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Five Ways To Buy Something You Can’t Afford

“If you can’t pay for it in cash, you can’t afford it.” “If you can’t buy it twice, you can’t afford it.” You’ve probably heard one of those aphorisms. The point is that even if you’re paying with a credit card (for the convenience or the cash back or travel rewards), if you can’t cover the cost of something with available cash, you can’t afford it and shouldn’t buy it.

While that is generally true, it’s not always practical advice when you, or someone you love, really needs something that neither your paycheck nor savings can cover. It’s also not realistic, since most Americans spend money on things they don’t need.

But you didn’t click on this article for a debate on whether Americans spend too much.

Today In: Money

Nope. You want to know HOW to pay for something you can’t afford to pay for in cash now.

I’ll cover five options: old-fashioned layaway; newfangled point-of-sale financing; credit cards; saving for what you want to buy; and selling stuff you already own, but don’t want as much as what you plan to buy.

1. Old-fashioned Layaway

Growing up, I only heard about layaway during the holiday season when major department stores advertised their Christmas layaway programs. Now, the fintech community has transformed this option, as I’ll discuss next.

But first, it turns out the traditional Christmas layaway is alive and well at Walmart, the world’s largest retailer by sales. And now is the time to get started. Layaway works like this at Walmart: You go to a store, collect your intended gifts,  go to a special Layaway counter, put down a deposit of at least $20 or 20% (whichever is more), and make additional payments whenever you’re in the store.

Walmart requires all items be paid off and picked up by December 10, 15 days before Christmas. There’s no interest charged. If you decide you don’t want a purchase after all, you can get a refund, usually minus a cancelation fee. That fee can be steep: 20% of the purchase price or $20, whichever is greater. (But Maryland, Ohio, Rhode Island and Washington, D.C., don’t allow a cancellation fee, while Alabama caps it at $25 and North Carolina at $50.)

If you’re shopping for a major appliance, Sears offers a layaway program year-round online and in its stores. The plan includes a $10 or $20 service fee and a set payment term of 8 to 12 weeks. If you want to cancel a Sears layaway contract, you have to go to the store to do it.

2.  Newfangled Point-of-Sale Financing

The basic principle of old-fashioned layaway is that you don’t get the item until you have finished paying for it. If your refrigerator or washing machine is broken beyond repair, you don’t want to wait 8 or 12 weeks for a new one.

With newfangled point-of-sale financing (it’s primarily available online, but sometimes in stores, too), you get the item now and pay over time. Essentially, you’re taking out an instant personal short-term loan that is tied to the purchase of a specific item or service.

QuadPay, Klarna and Sezzle allow you to pay for an item in four interest-free payments. Forbes Fintech 50 member Affirm offers interest-free financing from a small number of retailers that subsidize financing (among them Peloton, Warby Parker and Casper), but generally charges interest rates ranging from 10% to 30% (based on your credit score) for other purchases. Affirm’s longest loan term is 48 months.

Often, these fintech financing offers only become apparent when you go to check out a purchase online. But you can also plan ahead. For example, Affirm offers a list of merchants who offer its service in each category. Plus, it allows you to find out in advance how large a purchase it will finance for you. Affirm gives you this number, it says, without making a “hard inquiry” on your credit record, meaning it won’t affect your credit score, the way applying for a new credit card likely would.

When you buy something financed by Affirm, however, both your loan and your payments are reported to the credit bureaus, meaning timely payments can help your credit score and late payments will hurt it.

Separately, while Amazon’s credit cards may be better known, the behemoth of online selling also offers its own point-of-sale installment payment plans on certain (usually higher-dollar) purchases.

Read more:  Fintech’s Version of Layaway Explodes Online

3. Credit Cards

Like point-of-sale apps, credit cards allow you to get an item upfront while you pay the costs over time. “When you swipe a credit card, you are taking out a loan,” warns Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche, a budgeting expert and financial wellness advocate. But unlike point-of-sale financing, it’s not a one-time loan with a set payoff date. The lure and danger of credit cards is that they provide so-called “revolving” lines of credit that you can use as long as you keep the account open and in good standing.

The credit card company doesn’t care what you’re buying with the credit line. (By contrast, companies like Affirm use algorithms that actually take the item you’re purchasing into account when deciding whether to green-light a loan.)

Before reviewing ways to use your credit card, here’s a bit of basic, yet very important, information on credit cards. Most credit cards are unsecured, meaning that if you don’t pay the lender back for the purchases you made, then they can’t take possession of those things. Lenders will likely send you notices requesting payment. If that doesn’t work, they will send your account to collections and report your delinquent account to the credit bureaus, hurting your credit score and ability to do things like get a mortgage or rent an apartment.

Some banks and credit card issuers offer secured credit cards, which are credit cards that require a deposit in order to use them. These are great for building credit and improving your credit. But they do not work if you do not have enough cash to cover the deposit amount.

So back to unsecured credit cards. Your credit line comes at a price known as the annual percentage rate (also called the purchase rate) and it’s based on your credit history. Individuals with good or excellent credit can borrow at lower APRs than individuals with bad credit.

Read more: The Forbes Guide To Credit Cards

But sometimes–often when you take out a new credit card and sometimes when you receive a special offer from an existing one–there’s a promotional period that allows you to buy something and take months to repay, without owing any interest.

If you’re in a rush to buy that new washing machine, you might be able to buy it with a credit card you already have and then apply for a new card with an attractive balance transfer offer.  Typically, there may be a fee for this transfer. But not always.

For example, the Chase Slate credit card is currently offering new customers a 15-month 0% interest rate for new purchases and balance transfers. Plus, there’s no fee for balance transfers during the first 60 days after you open the card. Be careful: If you don’t pay off your balance within those 15 months, you’ll be stuck paying an interest rate of between 16.99% and 25.74%.

Read more: How To Make A Balance Transfer Card Work For You

The 10 Best Best Balance Transfer Credit Cards

Credit cards are an option for buying something you can’t afford to pay for with cash—but an option that should be approached with extreme care. It’s easy to let a credit card balance sneak up on you (just ask this Millennial who accumulated  more than $30,000 in credit card debt) particularly if you carry the card around and begin to use if for everyday expenses, as opposed to the one-time purchase of an expensive item (e.g. the washing machine) you need now.

Read more:  The Best Way To Pay Off A Credit Card Debt 

4. Save Your Coins

In the wise words of rapper Wiz Khalifa, “Surround yourself with people who help you save money, not spend it.” It’s not clear in what ways Khalifa and his friends save a few hundred dollars, but there are plenty of ways you can save money toward a goal.

The most basic and traditional way is to open a savings account. You can even incorporate your friends in this process: ask them if they’d like to refer you to their bank for any referral bonuses for the both of you. For example, if a TD Bank customer refers a friend who opens an account,  each gets a $50 bonus.

Of course a $50 bonus shouldn’t lead you to open a savings account with a noncompetitive rate. With the growth of high-yield online savings accounts, it’s easier than ever to find an account with a good interest rate.

You’ve found a high rate. Now, get a plan to save for that big purchase you can’t finance from current cash flow. Let’s say you have a friend’s out-of-town wedding next year. Calculate the costs of travel, the outfit you’ll need, the wedding gift and anything else that factors into it. Then divide the total expense by the number of months or weeks you have until the date you need to be ready to purchase those things.

Once you’ve figured out how much to set aside into that savings account every month or every week, consider setting up automatic transfers from a checking account to a savings account so you don’t have to think about it. (And if your bank doesn’t offer that kind of service, consider finding a new one.)

More reading: Three Good Reasons To Switch Banks And How To Do It

Another behavioral suggestion to reinforce your savings comes from Aliche, who observes that “inconvenient money gets saved.” She suggests making your savings account difficult to withdraw money from. In other words, it’s harder to save money when it’s easy to transfer money back into your checking account for happy hour or an impromptu shopping spree.

“I had to make my money inconvenient so I opened up an online-only bank account. I just put my savings there–not checking, no debit card, just savings. It is impossible for impulse buys,” Aliche says. Banks usually take a day or more to transfer your money to other banks. Within that 24- to 36-hour period the impulse to buy something might pass.

Another behavioral trick to boost your savings: roundup options. A roundup is a feature wherein you accumulate more savings by automatically transferring over loose change to your savings account. Some banks like Bank of America have this feature. If your bank doesn’t have this, then consider a roundup app like Acorns, Qapital, Digit or Chime. These apps work with third parties, meaning a partner bank that you provide personal identifying information to. (They do this so they can offer FDIC insurance on your savings, since they’re not banks themselves.)

5. Sell Stuff

Way back when, if you needed to raise cash from your stuff, you had to go to the pawnshop or stage a garage sale. Both might be seen as signs of financial distress. Now, however, there are more ways than ever to sell surplus items online and living with fewer material things can be seen as a savvy lifestyle choice.

More reading: The Joys Of the Minimalist Life In Retirement

How Decluttering Her Home Changed This Young Mother’s Entire Life

Since the heyday of eBay, there’s been a surge of platforms for neighbors and strangers to sell stuff to one another. Some platforms allow you to sell for a set price, while others allow users to bid on your items. Sites like LetGo, Craigslist, Ruby Lane and Facebook Marketplace allow you to unload unwanted furniture and decorative knickknacks. When it comes to your wardrobe, top options include PoshMark, thredUP, The Real Real, Kidizen and Tradesy.

More reading: Life After Forever 21. How To Reduce Your Personal Cost Per Wear

Once you’ve gathered intel on your salable items,  decide how you’ll sell them. Would you prefer to sell them yourself on sites like Poshmark and Craigslist or sell through an online consignment shop like The Real Real?

Before snapping Instagram-worthy pics of your things, there are a few things you should do to prepare. First, edit what you’re going to sell. Things in good condition and better do well on these platforms. Anything less than good condition should be recycled or trashed.

Second, research the price range of your item. The item likely will not go for what it originally cost, especially after you’ve used it—unless it’s a limited edition collectible.

Aliche’s sister picked up a Hermès scarf for $2 at a thrift store. (The old-fashioned kind.) While she had been shopping for a scarf to tie around her head at night, she decided to take this scarf to an Hermès in Short Hills, New Jersey, and get it authenticated. It turned out to be a limited-edition design worth upwards of $1,000. She sold it on Poshmark.

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Asia is a personal finance writer for the Money and Markets team at Forbes. She’s based in New Jersey. Before joining Forbes, she reported for Financial Advisor magazine and also wrote for The Cranford Chronicle, NJ.Com and ThePopBreak.com. She also spent two years teaching English as another language in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.

Source: Five Ways To Buy Something You Can’t Afford

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Investing 101 FREE ebook: http://theminoritymindset.com/get-ric… SUBSCRIBE for the latest videos *NEW VIDEOS EVERY WEEK* SC @M2JaspreetSingh http://www.TheMinorityMindset.com Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/MinorityMindset Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/MinorityMindset What Can You Afford? Budgeting For Wealth | Minority Mindset – Jaspreet Singh What’s up everybody my name is Jaspreet singh & welcome to the Minority Mindset’s Finance Friday. What’s affordable mean? If you got $200 in your bank account can you afford a $200 pair of shoes? It depends who you ask If you haven’t watched my previous video on budgeting, you should watch it so you know how to allocate your money once you start making it. But now you have some money in your bank account what do you do? If you want to buy luxury things, meaning things that you don’t need, Yo Jaspreet I need these new $200 shoes No remember my rule of 5. If you can’t buy 5 of them, you can’t afford one of them. If you want to buy a $100 pair of shoes and you don’t have $500 saved up, you can’t afford it. What’s the point of doing this? It forces you to live below your means. It forces you to save for something bigger, something to invest it, something that will make you more money. Make the sacrifice now so you can live bigger tomorrow. And listen, just because a sales person says you qualify for something more expensive doesn’t mean you can afford it. I briefly was a real estate sales agent for people who wanted to buy and sell their homes. We were paid based on the value of the home, the more the home costs the more we get paid. The same worked with banks, bank loan officers are often paid based on the value of the loan. Now although the bank officer and the real estate agent have to look out for your best interest, they aren’t doing anything illegal by approving you for the highest amount possible. So it’s in the bank officers best interest to get you the biggest loan as possible so they get the biggest paycheck. And it is in the real estate salesperson’s best interest to sell you the most expensive home so they get a big check. These people don’t have to deal with the consequences If you end up buying something that’s a little too expensive for you. You have to be the one in charge and know what your budget is. Don’t rely on sales people because their interest isn’t always the same as yours. And its not just houses and mortgages. Payment plans are becoming more popular for everyday items. Appliances, furniture, electronics, even our cell phones. I’ve said this before but it is nearly impossible to build wealth when you are constantly making payments to pay off things that you can’t afford. This year, Forbes reported that 63% of Americans, 63% don’t have enough funds saved up to cover a $500 emergency. Don’t be the majority. Put in the work and the sacrifice now so you can live better tomorrow. If your goal is to build wealth, you have to start living below your means. If you can’t buy 5 of them, you can’t afford one them. I know it’s hard, but you will set yourself up to stand out from the majority. #ThinkMinority #MIH #Budgeting http://www.TheMinorityMindset.com This Video: https://youtu.be/HRRrBrF7jRA Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/MinorityMin… Based in Detroit. Jaspreet Singh

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How Can Banks Rise to The Omnichannel challenge?

Banks should follow in the footsteps of other innovative consumer-focused industries to deliver an omnichannel banking experience that is relationship-focused, interactive, relevant and personal.

Never has technology accelerated changes in consumer behavior so quickly that whatever is cutting-edge today becomes tomorrow’s status quo. And, consumers’ expectations of digital services and platforms change even more rapidly.

For example, consumers are no longer completely satisfied with having content available digitally and on demand; they want personalized suggestions specifically tailored for them. And why shouldn’t they? They expect the same from their social media platforms, where personalized ads are as familiar now as they were once disconcerting.

In fact, today’s mobile-first society enables conversationalist on a scale never seen before, which has transformed consumer habits – from how they spend their free time to how they plan vacations, where and when they shop, and even how they manage their homes.

New age banking

Banking customers are no different when it comes to managing their money. They expect to access their information, and perform an ever-expanding list of banking actions anywhere, anytime and on any device. They expect their bank to meet their individual needs and preferences in the same way that their media streaming service or favorite big tech company does. With these expectations, they’re challenging what banks do, why they do it and how it’s done.

Large-scale changes in the banking landscape mean that consumers are spoil for choice, and recent studies indicate that many would even consider going over to the competition – including to non-traditional players – if their current providers fell behind in service delivery and no longer met their expectations.

Meeting customers’ expectations no longer hinges on a omnichannel strategy per se. Although multichannel banking has been around for years, it is no longer ground-breaking and certainly does not provide a competitive advantage. What can give banks the edge, however, is taking stock of their various channels and strategically considering how their customers use them, and what this reveals about their preferences.

Taking lessons from retail

Traditionally, banks spend much of their time and effort ensuring accurate transaction processing, but they’re starting to recognize that there are valuable lessons to be learnt from industries, like retail, that place a strong emphasis on customer experience. Some of the world’s top-rated banks understood this years ago when they were still considered challenger banks. They succeeded in turning customer experience into a competitive advantage that resulted in increased market share and remarkable customer satisfaction rates.

For the retailers known for their customer-first perspective, it is their store of data that gives them the edge over their competitors. They know that every time a customer searches online from their computer or mobile device, or calls the customer service department, that customer leaves a digital trail. This data-rich trail leads to a more intimate understanding of that customer and therefore what it takes to provide them with more relevant services and offerings – the essence of contextual commerce.

Smart organizations recognize the possibilities that using data in this way opens up. Instead of having a handful of interactions with their consumers each month, they can establish meaningful, ongoing and highly personalized interactions every day.

Mobile-centric

Ensuring that these exchanges are truly valuable to customers is not always easy, especially when a bank must simultaneously balance factors like cost, legacy systems and competition. For many banks, a digital-first, or even a digital-only strategy, seemed like the answer. After all, digital channels have great potential in terms of cost savings and keeping up with the competition. However, research indicates that satisfaction levels among digital-only banking customers is significantly lower than among digital-centric customers, i.e., those that occasionally also use branches. So, while leveraging digital channels is a must for any bank, losing sight of the importance of branches, and the opportunity they provide to personally interact with customers, can be detrimental.

So, how can banks provide the level of service consumers demand, through the channels they prefer, while managing to offer a consistent experience across them all? Leveraging the mobile device, a universal tool that consumers always have with them, could provide the answer.

If the mobile device could be leveraged to securely identify a customer to their bank, it could become the ideal way to build confidence in sophisticated technologies. And even though the mobile device is a digital tool, it could also enhance the customer’s in-branch experience. For example, customers could use it to check in at a specific branch, authenticate interactions and digitally sign documents. A phone also delivers contextual information about a consumer, such as their location, which can initiate highly relevant and interactive dialogues at key moments. In this way, the mobile device can become the portal to the other channels – a trusted and familiar key to an omnichannel banking relationship.

True multichannel means more than just many ways

Today, banks are starting to realize that a true omnichannel approach to banking means more than just providing multiple ways for customers to transact. It’s about a thoughtfully designed, seamless and consistent interaction between customers and their financial institutions across multiple channels, with each channel complementing the others.

In the financial services industry, we’re still in the early stages of digital transformation. As Millennial and Gen Z consumers start to make up larger portions of the workforce, there will be countless changes in the ways they will want to interact with service providers like banks. To meet all these changing demands, banks will need to think about their multichannel capabilities, as well as the insights they can gain from their multiple consumer touch points, as a competitive advantage. In doing so, they can offer their customers the personalized experiences they have come to expect – no matter the channel.


About the Author

Frans Labuschagne, UK & Ireland Country Manager, Entersekt. Business Leadership and Management: Comprehensive international general management, sales and marketing management experience. Broad knowledge of the technology industry, especially financial services, enterprise software, and broad base of partnership management, with a focus on highly integrated solutions of management consulting, technology integration and application development.

Featured image: ©REDPIXEL

Source: How can banks rise to the Omnichannel challenge?

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The retail and supply chain industries are buzzing with strategies for succeeding in a multichannel marketplace: How do you give customers the choices they want on the channels they want, while fulfilling the order in a way that’s convenient for the customer as well as efficient and profitable for the retailer? Circling around this question, though, is yet a larger one –to protect your brand and reputation, how do you ensure a consistent customer experience across all channels? Executing your omni-channel strategy is easier said than done. In this video series, we invite retailers and grocers to think outside of the warehouse box about how to incorporate brick-and-mortar stores into the order fulfillment process. Watch to discover how businesses are implementing these techniques today to offer a seamless customer experience, reduce costs, and increase e-commerce profitability! Watch the full video series here: http://www.highjump.com/video-series-…

Your Bank Could Be Holding Your Business Back From Growth. Here’s When You Should Consider Breaking Up

The bankers you work with may seem like great men and women, and they probably are truly nice people. They greet you by name, ask about your spouse and kids and appear to take a real interest in how well your enterprise is doing. Their financial products may be meeting your needs to a T.

But how strongly do you feel about your relationship with your bank? How do you think they’ll cooperate with you when the stuff hits the fan — which it most certainly will at some point? That’s the real test.

True colors

Here’s a true-life example: I’ve been working with an entrepreneur who finds himself in a down cycle. The company’s business plan is sound, the management team is experienced, and the product remains viable, so the problem isn’t terminal. But it may be awhile before the company’s prospects brighten.

The company works with a popular bank, which is starting to get nervous about its loans and is considering adding demanding conditions or even calling the loans.

The entrepreneur, however, feels a sense of loyalty to the bank, which has worked with him for several years. I have counseled him to consider other options. The reality is that bankers seven states away that he’s never met, not his local team — are the ones making the decisions.

He’s holding fast– and that’s a big mistake.

The entrepreneur has the opportunity to move to a smaller, regional bank. That bank’s rates may be slightly higher, but they’re more interested in a relationship.

And there’s certainly value in being in the room with the actual decision-makers — for both sides. Yes, your financials are going to be the primary determinant in lending decisions, but the human element can sway an on-the-fence lender to your team. Meantime, you’ll be able to tell a lot about the banker by meeting in person. Sometimes, it’s okay to trust your gut.

Loyalty only takes you so far

I get why entrepreneurs are loyal to bankers that have brought them success, but passing up the opportunity for a better financial situation is a kin to resting on your laurels.

As an entrepreneur, your best chances for success are by finding every possible edge you can. Incremental gains add up nicely over time, you should be taking advantage of them.

As for your spurned banker — they will get over it. Yes, that’s cynical, but that’s the way the business world works, especially with the larger banks. Remember also that your financial needs are a living, changing thing. What worked for you at one point may not be the most appropriate thing for you now.

The most successful entrepreneurs and companies are never satisfied with the status quo. Neither should you.

By: Ami Kassar CEO, MultiFunding.com

Source: Your Bank Could Be Holding Your Business Back From Growth. Here’s When You Should Consider Breaking Up

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Are you struggling in your business? Does each month feel like it’s a mad dash to figure out who’s going to get paid? I want to teach you what I do to turn around businesses to make them profitable again. Are you an entrepreneur? Get free weekly video training here: http://www.danmartell.com/newsletter + Join me on FB: http://FB.com/DanMartell + Connect w/ me live: http://periscope.tv/danmartell + Tweet me: http://twitter.com/danmartell + Instagram awesomeness: http://instagram.com/danmartell I’m the guy that gets the call when a business is in trouble… … when a business is on the verge of bankruptcy. Friends call me. Banks call me. If I’m lucky, the entrepreneur calls me before it’s too late. The truth is, it’s always challenging for me to see another entrepreneur failing… … especially when they have major debt owed, personal guarantees and their biggest dreams hanging in the air as collateral. It’s even more heartbreaking when kids are involved. It crushes me inside. That being said, the game plan to turn things around is ALWAYS the same. The #1 thing it takes is uncomfortable discussions, honest assessments and quick decisions. Hard? You have no idea. However, staring at the light waiting for the train to hit you isn’t the right move either. Recently I was able to take a company losing tens of thousands each month, to profitable in 14 days. In this week’s video I provide a step by step process for getting you off the tracks, and pulling a sharp 180 regardless of the challenges you’re facing. When it comes to the steps and process they go like this: 1) Get clarity on the numbers (scary as hell, but necessary) 2) Test the business model 3) Cut deep but not the bone 4) Focus on the customers 5) Write the rules 6) Build it back up The truth is, this strategy is something most companies should use to evaluate their real success. Too many times I’ve had founders tell me their business is doing “GREAT” only to ask a few questions and have them realize they’re way below the market norm. Stop being romantic about your business and get serious about how you’re measuring your progress. Leave a comment below with your business, industry and top question you have about your business model or challenges and I’ll be sure to provide some insights to help you evaluate your progress! Dan “saving businesses daily” Martell Don’t forget to share this entrepreneurial advice with your friends, so they can learn too: https://youtu.be/JyfE6jzcOGI ===================== ABOUT DAN MARTELL ===================== “You can only keep what you give away.” That’s the mantra that’s shaped Dan Martell from a struggling 20-something business owner in the Canadian Maritimes (which is waaay out east) to a successful startup founder who’s raised more than $3 million in venture funding and exited not one… not two… but three tech businesses: Clarity.fm, Spheric and Flowtown. You can only keep what you give away. That philosophy has led Dan to invest in 33+ early stage startups such as Udemy, Intercom, Unbounce and Foodspotting. It’s also helped him shape the future of Hootsuite as an advisor to the social media tour de force. An activator, a tech geek, an adrenaline junkie and, yes, a romantic (ask his wife Renee), Dan has recently turned his attention to teaching startups a fundamental, little-discussed lesson that directly impacts their growth: how to scale. You’ll find not only incredible insights in every moment of every talk Dan gives – but also highly actionable takeaways that will propel your business forward. Because Dan gives freely of all that he knows. After all, you can only keep what you give away. Get free training videos, invites to private events, and cutting edge business strategies: http://www.danmartell.com/newsletter

Banks Around The World Face Significant Profits Pressure For The Foreseeable Future

Numerous indicators in the U.S. and around the world are signaling a slowing economy at best and a near-term recession at worst.  The slowing global economy, along with low interest rates, ongoing trade tensions, and intensifying Brexit uncertainty will weigh on banks’ profitability for the foreseeable future.  In the US, whatever benefits banks derived from Trump’s tax reform, if any, are long gone.

Global Macroeconomic Outlook for the G-20

Moody’s Global Macroeconomic Outlook, August 2019

Last week’s announcement from Coalition that American and European investment banks’ capital markets and advisory’s revenues hit a thirteen-year low is likely to be the beginning of more challenges to come.  Even before that announcement, Moody’s Investor Services had changed its positive outlook on global investment banks to stable precisely due to slower economic growth and lower interest rates.

Today In: Money

Drivers of Moody’s Stable Outlook for Global Investment Banks

Moody’s Investors Services

As a recession comes closer, bank risk managers, investors, regulators, and rating agencies will be monitoring banks’ loan impairments carefully.  According to the Fitch Ratings’ Large European Banks Quarterly Credit Tracker – 2Q19, released last week, “The economic slow down in Europe has not resulted in material new impaired loans yet, but the substantially weakened economic outlook has increased the likelihood of an at  least modest increase in impaired loans.”

Impaired Loans/Gross Loans

Fitch Ratings, Large European Banks Quarterly Credit Tracker

Banks’ high holdings of leveraged loans and below investment grade bonds and securitizations, especially those that are less liquid and harder to value, will also weigh on their earnings as the global economy slowdown intensifies.  Fitch Ratings’ recent ‘U.S. Leveraged Loan Default Insight’ shows that its “Top Loans and Tier 2 Loans of Concern combined total jumped to $94.1 billion from $74.5 billion in July. The Top Loans of Concern amount ($40.9 billion) is the largest since March 2017, with six names added to the list and nearly all bid below 70 in the secondary market.”  Unfortunately, underwriting continues to deteriorate. The Federal Reserve Senior Loan Officer Survey showed a modest loosening of lending standards on corporate loans for the second consecutive quarter.

Leveraged Loans of Concern Amount Outstanding

Fitch U.S. Leveraged Loan Default Index.

A slowing economy and low interest rate environment are outside of bank managers’ control. Yet, cost efficiency, is something that banks can influence; it needs to improve for banks to be more profitable.  European banks’ median/cost income ratio, for example, is 66%. “The sector’s structural cost inefficiency will eventually have to be addressed given the persistently weak rate and revenue outlook. Improving cost efficiency faster and developing fee-generating businesses are crucial to sustain profitability in 2H19 and beyond.”

Cost Efficiency

Fitch Ratings, Large European Banks Quarterly Credit Tracker

Global investment banks will also have to be very attentive to what changes need to be made to their business models. While there will be demand for their advisory and distribution services, the demand will slow down in what is likely an upcoming recession.

Capital Markets Revenue Relative to Total Revenue, 2018

Source: Moody’s Investors

Moreover, as banks continue to lay-off front office professionals, some top latent to effect deals well will be lost.  Volatility from Trump’s multiple front trade wars and Brexit will put a lot of pressure on banks with capital market activities.

Aggregate capital markets revenue first-half 2009-19 (USD billions)

Moody’s Investor Services

Banks in emerging markets are also under profit pressure.  Many of the banks in Latin America already have a negative outlook by ratings agencies, particularly due to a slowdown in Mexico and recessionary pressures in Brazil. Asian banks are particularly sensitive to US-Chinese trade tensions.

Emerging Markets: Median GDP Growth by Region

Fitch Ratings

More than ever, to increase profitability, bank executives will need to find ways to diversify their revenue streams in all parts of their banks, commercial, investment bank, asset management as well as in custody and clearing services.  Banks need to be profitable to be liquid and to be well capitalized to sustain unexpected losses. What worries me is that a slowing global economy, coupled with increasing deregulation in the US, such as the recent gutting of the Volcker Rule, will embolden banks to chase yield even more and take excessive risks that could imperil depositors and taxpayers.  More than ever, investors, bank regulators, and rating agencies should remain vigilant so as to spare ordinary citizens the pain of when banks run into trouble.

 

 

Source: Banks Around The World Face Significant Profits Pressure For The Foreseeable Future

We Ranked the Top 10 Richest Banks in the World Right Now!

• Read the full article here: http://www.alux.com/richest-banks-in-…

When you’re thinking about money and wealth is hard not to include in that equation Banks. Someone said: Money makes the world go round” and banks, well, that’s where money likes to hang out. Every Aluxer we’ve met has close relations to at least one bank which makes it possible for us to enjoy life to the fullest. #2 *** HSBC Holdings is previously known as The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation which was founded in 1865 in Hong Kong. However, in 1991-1992, after acquiring Midland Bank The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation moved it’s headquarters to London because it was much better from a financial and strategic point of view.

This is the moment when the bank kind of re-branded itself and became HSBC Holdings the bank that you know today. With that said, we’d like you to enjoy our latest video on: the top ten richest banks in the world. Here we’re answering questions like; • Which is the richest bank in the world?! • How much money do the top banks have?! • Is Bank of America the richest bank in the world?! • Who owns the richest bank in the world? • How much money does the richest bank have?! Say Hello on: https://www.instagram.com/aluxcom/ https://twitter.com/aluxcom https://www.facebook.com/EALUXE – SUBSCRIBE to ALUX: https://goo.gl/KPRQT8 WATCH MORE VIDEOS ON ALUX.COM! Most Expensive Things: https://goo.gl/09XcYJ Luxury Cars: https://goo.gl/eOUgfS Becoming a Billionaire: https://goo.gl/rRLgJI World’s Richest: https://goo.gl/m6emkX Inspiring People: https://goo.gl/KxqTdL Travel the World: https://goo.gl/g5BGmm Dark Luxury: https://goo.gl/20ZsSt Celebrity Videos: https://goo.gl/0cs6sx Businesses & Brands: https://goo.gl/otHsTB — Alux.com is the largest community of luxury & fine living enthusiasts in the world. We are the #1 online resource for ranking the most expensive things in the world and frequently refferenced in publications such as Forbes, USAToday, Wikipedia and many more, as the GO-TO destination for luxury content! Our website: https://www.alux.com is the largest social network for people who are passionate about LUXURY! Join today!

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3 Funds To Buy On This Pullback (7.7% Dividends, 200% Payout Growth)

Forget the trade war noise. Here’s the only thing you need to know: if you’d bulked up your stock holdings on any of the dips we’ve seen in the last four years, you’d be a lot richer today.

The reason for the market’s “one step back, two steps ahead” pattern is simple: despite the interest rate- and trade-driven terror, corporate profits and sales are rising (as are workers’ wages), and unemployment is low.

In other words, the US economy is solid—and it’s stayed solid through every short-term crisis of the last few years. So now we have another pullback that’s given us another chance to amplify our upside.

But what to buy?

You can easily get into the market with an index fund like the S&P 500 ETF , but there’s a problem: we want to have a nice stash of dividend cash to drop into stocks on the next pullback, and with SPY, your payouts are tiny, with just a 1.9% dividend yield.

Today In: Money

This is where closed-end funds (CEFs) come in.

With an average yield of 7.4%, CEFs are much bigger income producers than the index, and three CEFs are particularly appealing right now, with overhyped fears making them unusually cheap.

Let me explain.

Because CEFs’ market prices can deviate from the value of the holdings in their portfolios (called the portfolio’s net asset value, or NAV), CEFs can trade at wide discounts to their NAV—even if the funds have a long history of strong performance.

That’s exactly what we’re seeing in the three funds I’m going to show you now.

Bargain CEF Pick No. 1: Buy Like Buffett (But With 209% Payout Growth)

Let’s start with the Boulder Growth & Income Fund (BIF), whose 3.9% yield is more than double that of the average S&P 500 stock, even though it’s actually on the small side for a CEF. Plus, BIF pays out special dividends every once in a while and has been aggressively increasing its regular quarterly payout, too!

A 200% dividend-growth rate isn’t something you see every day, but BIF can do it because it focuses on stocks whose bargain valuations set them up to outperform over the long haul. It then returns those gains to you in cash.

To get that type of performance, it follows the teachings of the master—Warren Buffett.

In fact, a third of the fund is in Berkshire Hathaway (BRK.A, BRK.B), so owning BIF is like getting Buffett’s portfolio at a big discount, as BIF trades 16.8% below its NAV. That makes it the third-most discounted CEF I track through our CEF Insider service.

Beyond Berkshire, BIF holds companies with strong cash flows that Buffett has also bought: names like JPMorgan (JPM), Cisco (CSCO) and Wells Fargo (WFC). These firms can withstand an economic slowdown because of their strong balance sheets.

Bargain CEF No. 2: A 9% Dividend Disguised as 1%

General American Investors (GAM) also goes after bargain stocks, plus the fund is a bargain itself at a 14.5% discount to NAV. GAM is what I call a “stealth yielder”: while its normal dividend (paid annually) yields about 1%, the fund gives you the bulk of your cash through a big special dividend in December.

These special payouts are a big deal: they gave GAM an annualized yield of more than 9% last year, and a similar yield is likely in November, when the fund will announce its end-of-year payout.

What about the portfolio?

GAM, like BIF, is a value-focused fund, zeroing in on firms with strong cash flows, like Microsoft (MSFT), Alphabet (GOOGL) and Republic Services (RSG). That gives it a mix of high-performing tech stocks and stable cash generators from other sectors. This balanced approach is how GAM has been returned so much cash to shareholders over the years.

Bargain CEF No. 3: A Huge 7.7% Dividend Paid Upfront

The Nuveen Tax-Advantaged Dividend Growth Fund (JTD) takes a similar approach as BIF and GAM, but its “regular” dividend yields an outsized 7.7%, so you don’t have to wait for dividend hikes or special payouts to get your big yield here.

Plus, JTD trades at a 2.3% discount that, while smaller than those of GAM and BIF, is still far too big, given what the fund does.

JTD’s diverse portfolio ranges from Honeywell International (HON) to SAP (SAP), UnitedHealth Group (UNH) and AT&T (T). It also includes some tech, such as Microsoft (MSFT). The fund’s global approach helps it find bargain-priced companies with entrenched client bases and stable revenues.

That’s why JTD has been crushing the market for a decade. And here’s the best part: only a few people know. If you look at the market-price movement for JTD, it seems pretty ho-hum.

However, add in JTD’s big payouts and the chart looks much better!

Not only has JTD soared over the last decade, it has also beaten the index, with a huge chunk of its return in cash, to boot. That means this fund shouldn’t trade at a discount at all—but the fact that it does means it’s certainly worth your attention now.

Michael Foster is the Lead Research Analyst for Contrarian Outlook. For more great income ideas, click here for our latest report “Indestructible Income: 5 Bargain Funds with Safe 8.5% Dividends.”

Disclosure: none

I have worked as an equity analyst for a decade, focusing on fundamental analysis of businesses and portfolio allocation strategies. My reports are widely read by analysts and portfolio managers at some of the largest hedge funds and investment banks in the world, with trillions of dollars in assets under management. Michael has been traveling the world since 1999 and has no plans to stop. So far, he’s lived in NYC, Hong Kong, London, Los Angeles, Seoul, Bangkok, Tokyo, and Kuala Lumpur. He received his Ph.D. in 2008 and continues to offer consulting services to institutional investors and ultra high net worth individuals.

Source: 3 Funds To Buy On This Pullback (7.7% Dividends, 200% Payout Growth)

I’ve found three of the highest dividend paying stocks that will not only protect your money but also grow it if the stock market falls. I’m also updating our 2019 stock market challenge portfolio of dividend stocks that is beating the market two-times over. Stocks are falling again and investors are scrambling trying to find safety and growth at the same time. It may seem like an impossible task but I’ve found two sectors and three dividend paying stocks that will do just that. After more than a decade as an investment analyst, I’ve put together a screen to find the best stocks no matter what the market does. I’ll reveal those three stocks I’ve found plus update you on our 2019 dividend stock portfolio, the 11 best dividend stocks I’m investing in this year. These top dividend stocks are not only producing a return twice that of the stock market but they haven’t fallen as much as the S&P 500 on the recent weakness. Not only are these stock picks producing dividend income but also protection from a stock market crash. If you haven’t seen the other videos in our 2019 challenge, I put them all in a playlist linked here. Make sure you check those out because I show you how to invest in dividend stocks and reveal how I picked the best dividend stocks of 2019. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pfw_Q… If you want to create your own portfolio of dividend stocks, I recommend M1 Finance. It’s the no-cost investing platform I’m using and some solid features over other investing apps like Robinhood. https://mystockmarketbasics.com/joinm… Being able to reinvest dividends without paying trading fees is important because you want to get that money working for you as fast as possible. Another feature of M1 Finance is that you can set up retirement accounts, not available on Robinhood, which is very important to avoid paying taxes every year on the dividend payouts. I start the video off with an update to the Stock Market Challenge portfolio and those 11 dividend stocks beating the market. I then tell you why the stock market is down lately and those three stock picks that could save your portfolio. 1:09 2019 Dividend Stock Market Challenge Update 2:20 11 Stocks that Pay Dividends AND Beat the Market 2:44 Why is the Stock Market Down 4:01 Best Dividend Stocks for 2019 7:52 How I Pick High-Yield Dividend Stocks 8:23 Highest Dividend Paying Stocks for Safety and Growth SUBSCRIBE to create the financial future you deserve with videos on beating debt, making more money and making your money work for you. https://peerfinance101.com/FreeMoneyV… Free Webinar – Discover how to create a personal investing plan and beat your goals in less than an hour! I’m revealing the Goals-Based Investing Strategy I developed working private wealth management in this free webinar. Step-by-step to everything you need for this simple, stress-free strategy. Reserve your spot now! https://mystockmarketbasics.com/free-… Joseph Hogue, CFA spent nearly a decade as an investment analyst for institutional firms and banks. He now helps people understand their financial lives through debt payoff strategies, investing and ways to save more money. He has appeared on Bloomberg and on sites like CNBC and Morningstar. He holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation and is a veteran of the Marine Corps. #growyourdough

How Effective CFOs Are Driving Companies to Success and Profitability

For more than 30 years, there have been articles touting the CFO as someone who “needs to be strategic: a business partner and not just a bean counter.”

Business writers still publish these articles today, but it’s time to stop. CFOs know they need to be strategic, and they know they need to operate the finance function. They don’t need an article to tell them that anymore. They do, however, need clear vision and technology to help them juggle new balls in the finance ecosystem: regulatory changes, artificial intelligence and Blockchain. Finance must add these balls to its mix while still juggling its “traditional” responsibilities of internal controls, compliance and closing the books quickly.

The future of finance is chockablock with new regulations, technologies and business models. The CFO must handle responsibilities beyond the finance function. They must also use strategic skills to transform the organization. Using the old, heavy, rigid ERP offerings will not provide the tools to nimbly break out of the “Old CFO” role.

This eBook provides a guide to the new technologies every CFO needs to succeed as well as a strategic framework for balancing traditional CFO responsibilities with their new, highly strategic ones.

By: Oracle View

 

Source: How Effective CFOs Are Driving Companies to Success and Profitability | Inc.com

Deutsche Bank Ensnared by Billion-Dollar Malaysian Fund Scandal

A multi-billion-dollar fraud scandal perpetrated by an investment arm of the Malaysian government appears to have ensnared another major global financial institution — Deutsche Bank  (DBGet Report) — which already is reeling from massive restructuring efforts.

The Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday that the Justice Department is investigating whether the German lender violated foreign corruption or anti-money-laundering laws in its work for the 1Malaysia Development Bhd. fund, which included helping the fund raise $1.2 billion in 2014 as concerns about the fund’s management and financials had begun to circulate.

Download Now: To be a profitable investor you first need to know the rules. Get Jim Cramer’s 25 Rules for Investing Special Report

The investigation comes amid a massive overhaul of the Munich-based bank announced over the weekend, which includes layoffs in the thousands and the creation of a separate entity for bad loans, debt and other problem investments and holdings that have plagued the bank since the 2008 global financial crisis.

Investigators reportedly have been assisted by former Goldman Sachs executive, Tim Leissner, the Journal said, citing people familiar with the matter. Prosecutors have been investigating similar issues at Goldman, where Leissner, a former managing director, pleaded guilty last year to helping re-direct billions of dollars from the 1MDB fund.

A state economic-development fund, 1MDB turned into a major global scandal after billions of dollars were drained from it between 2009 and 2014, leading to multiple government investigations and the downfall of former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak.

The Department of Justice has said the stolen money totals at least $4.5 billion and that it was used to pay bribes to government officials, pad a slush fund controlled by the former prime minister and purchase hundreds of millions of dollars in luxury goods and real estate.

Shares of Deutsche Bank were down 0.54% at $7.36 in early trading in New York on Thursday.

By:

Source: Deutsche Bank Ensnared by Billion-Dollar Malaysian Fund Scandal – Report

SoftBank Launches New $108 Billion Vision Fund To Invest in AI

SoftBank stunned the venture capital world with its launch of the $100 billion Vision Fund in 2017 and its wide-ranging and aggressive investments. Now billionaire Masayoshi Son has announced an even larger fund with $108 billion to invest in artificial intelligence companies.

Announced on Thursday, the “SoftBank Vision Fund 2” will be the biggest tech fund in the world if it comes to fruition. “The objective of the Fund is to facilitate the continued acceleration of the AI revolution through investment in market-leading, tech-enabled growth companies,” SoftBank Group wrote in a filing with the Tokyo Stock Exchange.

SoftBank has upped its own stake in the new fund to $38 billion from the $25 billion in the original fund and has tapped leading tech companies like Apple, Microsoft and Foxconn, along with Japanese investment investment banks and Kazakhstan’s sovereign wealth fund.

One noticeable omission from the second fund is Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund, which pumped $45 billion into the first Vision Fund. SoftBank has faced criticism over its ties with Saudi Arabia and Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman following the grisly murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul.

However, SoftBank said discussions are ongoing with additional participants, so it’s possible Saudi Arabia will still participate in the second fund, while the total money raised may top $108 billion.

SoftBank used the first fund to make aggressive billion dollar investments into an eclectic range of technology companies around the world leading to some questioning the rational of the legendary investor and SoftBank founder Masayoshi Son. Uber, DoorDash, and WeWork have all been backed by the fund, European startups Improbable in the U.K. and travel booking website GetYourGuide in Germany.

The SoftBank Vision Fund, run out of an office in London’s exclusive Mayfair neighbourhood, is led by Son and Rajeev Misra, a banker who previously worked at UBS, Deutsche Bank and Merrill Lynch.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Send me a secure tip.

I’m a Staff Writer covering tech in Europe. Previously, I was a News Editor for Business Insider Australia, and prior to that I was a Senior Technology Reporter for Business Insider UK. My writing has also appeared in The Financial Times, The Telegraph, The Guardian, Wired, The Independent, and elsewhere. I have also appeared on the BBC, Sky News, Al Jazeera, Channel 5, Reuters TV, and spoken on Russia Today and Shares Radio. In 2015, I was shortlisted for Technology Journalist of the Year by the UK Tech Awards and in 2016 I was nominated as one of the 30 young journalists to watch by MHP Communications.

Source: SoftBank Launches New $108 Billion Vision Fund To Invest in AI

U.S. Bank Regulatory Easing Is Negative For Investors And Taxpayers

Storm clouds behind the exterior of the Federal Reserve building in Washington, DC

Storm clouds behind the exterior of the Federal Reserve building in Washington, DC

In a disappointing decision, the Federal Reserve Board announced yesterday that effective this year, it will limit its use of the “qualitative objection” in Dodd-Frank’s Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR). Under Dodd-Frank’s Title I, banks that are designated as systemically important are required banks to design a model using stress scenarios from the Federal Reserve. In order to pass the stress test, banks need to demonstrate that they would be able to meet Basel III capital and leverage requirements even in a period of stress.  It is in the qualitative portion of CCAR, that the Federal Reserve can identify and communicate to the market if a bank is having problems with its internal controls, model risk management, information technology, risk data aggregation, and whether a bank has the ability to identify, measure, control, and monitor credit, market, liquidity and operational risks even during periods of stress.  Easing this requirement, in combination with all the changes to Dodd-Frank that have been taking place since last year, is dangerous to investors, not to mention taxpayers, especially so late in the credit cycle.

Parts of the test that each firm is subject to this year in addition to the hypothetical scenario.

Parts of the test that each firm is subject to this year in addition to the hypothetical scenario.

*All firms subject to the qualitative objection, except TD Group, will have their fourth year in the 2020 cycle. TD Group’s fourth year will be the 2019 cycle.

According to the Federal Reserve’s press release “The changes eliminate the qualitative objection for most firms due to the improvements in capital planning made by the largest firms.”  Yes, there have been improvements in capital planning precisely, because there were consequences to banks which failed the qualitative portion of CCAR. Banks were prohibited from making capital distributions until they could rectify the problems the Federal Reserve found in the CCAR exercise.  This decision essentially defangs the CCAR qualitative review of banks’ capital planning process.

Nomi Prins

Nomi Prins

Dean Zatkowsky

“It is absolutely reckless of the Fed to relinquish its regulatory authority in such a manner, rather than retain the option of qualitative oversight, which has turned up red flags in the past,” said Nomi Prins former international investment banker. “We are after all, talking about what the banks deem a reporting burden versus necessary oversight that could detect signs of a coming credit or other form of banking related crisis from a capital or internal risk management perspective. Why take that risk on behalf of the rest of our country or the world?”

In writing about the Federal Reserve’s decision, the Wall Street Journal wrote that “Regulators dialed back a practice of publicly shaming the nation’s biggest banks through “stress test” exams, taking one of the biggest steps yet to ease scrutiny put in place after the 2008 crisis.” It is not public shaming. It is called regulators doing their job, that is, providing transparency to markets about what challenges banks may be having. Without transparency, the bank share and bond investors cannot discipline banks.

Just last month, the Federal Reserve Board announced that it would be “providing relief to less-complex firms from stress testing requirements and CCAR by effectively moving the firms to an extended stress test cycle for this year. The relief applies to firms generally with total consolidated assets between $100 billion and $250 billion.”

Christopher Wolfe

Christopher Wolfe

Fitch Ratings

Investors in bank bonds, especially, should be concerned about recent easing of bank regulations. Immediately after the Federal Reserve decision was announced yesterday, Christopher Wolfe, Head of North American Banks and Managing Director at Fitch Ratings stated that “Taken together, these regulatory announcements raising the bar for systemic risk designation and relaxed standard for qualitative objection on the CCAR stress test reinforce our view that the regulatory environment is easing, which is a negative for bank creditors.”  Fitch Rating analysts have written several reports about the easing bank regulatory environment being credit negative for investors in bank bonds and to  counterparties of banks in a wide array of financial transactions.

Dennis Kelleher

Dennis Kelleher

Better Markets

Also, a month ago, the Federal Reserve announced that it will give more information to banks about how it uses banks’ data in its model to determine whether banks are adequately capitalized in a period of stress.  In commenting on the Federal Recent decisions, Better Markets President and CEO Dennis Kelleher stated that “Stress tests and their fulsome disclosure have been one of the key mechanisms used to restore trust in those banks and regulators.  By providing more transparency to the banks in response to their complaints while reducing the transparency to the public risks snatching defeat from the jaws of victory in the Fed’s stress test regime.”

Gregg Gelzinis

Gregg Gelzinis

Center for American Progress

Gregg Gelznis, Policy Analyst at the Center for American Progress also expressed his concern about the Federal Reserve’s recent changes to the CCAR stress tests.  “While Federal Reserve Chairman Jay Powell and Vice Chairman for Supervision Randal Quarles have spoken at length about the need for increased stress testing transparency, this transparency only cuts in one direction.” He elaborated that the Federal Reserve’s decision “benefits Wall Street at the expense of the public. The Fed has advanced rules that would provide banks with more information on the stress testing scenarios and models. At the same time, they have now made the stress testing regime less transparent for the public by removing the qualitative objection—instead evaluating capital planning controls and risk management privately in the supervisory process.”

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I have been dedicated to providing clients high quality financial consulting, research, and training services on Basel III, risk management, risk-based supervision

Source: U.S. Bank Regulatory Easing Is Negative For Investors And Taxpayers

Bank Of England Governor Might Open Opportunity For Ripple Tech, Says That Payments Across Borders Should Be Indistinguishable From Those Across The Street

The Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, has vowed to transform the central bank in preparation for the upcoming “fourth industrial revolution.”

Speaking at the Innovate Finance Global Summit, Carney said that he would focus on encouraging innovation among fintech startup, and making climate change and Artificial Intelligence (AI) priorities.

Carney stressed on the emerging digital economy, which many developing nations are preparing for by embracing blockchain technology and decentralized systems.

The Governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, has vowed to transform the central bank in preparation for the upcoming “fourth industrial revolution.”

Speaking at the Innovate Finance Global Summit, Carney said that he would focus on encouraging innovation among fintech startup, and making climate change and Artificial Intelligence (AI) priorities.

Carney stressed on the emerging digital economy, which many developing nations are preparing for by embracing blockchain technology and decentralized systems.

The second great wave of globalisation is cresting. The Fourth Industrial Revolution is just beginning. And a new economy is emerging. That new economy requires a new finance. A new finance to serve the digital economy, a new finance to support the major transitions underway across the globe, and a new finance to increase the financial sector’s resilience.

Carney also spoke of the changing nature of the way we exchange value,

Consumers and businesses increasingly expect transactions to be settled in real time, checkout to become an historical anomaly, and payments across borders to be indistinguishable from those across the street.

Though Ripple is not mentioned by name, the kind of solutions that Ripple offers is a partial answer for the kind of upgrade that Carney speaks of. The cross-border solutions that Ripple provides has been warmly welcomed by banks across the world.

Earlier this year, the World Economic Forum released a report that showed over 40 central banks across the world were conducting research and/or implementing blockchain solutions. Certainly there is a lot to be gained by established entities adopting the technology, IMF Managing Director, Christine Lagarde, has also said that “cryptocurrencies clearly shake the world.”

Abhimanyu Krishnan
About Abhimanyu Krishnan

Abhimanyu is an engineer on paper but a writer by living. To him, the most celebratory aspect of blockchain technology is its democratic nature. While he’s hodling, he can be found reading a good book or making the local dogs howl with the sound of his guitar playing.

Source: Bank Of England Governor Might Open Opportunity For Ripple Tech, Says That Payments Across Borders Should Be Indistinguishable From Those Across The Street

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