How Lemon Water Impacts Your Bladder, Per Urologists

That’s why so many people swear by drinking lemon water as part of their daily wellness routine, especially first thing in the morning upon waking up. Lemon water can help to make you feel more awake and alert by replenishing your body’s fluids—and you can’t deny that the sharp, acidic zing from the citrus helps clear some of the morning blearies, too.

“Many people report that they benefit from drinking lemon water first thing in the morning,” says Justin Houman, MD, a urologist available on Sesame. “They find it feels energizing and refreshing, alongside of course being thirst-quenching.”

However, there might be other impacts that drinking lemon water can have on your body, particularly your bladder. Here’s what two urologists have to say about how lemon water impacts your bladder health—including whether it’s beneficial or irritating—and provide recommendations for reaping the most bladder-boosting benefits from lemon water.‘I’m a Urologist, and These Are the Foods I Always Eat for…These Are the 10 Most Important Things We Learned From a Urologist…

How Lemon Water Impacts Your Bladder

First off, let’s quickly clear the air on one common misconception: Lemon water and lemonade are not the same. “Many people are told that lemon water and lemonade are natural treatments for common urological issues such as kidney stones, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and urinary incontinence, but in reality, lemonade is often full of bladder irritants like sugar and artificial coloring and flavoring, so those attempting to get the benefits of lemon water should not use lemonade as a substitute,” says Shenelle N. Wilson, MD, urologist and founder and CEO of Urology Unbound.

That being said, lemon water is certainly also no cure-all for bladder infections and doesn’t have miraculous powers that will make much of a difference in solving real-deal conditions like kidney stones or UTIs. “Lemon water will not dissolve existing stones, and it also won’t help stones pass any easier than if you were drinking plain water without lemon.

Lemon water also does not prevent or treat UTIs or urinary incontinence, and any benefits derived for these conditions are due to the increased water intake associated with drinking lemon water and water in general,” says Dr. Wilson. “If you have a UTI, for instance, drinking lemon water will not cause the infection to clear up on its own. You’ll likely need a round of antibiotics, as prescribed by a physician.”

According to Dr. Wilson, however, it can work in tandem with other lifestyle habits and dietary measures to support your bladder and its health. “Drinking lemon water can be a healthy habit that encourages optimal bladder health by providing much-needed hydration to the body—and that’s enough of a reason to drink it in the day,” she says.

What’s more, Dr. Wilson shares that drinking lemon water may help ward off the development or recurrence of kidney stones over time due to its ability to impact calcium oxalate formation, as shown in a recent study in the journal Europe PMC. “Lemon water can increase urinary citrate and urine pH, thereby potentially reducing one’s risk for formation of the most common type of kidney stone, calcium oxalate,” Dr. Wilson says.

Dr. Houman agrees, and adds this there may be slight immune- and digestion-boosting benefits to drinking lemon water as well. “Some patients who are prone to kidney stones are actually advised to drink freshly-squeezed lemon juice daily, as it may help reduce the chances of kidney stone formation, but more research is needed.

The acidity of lemons can also help supplement the acidity in your stomach, which tends to decline with age, so drinking lemon water may help with digestion as we age,” he says. It’s important to keep in mind that these benefits are likely minor—you’re only consuming a small portion of a lemon by squeezing it into a glass of water, after all.

Are There Drawbacks To Drinking Lemon Water?

Despite the benefits of drinking lemon water, some people may get adverse reactions or feel GI or bladder discomfort from the acid. So if that’s the case, it’s best to ditch the lemons and focus on drinking plain water in adequate amounts each day to best serve bladder health and function. “Lemon water can irritate the bladder in some patients, causing the sensation where you feel like you need to urinate more often than usual,” says Dr. Houman.

“Patients who are prone to irritative bladder symptoms in particular are advised to avoid citric foods, such as lemons, oranges, grapefruits, and tomatoes. Diluting your lemon water more heavily may decrease the irritative symptoms you are experiencing, but generally speaking, it’s probably not worth it.”

Plain water offers virtually as many bladder benefits, adds Dr. Wilson, so you won’t be missing too much if lemon water doesn’t agree with your urological or digestive system. “Simply drinking at least two and a half liters of water daily is among the most important ways to help prevent kidney stones from recurring, so I would advise patients sensitive to lemon water discontinue the consumption of it if it causes them discomfort,” says Dr. Wilson.

Additionally, if you struggle with nocturia—or the need to urinate frequently in the middle of the night—lemon water before bed may not be the best idea. “There is no ideal time to drink lemon water, but since lemon is a natural diuretic, I would recommend patients who struggle with frequent urination at night to stop drinking it, as well as all other fluids, at least two hours before bedtime,” says Dr. Wilson.

Beyond that, Dr. Wilson says that there isn’t any negative influence on the bladder to worry about regarding lemon water. “There’s no drawback to drinking lemon water from a urological standpoint,” she says. So if you enjoy it for its flavor and find that it’s helpful for keeping you hydrated, drink as much as you like.

How to Drink Lemon Water

It doesn’t need to be fancy. You can drink lemon water warm—try boiling water and infusing it with lemon juice and zest—or you can squeeze lemon juice into a glass of cold water or pitcher and store it in the fridge for ease and accessibility. You can also sprinkle in anti-inflammatory spices like cayenne or turmeric, or drop in additional pieces of fruit or herbs for even more flavor and health benefits.

Bottom line

“Many who make a habit of drinking lemon water first thing in the morning consider it to be a healthy way to start a happy, productive day,” says Dr. Houman. Are who are we to suggest there’s anything wrong with that? If you find that drinking lemon water in the morning improves your wellbeing and eases you into the day, then there’s zero reason to stop your daily practice.

“I’ve heard about the various ways people incorporate lemon water into their diet and drink it often myself,” agrees Dr. Wilson. “As a urologist, I don’t manage my patients’ mood or energy levels, but when I need to alkalinize a patient’s urine, I discuss lemon water in that capacity.

However, I also often prescribe medications for that purpose. So while I am a big believer and follower of naturopathic and dietary remedies, as a physician I don’t make general recommendations for treatments or therapies that have not been really proven in the medical literature,” says Dr. Wilson.

Source: How Lemon Water Impacts Your Bladder, Per Urologists | Well+Good

.

Sweeteners May Be Linked To Increased Cancer Risk

1

Sweeteners have long been suggested to be bad for our health. Studies have linked consuming too many sweeteners with conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But links with cancer have been less certain.

An artificial sweetener, called cyclamate, that was sold in the US in the 1970s was shown to increase bladder cancer in rats. However, human physiology is very different from rats, and observational studies failed to find a link between the sweetener and cancer risk in humans. Despite this, the media continued to report a link between sweeteners and cancer.

But now, a study published in PLOS Medicine which looked at over 100,000 people, has shown that those who consume high levels of some sweeteners have a small increase in their risk of developing certain types of cancer.

To assess their intake of artificial sweeteners, the researchers asked the participants to keep a food diary. Around half of the participants were followed for more than eight years.

The study reported that aspartame and acesulfame K, in particular, were associated with increased cancer risk – especially breast and obesity-related cancers, such as colorectal, stomach and prostate cancers. This suggests that removing some types of sweeteners from your diet may reduce the risk of cancer.

Cancer risk

Many common foods contain sweeteners. These food additives mimic the effect of sugar on our taste receptors, providing intense sweetness with no or very few calories. Some sweeteners occur naturally (such as stevia or yacon syrup). Others, such as aspartame, are artificial.

Although they have few or no calories, sweeteners still have an effect on our health. For example, aspartame turns into formaldehyde (a known carcinogen) when the body digests it. This could potentially see it accumulate in cells and cause them to become cancerous.

Our cells are hard-wired to self-destruct when they become cancerous. But aspartame has been shown to “switch off” the genes that tell cancer cells to do this. Other sweeteners, including sucralose and saccharin, have also been shown to damage DNA, which can lead to cancer. But this has only been shown in cells in a dish rather than in a living organism.

Sweeteners can also have a profound effect on the bacteria that live in our gut. Changing the bacteria in the gut can impair the immune system, which could mean they no longer identify and remove cancerous cells.

But it’s still unclear from these animal and cell-based experiments precisely how sweeteners initiate or support cancerous changes to cells. Many of these experiments would also be difficult to apply to humans because the amount of sweetener was given at much higher doses than a human would ever consume.

The results from previous research studies are limited, largely because most studies on this subject have only observed the effect of consuming sweeteners without comparing against a group that hasn’t consumed any sweeteners. A recent systematic review of almost 600,000 participants even concluded there was limited evidence to suggest heavy consumption of artificial sweeteners may increase the risk of certain cancers. A review in the BMJ came to a similar conclusion.

Although the findings of this recent study certainly warrant further research, it’s important to acknowledge the study’s limitations. First, food diaries can be unreliable because people aren’t always honest about what they eat or they may forget what they have consumed. Although this study collected food diaries every six months, there’s still a risk people weren’t always accurately recording what they were eating and drinking.

Though the researchers partially mitigated this risk by having participants take photos of the food they ate, people still might not have included all the foods they ate. Based on current evidence, it’s generally agreed that using artificial sweeteners is associated with increased body weight – though researchers aren’t quite certain whether sweeteners directly cause this to happen.

Although this recent study took people’s body mass index into account, it’s possible that changes in body fat may have contributed to the development of many of these types of cancers – not necessarily the sweeteners themselves.

Finally, the risk of developing cancer in those who consumed the highest levels of artificial sweeteners compared with those who consumed the lowest amounts was modest – with only at 13% higher relative risk of developing cancer in the study period. So although people who consumed the highest amounts of sweetener had an increased risk of developing cancer, this was still only slightly higher than those with the lowest intake.

While the link between sweetener use and diseases, including cancer, is still controversial, it’s important to note that not all sweeteners are equal. While sweeteners such as aspartame and saccharin may be associated with ill health, not all sweeteners are.

Stevia, produced from the Stevia rebaudiana plant, has been reported to be useful in controlling diabetes and body weight, and may also lower blood pressure. The naturally occurring sugar alcohol, xylitol, may also support the immune system and digestion. Both stevia and xylitol have also been shown to protect from tooth decay, possibly because they kill bad oral bacteria.

So the important choice may be not the amount of sweetener you eat but the type you use.

By:

James is an Associate Professor in Biosciences in the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University, UK and a broadcaster with a number of television companies. James’s broadcasting includes work on BBC2’s Trust Me I’m a Doctor where he is the programmes most used contributor

Source: Sweeteners may be linked to increased cancer risk – new research

.

Critics:

Artificial sweeteners (particularly aspartame and acesulfame-K) are associated with increased cancer risk, according to a study published online March 24 in PLOS Medicine. Charlotte Debras, from the Sorbonne Paris Nord University, and colleagues examined the associations between artificial sweetener intakes and cancer risk, overall and by site, among 102,865 adults from the French population-based cohort NutriNet-Santé (2009 to 2021), with a median follow up of 7.8 years.

The researchers found that higher consumers of total artificial sweeteners (above the median exposure) had increased risk of overall cancer compared with nonconsumers (hazard ratio, 1.13). Aspartame and acesulfame-K was associated with increased cancer risk (hazard ratios, 1.15 and 1.13, respectively). Risks were elevated for breast cancer (hazard ratio, 1.22 for aspartame) and obesity-related cancers (hazard ratios, 1.13 and 1.15 for total artificial sweeteners and aspartame, respectively).

“Our findings do not support the use of artificial sweeteners as safe alternatives for sugar in foods or beverages and provide important and novel information to address the controversies about their potential adverse health effects,” the authors write. “These results are particularly relevant in the context of the ongoing in-depth re-evaluation of artificial sweeteners by European Food Safety Authority and other agencies globally.”

.

Related articles:

One Major Side Effect of Eating Boiled Eggs, Experts Say

A hard-boiled egg can be a good source of protein that takes the edge off hunger, but the new “boiled egg diet” takes things a little too far. That’s what two dietitians believe, as a restrictive new weight-loss trend is said to be gaining momentum on social media. What exactly is the boiled egg diet? Here’s important insight you should know.

Keep reading to learn a major side effect of going on the boiled egg diet, and sign up for the Eat This, Not That! newsletter for the nutrition news you need. Also, don’t miss This Gone-Viral Way to Cook Eggs Is Dangerous, Say Experts.

Women’s Health has reported on the boiled egg diet, which apparently is stirring buzz online. This diet isn’t exactly what it sounds like (fortunately). While it is composed of boiled eggs, that’s not all that’s on the menu. According to WH, the boiled egg diet also includes a list of lean proteins (fish, pork, poultry minus skin), non-starchy vegetables (think leafy greens, broccoli, bell peppers, asparagus, and carrots), a very select handful of fruits (berries, lemons, grapefruit and watermelon), and minimal fats (butter, mayonnaise, and coconut oil).

RELATED: One Major Effect of Eating Fruit Every Day, Says New Study

The boiled egg component of the diet generally comes in as the diet calls for an individual to eat two eggs with fruit at breakfast, then vegetables with eggs or another lean protein at both lunch and dinner, according to registered dietitian and nutritionist Erin Palinski-Wade.

RELATED: Unhealthiest Proteins for Weight Loss, According to Experts

Anytime you subtract all the carbohydrates from your diet, it’s going to help you lose weight—but not in a healthy way. Palinski-Wade says the problem with the boiled egg diet is that it doesn’t provide your body with all the nutrition you need.

To this point, WH also cites Keri Gans, another registered dietitian and nutritionist, listing the foods that are off limits on the boiled egg diet: “[…T]he diet suggests avoiding all processed foods, and even other veggies like potatoes, corn, peas, and legumes. You’re also asked to avoid some fruits: bananas, pineapple, mango, dried fruits, and sweetened beverages.”

Just one example of why this isn’t ideal for your health comes from a brand-new study that’s stressing why eating whole grains is so important to cardiovascular health, and how whole grains can even help you lose weight.

A couple hard-boiled eggs are a good snack now and then, but several a day? It wouldn’t be sustainable for most people to diet successfully, Palinski-Wade suggests.

Also, it’s important to remember that while eggs have some super health benefits, they’re also a source of cholesterol and saturated fat. If you’re not egged-out, peek at One Major Side Effect of Eating Too Many Eggs, Says Science.

Keep reading:

Krissy Gasbarre

Source: One Major Side Effect of Eating Boiled Eggs, Experts Say | Eat This Not That

.

Find These Easy Ways To Burn Weight:

Breakfast for dinner doesn’t have to mean a sad plate of scrambled eggs. Try this frittata recipe: Beat 6 eggs with black pepper, a pinch of salt and Parmesan cheese. Sauté 1/2 cup of chopped asparagus and 1/2 cup of chopped lean ham in 1 teaspoon of melted butter or coconut oil for 3 minutes in an oven-safe pan. Add the egg mixture to the pan and stir gently. Cook until the egg mixture has set on the bottom, about 4 minutes, and sprinkle with parsley. Place the pan in the oven and broil for about 3 minutes, or until the frittata is lightly browned. Serves 3.

Slipping some egg onto your sandwich is an easy way to boost your midday protein intake and ward off mid-afternoon hunger pangs. Try topping a lunch BLT with avocado slices and an egg for a slimming protein-and-healthy-fat combo. Dining at home? Cook an egg sunny side up for your sandwich. The yolk makes a sauce for the whole dish that’s worth breaking out the fork and knife.

You can make your own fried rice quickly and easily. This recipe is perfect on those rights when you need some energizing—stat! Boil 1 cup of water with 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 2 tablespoons of low-sodium soy sauce. Add 1 cup of instant rice and stir. Remove from heat, cover and let sit for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, heat 1 teaspoon of sesame oil in a wok or skillet over medium heat, before sautéing 1/2 cup each of onions, green beans and bean sprouts and 2 garlic cloves for 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in 1 beaten egg and scramble for 2 minutes before stirring in the rice and mix. Top it off with 2 finely chopped green onions and a dash of pepper. Top with stir-fried chicken breast or grilled shrimp.

A big bowl of oatmeal is your morning go-to now, right? Right? Good! Now take that big boost of energy to the next level with a cooking trick. Get a little extra protein by stirring in a whole egg while your oats are cooking. (Tip: Add some sweetness before serving by drizzling it all with vanilla extract and a sprinkle of cinnamon.) Similarly, you can thicken up broths and soups by adding a beaten egg at the end of cooking; just stir and remove from heat.

Related Stories:

About ETNT Health

Don’t forget to check your EU passenger rights before departure to

If you’re over 40 – this game is a must!

Tinnitus? Do This Immediately (Watch)

The push-up underpants that have taken out country by storm.

Everybody Is Staying Cool With This Tiny Portable AC
What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Canned Tuna
Warning Signs You’re Getting Cancer, According to Doctors
15 Walmart Hacks To Take Advantage of Their Deals
This Can Lead to “Fatal” Heart Attack, Say Doctors Now
You “Should Not” Take COVID Vaccine if You Have This Condition, Alerts FDA
Celeb Couples We Totally Forgot Were Married
If Your Stomach Feels Like a Bloated Balloon, Try This
Doctor Urges: If You Have Arthritis, Do This Now
The Unhealthiest Canned Foods on the Planet
Surprising Exercises That Will Help You Get Lean, Says Science
21+ Best Healthy Salmon Recipes for Weight Loss
Sure Signs You’ve Already Had COVID, Says Dr. Fauci
Doctors Baffled: Simple Tip Relieves Years of Joint Pain (Try Tonight)
Why You Should Never Buy Meat From Aldi
Internet Without Landline: Prices in 2021 Might Surprise You

8 Mistakes You’re Making When Cooking Veggies

8 Fat-Burning Ways to Eat Eggs

Should I Eat Egg Yolks?

The Science Behind Grilling the Perfect Steak

Summer has arrived, and it’s time to fire up the backyard grill. Though many of us are trying to eat less beef for environmental reasons, it’s hard to resist indulging in an occasional steak — and you’ll want to make the most of the experience.

So, what’s the best way to grill that steak? Science has some answers. Meat scientists (many of them, unsurprisingly, in Texas) have spent whole careers studying how to produce the tenderest, most flavorful beef possible. Much of what they’ve learned holds lessons only for cattle producers and processors, but a few of their findings can guide backyard grillmasters in their choice of meat and details of the grilling process.

Let’s start with the choice of meat. Every experienced cook knows that the lightly used muscles of the loin, along the backbone, have less connective tissue and thus give tenderer results than the hard-working muscles of the leg. And they know to look for steaks with lots of marbling, the fat deposits between muscle fibers that are a sign of high-quality meat. “If you have more marbling, the meat will be tenderer, juicier, and it will have richer flavor,” says Sulaiman Matarneh, a meat scientist at Utah State University who wrote about muscle biology and meat quality in the 2021 Annual Review of Animal Biosciences.

From a flavor perspective, in fact, the differences between one steak and the next are mostly a matter of fat content: the amount of marbling and the composition of the fatty acid subunits of the fat molecules. Premium cuts like ribeye have more marbling and are also richer in oleic acid, an especially tasty fatty acid — “the one fatty acid that frequently correlates with positive eating experience,” says Jerrad Legako, a meat scientist at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. Sirloin, in contrast, has less oleic acid and more fatty acid types that can yield less appealing, fishy flavor hints during cooking.

That fatty acid difference also plays out in a big decision that consumers make when they buy a steak: grain-fed or grass-fed beef? Grain-fed cattle — animals that live their final months in a feedlot eating a diet rich in corn and soybeans — have meat that’s higher in oleic acid. Animals that spend their whole life grazing on pasture have a higher proportion of omega-3 fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids that break down into smaller molecules with fishy and gamy flavors. Many consumers prefer to buy grass-fed beef anyway, either to avoid the ethical issues of feedlots or because they like that gamy flavor and leaner meat.

The biggest influence on the final flavor of that steak, though, is how you cook it. Flavorwise, cooking meat accomplishes two things. First, the heat of the grill breaks the meat’s fatty acids into smaller molecules that are more volatile — that is, more likely to become airborne. These volatiles are responsible for the steak’s aroma, which accounts for the majority of its flavor. Molecules called aldehydes, ketones and alcohols among that breakdown mix are what we perceive as distinctively beefy.

The second way that cooking builds flavor is through browning, a process that chemists call the Maillard reaction. This is a fantastically complex process in which amino acids and traces of sugars in the meat react at high temperatures to kick off a cascade of chemical changes that result in many different volatile end products.

Most important of these are molecules called pyrazines and furans, which contribute the roasty, nutty flavors that steak aficionados crave. The longer and hotter the cooking, the deeper into the Maillard reaction you go and the more of these desirable end products you get — until eventually, the meat starts to char, producing undesirable bitter, burnt flavors.

The challenge for the grillmaster is to achieve the ideal level of Maillard products at the moment the meat reaches the desired degree of doneness. Here, there are three variables to play with: temperature, time and the thickness of the steak.

Thin steaks cook through more quickly, so they need a hot grill to generate enough browning in the short time available, says Chris Kerth, a meat scientist at Texas A&M University. Kerth and his colleagues have studied this process in the lab, searing steaks to precise specifications and feeding the results into a gas chromatograph, which measures the amount of each volatile chemical produced.

Kerth found, as expected, that thin, half-inch steaks cooked at relatively low temperatures have mostly the beefy flavors characteristic of fatty acid breakdown, while higher temperatures also produce a lot of the roasty pyrazines that result from the Maillard reaction. So if your steak is thin, crank up that grill — and leave the lid open so that the meat cooks through a little more slowly. That will give you time to build a complex, beefy-roasty flavor.

And to get the best sear on both sides, flip the meat about a third of the way through the expected cook time, not halfway — that’s because as the first side cooks, the contracting muscle fibers drive water to the uncooked side. After you flip, this water cools the second side so it takes longer to brown, Kerth’s team found.

When the scientists tested thicker, 1.5-inch steaks, the opposite problem happened: The exterior would burn unpleasantly before the middle finished cooking. For these steaks, a moderate grill temperature gave the best mix of volatiles. And sure enough, when Kerth’s team tested their steaks on actual people, they found that diners gave lower ratings to thick steaks grilled hot and fast. Diners rated the other temperatures and cooking times as all similar to each other, but thick steaks cooked at moderate temperatures won out by a nose.

That might seem odd, given that steakhouses often boast of their thick slabs of prime beef and the intense heat of their grills — exactly the combination Kerth’s study found least desirable. It works because the steakhouses use a two-step cooking process: First, they sear the meat on the hot grill, and then they finish cooking in a moderate oven. “That way, they get the degree of doneness to match the sear that they want,” says Kerth. Home cooks can do the same by popping their seared meat into a 350°F oven until it reaches their desired doneness.

The best degree of doneness, of course, is largely a matter of personal preference — but science has something to say here, too. Meat left rare, says Kerth, doesn’t receive enough heat to break down its fatty acids to generate beefy flavors. And once you go past medium, you lose some of the “bloody” flavors that come with lightly cooked meat. “A lot of people, myself included, like a little bit of bloody note with the brown pyrazines and Maillard compounds,” says Kerth. “It has a bigger flavor.” For those reasons, he advises, “I wouldn’t go any lower than medium rare or certainly any higher than medium. Then you just start losing a lot of the flavor.”

Kerth has one more piece of advice for home cooks: Watch the meat closely when it’s on the grill! “When you’re at those temperatures, a lot happens in a short period of time,” he says. “You start getting a lot of chemical reactions happening very, very quickly.” That’s the scientific basis for what every experienced griller has learned from (literally) bitter experience: It’s easy to burn the meat if you’re not paying attention.

Happy scientifically informed grilling!

Source: The Science Behind Grilling the Perfect Steak | Innovation | Smithsonian Magazine

.

Critics:

Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above, below or from the side. Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat and vegetables quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), using a cast iron/frying pan, or a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill).

Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily through thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is called broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is through thermal radiation.

Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma and flavor from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).

Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens. Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oils, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.

References:

  • AngryBBQ. Not sure what about barbecue makes Mike and Jannah Haas angry, but they have a nice little blog.
  • Barbecue Master. Based in NC barbecue country, Cyndi Allison has been writing about barbecue and teaching it for more than a decade. Check out the links to her other websites and blogs.
  • Barbecues & Grilling at about.com. Derrick Riches is a self taught cook who has learned a lot and he passes it along in this large and deep reference.
  • Barbecuen. Articles and ideas on everything from grills to cooking elk.
  • BroBBQ. A blog of recipes, product testing, fun by Jack Thompson.
  • BBQDryRubs. The site is a nice hobby site from David Somerville covering more than rubs. He focuses on Weber gear and the sausage section is good.
  • BBQ FAQ. An astonishing compilation of wisdom from scores of serious cue’ers. The only problem is that the mailing list of participants has been dissolved so you can no longer sign up. Also, a lot of the links are broken. Still, the knowledge there is timeless.
  • BBQ Sauce Reviews. He likes sauce. Some better than others. See if you fave is on his 5-star list.
  • Braai 4 Heritage. In South Africa they call it braai, and everyone barbecues. They even have a National Braai Day!
  • BBQ Specialties. A nice little blog with recipes.
  • Cooking Outdoors. Gary House is fearless as he cooks everything on his grills, even pies and bread. There are sections on barbecue, cast iron cooking, Dutch oven, fire pit, and foil cooking. Lots of recipes well illustrated with photos.
  • Food Fire Friends. Mark Jenner’s site explores many aspects of outdoor cooking, including recipes, techniques, and product guides, as he works his way toward mastering cooking with live
    fire.
  • GrateTV. This frequent video show stars Jack Waiboer, a talented BBQ cook and competitor based in SC, and co-host Bill West (above). They teach tips, technique, tools, toys, secret ingredients, beer drinking, and answer viewer email questions. They know their stuff, and teach it with a smile. That’s them above, and one of the gadgets they feature.
  • GrillGirl. Robyn Medlin Lindars knows how to cook, and she can do it outdoors. She blogs about her adventures and recipes. Her specialty is making barbecue fun for women. She also cooks on her sailboat! Fun stuff!
  • A Hamburger Today. Gently patted together by Robyn Lee, this site is made of prime restaurant commentary, stuffed with burger lore, topped with good humor, and held together with beautiful drippy photographs. She is aided by a handful of burgerphiles who know their stuff.
  • Home BBQ. Message boards that discuss just about anything barbecue.
  • The Ingredient Store.com. Home of the FAB injections and marinades. FAB is the stuff most of the brisket champs inject (into the meat, not themselves).
  • Live Fire Online. Curt McAdams can cook and takes nice pix in Ohio. He focuses on barbecuing and grilling, but often digresses on local foods, markets, baking, and dining.
  • Mark Stevens. I met Mark in one of the online message boards and have learned a thing or two from him and his tips. You can too. His home made website has great links, and some good recipes and tips.
  • Naked Whiz. This may be the most inaccurate and inappropriate name for a website on the net, but don’t let it deter you. This is the go-to site if you have any questions about charcoal, how it is made, and what is the best.
  • Nibble Me This. Chris Grove is in Knoxville and he works his Big Green Egg and other cookers hard. He has also written a book about kamados.
  • Grillocracy. Our lead writer Clint Cantwell’s personal BBQ and grilling blog.
  • Patio Daddio BBQ. John Dawson brings his analytical IT mind to the patio and tests new techniques, equipment, and recipes with an unusual thoroughness and sharp sense of humor. He also competes. This is one of my faves.
  • Postcards from Scotsylvania. Scot Murphy is a very smart, witty, fella, and a pretty good cook too. His blog covers barbecue, gardening, politics, comics, and “ruminations about the universe, occasional whining, snarkiness, stuff like that.”
  • Real Truck. Accessories and gear for your truck.
  • She Smoke. Julie Reinhardt is the author of the book She-Smoke, a Backyard Barbecue Book, and co-owner of Smokin’ Pete’s BBQ in Seattle. This blog is an extension of the book, the restaurant, and how she rolls with two kids in tow.

The Hidden Dangers of Protein Powders

2f67e67b-217d-4b2f-9a4b-ed3526d8fc28

Adding protein powder to a glass of milk or a smoothie may seem like a simple way to boost your health. After, all, protein is essential for building and maintaining muscle, bone strength, and numerous body functions. And many older adults don’t consume enough protein because of a reduced appetite.

But be careful: a scoop of chocolate or vanilla protein powder can harbor health risks. “I don’t recommend using protein powders except in a few instances, and only with supervision,” says registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

What is protein powder?

Protein powders are powdered forms of protein that come from plants (soybeans, peas, rice, potatoes, or hemp), eggs, or milk (casein or whey protein). The powders may include other ingredients such as added sugars, artificial flavoring, thickeners, vitamins, and minerals. The amount of protein per scoop can vary from 10 to 30 grams. Supplements used for building muscle contain relatively more protein, and supplements used for weight loss contain relatively less.

What are the risks?

There are numerous risks to consider when using a protein powder. Among them:

  • A protein powder is a dietary supplement. The FDA leaves it up to manufacturers to evaluate the safety and labeling of products. So, there’s no way to know if a protein powder contains what manufacturers claim.
  • We don’t know the long-term effects. “There are limited data on the possible side effects of high protein intake from supplements,” McManus says.
  • It may cause digestive distress. “People with dairy allergies or trouble digesting lactose [milk sugar] can experience gastrointestinal discomfort if they use a milk-based protein powder,” McManus points out.
  • It may be high in added sugars and calories. Some protein powders have little added sugar, and others have a lot (as much as 23 grams per scoop). Some protein powders wind up turning a glass of milk into a drink with more than 1,200 calories. The risk: weight gain and an unhealthy spike in blood sugar. The American Heart Association recommends a limit of 24 grams of added sugar per day for women and 36 grams for men.

A new risk revealed

Earlier this year, a nonprofit group called the Clean Label Project released a report about toxins in protein powders. Researchers screened 134 products for 130 types of toxins and found that many protein powders contained heavy metals (lead, arsenic, cadmium, and mercury), bisphenol-A (BPA, which is used to make plastic), pesticides, or other contaminants with links to cancer and other health conditions. Some toxins were present in significant quantities. For example, one protein powder contained 25 times the allowed limit of BPA.

How could protein powder contain so many contaminants? The Clean Label Project points to manufacturing processes or the existence of toxins in soil (absorbed by plants that are made into protein powders).

Not all of the protein powders that were tested contained elevated levels of toxins. You can see the results at the Clean Label Project’s website (www.cleanlabelproject.org).

Daily protein goals

Aim for the Recommended Dietary Allowance for protein intake: 46 grams per day for women and 56 grams for men. For example:

  • an egg for breakfast (6 grams)
  • 6 ounces of plain Greek yogurt at lunch (18 grams)
  • a handful of nuts for a snack (4–7 grams)
  • a cup of milk (8 grams) and 2 ounces of cooked chicken for dinner (14 grams).

What you should do

McManus says that in certain cases, chemical-free protein powders may be helpful—but only with medical supervision. Such cases could include

  • difficulty eating or an impaired appetite (as a result of cancer treatment or frailty from older age)
  • a surgical incision or a pressure wound that is not healing well (your body needs protein to repair cells and make new ones)
  • a serious condition requiring additional calories and protein in order for you to get better (such as burns).

Otherwise, get protein from whole foods: nuts, seeds, low-fat dairy products (yogurt, milk, cheese), legumes (beans, lentils), fish, poultry, eggs, and lean meat. “You’ll find,” McManus says, “that there are many ways to get protein without turning to a powder.”

Source: The hidden dangers of protein powders – Harvard Health

.

Critics:

Bodybuilding supplements are dietary supplements commonly used by those involved in bodybuilding, weightlifting, mixed martial arts, and athletics for the purpose of facilitating an increase in lean body mass. The intent is to increase muscle, increase body weight, improve athletic performance, and for some sports, to simultaneously decrease percent body fat so as to create better muscle definition.

Among the most widely used are high protein drinks, pre-workout blends, branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), glutamine, arginine, essential fatty acids, creatine, HMB, whey protein, ZMA and weight loss products. Supplements are sold either as single ingredient preparations or in the form of “stacks” – proprietary blends of various supplements marketed as offering synergistic advantages.

While many bodybuilding supplements are also consumed by the general public the frequency of use will differ when used specifically by bodybuilders. One meta-analysis concluded that – for athletes participating in resistance exercise training and consuming protein supplements for an average of 13 weeks – total protein intake up to 1.6 g/kg of body weight per day would result in an increase in strength and fat-free mass, but that higher intakes would not further contribute.

In addition to being potentially harmful, some have argued that there is little evidence to indicate any benefit to using bodybuilding protein or amino acid supplements. A 2005 overview concluded that “[i]n view of the lack of compelling evidence to the contrary, no additional dietary protein is suggested for healthy adults undertaking resistance or endurance exercise”.

In dispute of this, a 2017 meta-analysis concluded that for athletes participating in resistance exercise training and consuming protein supplements for an average of 13 weeks, total protein intake up to 1.6 g per kg body weight per day would result in an increase in strength and fat-free mass, i.e. muscle, but that higher intakes would not further contribute. The muscle mass increase was statistically significant but modest – averaging 0.3 for all trials and 1.0 to 2.0 kg, for protein intake ≥ 1.6 g/kg/day.

See also

%d bloggers like this: