How To Embrace The Post-Pandemic, Digital-Driven Future Of Work

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Digital will separate the winners from the laggards in the hypercompetitive, post-pandemic business landscape, says Ben Pring, Managing Director of Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work. We undertook a global, multi-industry study to understand how businesses are preparing for this future and here’s what we found.

COVID-19 changed digital from a nice-to-have adjunct to a must-have tool at the core of the enterprise. The pandemic forced businesses to reassess how they strategize and execute their digital ambitions in a world that has migrated online, possibly for good in many areas. Those that did not prioritize digital prior to the pandemic found that procrastination was no longer an option — the digital landscape is hypercompetitive.

The Cognizant Center for the Future of Work (CFoW), working with Oxford Economics, recently surveyed 4,000 C-level executives globally to understand how they are putting digital to use and what they hope to achieve in the coming years.

The CFoW found that digital technologies are key to success in the coming years and uncovered six key steps that all organizations can take to more fruitfully apply to gear-up for the fast unfolding digital future:

  • Scrutinize everything because it’s going to change. From how and where employees work, to how customers are engaged, and which products and services are now viable as customer needs and behaviors evolve rapidly.
  • Make technology a partner in work. Innovations in AI, blockchain, natural language processing, IoT and 5G communications are ushering in decades of change ahead and will drive new levels of functionality and performance.
  • Build new workflows to reach new performance thresholds. The most predictable, rote and repetitive activities need to be handed off to software, while humans specialize in using judgment, creativity and language.
  • Make digital competency the prime competency for everyone. No matter what type of work needs to be done, it must have a digital component. Levels of digital literacy need to be built out even among non-technologists, including specialized skills.
  • Begin a skills renaissance. Digital skills such as big data specialists, process automation experts, security analysts, etc. aren’t easy to acquire. To overcome skills shortages, organizations will need to work harder to retain and engage workers.
  • Employees want jobs, but they also want meaning from jobs. How can businesses use intelligent algorithms to take increasing proportions of tasks off workers’ plates, allowing them to spend their time creating value? This search for meaning stretches beyond the individual tasks of the job to what the organization itself stands for.

Here are a few key findings from our research:

Redesigning the workplace is just the beginning: The virus will force enterprises to ask more strategic questions.

A mesh of machine emerges: While IoT is beginning to take hold, few respondents have piloted 5G projects. But over time , the mesh of machines created by IoT and 5G will serve as the foundation for news levels of functionality and possibility.

The 3As-AI , automation and analytics are the engines of digitization: To make the future of work happen, the 3As are emerging as a sophisticated and complex set of tools more deeply embedded in processes.

To learn more, read our whitepaper “The Work Ahead: Digital First (to Last)” or see the full Work Ahead study series.

Ben Pring leads Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work and is a coauthor of the books Monster: A Tough Love Letter On Taming The Machines That Rule Our Jobs, Lives, and Future, What To Do When Machines Do Everything and Code Halos: How the Digital Lives of People, Things, and Organizations Are Changing the Rules of Business. In 2018, he was a Bilderberg Meeting participant. He previously spent 15 years with Gartner as a senior industry analyst, researching and advising on areas such as cloud computing and global sourcing. He can be reached at Benjamin.Pring@cognizant.com

Source: How To Embrace The Post-Pandemic, Digital-Driven Future Of Work

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Critics:

Digitalization  is the adoption of digital technology to transform services or businesses, through replacing non-digital or manual processes with digital processes or replacing older digital technology with newer digital technology. Digital solutions may enable – in addition to efficiency via automation – new types of innovation and creativity, rather than simply enhancing and supporting traditional methods.

One aspect of digital transformation is the concept of ‘going paperless‘ or reaching a ‘digital business maturity’ affecting both individual businesses and whole segments of society, such as government,mass communications,art, health care, and science.

Digital transformation is not proceeding at the same pace everywhere. According to the McKinsey Global Institute‘s 2016 Industry Digitization Index, Europe is currently operating at 12% of its digital potential, while the United States is operating at 18%. Within Europe, Germany operates at 10% of its digital potential, while the United Kingdom is almost on par with the United States at 17%.

One example of digital transformation is the use of cloud computing. This reduces reliance on user-owned hardware and increases reliance on subscription-based cloud services. Some of these digital solutions enhance capabilities of traditional software products (e.g. Microsoft Office compared to Office 365) while others are entirely cloud based (e.g. Google Docs).

As the companies providing the services are guaranteed of regular (usually monthly) recurring revenue from subscriptions, they are able to finance ongoing development with reduced risk (historically most software companies derived the majority of their revenue from users upgrading, and had to invest upfront in developing sufficient new features and benefits to encourage users to upgrade), and delivering more frequent updates often using forms of agile software development internally. This subscription model also reduces software piracy, which is a major benefit to the vendor.

Unlike digitization, digitalization is the ‘organizational process’ or ‘business process’ of the technologically-induced change within industries, organizations, markets and branches. Digitalization of manufacturing industries has enabled new production processes and much of the phenomena today known as the Internet of Things, Industrial Internet, Industry 4.0, machine to machine communication, artificial intelligence and machine vision.

Digitalization of business and organizations has induced new business models (such as freemium), new eGovernment services, electronic payment, office automation and paperless office processes, using technologies such as smart phones, web applications, cloud services, electronic identification, blockchain, smart contracts and cryptocurrencies, and also business intelligence using Big Data. Digitalization of education has induced e-learning and Mooc courses.

See also

 

The 5 Biggest IT Mistakes Companies Make And How To Avoid Them

Young woman working at home

A new study released by research firm Gartner shows that employees are nearly two times more likely to pretend to be working when their employers use tracking systems to monitor their output. Gartner surveyed more than 2,400 professionals in January 2021.

Across the world, IT professionals are in charge of an increasing number of servers and data coming in from disparate sources, and they’re using way too many monitoring tools to make sense of it all. The Reducing Complexity in IT Infrastructure Monitoring: A Study of Global Organizations report by the Ponemon Institute sheds light on the challenges of troubleshooting and monitoring cloud and on-premises environments.

  • 24% said the handling of scale and complexity of IT infrastructure has improved
  • 29% said the ability to easily deploy and maintain server monitoring technologies has improved

The survey also found that while a significant percentage of IT practitioners are in charge of monitoring over 50 servers, only 33% felt that they could ensure performance and system availability with their current toolset. So how can IT effectively manage increasingly complex, hybrid environments, and what are the major missteps IT organizations can correct to build a more efficient approach to infrastructure monitoring and troubleshooting?

Here are some of the biggest IT mistakes companies of all sizes make — and how to avoid them.

Problem #1: Too Many Tools

Seventy percent of IT professionals in the survey said that using data to determine root cause slows them down — ingesting and normalizing data of differing formats and types is tedious and unmanageable, and it’s difficult to make real-time decisions. This is often because companies use too many monitoring tools for single layers of their IT stack, such as networks or applications, which creates silos and inefficiencies. When data lives inside one tool but can’t access or communicate with data confined to other tools, IT practitioners lose context on what’s happening in their environment because they’re seeing only a part of the picture.

The Solution: The solution to too many tools and disparate data is a single, scalable monitoring tool that provides end-to-end operational visibility into hybrid environments.

Problem #2: IT and Business Friction

As digital business infrastructure increases in complexity, IT teams feel more pressure than ever to reduce business-impacting incidents. When IT systems fail, the ramifications go beyond the immediate financial loss of downtime — a business could lose customers and jeopardize its reputation, a harsh reality that keeps IT teams up day and night. According to Ponemon’s research, 61 percent of IT professionals say that lack of system availability and poor performance creates friction between IT and lines of business.

The Solution

In addition to a solution that allows IT to find the root cause to identify service interruptions, IT and business need to work together to design business and technical requirements in tandem.

Problem #3: No Way to Easily Identify Root Cause

Across the globe, IT professionals spend their days identifying and fixing server environment problems. Indeed, the Ponemon survey found that the top two challenges of troubleshooting, monitoring and cloud migration are:

  • Lack of insights to quickly pinpoint issues and identify the root cause
  • Complexity and diversity of IT systems and technology

When IT can’t find and fix issues quickly, it has a direct effect on the business.

The Solution: For IT to quickly fix problems, they need a monitoring tool that can surface an issue’s root cause with an alert about where and why something is wrong. Issue resolution time can be cut in half with a monitoring solution that correlates metrics and logs, and provides visualizations of alerts, trends and logs in one place. Making sure your monitoring tool can enable those types of actions and resolution planning is critical for success.

Problem #4: The Wrong Skills to Manage Application Complexity

When Ponemon asked IT professionals about the biggest risks to their ability to troubleshoot, monitor and migrate to the cloud:

  • 55%  said the increasing complexity of applications running on infrastructure
  • 44%  said a lack of skills and expertise to deal with application complexity

As infrastructure grows and evolves, it becomes increasingly difficult for IT teams to successfully manage, monitor and troubleshoot systems. Couple that with an IT skills gap that makes it difficult for organizations to attract and retain qualified talent, and it becomes clear why IT teams feel nonstop pressure.

The Solution: To effectively troubleshoot, monitor and migrate to the cloud, you need a solid plan that takes future growth into account is necessary for smooth IT operations. Business and IT need to work together to create an IT environment roadmap, followed by a talent strategy that aligns to that plan. Be sure to:

  • Identify skills gaps and adjust hiring
  • Identify and train qualified employees for advancement
  • Include succession planning for inevitable changes

Problem #5: Lack of Visibility Throughout Cloud Migration

Sixty-eight percent of IT practitioners said that ensuring application performance and availability throughout cloud migration caused the most stress. Over half said both cost and the inability to monitor and troubleshoot applications were their biggest pain points.

As infrastructure increases in complexity, the core responsibilities of IT to monitor and measure remain the same. So how can IT achieve infrastructure visibility and workload insights when performance data spans diverse environments?

The Solution: It’s critical to monitor performance across hybrid architectures with a monitoring solution that collects and correlates data from every location. Full visibility is needed throughout the migration process, so choose an end-to-end monitoring tool that allows you to establish a pre-migration baseline, mid-migration insights and post-migration success.

Before cloud migration, measure the baseline user experience and performance, and define acceptable post-migration levels. To accurately validate a migration’s success, use the same monitoring tool throughout the migration process. A unified tool can analyze centralized data and provide better insights from dashboards and reports.

For more of the biggest IT mistakes and solutions and examples of companies that have solved the problem check out: 8 Biggest Mistakes IT Practitioners Make and How to Avoid Them.

Splunk Inc. turns data into doing with the Data-to-Everything Platform. Splunk technology is designed to investigate, monitor, analyze and act on data at any scale.

Source: The 5 Biggest IT Mistakes Companies Make And How To Avoid Them

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More Contents:

How To Embrace The Post-Pandemic, Digital-Driven Future Of Work

Digital will separate the winners from the laggards in the hypercompetitive, post-pandemic business landscape, says Ben Pring, Managing Director of Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work. We undertook a global, multi-industry study to understand how businesses are preparing for this future and here’s what we found.

COVID-19 changed digital from a nice-to-have adjunct to a must-have tool at the core of the enterprise. The pandemic forced businesses to reassess how they strategize and execute their digital ambitions in a world that has migrated online, possibly for good in many areas. Those that did not prioritize digital prior to the pandemic found that procrastination was no longer an option — the digital landscape is hypercompetitive.

The Cognizant Center for the Future of Work (CFoW), working with Oxford Economics, recently surveyed 4,000 C-level executives globally to understand how they are putting digital to use and what they hope to achieve in the coming years. The CFoW found that digital technologies are key to success in the coming years and uncovered six key steps that all organizations can take to more fruitfully apply to gear-up for the fast unfolding digital future:

  • Scrutinize everything because it’s going to change. From how and where employees work, to how customers are engaged, and which products and services are now viable as customer needs and behaviors evolve rapidly.
  • Make technology a partner in work. Innovations in AI, blockchain, natural language processing, IoT and 5G communications are ushering in decades of change ahead and will drive new levels of functionality and performance.
  • Build new workflows to reach new performance thresholds. The most predictable, rote and repetitive activities need to be handed off to software, while humans specialize in using judgment, creativity and language.
  • Make digital competency the prime competency for everyone. No matter what type of work needs to be done, it must have a digital component. Levels of digital literacy need to be built out even among non-technologists, including specialized skills.
  • Begin a skills renaissance. Digital skills such as big data specialists, process automation experts, security analysts, etc. aren’t easy to acquire. To overcome skills shortages, organizations will need to work harder to retain and engage workers.
  • Employees want jobs, but they also want meaning from jobs. How can businesses use intelligent algorithms to take increasing proportions of tasks off workers’ plates, allowing them to spend their time creating value? This search for meaning stretches beyond the individual tasks of the job to what the organization itself stands for.…Read More……

Ben Pring leads Cognizant’s Center for the Future of Work and is a coauthor of the books Monster: A Tough Love Letter On Taming The Machines That Rule Our Jobs, Lives, and Future, What To Do When Machines Do Everything and Code Halos: How the Digital Lives of People, Things, and Organizations Are Changing the Rules of Business. In 2018, he was a Bilderberg Meeting participant. He previously spent 15 years with Gartner as a senior industry analyst, researching and advising on areas such as cloud computing and global sourcing. He can be reached at Benjamin.Pring@cognizant.com.

Source: How To Embrace The Post-Pandemic, Digital-Driven Future Of Work

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Critics:

One of the biggest misconceptions about digital transformation is that it is all about technological change. With companies feeling an urgent need to transform digitally, technology is considered to be the panacea for business problems and a way to speed up transformation.

But while technology is an important part of digital transformation, it can only deliver benefits if it is procured as part of a wider plan.

The issue is that those making the decisions to implement technology for the sake of technology may be focusing on the process of changing their business, rather than targeting their ultimate goals.

In fact, the majority (71 per cent) of IT leaders say their business is so fixated on digital transformation that the projects may not deliver tangible benefits, according to 2019 research from database company Couchbase.

Caroline Carruthers, former chief data officer at Network Rail and Lowell, believes that understanding the problems the business is trying to solve or the value it is aiming to generate is crucial.

“Otherwise, how do we know we’re not cutting a square hole [with technology] rather than a circular one? People hear buzzwords and want a quick fix; it’s engrained that we want things faster, while advances in consumer technology have meant people expect the same from business technology. However, the problems are far more complex,” she says.

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6 Trends That Will Shape The Financial Services Industry In 2021

Financial services industry trends contactless payments data AI BeyondCorp

Financial services in 2020 was defined by a sudden acceleration in digitization and digital engagement—pushed by the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Exchanges shut down their trading floors and moved to remote trading, mobile banking transactions spiked, personal trading apps saw record transaction volumes, and call center personnel kept customer support going by working from their living rooms.

While the financial services industry was able to weather the digital tsunami and continue its operations, it has become clear that the winds of change are not transient. Financial institutions are now thinking strategically about their technical setup and questioning whether the tools that they have previously relied on are the right ones to use going forward. Here are a few major themes we’ve identified as being likely to dominate financial industry conversations and technology roadmaps in 2021:

1. Modernizing dated core systems will be imperative

2020 was a year that put the financial infrastructure to the test and challenged existing architecture planning assumptions. Many of the core systems had not been architected to address the volume and pace of change that was suddenly required, and dated core systems struggled under the added weight.

Relief programs such as the Payment Protection Program (PPP) in the U.S. saw tremendous demand, but loan document processing, manual reviews, and approvals became bottlenecks. As the credit needs of small and medium businesses surged, lenders faced challenges updating their legacy underwriting and risk management systems to meet the demands. Batch-based, fragmented, and slow-moving information and data pipelines hindered the ability to gain real-time insights and rapid response to customer needs.

As financial services rallied to overcome what economists were calling “The Great Shutdown” or “The Coronavirus Recession,” the need for modern, agile, scalable, secure, resilient technology infrastructures became abundantly clear—and the new imperative in 2021.

Related: Lending DocAI fast tracks the home loan process

2. Banking goes beyond cash with digital engagement

The role of cash in society was in flux before 2020, with contactless payments already a way of life across Europe and Asia. Even in America, which has been resistant to move away from cash, 27% of U.S. businesses reported an increase in contactless payments by customers as a result of the pandemic, according to an April 2020 survey. That trend will continue in 2021, with 74% of global consumers saying they will use contactless payment methods even after the pandemic. Globally, the contactless payment market size is expected to grow from $10.3 billion in 2020 to $18 billion by 2025, at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 11.7% during the forecast period.

This trend toward contactless finances extends to banking. In 2020, 44% of retail banking customers relied on mobile apps to conduct business. Both traditional players and financial tech firms introduced new finance apps or upgraded existing ones to offer new services and programs to match consumer needs, such as benefit tracking for government-sponsored food allowances or access to early wages. As downloads of mobile apps soared, transaction volumes skyrocketed.

In 2021, as a direct response to consumers’ growing reliance on mobile payment and banking solutions, the financial services industry will likely continue to invest in modern data and analytics tools, artificial intelligence capabilities, and digital platforms.

3. Insurance becomes personal

In 2020, faced with a major health crisis, economic distress, and an uncertain future, insurance companies redefined how they did business almost overnight to provide stability, comfort, and peace of mind for their customers. For example, auto insurance providers offered discounts or refunds given decreased levels of driving. Health insurance companies adjusted their premiums to reflect reductions in non-essential surgeries.

It has become clearer than ever that the most useful products are tailored to the specific needs of the customer, and that hyper-personalization will continue to define the customer journey in 2021. Auto insurance products are more valuable when they are based on miles driven. Home insurance products are more effective when they are integrated with connected homes, so that they can prevent or minimize damage from water leaks or fires.

Building this level of personalization for customers requires a technology infrastructure that enables real-time insights from vast amounts of streaming data from a variety of data sources. Data and analytics, powered by AI, will enable personalized, contextualized interactions across the entire insurance life cycle, from sales and underwriting, to claims management and support.

4. Institutional and wholesale trading moves off trading floors

Suddenly, trading was no longer confined to corporate trading floors. While a small handful of firms positioned their traders as “essential workers” and required them to work on site, the majority of firms allowed traders work from the safety of their homes. As trading floors and exchanges worldwide emptied, the prior assumptions that all trading will happen from physical offices—over corporate networks and enterprise-operated data centers—were suddenly rendered obsolete. Operational resilience plans that counted on falling back to a secondary disaster recovery site became useless when all corporate sites shut down.

In the new world, financial architectures will decouple financial activities from physical facilities through the use of technologies like zero-trust networks that enable location-independent secure access. Operational resilience plans will be updated to include globally and regionally resilient infrastructures like cloud.

Related: The adoption of zero trust is an imperative for security modernization. Learn more about BeyondCorp Enterprise, Google’s comprehensive zero trust product offering.

5. Work-from-home must work across financial services

Throughout 2020, widespread stay-at-home restrictions challenged businesses everywhere to keep employees engaged, productive, and connected. With the pandemic, as corporate offices became unavailable overnight, the entire financial services workforce—from traders to bankers to support personnel—relied on their at-home internet connections along with existing VPN and virtual desktop infrastructure solutions to do their work. While it got the job done, internet connectivity issues, bandwidth limitations, security concerns, interoperability problems, and limitations in collaboration capabilities plagued the day-to-day experience.

It will take a reimagined work environment—one that combines immersive digital and mobile experiences with flexible hardware—to support in-person and remote workers.

Work-from-anywhere solutions need to take a comprehensive look at seamlessly enabling a heterogeneous, globally distributed workforce, including traders who need high-speed connectivity, quantitative analysts who need vast amounts of compute capacity, retail branch workers who need responsive insights platforms to serve customers, and more.

It will take a reimagined work environment—one that combines immersive digital and mobile experiences with flexible hardware—to support in-person and remote workers. New ways of hybrid working and connecting with customers will also lean heavily on helpful, integrated tools centered on the cloud to level traditional boundaries in 2021.

6. Embedded innovation is the new status quo

While 2020 was bleak from many perspectives, one of the rare positives is that it helped prove that agility and innovation, done right, is a game changer. The speed at which the financial services industry transformed to help their customers through the pandemic is the speed at which they want to continue operating. And that requires a culture of innovation that is embedded into the corporate culture of an institution.

From financial services institutions to vendors, regulators, and supervisors, 2021 is likely to be a year of deliberate cultural transformation to find new ways of working together to create safer, cheaper, more inclusive, and more equitable financial markets.

This year at Google Cloud, we will continue working with our customers across financial services to help them prepare for the future, through our technology, tools and innovation partnerships.

Keep learning: Discover the steps any organization can take to quickly adapt and achieve positive results with tighter resources. Get Google’s Guide to Innovation.

Ulku Rowe

At the forefront of Google’s cloud and machine learning capabilities, Ulku enables the financial services industry to take advantage of Google’s technology to fuel their digital transformation. Before joining Google, Ulku was a Managing Director of Technology at J.P. Morgan Chase and Bank of America. Ulku holds an MS degree in Computer Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a BS degree in Computer Engineering. She also serves on the Federal Reserve Bank of New York Fintech Advisory Group.

Source: 6 Trends That Will Shape The Financial Services Industry In 2021

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Building Business Stability In An Unstable World

Introducing Digital Factory 4.0, the future of effortless, connected, and proactive operations. 

I’ve seen some things. 

Back in 2000, I watched as the soaring dot com economy plummeted back to Earth. Then there was the gut-wrenching housing crisis of 2008. Still, I hardly envisioned a global pandemic that would drive 3,600 American businesses into bankruptcy in the first six months of 2020 alone.   

The scope of these bankruptcies are unprecedented, yet they underscore an old business maxim: the time to prepare for a crisis is before it happens. In an unpredictable world, futureproofing your business isn’t optional. COVID-19 is one example of instability, but it’s easy to think of others geopolitics, climate change, and societal tension to name a few. And while every industry confronts these challenges, not every industry is similarly at risk.  

Introducing Digital Factory 4.0  

Manufacturers are particularly exposed to the economic impacts of COVID-19 because of their global supply chains, interactive working environments, and high sensitivity to downstream demand. These factors place them at risk from future crises as well. As a result, their post-pandemic planning must include process alterations for COVID-19 and a comprehensive strategy for whatever comes next.  

Fortunately, in this digital day and age we have the tools to create resilience for this pandemic and beyond.  

The first step is the complete digitization and connection of factory operations through automation and digital workflows. This will create what I like to call Digital Factory 4.0.  

This factory represents a fourth revolution within manufacturing. In the first, steam power mechanized production; in the second, electricity created mass production; in the third, information technology automated and globalized that production.  

Now, in the fourth, emerging technologies, including artificial intelligence and the internet of things (IoT), are combining to digitize, automate, and transform the factory entirely. 

Digital nervous system 

Digital Factory 4.0 is based on a digital nervous system that ties the full manufacturing value chain together and makes all operations effortless, connected, and proactive. This nervous system consists of workflows that eliminate silos and create a connected enterprise of universal visibility.   

On the factory floor, insignificant problems quickly ripple into larger delays down the line when machine operators lack the knowledge to remediate the issue. Something as small as a misprinted label can throw the entire production process into disarray.  

In Digital Factory 4.0, notes detailing past machine fixes, a comprehensive knowledge base, and a workflow-powered connection to an outside technician are all accessible through a mobile device linked to the factory’s digital nervous system. Employees have the information they need at their fingertips, operations flow effortlessly, and overall equipment efficiency (OEE) is improved throughout the factory.  

In the event of a larger breakdown, information about downstream effect is quickly cascaded to the relevant parties via automated workflows. Information captured in these workflows, along with that from IoT sensors, helps manufacturers better understand the trade-offs that limit or increase capacity.   

Oh geez...just screens with code looking very technological. Bleep bloop!
A digital nervous system connects the Digital Factory 4.0. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Intelligent quality control 

World-class operations extend beyond maintenance and information dissemination to quality control and product development—two areas of significant expense.  

For example, when a manufacturer I worked with altered its pet food recipe, it unknowingly shipped bags with heavier individual pellets and thus more food than necessary. That compounded into a noticeable cost.  

Digital Factory 4.0 addresses this problem in two ways. First, IoT sensors identify discrepancies immediately and trigger a disruption workflow that drives actions to resolve the complication before production is impacted. This is intelligent quality control. Again, it’s both effortless and connected.  

Second, by digitizing product development—running simulations on a digital twin of the physical product—we can decrease parts per million (PPM) defective rates and proactively address quality issues that arise when we, for instance, change a recipe.  

Along with improved OEE, decreased PPM translates to higher margins and greater profit, ensuring a sustainable and resilient factory.  

Connecting teams and people 

Most important, Digital Factory 4.0 connects teams, keeping the workforce healthy and engaged while managing for regulatory compliance. This is especially important as leaders consider how to safely navigate the workplace during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

ServiceNow’s Contact Tracing app, for example, uses system data (badge scans, workstation location, etc.) to identify and isolate employees who come in contact with an individual infected by COVID-19. It’s one way to ensure a safe return to work, and it’s also indicative of a core tenet of connected teams: the use of employee data—on everything from common challenges to health and wellness—to build a sustainable workforce.  

For example, many manufacturing injuries can be linked to addressable root cause issues. By aggregating and analyzing information on these injuries, we can pinpoint causes and shift processes. The data also informs other areas in the organization, such as risk, compliance, and workforce planning.  

Digital Factory 4.0 is about getting access to this data on the assumption that all the information we need to perfectly optimize operations is readily available—if only we could see it.  

With COVID-19 placing pressure on manufacturers like never before, it’s the organizations who digitize operations and unlock their data that will survive, reinvest, and continuously improve.

Tasker Generes

Tasker Generes

Tasker Generes is global head of connected enterprise at ServiceNow, crafting strategy for the connected enterprise leveraging IoT, BlockChain, and AI while also providing executive level advisory to help companies modernize, transform and innovate. He is the author of 87 patent claims around ConnectedOperations, ConnectedHuman, ConnectedSecurity and ConnectedService. Prior to joining ServiceNow, Tasker was chief technology officer at Amtrak and ran his own consulting firm Silos to Service Solutions Inc., bringing business and IT together to leapfrog their competition through focused service. Through his work at IBM as chief technologist for service management solutions, Tasker developed a deep depth of knowledge and experience in leading global service management delivery across process, technology, organization and information. At IBM, he also served as co-chair of LEAP (Leadership Education for Asia-Pacifics). Tasker earned his Master of Project Management degree from George Washington University School of Management and a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of California, San Diego

Source: Forbes

Digital Transformation Will Change Manufacturing As We Know It

Turning the challenges of manufacturing into new opportunities for success with digital transformation.

The global manufacturing world seems to be travelling back in time. Large production plants and long assembly lines, where goods were mass produced in hundreds and thousands, may become a thing of the past. Instead we are witnessing a growing demand for products that are highly-customized to the needs of individual end customers. This is much like the years preceding the First Industrial Revolution when each product was painstakingly crafted by hand.

But this time, something is about to change.

Instead of workers spending hours creating made-to-order products, industry can now quickly produce millions of goods, in smaller and smaller batch sizes, without compromising on quality or productivity. This transformation is possible in a data-driven digital ecosystem powered by connected devices and solutions that maximize the potential from existing infrastructure.

Simply put, the digital transformation of businesses allows to capitalize on the benefits of digital tools such as smart sensors, cloud computing and the Internet to add value to existing manufacturing processes. Digitalizing a production process opens fresh opportunities by gathering meaningful insights that can be analyzed to better understand the condition of each and every individual piece of equipment. Sensors on a machine continuously track its status and can immediately alert operators in the case of an anomaly in normal working parameters. Digitalization enables operators to move from reacting to incidents on the shop floor to proactively maintaining their equipment to avoid unplanned downtime. This gives manufacturers the ability to meet increasingly demanding deadlines even while producing a greater mix of products.

Building a digital ecosystem

In a world of ever-growing complexity and competition, digitalization can offer a quick boost to the productivity of industrial equipment. Something as simple as installing a sensor on heat-sensitive machines, such as a welding robot, can help an operator to track temperature variations to ensure that the optimum temperature is maintained for the most flawless weld from the robot. Gaining increased transparency of processes in a factory not only leads to higher productivity, but also potentially helps to save significant resources due to fewer unplanned outages and can increase the lifecycle and decrease the power consumption of equipment.

Of course, the greatest value of the digital transformation of industries can be achieved when every piece of equipment along the value chain is connected. Be it directly on the shop floor or through the Industrial Internet of Things. Digitally connected assets that understand the information being passed around the shop floor can interact autonomously, lending a whole new dimension of efficiency and autonomy to industries.

The right digital strategy to choose

The statistics around digital transformation are highly encouraging. A 2019 report by market research firm IDC estimated that direct investment in digital transformation would approach a staggering $7.4 trillion between now and 20231. But on the flipside, it is not uncommon to see digital transformation strategies failing to reach their goals as companies struggle to find the right approach and trained employees who can take on the challenge of a complete recast of their business models.

For some six decades now, ABB has been at the forefront of developing and deploying technology for digital manufacturing. Just one example is the introduction of the world`s first digitally controlled robot in the year 1974. Today, ABB as a technology leader is driving the digital transformation of industries. It masters all elements of the Fourth Industrial Revolution that represents the next wave of innovations including IIoT, artificial intelligence and modular manufacturing to support both big and small businesses. For instance, artificial intelligence is at the heart of a solution that ABB has co-created with Microsoft to help a Nordic salmon fishery remotely track its fish population, thereby reducing the need for human intervention and ultimately making the production of over 70,000 tons of salmon a year more sustainable.

Digital transformation in real-time

One of the cornerstones of digital transformations and the factory of the future is the ability to act in real time, which allows companies to quickly respond to issues before they become problems. That is why I believe that progress that ABB has made with its telecommunication partners Ericsson and Swisscom in the field of 5G communications is so exciting.

At the recently concluded World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, ABB’s collaborative YuMi robot carved a message in a sandbox that was replicated at the same time by a second YuMi robot located 1.5 km away. This demonstration of low latency communication over long distances enabled by 5G can help bring future concepts of more flexible and modular manufacturing to reality. 5G networks over a specified area can connect thousands of automated guided vehicles that move around the factory floor bringing essential parts to production hubs within a very short time.

Much like mass production; paper designs and traditional 2D schematics will find fewer users as the industrial world becomes more digital. Taking their place are concepts like digital twins where a fully functional virtual image of a physical asset is created to help operators iron out details such as to test the interaction of a machine with its surroundings. Digital twins allow businesses avoid losing time in perfecting and testing out product prototypes or modifications and potentially reducing production costs.

A digital transformation of its own kind is happening in industrial services. Advanced monitoring solutions, such as ABB AbilityTM Connected Services, are helping companies monitor their assets in many sites on one system. Connected Services applied to ABB’s robots can help businesses monitor the condition of their fleet, diagnose anomalies, remotely operate them, help plan maintenance schedules by prioritizing the hardest working robots and provide a backup management so as to enable easy and fast recovery from a systems crash or from unwanted changes.

Enhancing efficiency and productivity, reducing unwanted incidents and creating a more reliable manufacturing process using digital transformation ultimately reduces the consumption of resources and helps build a more sustainable manufacturing process. We are at a point in time where we have come to understand that digitalization is not just a passing fad or a privilege of large companies, but a fundamental element of the future of industries.

1 Source: https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS45617519

Bazmi Husain is the Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of ABB.

Source: Digital Transformation Will Change Manufacturing As We Know It

Rico Dittrich graduated in International Politics and History from Jacobs University, Bremen, before moving to Ireland to make ends meet by testing video games. Rico changed companies and joined Google and went on to troubleshoot large customers’ issues with some of Google’s most technical and advanced digital analytics services. He currently works as Digital Analytics Specialist at Google, collaborating with large German retailers to set them up for the future of online measurement, attribution and automation. He has lived in six countries, across three continents, in the last six years and is fluent in German, English, and Spanish. At TEDxUniPaderborn 2017, Rico spoke on the topic “The difficulty of digital transformation & how to make it happen”. Born and raised in Germany, Rico Dittrich graduated in International Politics and History from Jacobs University, Bremen, before moving to Ireland to make ends meet by testing video games. Rico changed companies and joined Google and went on to troubleshoot large customers’ issues with some of Google’s most technical and advanced digital analytics services. He currently works as Digital Analytics Specialist at Google, collaborating with large German retailers to set them up for the future of online measurements, attributions and automation. He has lived in six countries, across three continents, in the last six years and is fluent in German, English, and Spanish. At TEDxUniPaderborn 2017, Rico will be speaking on the topic “Why Digital Transformation Is So Difficult and How to Make It Happen”. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

Artificial Human Beings: The Amazing Examples Of Robotic Humanoids And Digital Humans

As artificial intelligence continues to mature, we are seeing a corresponding growth in sophistication for humanoid robots and the applications for digital human beings in many aspects of modern-day life. To help you see the possibilities, we have pulled together some of the best examples of humanoid robots and where you might see digital humans in your everyday life today.

Humanoid Robots

Even though the earliest form of humanoid was created by Leonardo Da Vinci in 1495 (a mechanical armored suit that could sit, stand and walk), today’s humanoid robots are powered by artificial intelligence and can listen, talk, move and respond. They use sensors and actuators (motors that control movement) and have features that are modeled after human parts. Whether they are structurally similar to a male (called an Android) or a female (Gynoid), it’s a challenge to create realistic robots that replicate human capabilities.

The first modern-day humanoid robots were created to learn how to make better prosthetics for humans, but now they are developed to do many things to entertain us, specific jobs such as a home health worker or manufacturer, and more. Artificial intelligence makes robots human-like and helps humanoids listen, understand, and respond to their environment and interactions with humans. Here are some of the most innovative humanoid robots in development today:

Atlas: When you see Atlas in action (doing backflips and jumping from one platform to another), you can see why its creators call it “the world’s most dynamic humanoid.” It was unveiled in 2013, but its prowess for jumping platforms was released in a video in 2017. Atlas was created to carry out search and rescue missions.

Ocean One: Stanford Robotics Lab developed Ocean One, a bimanual underwater humanoid robot. Since Ocean One can reach depths that humans cannot, it can be very instrumental in researching coral reefs and other deep-sea inhabitants and features when it explores. Its anthropomorphic design and resemblance to a human diver make it very maneuverable.

Petman: Boston Dynamics, the same company responsible for Atlas, also created Petman (Protection Ensemble Test Mannequin) to test chemical and biological suits for the U.S. military. When you see bipedal Petman in motion, it’s easy to see its human-like characteristics.

Robear: Other humanoid robots such as Robear might look more cartoon than human, but their actions definitely mimic human movement. Robear was developed to possibly help with the shortage of caregivers in Japan as the population ages. As a result, this humanoid has very gentle movements.

Sophia: A humanoid robot developed by Hanson Robotics, is one of the most human-like robots. Sophia is able to have a human-like conversation and is able to make many human-like facial expressions. She has been made the world’s first robot citizen and is the robot Innovation Ambassador for the United Nations Development Programme.

Digital Human Beings

Digital human beings are photorealistic digitized virtual versions of humans. Consider them avatars. While they don’t necessarily have to be created in the likeness of a specific individual (they can be entirely unique), they do look and act like humans. Unlike digital assistants such as Alexa or Siri, these AI-powered virtual beings are designed to interact, sympathize, and have conversations just like a fellow human would. Here are a few digital human beings in development or at work today:

Neons: AI-powered lifeforms created by Samsung’s STAR Labs and called Neons include unique personalities such as a banker, K-pop star, and yoga instructor. While the technology is still young, the company expects that, ultimately, Neons will be available on a subscription basis to provide services such as a customer service or concierge.

Digital Pop Stars: In Japan, new pop stars are getting attention—and these pop stars are made of pixels. One of the band members of AKB48, Amy, is entirely digital and was made from borrowing features from the human artists in the group. Another Japanese artist, Hatsune Miku, is a virtual character from Crypton Future Media. Although she started out as the illustration to promote a voice synthesizer with the same name, she now draws her own fans to sold-out auditoriums. With Auxuman, artificial intelligence is actually making the music and creating the digital performers that perform the original compositions.

AI Hosts: Virtual copies of celebrities were created by ObEN Inc to host the Spring Festival Gala, a celebration of the Chinese lunar new year. This project illustrates the potential of personal AIs—a substitute for a real person when they can’t be present in person. Similarly, China’s Xinhua news agency introduced an AI news anchor that will report the news 24/7.

Fashion Models and Social Media Influencers: Another way digital human beings are being used is in the fashion world. H&M used computer-generated models on its website, and Artificial Talent Co. created an entire business to generate completely photorealistic and customizable fashion models. And it turns out you don’t have to be a real-life human to attract a social media following. Miquela, an artificial intelligence “influencer,” has 1.3 million Instagram followers.

Digital humans have been used in television, movies, and video games already, but there are limitations to using them to replace human actors. And while it’s challenging to predict exactly how digital humans will alter our futures, there are people pondering what digital immortality would be like or how to control the negative possibilities of the technology.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Bernard Marr is an internationally best-selling author, popular keynote speaker, futurist, and a strategic business & technology advisor to governments and companies. He helps organisations improve their business performance, use data more intelligently, and understand the implications of new technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, blockchains, and the Internet of Things. Why don’t you connect with Bernard on Twitter (@bernardmarr), LinkedIn (https://uk.linkedin.com/in/bernardmarr) or instagram (bernard.marr)?

Source: Artificial Human Beings: The Amazing Examples Of Robotic Humanoids And Digital Humans

5 Wonderful Humanoid Robots With Emotions & Artificial Intelligence || Best Robots #23 —————————————————————————————————— Join Amazon Prime For Amazing Offers(Free 30 Days Trial) : http://amzn.to/2HjTpKM ——————————————————————————————————- We need your support by subscribing, SUBSCRIBE : https://goo.gl/Jq4EwQ Do you have any idea about smart home robots? The futuristic modern robots are available in the market now. They are very intelligent robots. These all are so expert and very helpful to be part of your daily life. They can do lots of works even think like a human being and help you in your every task of your dailies life, you can not imagine. They can guide you, they can work like teachers, entertainer, security guard, postman, and anything you deserve. In a word, They are superb, Incredible. Here are the details and the links for the robots are given below. 1. JIA JIA : https://goo.gl/BPJaq4 2. SOFIA : http://www.hansonrobotics.com/robot/s… 3. Asuna : https://goo.gl/EUtTjn 4. ACTROID : http://www.roboticstoday.com/robots/a… 5. ERICA : http://www.jst.go.jp/erato/ishiguro/e… ——————————————————————————– Best 3 robots 2017, You will intend to buy in future. https://youtu.be/Y23TR34n618?list=PLs… ——————————————————————————– Best 3 robots 2017, You will intend to buy in future. https://youtu.be/Y23TR34n618?list=PLs… —————————————————————————— 5 Best 360 camera – World’s smallest Video camera / Gopro Camera #1- Nico, Moka, Luna, Two Eyes Vr, https://youtu.be/aBjy1G0A7A0 5 Best Fidget Spinners You’ll Intend to buy – Infinity cube, Zerohour, Centerspin, Revoq, Triportal https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_SX5J… Best 5 Drones, You wanna Buy #2- Mini Drone, Waterproof Drone – Hovercraft, Airblock, Bionic Bird https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fswVv… BIKI: First Bionic Wireless Underwater Fish Drone – Underwater Drone / Underwater Camera #2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0hRHW… BEST 5 UNDERWATER DRONES / UNDERWATER CAMERA – BEST DRONE WITH CAMERA /WATERPROOF CAMERA #3 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVZR5… Best 5 Humanoid Robots-New Generation Super Robots(Robothespian, Asimo, HRP4, Atlas robot,Valkyrie) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=raMiw… Best 3 robots 2017, You will intend to buy in future https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y23TR…

 

How Digital Transformation Is Revolutionizing Government

Infrastructure modernization has become critical for governments looking to serve citizens in the digital era. To provide services and programs that improve the lives of their constituents, local, state, and federal government agencies are undergoing digital transformations to take advantage of new technologies that enable them to harness the power of the cloud.

Yet while technology can help government become more effective, change of this magnitude doesn’t happen overnight. Based on myriad factors, different governments and government agencies are at various points in their digital transformations. Many will need to take a look at how they currently work and embrace technology that will help them scale their efforts and fulfill their commitments to constituents.

Here’s a look at how these digital transformations are enabling government agencies to reimagine how work gets done and redefine how they serve their citizens.

Automation Saves Time, Spurs Innovation

Government bureaucracy is known for the inordinate amount of paperwork required for the operation of any given department or agency. Workers spend time on meetings, paperwork, email, and data collection and reporting that they could be using to work on future activities and programs and more effectively serve other goals as well, according to a survey by the Governing Exchange.

Thanks to automation, this is starting to change. According to a recent report from Deloitte Consulting, the past year has seen a shift from government agencies experimenting with automation to implementing it across the board — a shift that is saving government workers thousands of hours previously spent on processing data and data entry. Now, employees at agencies leveraging automation are able to spend time on more valuable, mission-critical work to further innovation and better serve constituents.

As government entities rethink how work gets done, some are turning to a work execution platform to track, automate, and manage their operations and processes from end to end. A work execution platform enables government workers to automate data collection and other processes and workflows to move work forward more effectively and efficiently.

Governments Collaborate to Serve Constituents

Digital transformation can also help facilitate collaboration between different government entities, improving programs and services to better the lives of citizens. Governments that are able to work together to quickly, effectively, and securely share the resources, budget, or information needed to solve big problems can better serve citizens and communities at many levels.

One example of intergovernmental collaboration is evidenced the Deloitte-NASCIO Cybersecurity Study, which looks at how state chief information security officers can succeed in overcoming the top challenges of implementing effective cybersecurity programs. In order to meet critical security controls that protect privacy around healthcare data, state Health and Human Services (HHS) agencies worked with the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to successfully secure funding in order to put in place the recommended Minimum Acceptable Risk Safeguards (MARS) for systems that interact with Medicare and Medicaid data. This additional funding provided state HHS agencies with the resources needed (in addition to their state IT budgets) to further their digital transformations.

A common platform that serves as a single source of truth for an organization can help facilitate collaboration and reduce friction. Smartsheet Gov is the only work execution platform in the FedRAMP marketplace. It offers fast user adoption and seamless, secure sharing that helps organizations to easily collaborate and break down silos across departments and agencies — or even between federal and local government — to drive the best results for citizens. Through the use of data collection forms, Smartsheet Gov also enables agencies to quickly capture information across departments and regions, so they can analyze and act on the latest information.

Smart Cities Serve Tech-Savvy Citizens

In addition to digital platforms, governments are exploring and embracing the internet of things (IoT) and other innovative technologies as it applies to communities. Smart cities create a digitally connected environment to help governments better serve citizens.

Features of smart cities might include “smart meters” that enable public utilities to help citizens save energy or conserve water, and road sensors that track traffic patterns to support infrastructure development. This type of innovation can help local governments reduce spending and improve efficiency.

More comprehensive initiatives are in the works as well. For example, the Greater Phoenix Smart Region, seeks to bridge the gap between innovative technology and the needs of communities and policy makers through a partnership between the public sector, educational institutions, and government entities to create, advance, and adopt smart city technology “that improves the quality of life for all citizens.”

To plan for these complex initiatives that bridge the public and private sectors, as well as academia, a work execution platform can help drive the effective collaboration and transparency needed to manage innovative approaches to governance.

Learn more about how Smartsheet is powering digital transformation in government.

Smartsheet Contributor Smartsheet Contributor Brand Contributor

At a time when organizational speed and execution are critical to gaining a competitive edge, modern work — especially at scale —

Source: How Digital Transformation Is Revolutionizing Government

Digitization Is Poised To Transform Steel Plants

We live in a digital age, and our production processes need to evolve to reflect that fact. Converting traditional production environments into highly automated “smart” plants will entail fundamental changes in the way metals manufacturers interact with their suppliers and customers. When technology works in perfect harmony with the different aspects of metals production, the effect can be compared to that of a skilled orchestra’s performance……………

Source: Digitization Is Poised To Transform Steel Plants

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