Advertisements

How To Answer The Salary Question On Online Job Applications – And Other Common Job Search Negotiation Questions Answered

Just in time for Veterans’ Day, I led a negotiation workshop for female military veterans and military spouses, organized by American Corporate Partnes. ACP is a national non-profit that offers a broad array of career support to veterans and military spouses, so it’s worth checking out! Here are five job search negotiation questions that apply to both military and non-military job applicants:

1 – How do you address online applications that require a dollar figure and avoid being screened out?

Getting the salary question so early in the hiring process is one of the reasons to avoid online applications if you can help it. It’s hard to give a desired salary when you don’t know much about the job. The desired salary should always be about the job at hand, not what you were making before, what you hope to make, even what you think you deserve.

Therefore, if possible, try to get referred to someone and get a chance to speak with people to learn more specifics about the job before suggesting a salary. However, sometimes you don’t don’t have an existing connection into the company, and you want to apply before too many others apply. First, see if you can just skip the question or write a text response (such as “commensurate with responsibilities of the job”). If not, put a nonsensical number like $1 so that you can move past the question. If you get asked about the $1 response in the first interview, then you can mention that you need to learn more about the job fist before estimating the appropriate salary.

2 – How do you avoid mentioning a salary range during your first interview?

Today In: Leadership

Related to the first question, another attendee wanted to avoid giving a salary range, not just at the application stage, but even in the first interview. While I agree that you want to have as much detail about the job as possible before quoting a desired salary, you don’t want to avoid discussing salary at all costs. Some recruiters don’t move forward with a candidate if they don’t have an idea of target salary because the candidate might be too expensive and it’s a waste of everyone’s time. Refusing to discuss salary may prevent you from moving forward.

Therefore, you don’t want to avoid mentioning a salary range at all – just avoid mentioning a salary target too soon. Too soon is when you’re not clear about the job. It’s also too soon to discuss salary if you have not researched the market and may underestimate or overestimate your value. For that reason, you should be researching salaries now, even before you get into an interview situation. You don’t want to be caught unprepared to discuss salary. Your lack of readiness is a problem for you, not the employer.

3 – When during the interview process do you start negotiating the job salary?

Ideally you don’t mention salary until you are clear about the scope of the job. That said, mentioning a salary target is not the same as negotiating that particular job’s salary. Sure, it puts a number or range of numbers out there as a starting point, but you’re not bound to it. If you learn different information during the interview process that changes your view of an appropriate salary for that job, then you can still negotiate a different salary.

But don’t start negotiating a particular job’s salary until the employer has given you an offer or confirms that an offer is being put-together. Until the point you know that an employer wants you, your salary talk is all hypothetical. The majority of your interviews should be spent on the scope and responsibilities of the job, not any part of compensation (whether that’s salary or other type of compensation, such as bonus, benefits, time off, etc). You want to demonstrate that you’re interested in the role and making a contribution to that company, not just the salary or whatever else is in it for you.

4 – How do you negotiate differently for public sector v. private sector jobs?

When you do negotiate a particular job’s compensation, your approach should always be customized to that job, in that company and in that industry. Change the job, and you change the compensation and therefore the negotiation. Similarly, go from public sector to private sector, and you change the compensation and therefore how you should approach the negotiation.

One important difference between public and private sector jobs, in particular, is how compensation may be structured differently. A private sector job may offer equity or profit-sharing potential. That type of ownership element is not possible with a public sector job. Knowing this, you may take a lower base salary at a private job that’s offering equity compared to a similar public sector job that won’t offer that. Understanding the different elements available to your potential employers enables you to negotiate on those different terms. Negotiations at different employers will be different because you need to do customized research for each opportunity, consider different compensation structures for each and possibly propose different terms. This is true, not just for public v. private sector, but also start-up v. established company or companies in different geographies. Change the job, the company, the industry or sector, and you change the compensation.

5 – How do you negotiate salary when returning to a corporate position after consulting independently for several years?

When you’re making a career change, in this case consulting to corporate (but it could also be one industry to another or one role to a different one), it should not impact the compensation you receive. Tie the compensation to the scope of the job. Your background enables you to land the job or not. Once you are the one they want, your compensation should be what makes sense for that job, even if you have an atypical background by virtue of your career change.

This requires, of course, that you know what the job should pay. When you have been consulting for several years, you may be out of the loop on what in-house compensation looks like. You need to do research on current compensation, including salary, benefits and other perks for being in-house.

Negotiating a corporate position after consulting for a while also requires that you’re willing to stand your ground and negotiate. If you are too anxious to land an in-house position and get out of consulting, you might settle for less. This is where research can help again — set an appropriate target and don’t underestimate yourself. Having multiple job leads in your pipeline will also help you stay confident in the negotiation.


Remember, you can negotiate

The exact strategy or approach to best negotiate a job offer varies based on what you want, the job at hand, where you are in the negotiation and who you are negotiating with. However, even these general tips show that there are many actions you can take during a negotiation. With some research and preparation, you do have influence on the compensation you receive.

During the ACP workshop, we covered even more questions. In the next post, I’ll answer five more negotiation questions, this time about career management:

  • How to negotiate for flexibility
  • How to renegotiate when you accepted a lower salary years ago
  • How to keep your salary competitive after years in the same job
  • How to negotiate for fairness when your boss plays favorites
  • How negotiation changes when you go from employee to business owner

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

As a longtime recruiter and now career coach, I share career tips from the employer’s perspective. My specialty is career change — fitting since I am a multiple-time career changer myself. My latest career adventures include running SixFigureStart, Costa Rica FIRE and FBC Films.

I am the author of Jump Ship: 10 Steps To Starting A New Career and have coached professionals from Amazon, Goldman Sachs, Google, McKinsey, Tesla, and other leading firms. I teach at Columbia University and created the online courses, “Behind The Scenes In The Hiring Process” and “Making FIRE Possible“.

I have appeared as a guest career expert on CNN, CNBC, CBS, FOX Business and other media outlets. In addition to Forbes, I formerly wrote for Money, CNBC and Portfolio.

Source: How To Answer The Salary Question On Online Job Applications – And Other Common Job Search Negotiation Questions Answered

 

475 subscribers
HOW TO ANSWER THE SALARY QUESTION ON A JOB APPLICATION // Do you come across a job you really want to apply to, only frozen by the question ‘What is your salary expectation?’ You’ve probably heard the first person to give a number loses – and you’re absolutely right! On top of that, your last salary or desired salary is none of their business until both parties agreed they are equally excited about one another. So how do you politely deflect this question? Watch this video for the answer! [RESOURCES & LINKS] FREE RESOURCE: Free worksheets, guides, and cheat sheets for your job search https://cultivitae.lpages.co/newslett… FREE STRATEGY SESSION: If you are interested in learning about career coaching (seeking a career transition or career advancement) book a free strategy session http://www.cultivitae.com/call FREE WORKSHOP: How to Snag Your Dream Job or Promotion THIS Quarter https://cultivitae.lpages.co/newslett… FREE COMMUNITY: Join our community, “Ultimate Career Support for Ambitious Corporate Professionals” Facebook Group here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/culti… Say hi on social: Twitter: https://twitter.com/CultiVitae Instagram: http://instagram.com/cultivitae Facebook: www.facebook.com/cultivitae Linkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/emilycliou Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/cultivitae CultiVitae’s homepage: www.cultivitae.com Blog URL: http://cultivitae.com/2018/06/28/sala… YouTube URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7eKbv…

Advertisements

I’ve Interviewed 300+ Successful Women. Here’s What I’ve Learned About Creating a Career You Love

Over the past few years, I’ve interviewed hundreds of successful women. They have every type of journey you could dream of: There are women who have reached the C-suite in Fortune 500 companies and well-funded startups, women who have started and run their own ventures, and women who have made dramatic career turnarounds.

They’re all extraordinarily unique, of course, but there’s one thing they have in common: They’ve charted the path to work that they love.

That doesn’t just mean big jobs with important tiles and sizable paychecks (though in some cases, that’s true). Instead, these women have thoughtfully built careers around their innate strengths, their personal passions, and the type of work that brings them meaning and purpose.

Yes, creating a career like this may seem like a lofty goal. But if there’s anything I’ve learned from these interviews over the years, it’s this: Every single one of us has the power to find work we love. It’s just a matter of confidently taking steps to get there. As Katie Fogarty, founder of The Reboot Group, shared on my Facebook Watch show, Work It: “Do not wait for people to give you permission. Seize your permission. Seize control of your career.”

Ready to get started? Straight from some of the most successful women in the world, here are five crucial lessons about taking the reins and crafting the professional life of your dreams.

Today In: Leadership

1. Expand Your Idea Of A Dream Job

Often, we have a pretty narrow view of our ultimate goals. We envision achieving a specific job title or working for a particular company. But what happens when we achieve that singular goal, and it doesn’t live up to expectations? That’s all too common—and so the most successful women I’ve interviewed have made it clear that it’s key to widen your perspective.

For example, Kristin Lemkau, Chief Marketing Officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co., emphasizes that it’s critical to be flexible when thinking about your dream job. If you’re only focused on getting your current boss’ job, for example, you may miss other options—inside or outside of your company. “By staying flexible and open,” she explains, “you might encounter an opportunity that you had never before considered.”

Lindsey Knowles, VP of Marketing at Winc Wines, echoes this sentiment. “Be open. And try different things. There’s so much you can’t know until you do it,” she shares. “Until you’ve been in a few different types of workplaces, you can’t know what your preferred working style is or the types of problems you like to solve.”

2. Pursue What Matters To You—Not To Anyone Else

Similarly, we’re conditioned to believe that the traditional markers of success, like money or a C-level title, will make us happy, too. But for most people, that’s not the full story. Instead, it’s key to dig deep and understand the very personal factors that drive meaning for you—whether that’s constantly learning new skills or being involved in radical social change—and pursue jobs that incorporate those elements.

According to Aditi Javeri Gokhale, Chief Marketing and Communications Officer at Northwestern Mutual, a good place to start is thinking about the people you want to work with and the issues you’re passionate about. “I have always identified with jobs where I have a good connection with my leaders, with the mission of the company, and with the team that surrounds me.” When you have that connection, it’s easier to excel at—and enjoy—a job, no matter what your title is.

3. Be Intentional About What You Say Yes To

Cathleen Trigg-Jones, journalist and founder of CatScape Productions, once explained to me her strategy for evaluating opportunities. She would yes to the things that would move her closer to her dreams, and she would say no to the things that didn’t serve her. (Even if they looked like good opportunities on paper!)

This simple rule can move you toward a career you love in two important ways. First, it pretty much guarantees that you get to do more of the work you’re excited about. Second, you get to incrementally step further away from the tasks you don’t enjoy and that don’t help you get where you want to go—even if there are certain aspects of them that may be tempting. Keep following this formula, and you will organically move in the right direction.

4. Don’t Be Afraid To Take Risks

If you want a meaningful professional life, you have to be willing to take risks. Why? “If you don’t do things because you’re scared to fail, you’re not really getting the best out of yourself,” Sabrina Macias, Senior Director of Global Communications at DraftKings, once told me. “Risk is healthy; it makes you more creative.”

A risky move, of course, doesn’t necessarily spending your life savings to start a company—maybe it’s accepting a position you’re not sure you’re qualified for, asking for more responsibility, or volunteering to head a bigger project than anything you’ve ever tackled.

Maybe it’s simply giving yourself permission to try something wildly different. Cindy Gallop, founder and CEO of MakeLoveNotPorn, explains the concept this way: “Stop and ask yourself what would make you happy, and design that.” That might be advocating for a new offering at your company or working on that creative side project you’ve been thinking about. “Just start doing it,” she said. “You’ll be amazed at how many people will be drawn to somebody who is doing things differently—and enabling other people to do things differently.” But that’s the key: You have to first be willing to do things differently.

5. Know That Change Is Inevitable

Finally, know this about career paths: What you want and what works for you is likely going to change over time. As Carol Lovell, founder and CEO of STOW put it: “The meaning of success for me has altered throughout my life. What you think it means at 25 is very different to what you know it means at 50.” The lesson? Don’t be afraid to adjust course when you realize that you’ve changed.

On a smaller scale, even if you have a specific goal you’re working toward, you’ll undoubtedly encounter new information, opportunities, and roadblocks that make you rethink your course. And that’s OK. “It’s not a matter of creating this rigid plan of like, do this step, do this step, no matter what,” explains former CEO and board director Shellye Archambeau. “And things will happen! There will be roadblocks, things will happen that’ll cause you to change and that’s okay. You have to be open to that.”

The road to a career you love isn’t easy. It requires saying no, taking risks, and sticking to your guns. But as a result, you’ll be doing the work you’re passionate about and building a life that works for you. Take it from hundreds of women: It’s worth it.

Carrie Kerpen is CEO and co-founder of Likeable Media, an award-winning digital agency that achieved Crain’s 6th “Best Place To Work in NYC.” She is the author of WORK IT: Secrets For Success From The Boldest Women In Business and the host of the popular podcast All the Social Ladies. Follow her on Twitter @carriekerpen or visit her at carriekerpen.com.

Source: I’ve Interviewed 300+ Successful Women. Here’s What I’ve Learned About Creating a Career You Love.

34.3K subscribers
After running through what to wear for a job interview with a friend, I thought it might be fun to run through some options depending on the kind of workplace you’re interviewing for. If you’ve got your own tips on what to wear to a job interview or if you have a go-to piece, I’d love to see it or know what it is! Hope you’re wonderful! X Jodie

4 Hard Truths About Why Your Key Team Members Quit

A while back we talked about the real reasons why you weren’t hiring new employees, and shared the hard truths behind why you might be hesitant to find and hire new talent despite a need for help. Today, I wanted to share a little more hard truth- this time surrounding the reasons why your employees quit. As a business owner, you may have an idea of why you have turnover, but it generally boils down to four main categories.

1. Lack of Recognition

One of the main reasons that employees look for another position has to do with lack of recognition from management. They think “I have been busting my hump for these people for the last ten years and I haven’t had a raise in three and all they ever do is give praise to Julie and I have done twice as much as Julie….etc” Really taking the time to celebrate victories with your employees and recognize their hard work goes a long way to keeping them happy in their current position. And it’s important to think outside of the “employee of the month” box and really get to the heart of recognizing hard work and talent on your team.
Hiring Tip: If your job opening has growth opportunities make sure to list that in the listing. A lot of job seekers are looking for this specifically and will help you stand out amongst the crowd.

2. Lack of Growth

Does the position have the opportunity for promotion? Employees that have no promotion opportunities, are already at the top of their pay grade and have no coaching or mentorship opportunities available to them are the most likely to leave to look for something else. Depending on your company, you may not be able to offer up a promotion in the traditional sense but mentoring or coaching your key team members to grow in their field can go a long way to keeping them interested and engaged.

Hiring Tip: Instead of hiring for a project manager right out of the gate consider hiring for a project manager level 1 or level 2, allowing the candidate room to be promoted over time.

3. Lack of Management

We have all heard the phrase, “people don’t quit jobs, they quit managers.” And this is very true. If they aren’t getting recognition, training or advancement opportunities it’s usually because of a manager. You want to make sure that your managers know what they’re doing and value their team and are doing all those things that are important to be able to keep those people.

4.Money

Everyone has economic needs and it’s important to pay your employees fairly. This should be a given. But when we talk about money and compensation it really comes down to two things.

  1. Are you being fair? Are you paying the person what they are worth to the company?
  2. Are you being respectful? Are you paying them what the market values their skill set at?

We can’t all compete to pay the highest wage, but you can make sure that you are being fair and respectful of your employees and their economic needs.

Hiring Tip: It’s also important to note here that often times when an employee comes to you asking for more money, what they really mean is that they want more independence, autonomy or growth opportunities. Those things can often be achieved with a larger salary, but there are other ways to make an employee feel appreciated without offering up more money. So if you are paying a fair wage, it might be a good idea to look at other factors that are at play here.

David Finkel Author, ‘The Freedom Formula: How to Succeed in Business Without Sacrificing Your Family, Health, or Life’

Source: 4 Hard Truths About Why Your Key Team Members Quit

63.3K subscribers
What To do When Your Network Marketing Team Members Quit ***Download my Guide to Generating Business & Sales Online here: http://www.tanyaaliza.com/40download In this episode, I share my best network marketing training tips on how to get past the frustration and disappointment that can linger on when someone quits your network marketing team. What’s your initial reaction when someone in your team decides to quit your network marketing team? Do you turn around and say, “Have you gone mad?!”  Or do you wish them well and mean it? Despite your best efforts to coach and support team members, there will always be some that leave. Everyone has their own theory on why people quit network marketing, but generally, people quit things all the time. They quit their job, their marriage, college, their dreams and every industry imaginable. It’s a fact of life and it’s inevitable. However, for most people, this kind of event shakes them up and leaves them feeling frustrated and disappointed. It may have already happened to you, and it’ll most certainly happen to all network marketers. So, if you’re stuck on an emotional roller coaster every time someone in your network marketing team decides to take a hiatus, then this network marketing training is for you. In this episode, I’ll be sharing some tools and strategies I use that will help you prepare for this type of situation and not allow it to detract you or prevent you from growing your business ****Download the FREE Resource mentioned in this video – My Guide to Generating Business, Leads and Sales Online – http://www.tanyaaliza.com/40download ———Connect With Tanya———— Tanya Aliza on Social Media: http://www.tanyaaliza.com http://www.facebook.com/tanyaaliza http://instagram.com/tanyaaliza http://twitter.com/tanyaaliza Share this video – https://youtu.be/6yUaFH23DC0 About this video: In this episode I share with you some of my Network Marketing Team training tips so that you know what to do if you have a teammate quit or cancel. In this network marketing training I also share so network marketing tips so you can understand why people quit. I hope you find this one of your most best network marketing training.

Why These 2 Criteria Will Help You Choose Your Next Job More Wisely | Inc.com

So you finally decided to find a new job. After months of contemplating, you’ve come to the realization you’ve hit one of three specific career roadblocks and the only solution is to find a new employer. But, now what? How do you make sure you don’t, as the saying goes, “jump out of the frying pan and ito the fire.” You’re wise to be worried. As a career growth coach, I’ve worked with hundreds of people who left bad jobs only to end up in worse ones. The result is a massive crisis of confidence that’s tough to bounce back from. So, what can you do to minimize the risk of making a bad career move?

The G.L.O.W. Method for career self-improvement

In my first book, I introduced the four-step methodology I use to help people create career satisfaction on their own terms. The G.L.O.W. Method teaches you a simple process you can use throughout your career to drive professional growth.

  1. Gain Perspective = force yourself to look at your situation from a new point of view.
  2. Luminate the Goal = dial-in tightly on a specific result you want to achieve.
  3. Own Your Actions = map out the specific habits you’ll need to succeed.
  4. Work It Daily = set up systems to build those habits consistently.

Let’s look at how that second step can help identify what your next job should be.

Your next job needs to meet 2 criteria…

To Luminate the Goal, you’ve got to shine a bright light on what you want. Getting clear on what a good job means to you is vital. When it comes to building a satisfying career, no two people want the same things. Unfortunately, many job seekers start looking for work based on the wrong criteria. They make a long list things like the ideal salary, benefits, location, etc. While I think those things are important and should eventually be outlined, the real first step in the process is to define your next job based on the following two criteria:

1. Does the job let you work on solving a problem you care about?

Today, we want our jobs to have purpose. When we believe our jobs have meaning, we feel more satisfied and engaged in the work. This leads to greater productivity and success. If you don’t feel the job will let you contribute to something you care about, you’ll struggle to stay motivated and positive on the job.

Now, I’m not saying that the job needs to change the world. On the contrary! What I’m saying is you need to make a connection between your job and the impact is has.

For example…

I worked with a client who came from a family of dentists and lawyers. She felt incredible pressure to have what she referred to as a “serious” job. However, her real passion in life was make-up. She loved doing her friends’ faces. When I asked her why, she explained the intense joy she felt when she saw their expressions of excitement when they looked in the mirror. In her words, “Each time I feel so much power knowing I made my friend feel better about herself.” That’s when I pointed out to her that this work had deep meaning and purpose to her, which meant she’d be more successful and satisfied working in cosmetics. She took my advice and now is an executive at a make-up company and couldn’t be happier.

2. Will you be using your preferred workplace personas to do the job?

We all have lots of skills and abilities. But, that doesn’t mean we want to use all of them on a daily basis. Understanding how you like to execute tasks and create value for employers is a vital part of the job search process. These are referred to as your “workplace personas” and they are the easiest way to narrow down the type of job you want next.

Let me prove it to you…

If you go to a job board right now and search for open positions with the job title, “Account Manager” you’ll come up with dozens of opportunities. However, as you start to read through them, you’ll see no two are alike. Some companies call salespeople Account Managers. Meanwhile, other companies see that as a customer or vendor support role. Each job would require you to use a different set of skills. If you don’t know the workplace personas you want to leverage, how can you narrow in on the jobs that would suit you?

Create an interview bucket list to help make sense of your criteria.

One of the first exercises I have our clients complete when looking for a new job is an interview bucket list. It’s a list of companies whose products and services you admire. It helps them understand how they feel connected to certain employers so they can map out the two criteria above. When you explore why you’re drawn to a company you reveal key information about yourself that makes defining your criteria easier. Better still, it will actually get you excited about the job search process.

 P.S. – If what I’m explaining makes sense so far, check out my next article which explains how you can Own Your Actions once you decide what type of job you want.

By: J.T. O’Donnell

Source: Why These 2 Criteria Will Help You Choose Your Next Job More Wisely | Inc.com

Scott Dinsmore’s mission is to change the world by helping people find what excites them and build a career around the work only they are capable of doing. He is a career change strategist whose demoralizing experience at a Fortune 500 job launched his quest to understand why 80% of adults hate the work they do, and more importantly, to identify what the other 20% were doing differently. His research led to experiences with thousands of employees and entrepreneurs from 158 countries. Scott distilled the results down to his Passionate Work Framework – three surprisingly simple practices for finding and doing work you love, that all happen to be completely within our control. He makes his career tools available free to the public through his community at http://LiveYourLegend.net In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations) This talk was shot shot and edited in stereoscopic 3D by Golden Gate 3D and Area 5. http://gg3d.com http://area5.tv To view in 3D, click here: http://youtu.be/5o1nCKGk5Bs

10 Great Jobs You Can Do From Anywhere – Evie Carrick

1.jpg

We all have that friend (or guilty Instagram follow) who seems to be constantly traveling. They post photos working poolside in Bali one day and hiking in Laos the next. Chances are they’ve joined the growing army of digital nomads, or people who work remotely from coffee shops and workspaces around the globe in order to fund a nomadic, travel-heavy lifestyle. This all may sound too good to be true, but I know the lifestyle is real because I’ve lived it. For 10 months freelance writing funded my travels and allowed me to live in places as varied as a homestay in Cambodia and a camper van in Japan. A spot with reliable wifi and good coffee was gold, and when I found it, you can bet I wasn’t the only one glued to my laptop and wearing out my welcome………

Read more: https://free.vice.com/en_us/article/wj93v5/remote-jobs-travel

 

 

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

 

 

Top 10 Highest Paying Jobs in Aviation -List Aviation

In an increasingly globalised world where the cost of air travel has become more affordable, millions of passengers take to the skies each and every day. Yet, regardless of where they have come from or where they are flying to, they all have one thing in common: at one point in their journey, they have all travelled through an airport.

With such a high turnover of daily visitors, it’s no surprise, therefore, that airports can sometimes experience a spot of friction. What keeps things moving, though, is the people that work there.

In every airport across the globe, workers from a wide variety of backgrounds and capabilities fulfil an eclectic mix of roles and responsibilities that are all vitally important to the bigger picture – and you could be one of them.

Indeed, if you want to embark on a career in this highly dynamic and fast-paced industry, then you’re in luck. We’ve compiled a handy breakdown of the most lucrative roles available, and the best part is that many of them don’t require any prior education.

So, whether you’re looking for a new job or you’re fresh out of school, read on – these are the highest paying aviation jobs in the world…

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

 

 

How To Leverage A Job Offer At Your Current Role – Lelia Gowland

1.jpg

While men can have a grand old time leveraging one job offer for another with minimal consequence, women often face negative repercussions for doing the same. Traditional negotiation advice about leveraging one job offer for another has the potential to backfire for women. The good news is that there are tools to avoid these consequences.A client, “Sarah,” reached out to me because she was actively recruited by a new company for a job that would be a promotion…..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/leliagowland/2018/09/26/how-to-leverage-a-job-offer-at-your-current-role/#6dbcdde0a2ab

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you