16 Slow Cooker Recipes That You Can Prep and Forget

 
 

The humble slow cooker may never be the showstopping star of the culinary appliance show, but for many busy cooks, it is the behind-the-scenes workhorse of the home kitchen: cooking and keeping meals warm for family members or roommates with wildly divergent schedules who work outside the home (or would just rather not cook at the end of a long day), but still want a hot, home-cooked meal.

The secret to successful slow cooking is using it for what it does best — braises, stews and soups — and not for cooking delicate foods like pasta, low-fat meats and seafood (with the exception of one smart shrimp recipe below). The recipes we’ve chosen here are just that sort, and they don’t require a ton of prep.

A tip: Many of these recipes have Instant Pot or stovetop versions. If they do, we’ve included links. For those that don’t, skim through the comments section of the recipes; many readers have come up with their own Instant Pot or stovetop variations that might serve as inspiration.

1. Mississippi Roast

 

Sam Sifton was on the fence about slow cookers until he tried the original version of this recipe that’s made with a packet of Ranch dressing mix, a packet of au jus mix, a stick of butter and a handful of pepperoncini peppers. He came up with a crazy-good no-powder-packet version that works just as well with beef, pork, venison, and as recently confirmed by one Colorado reader, moose.

Recipe: Mississippi Roast

Everyone’s favorite slow cooker recipes are those that are truly “fix-it and forget it,” and Sarah DiGregorio’s chipotle-honey chicken tacos fit the bill. Combine boneless chicken thighs, honey, onion and garlic powders, cumin, salt and chipotle chiles and adobo sauce in the crock, and cook on low for three to five hours. Shred, then tuck into tortillas and top as you wish. Chipotle peppers can be very spicy, so scale back considerably if you or someone at the table has sensitive taste buds.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Chipotle-Honey Chicken Tacos | Instant Pot Chipotle-Honey Chicken Tacos

Here’s a clever way to have a hot breakfast ready the minute you wake up. Sarah DiGregorio makes use of the auto-warm setting, a feature that appears on most newer slow cookers. After the cook time finishes, the machine automatically switches to warm. Here, steel-cut oats are cooked on low for two hours, then held on warm for six more, yielding a perfectly cooked, yet textural and satisfying porridge that will keep you full until lunch.

As far as we’re concerned, any recipe that calls for a can of Dr Pepper deserves a second look. This slow cooker barbecue pulled pork, which was adapted from a three-ingredient recipe found on Pinterest and food blogs everywhere, is practically effortless and lends itself to improvisation. Sub in root beer, cola, birch beer, actual beer, coffee or even Mountain Dew for the Dr Pepper, but nothing with artificial sweeteners, please. Those can leave an unpleasant bitter aftertaste.

Recipes: Slow Cooker BBQ Pulled Pork | Instant Pot BBQ Pulled Pork

This savory Thai-inspired sweet-potato soup from Sarah DiGregorio is rich with curry paste, peanut butter and coconut milk, so it makes for a very stick-to-your-ribs vegan main if you are using a shrimp-free curry paste. If you can find them at your market, scatter the top with chile-lime flavored peanuts. If you can’t, standard roasted peanuts will do just as well. Serve this soup solo or over rice and alongside a cold, crisp salad.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Curried Sweet Potato Soup With Coconut and Kale | Instant Pot Curried Sweet Potato Soup With Coconut and Kale

Meteorologists are predicting an intense winter, so we recommend keeping a crock of this mulled cider simmering on your countertop until March. That is all.

“Who knew you could do ribs in a slow cooker, and they could be this succulent and luscious with a comical lack of effort?” wrote one reader. No liquid is needed to make these tender hot-honey ribs from Sarah DiGregorio because they cook in their own juices as they braise. A lively hot honey made with honey, red chiles, lime juice and peel, and apple cider vinegar doubles as a broiling glaze and serving sauce.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Hot-Honey Ribs | Instant Pot Hot-Honey Ribs

This white bean and chicken chili from Sarah DiGregorio is a nice break from the traditional brick-red beef version. Two types of chiles — canned and fresh — provide plenty of pep, and fresh or frozen corn adds crunch. Top it with cubed avocado, sour cream and shredded Cheddar or Monterey Jack, then serve it alongside Melissa Clark’s brown butter skillet cornbread for a meal you’ll want to make again and again.

Recipe: Slow Cooker White Chicken Chili

Shrimp isn’t a common slow cooker ingredient, but here, a briny, caper-laden tomato sauce (inspired by eggs in purgatory) simmers for several hours, then shrimp are dropped in just a few minutes before you’re ready to eat, so they are just cooked through, but not overdone. Serve it over pearl couscous or with a hunk of craggy bread to sop up the mouthwatering sauce.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Shrimp in Purgatory | Stovetop Shrimp in Purgatory

Sarah DiGregorio’s riff on the classic Italian vegetable soup is an excellent way to use up vegetables that are on the verge and bread that has seen better days. This recipe calls for dried cannellini beans (no need to soak!), but you can also use two 15-ounce cans. Just be sure to cut back on the salt considerably, as canned beans are already salted.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Ribollita With Smoked Mozzarella | Instant Pot Ribollita With Smoked Mozzarella

Traditional red beans and rice calls for sausage and ham hock, but in this vegan recipe, Sarah DiGregorio uses smoked paprika, miso and soy to provide the same satisfying smoky-spicy flavor. They won’t come out quite as creamy as the richer pork version, so smash a few ladlefuls against the side of the pot to help thicken things up. Serve with rice, hot sauce and maybe a little Professor Longhair for background music.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Vegan Red Beans and Rice | Instant Pot Red Beans and Rice

This clever recipe from Sarah DiGregorio was developed with Thanksgiving in mind, but it’s perfect for any meal where stove and oven space are in high demand. The entire thing is done in the slow cooker: Toss peeled potatoes, melted butter, salt and black pepper into the crock, then cook on high until the potatoes are fork tender (about four hours). Add sour cream and a bit more butter, then mash until smooth and creamy.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Mashed Potatoes With Sour Cream and Chives

What is fall without pot roast? Not worth living, we say. This classic red wine version from Sarah DiGregorio features fall-apart meat and tender, sweet vegetables. To avoid too-soft vegetables, she recommends adding the vegetables about 4 hours before dinner time, but if that doesn’t work for you, one reader suggested this tip she got from Cooks Illustrated magazine: “Make a packet out of aluminum foil. Put in the vegetables and a bit of the wine mixture and a bit of the herbs, salt and pepper. Seal up the foil packet and place it on top of the meat in the slow cooker. Cover and cook as normal. When done, just open the packet and mix in with the meat. Perfect veggies every time!”

“If one could eat the smell of Christmas, this is what it would taste like. Pure MAGIC,” wrote one reader. Well, that’s an endorsement. This sticky sweet treat, from Sarah DiGregorio, is redolent with cinnamon and cardamom, and is a pudding in the British sense of the word: a dense and moist steamed date cake that is perfectly suited to being made in the slow cooker. You can also make it in the oven (instructions are included in the recipe), but it will have the texture of a moist, sliceable quick bread.

Recipe: Slow Cooker Sticky Toffee Pudding

One big complaint about slow cookers is that you can’t simmer soups and stews with the lid off to reduce and thicken. Sarah DiGregorio has a fix for that when it comes to creamy soups: Make a simple flour and butter roux in the microwave, then whisk it into the stock in the slow cooker before adding the other ingredients. Ta-da! A thick and creamy soup. This one is loaded with fresh mushrooms, carrots, herbs and wild rice, making it the perfect sweater weather vegetarian soup.

Recipes: Slow Cooker Mushroom and Wild Rice Soup | Instant Pot Mushroom and Wild Rice Soup

This soup is here to collect all of the Parmesan rinds hanging out in your freezer. (And if you’re not saving them, please start!) Here, the rind infuses the soup with a complex flavor that is really something special. Wheat berries are called for because they hold their shape and take a long time to become tender, but you can also use farro or spelt. Just keep in mind that they will cook faster, so they will end up a bit softer.

Recipes: Slow Cooker White Bean Parmesan Soup | Instant Pot White Bean Parmesan Soup

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Source: 16 Slow Cooker Recipes – The New York Times

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The Science Behind Grilling the Perfect Steak

Summer has arrived, and it’s time to fire up the backyard grill. Though many of us are trying to eat less beef for environmental reasons, it’s hard to resist indulging in an occasional steak — and you’ll want to make the most of the experience.

So, what’s the best way to grill that steak? Science has some answers. Meat scientists (many of them, unsurprisingly, in Texas) have spent whole careers studying how to produce the tenderest, most flavorful beef possible. Much of what they’ve learned holds lessons only for cattle producers and processors, but a few of their findings can guide backyard grillmasters in their choice of meat and details of the grilling process.

Let’s start with the choice of meat. Every experienced cook knows that the lightly used muscles of the loin, along the backbone, have less connective tissue and thus give tenderer results than the hard-working muscles of the leg. And they know to look for steaks with lots of marbling, the fat deposits between muscle fibers that are a sign of high-quality meat. “If you have more marbling, the meat will be tenderer, juicier, and it will have richer flavor,” says Sulaiman Matarneh, a meat scientist at Utah State University who wrote about muscle biology and meat quality in the 2021 Annual Review of Animal Biosciences.

From a flavor perspective, in fact, the differences between one steak and the next are mostly a matter of fat content: the amount of marbling and the composition of the fatty acid subunits of the fat molecules. Premium cuts like ribeye have more marbling and are also richer in oleic acid, an especially tasty fatty acid — “the one fatty acid that frequently correlates with positive eating experience,” says Jerrad Legako, a meat scientist at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. Sirloin, in contrast, has less oleic acid and more fatty acid types that can yield less appealing, fishy flavor hints during cooking.

That fatty acid difference also plays out in a big decision that consumers make when they buy a steak: grain-fed or grass-fed beef? Grain-fed cattle — animals that live their final months in a feedlot eating a diet rich in corn and soybeans — have meat that’s higher in oleic acid. Animals that spend their whole life grazing on pasture have a higher proportion of omega-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids that break down into smaller molecules with fishy and gamy flavors. Many consumers prefer to buy grass-fed beef anyway, either to avoid the ethical issues of feedlots or because they like that gamy flavor and leaner meat.

The biggest influence on the final flavor of that steak, though, is how you cook it. Flavorwise, cooking meat accomplishes two things. First, the heat of the grill breaks the meat’s fatty acids into smaller molecules that are more volatile — that is, more likely to become airborne. These volatiles are responsible for the steak’s aroma, which accounts for the majority of its flavor. Molecules called aldehydes, ketones and alcohols among that breakdown mix are what we perceive as distinctively beefy.

The second way that cooking builds flavor is through browning, a process that chemists call the Maillard reaction. This is a fantastically complex process in which amino acids and traces of sugars in the meat react at high temperatures to kick off a cascade of chemical changes that result in many different volatile end products.

Most important of these are molecules called pyrazines and furans, which contribute the roasty, nutty flavors that steak aficionados crave. The longer and hotter the cooking, the deeper into the Maillard reaction you go and the more of these desirable end products you get — until eventually, the meat starts to char, producing undesirable bitter, burnt flavors.

The challenge for the grillmaster is to achieve the ideal level of Maillard products at the moment the meat reaches the desired degree of doneness. Here, there are three variables to play with: temperature, time and the thickness of the steak.

Thin steaks cook through more quickly, so they need a hot grill to generate enough browning in the short time available, says Chris Kerth, a meat scientist at Texas A&M University. Kerth and his colleagues have studied this process in the lab, searing steaks to precise specifications and feeding the results into a gas chromatograph, which measures the amount of each volatile chemical produced.

Kerth found, as expected, that thin, half-inch steaks cooked at relatively low temperatures have mostly the beefy flavors characteristic of fatty acid breakdown, while higher temperatures also produce a lot of the roasty pyrazines that result from the Maillard reaction. So if your steak is thin, crank up that grill — and leave the lid open so that the meat cooks through a little more slowly. That will give you time to build a complex, beefy-roasty flavor.

And to get the best sear on both sides, flip the meat about a third of the way through the expected cook time, not halfway — that’s because as the first side cooks, the contracting muscle fibers drive water to the uncooked side. After you flip, this water cools the second side so it takes longer to brown, Kerth’s team found.

When the scientists tested thicker, 1.5-inch steaks, the opposite problem happened: The exterior would burn unpleasantly before the middle finished cooking. For these steaks, a moderate grill temperature gave the best mix of volatiles. And sure enough, when Kerth’s team tested their steaks on actual people, they found that diners gave lower ratings to thick steaks grilled hot and fast. Diners rated the other temperatures and cooking times as all similar to each other, but thick steaks cooked at moderate temperatures won out by a nose.

That might seem odd, given that steakhouses often boast of their thick slabs of prime beef and the intense heat of their grills — exactly the combination Kerth’s study found least desirable. It works because the steakhouses use a two-step cooking process: First, they sear the meat on the hot grill, and then they finish cooking in a moderate oven. “That way, they get the degree of doneness to match the sear that they want,” says Kerth. Home cooks can do the same by popping their seared meat into a 350°F oven until it reaches their desired doneness.

The best degree of doneness, of course, is largely a matter of personal preference — but science has something to say here, too. Meat left rare, says Kerth, doesn’t receive enough heat to break down its fatty acids to generate beefy flavors. And once you go past medium, you lose some of the “bloody” flavors that come with lightly cooked meat. “A lot of people, myself included, like a little bit of bloody note with the brown pyrazines and Maillard compounds,” says Kerth. “It has a bigger flavor.” For those reasons, he advises, “I wouldn’t go any lower than medium rare or certainly any higher than medium. Then you just start losing a lot of the flavor.”

Kerth has one more piece of advice for home cooks: Watch the meat closely when it’s on the grill! “When you’re at those temperatures, a lot happens in a short period of time,” he says. “You start getting a lot of chemical reactions happening very, very quickly.” That’s the scientific basis for what every experienced griller has learned from (literally) bitter experience: It’s easy to burn the meat if you’re not paying attention.

Happy scientifically informed grilling!

Source: The Science Behind Grilling the Perfect Steak | Innovation | Smithsonian Magazine

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Critics:

Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).

Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.

Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).

Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens. Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.

References:

  • AngryBBQ. Not sure what about barbecue makes Mike and Jannah Haas angry, but they have a nice little blog.
  • Barbecue Master. Based in NC barbecue country, Cyndi Allison has been writing about barbecue and teaching it for more than a decade. Check out the links to her other websites and blogs.
  • Barbecues & Grilling at about.com. Derrick Riches is a self taught cook who has learned a lot and he passes it along in this large and deep reference.
  • Barbecuen. Articles and ideas on everything from grills to cooking elk.
  • BroBBQ. A blog of recipes, product testing, fun by Jack Thompson.
  • BBQDryRubs. The site is a nice hobby site from David Somerville covering more than rubs. He focuses on Weber gear and the sausage section is good.
  • BBQ FAQ. An astonishing compilation of wisdom from scores of serious cue’ers. The only problem is that the mailing list of participants has been dissolved so you can no longer sign up. Also, a lot of the links are broken. Still, the knowledge there is timeless.
  • BBQ Sauce Reviews. He likes sauce. Some better than others. See if you fave is on his 5-star list.
  • Braai 4 Heritage. In South Africa they call it braai, and everyone barbecues. They even have a National Braai Day!
  • BBQ Specialties. A nice little blog with recipes.
  • Cooking Outdoors. Gary House is fearless as he cooks everything on his grills, even pies and bread. There are sections on barbecue, cast iron cooking, Dutch oven, fire pit, and foil cooking. Lots of recipes well illustrated with photos.
  • Food Fire Friends. Mark Jenner’s site explores many aspects of outdoor cooking, including recipes, techniques, and product guides, as he works his way toward mastering cooking with live
    fire.
  • GrateTV. This frequent video show stars Jack Waiboer, a talented BBQ cook and competitor based in SC, and co-host Bill West (above). They teach tips, technique, tools, toys, secret ingredients, beer drinking, and answer viewer email questions. They know their stuff, and teach it with a smile. That’s them above, and one of the gadgets they feature.
  • GrillGirl. Robyn Medlin Lindars knows how to cook, and she can do it outdoors. She blogs about her adventures and recipes. Her specialty is making barbecue fun for women. She also cooks on her sailboat! Fun stuff!
  • A Hamburger Today. Gently patted together by Robyn Lee, this site is made of prime restaurant commentary, stuffed with burger lore, topped with good humor, and held together with beautiful drippy photographs. She is aided by a handful of burgerphiles who know their stuff.
  • Home BBQ. Message boards that discuss just about anything barbecue.
  • The Ingredient Store.com. Home of the FAB injections and marinades. FAB is the stuff most of the brisket champs inject (into the meat, not themselves).
  • Live Fire Online. Curt McAdams can cook and takes nice pix in Ohio. He focuses on barbecuing and grilling, but often digresses on local foods, markets, baking, and dining.
  • Mark Stevens. I met Mark in one of the online message boards and have learned a thing or two from him and his tips. You can too. His home made website has great links, and some good recipes and tips.
  • Naked Whiz. This may be the most inaccurate and inappropriate name for a website on the net, but don’t let it deter you. This is the go-to site if you have any questions about charcoal, how it is made, and what is the best.
  • Nibble Me This. Chris Grove is in Knoxville and he works his Big Green Egg and other cookers hard. He has also written a book about kamados.
  • Grillocracy. Our lead writer Clint Cantwell’s personal BBQ and grilling blog.
  • Patio Daddio BBQ. John Dawson brings his analytical IT mind to the patio and tests new techniques, equipment, and recipes with an unusual thoroughness and sharp sense of humor. He also competes. This is one of my faves.
  • Postcards from Scotsylvania. Scot Murphy is a very smart, witty, fella, and a pretty good cook too. His blog covers barbecue, gardening, politics, comics, and “ruminations about the universe, occasional whining, snarkiness, stuff like that.”
  • Real Truck. Accessories and gear for your truck.
  • She Smoke. Julie Reinhardt is the author of the book She-Smoke, a Backyard Barbecue Book, and co-owner of Smokin’ Pete’s BBQ in Seattle. This blog is an extension of the book, the restaurant, and how she rolls with two kids in tow.

Surprising Side Effects of Eating Chickpeas, According to Science

Roasted chickpeas

If you’re a vegetarian or try to eat plant-based most of the time, you’re likely familiar with chickpeas. This high-protein legume is part of the ‘bean’ family and is a tasty component of many recipes. In just one cup, eating chickpeas offers your body 10 to 15 grams of protein, 9 to 12 grams of fiber, 4 grams of fat, and 34 to 45 grams of carbohydrates. In short: they’re a powerhouse of nutrients.

They can be served soft or crunchy, salty or slightly sweet, and they still offer lots of vitamins and minerals. When you include chickpeas in your meal planning, you’ll give your body a wellness boost. Pay attention to how you feel after eating chickpeas. If you start to have any sort of stomach issues or other symptoms, consult your doctor. Though most people enjoy the taste and benefits of these bite-sized legumes, some may not digest them well.

From what creates addicting hummus to the perfect addition on top of a salad or warm bowl, chickpeas are a mostly healthy addition to your balanced diet. Here, we explore the side effects of eating chickpeas, including the good and the not-so-good. And for even more healthy tips be sure to check out our list of The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.

They help with digestion.

Fiber is an essential part of digestion, and yet, some people struggle to get enough of it every day. Luckily, chickpeas soar in this category, particularly with a high dose of soluble fiber called raffinose. This helps you to digest your food more slowly since the good kind of bacteria breaks down the raffinose. Also, bowel movements might be more comfortable and more frequent, according to one study about chickpeas.

Here are 9 Warning Signs You’re Not Eating Enough Fiber.

They can help lower cholesterol.

For optimum vitality and energy, it’s essential to manage your cholesterol. How come? This stat can contribute to heart disease, obesity, strokes, and other serious illnesses. Because chickpeas are packed with soluble fiber, it improves our gut health and thus, lowers our cholesterol levels.

Along with chickpeas, here are 17 Foods That Lower Cholesterol.

They may lower your cancer risk.

Our bodies are impressive things, able to fight disease, create organs during pregnancy and protect us against viruses, environmental factors, and more. When we feed our body nutrient-rich foods, like eating chickpeas, it’s like giving ourselves a helping hand. In fact, when we consume chickpeas, our bodies produce ‘butyrate,’ a short-chain fatty acid. Some studies have shown this fatty acid can fight sick and/or dying cells. Another study goes a step further and says this could lower our overall risk for colorectal cancer!

They give you stronger bones.

Like many other legumes, chickpeas are packed with fiber, magnesium, and calcium. These present many wonders for our body, but one of the most significant is building stronger healthier bones.

Canned chickpeas should be eaten within a year.

As with anything that’s packaged from a manufacturer, canned chickpeas often contain an added preservative to ensure freshness and taste. Though this doesn’t pose a risk most of the time, in some cases, the metal could be problematic. One study conducted by the University of Minnesota found that sometimes, the cans or lids can rust and leak into our food. That’s why it’s best to store canned goods in a dry, dark place and consume them within one year of purchase.

Be careful of botulism.

Though the risk for contracting botulism from canned goods is very low, it’s still there, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Botulism is common when someone cans food at home, and the canning process wasn’t done properly. This serious illness is rare and is caused by bacteria that disrupt the nervous system. Sometimes, when canned foods aren’t stored properly, this bacteria can thrive, particularly in low-salt, low-oxygen, and low-sugar solutions, like chickpeas.

They’re only healthy if you don’t overdo it.

Since chickpeas are healthy, you can have as much as you’d like, right? Not so much. While they are a source of protein, fiber, iron, and zinc, they can also be turned into various snacks and meals that rack up the calories and fat components. Two examples are hummus and falafel, both of which should be eaten in moderation.

They may not be gluten-free—even if they say they are.

If you pay attention to the packaging on chickpeas in Whole Foods, Trader Joe’s, and any other grocery store, you’ll notice ‘gluten-free’ isn’t printed on their label. But, since legumes don’t contain legumes or other sources of gluten, shouldn’t that messaging be apparent? The reason manufacturers shy away from this language is due to the risk of cross-contamination. Some preserves could be derived from grains, so to be on the safe side, they don’t call it a gluten-free food.

So if you find yourself with a can of chickpeas and you’re ready to reap the benefits of this nutritional superstar, check out our list of 29 Healthy Chickpea Recipes.

Source: Surprising Side Effects of Eating Chickpeas, According to Science | Eat This Not That

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Tofu, mint, detailed
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[…]  Cucumber, hummus (fresh chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, fresh garlic, filtered water, Himalayan sea salt), smoked paprika […]
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DUMP AND GO Instant Pot Recipes | easy vegan instant pot meals
vegan-recipe.org – Today
[…] ly/whitebean-stew Tomato-Fennel Chickpeas with Brown Rice: http://bit […]
4
The best restaurants in Munich | Telegraph Travel
[…] If you do get a table, get stuck into the “Hummus Komplett” topped with tahini, za’atar, whole chickpeas and a boiled egg; and the spinach and feta shakshuka – with plenty of warm pita to clean the plates […]
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Hummus Dip | Cardiac College
[…] Ingredients 1 can ‘No salt added’ chickpeas 1-2 tbsp Tahini or ground sesame seed paste 1 Lemon (juiced) 1-2 Garlic clove 1-2 tbsp Extra Virgin […] Add 1 can of ‘no salt added’ chickpeas […]
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Eat Voraciously: The Saffron Dealer
s2.washingtonpost.com – Today
[…] Not a fan of lentils? A drained can of chickpeas or Navy beans work here, too […]
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Little Goat Food & Drink | 2615 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg
littlegoat.unuhub.net – Today
Harvest Hash Code Red Goat Sweet potatoes and local veggies topped with herb aioli and a poached egg. Topped with crispy oats and greens. (Sub chickpeas and green goddess dressing to make this vegan) CA$14.00
1
Pressure Cooker Chickpea, Red Pepper and Tomato Stew Recipe
cooking.nytimes.com – Today
[…] Instead of stock, this stew relies on the thick liquid from the canned chickpeas, sometimes called aquafaba […] 5 garlic cloves, smashed and finely chopped ½ teaspoon smoked paprika 3 (15-ounce) cans chickpeas, with liquid (or about 4 1/2 cups cooked chickpeas and 1 cup cooking liquid) 2 (12-ounce) jars roasted red peppers, drained and finely chopped ( […] Stir in the chickpeas and their liquid, roasted red peppers and canned tomatoes […]
4
Fast Way To Cook Dried Beans ⋆
[…] Navy Beans- 4 minutes Black Beans- 5 minutes Chickpeas and Kidney beans- 6 minutes Secure your lid and make sure your pressure valve is set to seal […]
2
Super Lazy Vegan Snack Ideas! { healthy + easy }
vegan-recipe.org – March 6
[…] 1 – 2 tortillas vegan cream cheese a handful of spinach tomato, thinly sliced a small handful of chickpeas 1 – 2 tbsp marinara sauce (or pizza, pasta sauce) SNACK #3 Banana Chocolate Pudding 1-2 Bananas […] a little bit of sweetener if necessary some granola for the top SNACK #4 Raw Falafel Mix a can of chickpeas 1/2 red onion 1 clove garlic juice of 1 lemon a handful of fresh parsley seasonings: sea salt […]
4
Top 5 spring superfoods that help in weight loss – Times of India
timesofindia.indiatimes.com – March 6
[…] It’s a legume, which belongs to the same family as lentils, chickpeas and beans […]
2
60 Best Easy Dinners
themodernproper.com – March 6
Go to Homepage We’ve rounded up our 60 best, easy dinner recipes! From grilled steak to braised chickpeas to allll the sheet pan dinners—we’ve got you covered […] Yeah, it sounds brunchy, but trust us—try it for dinner! Braised Chickpeas with Chard […]
48
Moroccan Beef Stew with Stout –
peoplespint.com – March 6
[…] and one to drink) 1/2 cup halved and pitted Kalamata olives 1/3 cup of raisins 1 x 15 oz can of chickpeas, drained 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 x 28 oz can crushed tomatoes 1 teaspoon lemon peel Juic […] Add the stout, olives, raisins, chickpeas, crushed tomatoes and cilantro and bring to a boil […]
1
Spicy root & lentil casserole recipe
[…] LIKE THIS? Try some of our other veggie mains, Butternut squash & sage risotto, Pumpkin curry with chickpeas or Roasted vegetable lasagne […]
N/A
NSW’s food bowl being decimated by rodents
[…] His primary crops are wheat, barley, oats and chickpeas and he also runs cattle […] “We’ll go ahead with wheat, barley, oats and chickpeas, but we are concerned about the mice […]
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Once I Took a Weeklong Walk in the Sahara – Anna Badkhen
emergencemagazine.org – March 6
[…] After supper—soup made with Maggi packets, bland pasta with chickpeas and carrots, dates—we linger in the large common tent […]
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6 easy veg kabab recipes | 6 वेजिटेबल कबाब रेसिपी | meat alternatives kebab with veggies
veggie.vegan-recipe.org – March 6
[…] a popular and healthy snack or appetiser made from black ground chickpeas and other spices […]
4
‘Falastin’ cookbook opens Palestinian kitchen to home chefs | The Times of Israel
[…] It’s chickpeas, it’s lemons, it’s tahini […]
1
Ingredients Staples List For One Person
[…] thats reduced on the day I am in the supermarkets Cupboards Staples for One Tinned chopped tomatoes Chickpeas Coconut milk Passata Tinned tuna Tined chopped tomatoes Pesto (red or green) Pasta (your favourit […]
0
Chickpea genetics reduce need for chemicals | Crop Science Society of America
[…] “For over 30 years, common pathogens in chickpeas and other legumes have been controlled by fungicides,” says Vandemark […] “Our approach looked at two different types of chickpeas – kabuli and desi,” says Vandemark […] ” Kabuli chickpeas are larger, have a clear or light beige seed coat, and are typically canned and used to make hummus […]
N/A
DUMP AND GO Instant Pot Recipes | easy vegan instant pot meals
veggie.vegan-recipe.org – March 6
[…] ly/whitebean-stew Tomato-Fennel Chickpeas with Brown Rice: http://bit […]
4
Derval O’Rourke: Delicious chicken and butternut squash salad
[…] 60g butternut squash, peeled and cut into chunks 100g chicken breast fillet, sliced 40g tinned chickpeas drained and rinsed 4 spring onions, thinly sliced Handful fresh coriander, roughly chopped 1 lime […] To serve, place the pumpkin, chicken, quinoa, chickpeas, pepper, coriander, lemon juice and zest in a serving bowl […]
1
Welcome to the City That Endlessly Enchants-My Chennai | by Bertilla Niveda | World Traveler’s Blog | Mar, 2021
vocal.media – March 6
[…] You can find vendors selling sundal(chickpeas and crispy veggies), soan pappadi(fluffy cotton-candy-like sweet), bajji (onion/plantain fritters), […] We used to sit on the floor as a family and eat a giant appalam(deep-fried lentil flour and chickpeas, spiced with pepper and chili powder) […]
11
UP government felicitates 98-year-old man for being Atmanirbhar
[…] Inspired by PM Modi’s call for ‘Atmanirbhar Bharat’, he began selling boiled chickpeas (chana) on the streets […]
6
35 AMAZING Plant-Based Whole Grain Recipes
sharonpalmer.com – March 6
[…] Dietitian Mexican Bowl, Alana Haldan, Sprouts and Krauts (shown above) One Pan Pasta with Chickpeas and Tomatoes, Melissa Altman-Traub, RDN Squash Filled with Herbed Quinoa and Cranberries, Sharo […]
3
Slow cooker glory: Three recipes that are worth the wait
[…] Butter chickpeas Serves 4-6 If you are feeling virtuous, feel free to substitute coconut milk for the coconut crea […] each of fennel seeds, ground fenugreek and ground coriander 1 tbsp garam masala 225g (8oz) dried chickpeas 1 ×

Nestlé Health Science Acquires Vital Proteins

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Nestlé Health Science (NHSc), a global leader in the field of nutritional science, has agreed to acquire a majority stake in Vital Proteins, America’s top-selling collagen brand. This is the first major acquisition of a collagen-based wellness company to date. Vital Proteins was founded in 2013 by Kurt Seidensticker based on the belief that whole-food-based collagen nutrition is fundamental to maintaining overall health and longevity. Since launching, Vital Proteins has become the leading collagen brand in America, growing their annual sales above $100 million within the span of four years. The company’s brand’s portfolio includes over 150 collagen-based supplements, vitamins and food and beverage products.

Vital Proteins will continue to operate as a standalone business, “remaining committed to its founding mission of helping people live healthier lives through high quality, sustainably-sourced collagen nutrition,” according to a company statement. Seidensticker said that becoming a part of the NHSc portfolio will equip Vital Proteins with a variety of resources to scale the company’s reach and innovation. “I spent a lot of time having conversations with people I respected in the CPG space, in addition to leadership from companies that could eventually be a future partner. Through those conversations it became clear that NHSc was really aligned with our brand values, our mission and purpose to empower healthier lives,” he said.

“I’ve always envisioned Nestlé as the ideal partner and have enjoyed getting to know their team, their vision and their values. I also spent time talking to the founders of another like-minded wellness company whom I respect, to see who they thought was a good fit for their organization, and they felt Nestlé was the ideal partner as well. With Nestlé’s support, we will be able to leverage new resources, scale and capabilities, moving towards a future with an expanded global offering of high-quality nutrition products. The possibilities with Nestlé have reignited my imagination of all that Vital can be.”

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Vital Proteins complements NHSc’s other vitamin, mineral, supplement and wellness brands, including Atrium Innovations, Garden of Life, Pure Encapsulations and Persona. “This is an exciting opportunity for Nestlé Health Science to enter a growing area of nutrition with a successful brand,” said Greg Behar, CEO of NHSc. “The collagen nutrition market is growing, and Vital Proteins has shown its strength by becoming a full lifestyle brand which will perfectly complement our other vitamin, mineral and supplement brands.”

Board member and investor Brett Thomas, cofounder and managing partner of CAVU Venture Partners, credits much of the company’s success to Seidensticker’s leadership. “Kurt was a visionary founder who set out not only to create a category but to define a lifestyle—and we were believers,” said Thomas. “It was this passion, paired with his exceptional leadership skills and clear ability to execute that ultimately drove the brand’s success.” Seidensticker will remain in his role as Vital Proteins CEO, based out of the company’s headquarters in Chicago, IL.

“It speaks volumes about Vital Proteins as a wellness platform and moreover Kurt as a leader that such a great strategic partnership was formed amidst all the uncertainty in the world,” added Thomas. Since the outbreak of the pandemic, Vital Proteins has seen a more than 50% increase in demand for their products. “Consumers are now even more focused on their health and well-being in the midst of this pandemic. The appetite for authentic wellness brands that are rooted in science should remain high, particularly ones which know how to effectively communicate with Millennials and Gen-Z,” explained Romitha Mally, Vice Chairman at UBS who helped orchestrate this deal, as well as Dollar Shave Club and Sundial Brands/SheaMoisture’s sales to Unilever, Bai’s sale to Dr. Pepper Snapple Group and Primal Kitchen’s acquisition by Kraft Heinz.

To support the growth of the business, Nestlé plans to explore geographic and product expansion while maintaining the elements of the Vital Proteins brand that make it popular among consumers. Vital Proteins’ 150 unique products (representing a total of 250 variants of those products) are sold across 35,000 retail doors in North America and Europe, including Whole Foods, Costco, Target, Walgreens and Kroger.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out some of my other work here.

Writer of all things and host of ‘I Suck At Life‘ podcast.

Source: http://www.forbes.com

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Click ‘SHOW MORE’ to see everything I showed in this video ▼▼▼ Hey Everyone! Another video about Vital Proteins and Collagen Peptides. Been using it for the last 2.5 years and i’m hooked on it, not a sponsored video by any mean, i just really love this product and it does miracles for my hair, skin, nails and overall health. Thank you for watching and don’t forget to Subscribe for weekly videos 🙂 —— I get my music for my videos from Epidemic Sound ▶︎ https://tomas.pw/2x5IhNt

Hard Boiled Eggs: What May Be Behind This Deadly Listeria Outbreak

This is totally not eggs-ellent. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has announced yet another Listeria monocytogenes outbreak. This time the culprit seems to be, egg roll please: hard boiled eggs.

Yes, the CDC may have finally cracked the case on why seven people in five states have gotten sick with Listeria from April 10, 2017, to November 12, 2019. It can be hard to figure out the source of a Listeria infection, since symptoms of Listerosis can take a while to appear. Typically, symptoms appear one to four weeks after the consumption of the bacteria but can take up to 70 days to manifest.

For this outbreak, public health officials had detailed info on five of the cases. Of these, nearly all, with only one eggs-eption, had reported eating egg-containing products. Three had consumed hard-boiled eggs in salads. The common source seemed to boil down to bulk, fresh hard-boiled eggs produced by Almark Foods of Gainesville, Georgia. Although there currently isn’t a recall of such products , you may want to be eggs-tra careful about eating hard-boiled eggs, especially if you are at higher risk for Listeria badness.

Those at higher risk for Listeria infections include those 65 years and older, pregnant women and newborns, and anyone with a weaker immune system. If you fall into one of these categories, you are are probably all right if you are doing the boiling and hardening of the eggs yourself. However, any eggs that are already hard-boiled may not be all right, especially if they are from Almark. If you find out a hard-boiled egg is from Almark, put the egg down, step away from the table, and make sure that everything that touched the egg is cleaned and disinfected thoroughly.

As I have described before for Forbes, a Listeria infection may just give you a bout of flu-like symptoms. However, the greater concern is if the bacteria gets into your bloodstream or central nervous system. That’s when a Listeria infection can become deadly. This outbreak has already led to four people being hospitalized and one dying. Listeria can also cause many problems for pregnant women such as miscarriages and premature births and their newborns.

So, count these hard boiled eggs as yet another food product in the yolk of Listeria. Already this year, I have reported on Listeria contaminating deli meats and cheeses, happiness (otherwise known as avocados), sandwiches, salads, and wraps, sausage, oh Mann vegetables, and more happiness (otherwise known as sushi). What’s the eggs-planation for so many outbreaks? Have food safety regulations and monitoring been relaxed to the point that such contamination is becoming more common? It seems that this situation needs to be more closely eggs-amined.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I am a writer, journalist, professor, systems modeler, computational and digital health expert, avocado-eater, and entrepreneur, not always in that order. Currently, I am a Professor of Health Policy and Management at the City University of New York (CUNY), Executive Director of PHICOR (@PHICORteam), Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, and founder and CEO of Symsilico. My previous positions include serving as Executive Director of the Global Obesity Prevention Center (GOPC) at Johns Hopkins University, Associate Professor of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Associate Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics at the University of Pittsburgh, and Senior Manager at Quintiles Transnational, working in biotechnology equity research at Montgomery Securities, and co-founding a biotechnology/bioinformatics company. My work involves developing computational approaches, models, and tools to help health and healthcare decision makers in all continents (except for Antarctica) and has been supported by a wide variety of sponsors such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the NIH, AHRQ, CDC, UNICEF, USAID and the Global Fund. I have authored over 200 scientific publications and three books. Follow me on Twitter (@bruce_y_lee) but don’t ask me if I know martial arts.

Source: Hard Boiled Eggs: What May Be Behind This Deadly Listeria Outbreak

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Public health officials are encouraging consumers to take steps to reduce their risk of listeria infection after recent outbreaks of the foodborne illness. “Listeria is a type of bacteria that can be found in food products, and can cause quite serious foodborne illness in certain populations,” says Dr. Nipunie Rajapakse, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist. “We worry about it especially in pregnant women and their newborns, and people who have weakened immune systems, and in the elderly.” She says the most common foods that listeria infection is associated with are usually deli meats, hot dogs, and products that are refrigerated for a prolonged period of time. “Listeria is one of the few bacteria that likes to divide at low temperatures. That’s why we see this being a problem in foods that are refrigerated, and in foods that usually don’t transmit too many infections.” More health and medical news on the Mayo Clinic News Network http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/
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