InstantContent – Launch Your Fully Fledged 100% Unique Online Business with This Simple Yet Powerful Software

Powerful and intelligent software that will rewrite any piece of content – and this will be human-readable, make-sense content! Turn any video into content – that’s right with InstantContent , you’re a push of a button away from transcribing any video into an article! With just a click of your mouse you will have 100% unique content that search engines (especially Google) will love. This means better rankings! 100% Copyscape passed – InstantContent creates content that is unique for search engines and will pass the Copyscape test. Multiple streams of content: from turning videos into articles, to automatically curating and then rewriting content, to making ANY article you insert in it unique, InstantContent takes care of ALL your content generation needs…Read more..

VoiceRank360 Pro – Automate The Ranking Process And Triple Your Traffic & Profits

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We developed our own AI algorithm that is capable of finding the best questions and answers for any niche and give you the best unique content to use for yourself or your clients! You’ll get access to a powerful AI system that allows you to insert a keyword and generate Unique Question and Answers based articles that google is looking to display on it’s “Mighty Answer BOX”. Generate Unlimited Unique Articles from the best Questions Generated and use the power of placeholders to rank for Voice Phrases in virtually any City in the World! One Click Publishing to yours or your clients WordPress website – We wanted to make this as easy and as little work for you as possible Will 1 click do it for you?..Read more….

Sociible – NEW Web App Creates FULLY AUTOMATED Social Marketing Campaigns in MINUTES By Leveraging OTHER People’s AUTHORITY Content For Unlimited Hands-Free Traffic

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Viral Autobots Training – How To Find The Best Viral Content Posts In Social Media & Use Them Instantly To Your Website

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4 Key Elements of a Successful Landing Page for Health Consultants – Laura Peill

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Amidst the vast array of webpages, online Shopify sites, Instagram profiles and pop ups, sits the humble landing page.  Used for executing a call to action upon readers and known for being very good at its job when done well, it is a unique beast to tackle no matter what your site.

Add in the complexity of a unique niche, with specific parameters surrounding what you are trying to achieve and landing page success is not a matter of simply trial and error or a little bit of luck. It’s a matter of a masterfully executed strategy with dedicated elements that let your landing page stand alone and shine, and let you have the business in return to show for it.

1. Generates Trust and Authority

Given that the subject matter at hand is health and well being, there is a certain degree of trust and authority that needs to be displayed for the individual coming to your site. Whether they have stumbled on your site by accident or have researched their path and ended up there by intentional means, the only way they will stay is if they feel they can get the answer they are after from someone who they can trust to be offering it to them.

A landing page is unique in that it only offers a small snippet of information. From a trust perspective, it does not have the same advantage as a website whereby it can offer extensive pages and content which accumulate to build authority and trust. This means, that you are tasked with the job of building this trust and authority across the content of just one page, often, above the fold, and often in a few short seconds – readers don’t stick around for long unless they are convinced of a reason to do otherwise.

Building trust on a landing page comes down to making the most of the space you have with the time that your reader will be there, and across the messages and information you are trying to portray. It’s tricky business, and you only get one shot, so keep these things in mind:

Make the Content Rich

Don’t fool around with fluff, filler or unnecessary words and statements. Refrain from saying the same thing two different ways and pack the space you have with as much valuable information as you can.

Add Testimonials

Getting a seal of approval, positive reviews or unbiased opinions from others, especially past clients is a great way to show people that you know what you are talking about, that you have experience, and that people already trust what you are doing.

Use Statistics

There is nothing like numbers, percentages and indisputable statistical facts to back up what you are saying, offer support for your product or service and to garner increased trust from your audience.  Be sure to show the source of your data so that readers can verify your authority if they choose to.

2. Creates Attraction

Every time you create content, “you are making a statement and communicating with people – and your content is either attracting or repelling them.” Jess Stolberg

Jess Stolberg, a marketing consultant and online branding strategist speaks to the importance of having a landing page that creates attraction to the right people, by crafting it around a client profile.

In your business, the ultimate goal of a landing page is to pull the audience in to purchase your service or product or take the action you are requesting, such as sign up to your email list. This is not likely going to be successful if you are attracting the wrong people, who aren’t actually interested in your service or product at all.

In a case study published by Mailchimp, on Hom Sweet Hom design studio, they speak to another important angle of this, in which they emphasize the need to “design a landing page that matches your style.”  What this comes down to is the content that is contained within the page.

For example, if you are promoting a design business, having a landing page that doesn’t exhibit any design work to show the audience your design capabilities does not bode well for drawing them in to purchase your design. Conversely, if you are aiming to promote yourself as a writer, skilled at crafting blog posts that bring in traffic and boost SEO, a lack of writing or subpar writing on your landing page won’t do you any favours.

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Content is King and It Reigns Supreme – Logan Godfrey

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Content, along with content marketing, is important.

It’s important because it sets you apart from your competitors. Not just any kind of content, but content that’s better than all the rest. Content that makes you think. Content that makes you sweat. Content that makes you bleed. Okay… That might be going too far, but you get it. You have to make something great to stand apart from your competition, and the only way you do it is through hard and arduous work.

To help you get a better understanding of content, specifically content marketing, I have a put together a list of advantages that content marketing provides for businesses and law firms alike.

Improving Brand Reputation

With great content comes great responsibility. That’s the quote, right? Great content can build your reputation in whatever it is your business does or legal practice includes. In today’s shaky digital marketing place, it’s important to build trust with your audience and consumers. Content that is sensible, accurate, creative, or helpful can go a long way towards building that trust.

Increasing Website Conversions

Content and content marketing helps to improve website conversions because it allows a deeper connection with your audience and consumers. Not only does content build trust and relationships, but it can encourage conversions by giving your audience the information they need; which will keep them flocking back to your site. To do this, your content must include a clear call-to-action. This will guide your audience on what to do next in the conversion process.

Boosting SEO

The more that your content is optimized, the more your search engine optimization (SEO) will improve. SEO is critical to the visibility of your business online, and content creation is the best way to do this. For example, as a law firm, you should have each page devoted to each practice area.

Not only will it target people looking for a specific practice area, but it shows that you are an expert in this type of litigation. Remember, the more content you have, the more pages the search engine has to index and show to users in their search engine results and the more likely you’ll reach new clients.

Lead Generation

I mentioned lead generation a little earlier, but leads are important to all businesses and law firms, big and small. Consistent web traffic is essential to growing businesses and keeping them afloat. The more content you have focusing on a specific issue, the more people will visit your website or different pages on your website regarding it. Don’t write a blog about car accidents if you want more medical malpractice clients. It will be detrimental to your return on investment (ROI).

ENX2 – Your Source for the BEST Content Creation

It doesn’t end there, as content can help in countless ways. I could go on and on, but you should understand how content can positively impact your business or law firm without me writing a 200-page novel. Without it, your website will just not have the conversion rate that you deserve, no matter how amazing it looks.

But with the right content marketing strategy, not only will your website see a decent return on what you spend, but you’ll also see a rise in all your efforts. If you’re ready to increase your conversion rate and improve your client leads, then don’t wait another minute! Contact the content marketing masterminds at ENX2 Marketing today.

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Transform Your Content Marketing Program with a Message Architecture – Katie Del Angel

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It’s necessary for content marketing teams to constantly evaluate where they’re at. From measuring performance KPIs to the strategic trajectory, it’s important to ensure that your programs are aligned and on-track for success.

One important aspect that may not be on your radar to assess? Your message architecture.

A message architecture is a prioritized set of communication goals to guide team efforts across the organization. Generally, it originates at the corporate marketing level with input from key, cross-functional stakeholders. For global content teams, it can – and should – serve as a North Star to ensure that all the content you produce supports your company’s overarching goals.

More than likely, your brand may not yet have a message architecture to evaluate. Yet, there’s never a bad time to establish a message architecture, and it’s never too late. So why not now?

Beyond content marketing, a message architecture can help teams guide decisions around everything from site structure and taxonomy to product design and partnerships. Arming your teams with a hierarchy of communication goals ensures everything you “say,” regardless of channel, conveys a unified message.

Why your team needs a message architecture ASAP

At this year’s ThinkContent 2018 conference, the idea of amplifying content efforts with integrated planning and collaborative tools was a frequent focus. One system to unify workflows and marketing assets across content, social media, PR, design, and/or product teams may seem like the holy grail of efficient collaboration we’ve all been waiting for, but we can’t forget the fundamental rule of successful content marketing programs:

Marketers with a documented content marketing strategy are five times more likely to succeed.

Although many marketing teams typically include some variation of voice and tone guidelines within their content marketing strategy, a message architecture takes this one step further: While voice and tone guides help us decide how to say things, a message architecture guides what we say. In particular, what we say about who our brand is and what we care about. And when it comes to crafting impactful content, knowing what your brand needs to say is the first step.

What a message architecture looks like

A message architecture summarizes a brand’s prioritized communication goals in a short list of attributes and phrases. This should be part of your documented content strategy to be shared among teams – which is especially useful when new members join or projects begin.

For example, Facebook might have a message architecture that looks something like this:

Considerate

Proactively transparent

Thoughtful and helpful

Friendly

Familiar, occasionally playful

Welcoming, community-oriented

Creative

Pioneering

Innovative, yet consistent

Open to user feedback

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We can see these attributes in everything from Facebook’s new feature announcements to privacy update notices to error messages. Although they never say “we do this because we are considerate,” it’s evident that Facebook prioritizes that characteristic in the way it communicates with users on a daily basis.

A quick note about what a message architecture is NOT

The concept of a message architecture stems from the content strategy discipline. Author and strategist Margot Bloomstein was an early proponent of the term in her book “Content Strategy at Work,” sharing advice for building a message architecture to guide digital content initiatives like website redesigns. As Bloomstein underscored in her book, a message architecture differs from a mission statement (which is more about what we aim to achieve as a company) and a vision statement (which establishes where we are heading) because it is both actionable and specific to communication. (These are also the primary distinguishing factors between a message architecture versus a brand personality.)

A message architecture is also not a glossary for the actual words we will use in content or marketing copy. Rather, your message architecture is a reference point for cross-functional, internal teams to decide what to communicate.

Although the message architecture isn’t a glossary, the exercise of developing one will help your teams define a shared vocabulary. And that’s at least half of the magic!

How to establish a message architecture

Option 1: Card sort approach

A 45-60 minute card sort exercise is a great way to align internal stakeholders – from both within and outside of marketing –  around a shared vocabulary, spurring conversation around a visual hierarchy of characteristics.

Step 1: Gather your words

You’ll want to compile a list of 50-100 adjectives to guide the conversation in your workshop.

In her book, Bloomstein shares an excellent list of words to use as a starting point. You can find the list in an excerpt of “Content Strategy at Work” online. She also sells a set of premade cards.

I typically make my own set by hand-picking the more relevant words from Bloomstein’s list, and supplementing with tailored additions for my client’s industry. I compile them in a Google spreadsheet, then write each word on its own index card.

Step 2: Invite your stakeholders

Workshops tend to go much smoother when everyone has a moment to digest the instructions beforehand, so it’s ideal to send an email to stakeholders explaining the workshop well in advance. (A note on timing: As most people tend not to consider themselves “word people,” I find that this workshop is best at the beginning of the week when minds are fresh and ambition is high.)

I also share the adjective list and welcome stakeholders to add their own ideas. This saves time in explaining when you get everyone together, and also makes the team feel more involved right off the bat.

Step 3: Sort your cards

Bring your stakeholders into a room (be sure to have a long table and plenty of space to move) and begin by asking the team to sort the index cards into three distinct buckets:

  • Who We Are NOT
  • Who We Are (Today)
  • Who We Want To Be (in two years, five years, etc. depending on how agile your organization is)

Take a few minutes to review outliers or words that caused dissent at the end of this round, asking the team to discuss and articulate presumptions or bias about words. For instance, does “innovative” make one member crinkle their nose in disdain, conjuring images of aggressively sleek tech startups, while another envisions a premium, industry-leading enterprise?

After documenting the “NOT” pile (I usually snap a picture and make notes), ask the team to focus its attention on weeding out any aspects of their brand “TODAY” that they may want to shed or outgrow down the line. Document, then clear away anything that isn’t part of “Who We Want To Be.”

Step 4: Group and prioritize

Although many adjectives may appear to be similar, this is the time to dig into nuances and preferences. For instance, maybe the brand is both “approachable” and “friendly,” but really wants to lean into being proactively “friendly.”

Typically, I encourage teams to group affinities like this, stacking one directly on top of the other to show preference and priority within buckets.

Once these buckets are defined, it’s time to prioritize the buckets, themselves. For instance, one client chose to group characteristics by the following themes:

  • Words that describe our product
  • How our community sees us
  • How our customers see us
  • Who we are at our core

Depending on the organization or industry, each bucket may get prioritized higher or lower. InVision, a design software company, for example, may place the most emphasis on the product – which then influences how the community views the company.

Step 5: Find affinities and document

Now is the time to sort through notes and pictures from the workshop. Remembering that the message architecture is not a glossary, find clear and concise ways to define your “buckets.” Check out the Facebook example above for inspiration.

2. Spectrum shortcut approach

This 10-15 minute exercise is a good way to visualize and verbalize priorities. This is a quick hack of the familiar brand personality spectrum to help us establish a message hierarchy. Because there is less opportunity to find nuance in this exercise, this is good for brands that already have a good idea about who they are and where they’re going.

Step 1: Share the spectrum

Ideally, this speedy exercise can happen during a project kickoff or another in-person meeting. If so, post the “Brand Personality Spectrum” on a whiteboard or using large (8×6 inch) Post-It notes.

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If you are unable to do this in person, you can email the image to stakeholders separately, including instructions from Step 2.

Step 2: Mark your priorities

Once the spectrum is up, give each stakeholder two different-colored Post-Its or sticky dots per row. (For example, each participant would receive one pink and one yellow Post-It for “Personable and friendly” vs. “Corporate, professional,” another pair of pink and yellow for the “Spontaneous…” row, and so on.)

Ask each stakeholder to place the first color (say, pink) on each row where they believe the organization’s priority is TODAY. Then, ask them to place the second color (yellow) where they believe the organization’s priority can or should evolve to in the future. Each participant should contribute two colored markers for each row.

Take a moment to discuss here if there are obvious discrepancies or large leaps to uncover any assumptions or bias.

(If this is being done virtually, you will need to do a bit of extra legwork to follow up. A video conference call would be a great way to share findings and bring the conversation into the open.)

Step 3: Determine priority

Finally, ask each stakeholder to rank each row in terms of significance. You can do this by handing each participant a stack of Post-Its labeled 1-6, or by a color-coded tallying system on the whiteboard.

Again, this is a good opportunity to dig into the “Why” for each person, identify nuances, and find alignment.

Step 4: Document

As in the first approach, your output should look something similar to the Facebook example: concise, descriptive, and unique. (Because you won’t have a list of adjectives to get you going, you may need to be a little creative. Tap into the discussions you’ve heard to dig beyond the brand spectrum surface.)

Bringing the message architecture into your content marketing program

Once you’ve established a message architecture your organization can agree on, it’s time to socialize and fully incorporate it into your content marketing strategy. A few things you should do next:

  • Make sure to document the message architecture.
  • Update your content marketing strategy with the message architecture and ensure that all team members are aligned.
  • Explain what it is (and is not!).
  • Encourage your team to use this as a validation tool at the beginning of content planning cycles to 1. Ensure all content meets at least one stated communication goal and 2. Help prioritize scheduling or quantity of content in a certain focus area.
  • Take a look at your content hub. Is the UX supportive of your message hierarchy? Use the message architecture to consider how navigation, taxonomy, and overall layout can be improved to underscore your goals.
  • Share the message architecture with new team members and at the start of new projects, to maintain consistency.

When you know what your team really wants to communicate, it becomes that much easier to ensure you’re working toward the same goals – and measure success as you grow.

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