’s outstanding equity, was worth $2.4 billion at the close of Nasdaq trading on Thursday. The listing, announced in August, resulted from a merger with special purpose acquisition company Gores Metropoulos, a unit of Beverly Hills-based finance firm The Gores Group, and raised Luminar’s estimated market value to $3.4 billion prior to the start of trading. Investors in the newly public company include fellow billionaire Peter Thiel (net worth: $4.6 billion), who helped get Russell started with Luminar by making him a Thiel Fellow in 2012; Volvo Cars Tech Fund; Alec Gores of The Gores Group, another billionaire ($2.2 billion), who is also a Luminar board member; and billionaire Dean Metropoulos, the company’s chairman.

Thiel, the Paypal cofounder who famously created a fellowship offering extraordinary young people $100,000 to drop out of college to pursue their dreams, has been an advisor to Russell since he left Stanford to start Luminar in 2012. As a mentor, Thiel is impressed not just by the new tech billionaire’s intellect, but also his ability to hold on to a significant chunk of Luminar as it moved from Russell’s garage concept to Nasdaq.

“You can build a billion-dollar business but that does not mean you can become a billionaire,” says Thiel. “It’s remarkable from a financing perspective to retain a financial stake of that size.”

Russell, who’s also a Forbes 30 Under 30 alum from the class of 2018, isn’t looking to take on self-driving tech giants like Alphabet’s Waymo or GM-backed Cruise, but instead is perfecting sensors that help autonomous cars “see” their surroundings by bouncing a laser beam off objects in their path. Known as lidar for “light detection and ranging,” the technology is fundamental for autonomous vehicles. Luminar is competing in that space with Velodyne, the early leader in lidar for autonomous vehicles, and newcomer Aeva, both of which are also going public via SPAC mergers. Russell has sold prototype sensors to major auto companies for the past few years, but more recently secured production orders from Volvo Cars, Daimler and Intel’s Mobileye that may ensure revenue growth for several years. 


You can build a billion-dollar business but that does not mean you can become a billionaire. It’s remarkable from a financing perspective to retain a financial stake of that size. Peter Thiel


Luminar will likely post sales of just $15 million this year, but could generate at least $1.3 billion by 2026, based on estimates in an SEC filing.    

Russell’s abilities extend beyond the lab to the boardroom, according to Alec Gores, who helped arrange Luminar’s listing. “When we were negotiating, he was so on top of everything, the small details. Sixty-year-old guys who’ve been in the business for 40 years don’t understand this stuff, but he took time to study the SPAC,” he says. “I’m looking at this guy and saying, ‘You asked more questions than anybody I’ve seen that’s been doing this sh*t for a long time.’”

The lanky 6-foot-4 Russell, with shaggy strawberry blonde hair and a light beard to match, was racking up notable achievements long before his new billionaire status. As the story goes, he memorized the periodic table of elements at 2 years old and rewired his Nintendo DS game console into a crude mobile phone when he was in the sixth grade after his parents forbade him from having one. At 13, he filed his first patent: an underground water recycling system that catches sprinkler water and saves it for future gardening to reduce wastewater. Rather than go to high school, he spent his teen years at the University of California at Irvine’s Beckman Laser Institute. 

Next came admission to Stanford to study physics, but that didn’t last long. He dropped out midway through his freshman year after winning a $100,000 Thiel Fellowship stipend for his lidar concept, founding Luminar not long after obtaining his driver’s license. 

Excluding inherited fortunes, Russell is ​one of about a dozen people on the planet to make a billion dollars before they turned 30.

Lidar was an early fixation for Russell as he believes it has the potential to save lives both as part of self-driving cars and as a component of advanced driver-assistance systems that Volvo and other carmakers are bringing to market in the next two to three years. As a teenager, he’d looked at what Velodyne and other companies were doing with laser sensors, but determined a completely different approach was needed to make them cheap enough to be ubiquitous.

“It should not be a 16- or 17-year-old and then subsequently a 25-year-old that can build a business like this,” says Russell. “We’ve been able to accelerate this because no one has really done this before.”

It doesn’t hurt that Russell has zero distraction from social media or time-sucking general education requirements of college and high school degrees. Unlike most 25-year-olds, he has neither Twitter nor Instagram accounts, but confesses to learning most of what he knows about the world from avid Wikipedia and YouTube explainer consumption.

As a Gen Y billionaire, Russell is also thinking about his impact. Though he has no immediate plans for Bill Gates-like philanthropy, he sees his contribution as eradicating automobile accidents. “When this becomes a new, modern safety technology on vehicles that’s integrated on every vehicle globally produced, that’s when I’d firmly say that we’ve accomplished the goals that we set.” 

Alan Ohnsman

Alan Ohnsman

From Los Angeles, the U.S. capitol of cars and congestion, I try to make sense of technology-driven changes reshaping how we get around. Find me on Twitter at @alanohnsman

Alexandra Sternlicht

Alexandra Sternlicht

I’m the Under 30 Editorial Community Lead at Forbes. Previously, I directed marketing at a mobile app startup. I’ve also worked at The New York Times and New York

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Luminar, an autonomous vehicle technology startup, is set to go public through a SPAC merger with Gores Metropoulos Thursday. Luminar founder Austin Russell joins “Squawk Box” to discuss. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO: https://cnb.cx/2NGeIvi » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC Classic: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCclassic Turn to CNBC TV for the latest stock market news and analysis. From market futures to live price updates CNBC is the leader in business news worldwide. The News with Shepard Smith is CNBC’s daily news podcast providing deep, non-partisan coverage and perspective on the day’s most important stories. Available to listen by 8:30pm ET / 5:30pm PT daily beginning September 30: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/09/29/the-n… Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBChttps://www.cnbc.com/select/best-cred…#CNBC#CNBCTV

4 Ways to Successfully Build a Bootstrapped Business

Many aspiring entrepreneurs think the key to growing a successful company is linked to the ability to secure investor funding. For some businesses this may be true, but many successful companies have been built from the ground up with no outside investment or support, aka bootstrapping. It takes great dedication, strong work ethic, sweat equity and an immense amount of drive to bootstrap a business to success.

Today, the majority of entrepreneurs are bootstrapping their companies. One recent report found that of the 202 million working-age adults in the United States, 27 percent are either running a business they own and manage or starting such a business. Of these, 33.1 million are in the entrepreneurial phase (starting or running a business for less than three and a half years). Now consider that venture capital is used by only 0.5 percent of those 33.1 million entrepreneurs for startup capital.

Growing a business using a self-sustaining approach requires a strong vision for the company, supported by a focus on several key areas. These include developing a sustainable business model, prioritizing customer acquisition and retention, building transparency into the company’s DNA, and strategically expanding the company’s footprint and offerings.

Related: The 7 Elements of a Strong Business Model

1. Acquiring and retaining customers

Instead of chasing after funding to drive growth, bootstrapped companies devote their time and attention to customer acquisition and retention. With no outside investment, it is critical for bootstrapped businesses to build a customer base quickly to generate positive cash flow.

Attracting new customers and boosting loyalty in existing customers can come from listening to what they need and paying attention to their feedback about the company’s product or service and using this input to develop offerings that deliver the most value.

GitHub, a web-based hosting service for software development projects, is a prime example of this. The company, which functions as a social network, portfolio space and co-working space, started as a weekend project funded entirely by its three founders. As the project began to take off, programmers began requesting additional features to project their data, and the founders knew it was time to make the project a full-time job. The team began releasing new products tailored to accommodate customer requests and the business skyrocketed to success, currently serving 50 million developers worldwide.

Related: Are You Sitting on a Customer Retention Goldmine?

2. Developing a sustainable business model

Finding a problem and then developing a solution are foundational to successfully growing a bootstrapped company. Developing a business model that solves core problems serves a gap in the market and provides real value to customers, allowing businesses to quickly start selling services or products to establish and sustain cash flow.

Building a bootstrapped business allows for flexibility that a company backed by outside investors may not have, namely slowly and quietly growing to develop paying customers that offset the business costs rather than facing the expectation to prove high growth from the get-go to boost investor trust.

Different markets have different challenges, of course, but common among bootstrapped businesses is the desire to fill a market need and solve for its pain points. 

3. Practicing transparency

Customers are the only metric that counts for bootstrapped companies. In order to attract and retain customers, a company must make transparency part of its DNA. In a digital world where consumers have easy access to company information and reviews, customers expect and demand transparency from businesses. Business buyers want openness and honesty along their entire buying journey. A 2019 report by Marketo and Adobe on Creating Epic Customer Experiences found that 78 percent of business buyer survey respondents cited brand transparency as a top purchasing driver.

Business transparency is a game changer that can fuel business growth. Companies that practice transparency build strong, positive relationships that increase long-term customer loyalty, which in turn generates ROI in the form of profits and long-term sustainability.

Related: How Transparency Became a Top Priority for Businesses, and Why You Should Care

4. Growing through acquisition

Bootstrapped companies can also set themselves up to grow through impactful and strategic acquisitions. One of these growth strategies is horizontal acquisition, which involves buying a competing company to increase market share and/or scalability and accelerate company growth. When a company acquires a competing company, it gives them the ability to tap into existing elements such as key executives, proprietary technology and customer databases.

Building for the long term

The willingness and patience to grow at a smaller scale initially allows you to have the freedom to build up a company culture without outside pressure, while simultaneously retaining 100 percent ownership of your company and future vision. With the bootstrapping approach, founders call the shots on operating and growing the company.

While growing a bootstrapped company involves a lot of moving parts, a focus on prioritizing customer acquisition and retention, developing a sustainable business model, building transparency into the company’s DNA  and strategically expanding the company’s footprint and offerings can drive company growth and long-term sustainability.

By: Austin Mac Nab / Entrepreneur Leadership Network Writer

Starting a business is hard enough. The last thing you need to do is set up a foundation that works against you. A better approach is to take stock of your natural advantages, disadvantages, goals and needs, and “back in” to what that has to mean about your business model, pricing, market, product, approach, advertising, etc… Presented by Jason Cohen at MicroConf 2013. Check out Jason’s MicroConf speakers page for more talks → https://microconf.com/speakers/jason-…https://microconf.com#microconf#microconf2013 MicroConf Connect → http://microconfconnect.com Twitter → https://twitter.com/MicroConf E-mail → support@microconf.com MicroConf 2020 Headline Partners ► Stripe https://stripe.com Twitter → https://twitter.com/Stripe ► Basecamp https://basecamp.com Twitter → https://twitter.com/Basecamp

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2 Vital Things You Need to Do to Protect Your Business

As the Covid-19 lockdowns went into effect, I immediately started receiving calls, text messages, and emails from clients, friends, and family members worldwide. 

The texts included questions, fears, and a consistent theme of not knowing how their business would survive the lockdown. They were stuck trying to figure out how they would pay their team, pay their vendors, and pay the rent with the business shut down. 

Many small businesses in the US have already closed permanently, with an estimated 55% of businesses closed since March predicted not to reopen again. 

Related: 4 Ways Brands Can Be Activists for School Safety Right Now

I sat down with my team and spent a few days brainstorming some actions business owners could take to give them the ability first to survive the lockdown and second rebuild a more substantial business than they had before all the chaos started. 

1. Protect your operating cash

To make this easy to understand and relatable, let us look at how humans handle a lack of resources. Humans can survive 30 days without food, 3-4 days without water, but only 3-5 minutes without oxygen. 

Operating cash is oxygen in your business. When you run out of operating cash your business chokes to death very quickly, if you want to keep your business healthy and alive, you need to make sure you protect your operating cash.

We use a very easy to understand exercise that can help you discover considerable savings in just a few hours. Since the global lockdown started, we have been teaching this to business owners worldwide, and we were able to help:

  •  A gym owner in Texas save $5,400 per month from their P&L (roughly $60,000 for the year)
  • A business consultant in Toronto saved $3,000 per month from her business expenses (approximately $36,000 for the year)
  • A midmarket firm in Amsterdam was able to save €300,000 from their expenses 

Our team named it the stoplight exercise. Imagine a stoplight in the United States; it consists of red, yellow, and green colors. Red means stop; Yellow means slow or caution. Green means go. 

Related: 4 Ways 2020 Has Changed Company Culture Forever

Part 1 is to print out your itemized P&L or your credit card receipts for your business. 

Part 2 is to comb through all of the expenses and color, each with red, yellow, or green. Red is for any expenses that you need to cut out immediately, yellow is for the expenses that you might need to keep or might need to cut out if your business starts to slow down. Green is the expense you must maintain for your business to stay alive. 

Part 3 is to eliminate the expenses in red immediately. Put a plan together for the expenses in yellow (the question below can help), and you will keep the expenses in green since they are necessary for your business to stay alive. 

Question: What specific results do we need to maintain or achieve to keep the yellow expenses? If we drop below these results, we will need to eliminate these expenses immediately. 

2. Protect your core clients

A core client is a client that you do business with regularly and consistently. They depend on your product or service to meet their own needs, and your business depends on their business to keep the door open. 

According to Harvard Business Review, Acquiring a new customer costs 5–25 times more than keeping an existing customer. And in  Salesforce’s annual State of Sales Report, it reveals 79% of business buyers agree, it’s easier than ever to take my business elsewhere. 

Related: 6 Keys for Getting Temporarily Remote Teams Back Together

A few years ago, I was working closely with one of my favorite business mentors Keith Cunningham. He proposed a question that reshaped the way I think of working with my core clients. 

He asked, “What would you have to offer your core clients so that it would be INSANE for them ever to consider going anywhere else for this type of product or service?” 

To figure this out, we must take time to get to know our core clients’ needs, wants, and desires.

A need is something that we cannot live without. If this need were not to be met, the business relationship would end immediately. 

A want is something that we can certainly live without, but we might not want to. An example of this would be the fact we need a safe place to live, but most of us want a ______ (lake house, fancy home, one with a great view, etc.) place to live. 

A desire, these are the things that call to us as we drive around town or flip through a magazine, but we could never actually justify investing the capital in getting. 

Take time to sit with your core clients and learn about their needs, wants, and desires. Once you have done your research answer these two questions:

  1. What would you need to offer to your clients that would make it insane for them ever to consider going anywhere else? 
  2. What would you need to provide to your clients to make it insane for them ever to consider stopping working with you?

By: Jairek Robbins / Entrepreneur Leadership Network Contributor

A LIVE Broadcast with Q&A on how to protect your company secrets and clients lists. SIGN UP for my weekly newsletter to download my FREE E-book “The 10 Best Tax-Saving Secrets Everyone Should Know” and schedule a FREE 15 Minute Interview with an Attorney or CPA from my team! http://markjkohler.com/youtube Also, make sure to subscribe and hit that bell icon so you get a notification every time I post a video, go live, or post an awesome tax or legal tip! For the Estate Plan Special Visit: https://kkoslawyers.com/estate-planni… Check out my Law Firm KKOS Lawyers at http://www.kkoslawyers.com Visit my Accounting Firm K&E CPAs at: http://www.ke-cpas.com Check out my personal website with all my products at: http://www.Markjkohler.com

4 Ways Companies Can Foster a Culture of Giving Back

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

It goes without saying that 2020 has been a pretty rough year in a lot of ways. The global economy took a significant gut-punch with an unprecedented level of unemployment, and news broadcasts highlighted record numbers of people turning to food banks for support. Maybe you know somebody who has lost their job this year, or maybe you’ve found yourself in that unfortunate boat. 

If that’s not the case, count yourself lucky, and do what you can to put a little bit more good out into the world. The holiday season — and specifically December — accounts for 30 percent of annual giving, but building a company culture where giving back is a year-round occurrence has numerous benefits. For starters, it just feels good to make a positive difference and that positivity trickles down through employees.

Companies that regularly participate in philanthropic causes report happier employees. As you may very well already know, happier employees make for more productive employees (13 percent more productive to be exact) and overall, a more productive and successful business

Giving back is good for your brand — plain and simple

Besides the impact of helping others — the most important reason to give — and overall happier employees, businesses that embrace the philanthropic spirit are regarded in a higher value by consumers. As former St. Louis Rams player Torry Holt points out, regarding the NFL’s relationship with United Way, “the act of giving back evokes emotion and fosters an authentic connection.” It’s that sort of relationship that today’s consumers take notice of in a business. According to a 2016 survey, the majority of millennials prefer companies that actively give to charity

Related: 4 Ways Your Company Benefits From Giving Back

When a company aligns itself with charitable causes it’s not just benefiting the direct recipients of that giving, but its employees, and customers. So now that we’ve touched upon the benefits of creating a culture of giving within a business, how can leaders go about actually weaving it into their company? 

1. Volunteer days

Encouraging a spirit of giving in your employees shouldn’t be difficult and there’s a good chance many of them already have causes that they’re passionate about. One of the best ways to fuel team members’ passions for these causes is through a day — or even week — of volunteering. The concept is simple and incredibly effective: a business sets aside a certain number of days where employees are given time to volunteer with the charity of their choice. 

Some companies may simply allow employees to pick any organization to work with, while others may offer a selection of charities or nonprofits for employees to choose from. Team leaders may also choose to go with a majority rule and have employees vote on which charities the company wants to align itself with for volunteer work. Building volunteer days into a business not only builds camaraderie between employees but foster relationships within the community. 

2. Lend your resources

Another big way that companies can make a positive impact in their communities is by taking the pro-bono route and lending their resources free of charge. If your business has some extra space that’s not being used on the weekends or at night, consider reaching out to a nonprofit and offering it. 

Related: Here Are Legitimate Fundraisers Helping Damaged and Destroyed Small Businesses

One of the most beneficial ways that a company can offer its resources is through the knowledge of its employees. Whether it’s by offering a company’s time through a mentorship program (such as graphic design) or through a pro-bono service (such as legal advice or tax preparation, for instance) for those less fortunate, these acts of charitable giving can build meaningful relationships and have a dramatic impact on the lives of others.  

3. Get your customers involved

We’ve already touched on the fact that consumers view charitable companies in a more positive light, so why not get those customers involved in the giving? It’s easy for a company to simply write a check and hand it over to a charity, but it’s more inclusive if they bring their customers into the act. Company matching programs are a fantastic way of doing this and with the right structure, can be a robust way of generating substantial fundraising.  

Another way to go about involving your customers is by encouraging recurring donations to a nonprofit. Applications like Donorbox or GoFundMe make it incredibly easy for businesses to incorporate giving into their existing website. Giving incentives that include the consumer not only can provide much needed financial support, but build a stronger connection between a business and its customer base.

4. Become an event sponsor

Sponsoring a charitable event in the community is another way businesses can both lend their support and weave a spirit of philanthropy into the existing company culture. There are endless ways a company can choose to go about sponsoring a community event. Simply making a financial contribution is probably the most common — and oftentimes the most needed — but even with that, there are options: raffles, silent auctions, etc.

Many times charitable events will also need volunteers or a place to host an event, so again, there are a variety of paths a business can choose to go down when it comes to sponsoring an event. Whether it’s financially, or through its resources, when a company aligns itself with a charitable event, it’s showing a level of commitment to the community it serves. 

Related: 3 Ways to Give Back That Don’t Require a Financial Investment

Business leaders should look at giving back as an investment and apply a similar ROI strategy when choosing how to give,  just as they would any business decision. Building a culture of giving within your business shouldn’t be complicated and incorporating several different strategies is going to yield the best results — both externally and internally.

Chris Porteous

By: Chris Porteous Entrepreneur Leadership Network Contributor / High Performance Growth Marketer

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How to Boost Sales When Consumers are Spending Less

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Know me before selling me; that’s what Americans expect from sales reps. In a , it’s critical to align with customer preferences to avoid losing sales to rivals. Competition is stiff, as people have less disposable incomes. A 2018 study by the Federal Reserve found that 40 percent of Americans can’t come up with $400 to pay for an emergency. And that’s before 40 million people were out of work virtually overnight.

Here are tips to increase sales, even when the is in flux.

A must do whatever it takes to serve customers well

Buyers are weary. They’ve been locked down, and many have to fight for jobs before unemployment benefits run out. Not to mention 27 million have recently lost employer-based health insurance, according to Kaiser Family Foundation. Post-pandemic consumers, therefore, are thrifty and budget-conscious.

Salesy employees seem indifferent to customer needs. Businesses must encourage reps to truly listen to what customers want, even if they don’t articulate their needs and desires clearly. A helpful salesman should read between the lines and notice what isn’t being said. Moreover, he should act more like a product consultant than a commission-chasing machine.

“Our startup scaled significantly in our third year when we excelled at customizing apparel and giving customers a very personalized service,” says Michael Nemeroff, CEO of Rush Order Tees. The Philadelphia-based ecommerce brand grew from $30,000 a month in sales to $200,000 a month during that transition period.

Nemeroff credits his company’s extreme growth to streamlining of processes, expanding Rush Order Tees’ customer base and catering to orders of all sizes. “The real key was doing whatever it took to deliver any size order with any design for clients on extremely short deadlines,” he adds. “We earned a great reputation, and we have now reached a point where more than 40 percent of revenue is reorder business.”

Think long-term value

Any entrepreneur would pick recurring revenue over one-off transactions. So why should sales mentality be any different? A 2019 survey by Gartner found that millennials are generally skeptical of sales reps.

One sales expert believes that current events can be leveraged to create favorable impressions with prospective buyers. “Design your pitch to take advantage of everything that’s currently going on,” advises Temple Naylor, an influencer in high-ticket sales, in a recent call. “The recession can be utilized to help design the pitch. Do research and create data points that inform your pitch because prospects will be inclined to trust you as an authority.”

Trustworthiness and accurate product information are extremely important in the purchase decision. In other words, prospects are more likely to purchase from a rep with a solid reputation. “Everyone is scrambled in fear because of the downturn,” says Naylor. “So get your facts and data from very credible sources such as new studies from global consulting firms or large universities. It’s hard for prospects to argue with great information.”

Skepticism of a salesperson’s claims reduces a customer’s chance of buying by half, according to a 2020 survey by Gartner. There’s real risk of losing a customer by being inauthentic. They won’t feel special and appreciated, and lack of customer loyalty means they can easily switch over to a competitor.

Therefore agents, shopkeepers and anyone else who rings the cash register must earn trust by helping customers find what they need. Aside from getting word-of-mouth business, influencers may promote your brand on social media after you establish a solid reputation for helping customers. The sales commission should be a byproduct of great service rendered, not the goal in itself.

Be persistent with contacts

Finally, there’s nothing like good old follow-up. Prospects don’t buy at the present time for many reasons, even though they’re interested in a good or service. They may currently be busy, lack time, need a boss’s approval, lack money or have other priorities. However, a good salesperson will reconnect with a prospect when the timing is right and secure the transaction.

Only 2 percent of sales occur at a first meeting, according to Marketing Donut, a sales-resource website. And prospects say “no” four times before buying a product or service. Persistence matters. Many rejections are soft rebuffs — they don’t really mean it. And many are presently unsure of what they want until they see more information. A “no” often brings you one step closer to “yes,” especially for would-be customers who are teetering on the edge of purchasing.

“Have an emotionally intelligent dialogue and not a sales script,” suggests Naylor. “Talk like a normal human. You don’t have to be perfectly polished. Instead, lead people through self-doubt and resistance at the end of an offer.”

To underscore his point, according to HubSpot research, buyers want reps to listen to needs (69 percent); to not be pushy (61 percent); and to provide relevant information (61 percent). Is your staff properly trained and inspired to sell in the new economy?

Tom Popomaronis

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Source: https://www.entrepreneur.com

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