What AI Practitioners Could Learn From A 1989 MIT Dissertation

Child at laptop

More than thirty years ago, Fred Davis developed the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as part of his dissertation at MIT. It’s one of the most widely cited papers in the field of technology acceptance (a.k.a. adoption). Since 1989, it’s spawned an entire field of research that extends and adds to it. What does TAM convey and how might today’s AI benefit from it?

TAM is an intuitive framework. It feels obvious yet powerful and has withstood the test of time. Davis started with a premise so simple that it’s easy to take it for granted: A person will only try, use and ultimately adopt technology if they are willing to exert some effort. And what could motivate users to expend this effort?

He outlined several variables that could motivate users, and many researchers have added to his list over the years, but these two variables are the ones that were most important: 1. Does it look easy to use? 2. Will it be useful? If the learning curve doesn’t look too steep and there’s something in it for them, a user will be inclined to adopt. Many researchers have added to this foundation over the years. For example, we’ve learned that a user’s intention can also be influenced by subjective norms.

We’re motivated to adopt new tech at work when senior leadership thinks it’s important. Perceived usefulness can also be influenced by image, as in, “Does adopting this tech make me look good?” And lastly, usefulness is high if relevance to the job is high.

TAM can be a powerful concept for an AI practitioner. It should be front-of-mind when embedding AI in an existing tool or process and when developing an AI-first product, as in, one that’s been designed with AI at the center of its functionality from the start. (Think Netflix.) Furthermore, AI can be used to drive adoption by levering TAM principles that increase user motivation.

Making AI more adoptable

With the proliferation of AI in sales organizations, AI algorithms are increasingly embedded in tools and processes leveraged by sales representatives and sales managers. Adding decision engines to assist sales representatives is becoming increasingly common. A sales organization may embed models that help determine a customer’s propensity to buy or churn, recommend next best actions or communications and more. The problem is, many of these initiatives don’t work because of a lack of adoption.

TAM can help us design these initiatives more carefully, so that we maximize the chances of acceptance. For example, if these models surface recommendations and results that fit seamlessly into reps’ tools and processes, they would perceive them as easy to use.

And if the models make recommendations that help a sales person land a new customer, prevent one from leaving and help them upsell or cross-sell when appropriate, reps would perceive them as useful. In other words, if the AI meets employees where they are and offers timely, beneficial support, adoption becomes a no-brainer.

We also see many new products and services that are AI first. For these solutions, if perceived ease of use or perceived usefulness are not high, there would be no adoption. Consider a bank implementing a tech-enabled solution like mobile check deposits. This service depends on customers having a trouble-free experience.

The Newark airport’s global entry system uses facial recognition to scan international flyers’ faces. It’s voluntary, and the experience is fantastic. The kiosk recognizes my face, and a ticket is printed for me to take to the immigration officer. Personally, I find this AI-first process a better experience than the previous system that depended on fingerprints, and now I will always opt for the new one.

Using AI to drive adoption

And perhaps counter intuitively, what if AI was used to drive elements of TAM within existing technology? Can AI impact perceived usefulness? Can AI impact perceived ease of use? Consider CRM. It has been improved and refined over the years and is in use within most sales organizations, yet the level of dissatisfaction with CRM is high and adoption remains a challenge.

How can AI help? A machine learning algorithm that uses location services can recommend that a rep visit a nearby customer, increasing the perceived usefulness of their CRM solution. Intelligent process automation can also help reps see relevant information from a contracting database as information on renewals are being entered. Bots can engage customers on behalf of the representatives to serve up more qualified leads. The possibilities are numerous. All these AI features are designed to ensure that CRM lives up to its promise as a source of value to the sales representative.

Outside of sales, consider patients. In the past few years, many new technologies have been introduced to help diabetics. Adoption of this technology is critical to self-management, and self-management is critical to treating the disease. For any new technology in this space, patients need to see that it’s useful to them.

AI can play a role in gathering information such as glucose levels, activity and food intake and make recommendations on insulin dosing or caloric intake. Such information gathering could go a long way toward reducing the fatigue that diabetics feel while they make countless health and nutrition decisions throughout the day.

AI’s algorithmic nature makes it easy to forget that it’s another technology and that it can aid technology. Its novelty can convince us that everything about it is new. TAM holds up because it’s intuitive, straightforward and proven. While we boldly innovate a path forward in the world of AI, shed convention and think like a disruptor, let’s keep an eye on our history too. There’s some useful stuff in there.

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Arun provides strategy and advisory services, helping clients build their analytics capabilities and leverage their data and analytics for greater commercial effectiveness. He currently works with clients on a broad range of analytics needs that span multiple industries, including technology, telecommunications, financial services, travel and transportation and healthcare. His areas of focus are AI adoption and ethics, as well as analytics organization design, capability building, AI explainability and process optimization.

Source: What AI Practitioners Could Learn From A 1989 MIT Dissertation

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The AI Practitioners Guide for Beginners is a series that will provide you with a high-level overview of business and data strategy that a machine learning practitioner needs to know, followed by a detailed walkthrough of how to install and validate one of the popular artificial intelligence frameworks: TensorFlow on the Intel® Xeon® Scalable platform. Read the AI Practitioners Guide for Beginners article:
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IBM and Bank of America Advance IBM Cloud for Financial Services, BNP Paribas Joins as Anchor Client in Europe

ARMONK, N.Y., July 22, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — IBM (NYSE: IBM) today announced that several global banks including BNP Paribas, one of Europe’s largest banks, will join a growing ecosystem of financial institutions and more than 30 new technology providers adopting IBM Cloud for Financial Services. Today’s news also marks a significant milestone in IBM’s collaboration with Bank of America, with the availability of the IBM Cloud Policy Framework for Financial Services.

The IBM Cloud Policy Framework for Financial Services establishes a new generation of cloud for enterprises with common operational criteria and streamlined compliance controls framework specifically for the financial services industry, allowing IBM’s growing financial services ecosystem to transact with confidence.

IBM is also announcing the formation of the Financial Services Cloud Advisory Council to support this effort and advise on the ongoing advancement of the IBM Cloud Policy Framework for Financial Services. Chief Technology Officer Tony Kerrison will represent Bank of America on the Council, which will be led by Howard Boville, SVP, IBM Cloud. The Council will be focused on bringing major financial institutions together to help drive the strategic evolution of cloud security in this highly regulated sector.

“We have had great success with our proprietary, private cloud, that currently houses the majority of our technology workloads,” said David Reilly, Bank of America’s Global Banking & Markets, Enterprise Risk & Finance Technology and Core Technology Infrastructure executive. “At the same time, we have been looking to identify a financial services-ready solution that offers the same level of security and economics as our private cloud with enhanced scalability. That’s why we’re partnering with IBM to create an industry-first, third party cloud that puts data resiliency, privacy and customer information safety needs at the forefront of decision making.”

Central to the development of the IBM Cloud for Financial Services, IBM collaborated with Bank of America and Promontory, an IBM Services business unit and global leader in financial services regulatory compliance consulting, to establish a set of cloud security and compliance control requirements as the basis of its policy framework, which will allow financial institutions to confidently host key applications and workloads.

The IBM Cloud Policy Framework for Financial Services is now available and aims to deliver the industry-informed IBM public cloud controls required to operate securely with bank-sensitive data in the public cloud. IBM, Promontory and the advisory council will continue to collaborate to assure  that the framework will be up to date to address the latest industry regulations.

BNP Paribas joins IBM Cloud for Financial Services

BNP Paribas has committed to joining the IBM Cloud for Financial Services as an anchor client in Europe to support its first dedicated cloud in Europe to be GDPR compliant, acknowledging that a public cloud informed by IBM’s deep financial industry expertise, controls framework and industry-leading data-protection capabilities, meets their exacting standards. BNP Paribas will utilize a dedicated cloud, developed and managed by IBM, that will leverage IBM public cloud technologies, including Keep Your Own Key (KYOK) encryption capabilities. BNP Paribas could plan to onboard additional banking partners to the ecosystem across Europe in the future.

“As we continue to expand our collaboration with IBM, we’re driving innovation in the financial services industry and are able to partner with a growing ecosystem of technology providers, from small startups to leaders in the industry.  That’s an important step forward for BNP Paribas Group to accelerate its transformation journey and be compliant with European regulations,”  Bernard Gavgani, CIO, BNP Paribas. “IBM Cloud for Financial Services helps us to further our transformation journey to the cloud and migrate mission critical workloads with confidence knowing that we can meet the regulatory standards established for the industry.”

IBM Grows Financial Services Cloud Ecosystem

Additionally, MUFG Bank plans to explore the deployment of IBM Cloud for Financial Services in Japan, continuing its ongoing transformational journey with IBM to accelerate digital reinvention.

“MUFG has been shifting its IT workload to cloud for years, with strong focus on keeping our data secure and mitigating operational risks on this new and fast-changing technology platform. We believe IBM Cloud for Financial Services will be suited to help Japanese financial institutions redirect their efforts to maintain legacy systems toward digital reinvention in the era of new normal. We look forward to continuing discussions around our strategic partnership with IBM to leverage best-in-class technology for our mission-critical workloads, as well as to drive digital transformation across MUFG”, said Mr. Hiroki Kameda, Managing Corporate Executive Group CIO of MUFG.

IBM has also expanded its growing ecosystem of Independent Software Vendors (ISVs) to include more than 30 partners. These technology providers have committed to onboarding offerings and cloud services to IBM Cloud for Financial Services that will help address stringent security, resiliency and compliance requirements and can accelerate transactions with financial services institutions.

“With major financial institutions and technology partners joining our financial services cloud, IBM is establishing confidence within the industry and around the globe that the IBM public cloud, equipped with industry-leading encryption capabilities, is the enterprise cloud for all highly regulated industries, including financial services healthcare, telco, airlines and more,” said Howard Boville, Senior Vice President, IBM Cloud. “IBM is creating a platform with the goal that financial services institutions can address their regulatory requirements, while creating a collaborative ecosystem that helps enable banks and their providers to confidently transact.”

New IBM Research Cloud Innovation Lab and Innovative Security Capabilities for Clients

IBM Research has played a central role in the technology underpinnings of the IBM Cloud for Financial Services, taking a holistic approach to security and compliance that spans infrastructure, platform, data, and the developer workflow. For example, developed in collaboration with IBM Research, IBM will launch the IBM Cloud Security and Compliance Center which will allow clients to continuously monitor and enforce their security and compliance posture across their workloads, and provide a seamless, automated and adaptable process for improving cloud security. Following on the heels of its recent acquisition of Spanugo, the IBM Cloud Security and Compliance Center will include the ability to instrument the developer workflow with automated security and compliance checks.

Once the IBM Cloud Security and Compliance Center is available in August 2020, global banks and ISVs with workloads on the IBM Cloud for Financial Services, will be able to define their compliance profiles and manage controls, maintain an extensive data trail for audit, and, in continuous real time, monitor compliance across their organization. Promontory will continue to provide tailored, IT risk advisory services to users of the IBM Cloud for Financial Services.

To enable financial services clients and ecosystem partners to benefit from, and influence, the emerging cloud technologies being created at IBM Research, IBM will launch the IBM Research Cloud Innovation Lab, planned for August, 2020. Clients and industry partners of the IBM Cloud for Financial Services will be able to get a first look at the latest innovations from the IBM Research lab as well as quickly experiment, go deep into the technology and functionality of new cloud solutions and exchange ideas. More information on the IBM Research Cloud Innovation Lab and IBM Cloud Center for Security and Compliance can be found here.

IBM Cloud for Financial Services is built on IBM public cloud, powered by the same industry-leading confidential computing security found in IBM Z. Delivered via IBM Hyper Protect Services, it features ‘Keep Your Own Key’ encryption capabilities backed by the highest level of security certification commercially available, making the IBM public cloud the industry’s most secure and open public cloud for business.

Source: IBM

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New WiFi 6E Standard Brings 5G-Related Technologies To Local Area Wireless

When people talk about wireless technologies, they tend to think about broadband cellular wireless networks like 5G and WiFi, which offers local area wireless connections. The truth is that most people do not really know (nor do they care) much about the differences between how each technology works. They just want to know if they have reception that allows them to connect to a network and that they can get to the information, content, or services that they want.

If you are the type of person who’s reading a column like this, however, you probably do have at least a passing interest in how the technologies powering these different types of networks are related. Those questions are particularly relevant now, thanks to the latest additions to the WiFi standard, WiFi6 and WiFi6E. Several of the underlying technologies powering these new networks are very similar to, or in some cases even the same as, ones used for 5G networks.

Signal modulation techniques like OFDMA (Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiple Access) and transmission technologies like beamforming and MU-MIMO (Multi-User Multiple Input, Multiple Output), for example, are a key part of both WiFi 6/6E and 5G.

But first, a quick reminder. Like all cellular technologies, 5G is based on the use of licensed radio frequency spectrum (for more details on what spectrum is and how it works, see “The 5G Landscape, Part 2: Spectrum and Devices.”) What this means is that companies that want to use these networks—that is, telco carriers—have to purchase the exclusive right to broadcast signals over certain radio frequencies.

Those signals are broadcast from cell towers at high power levels and can travel for long distances, often measured in miles. In order to connect to those networks, any device you use needs to have a SIM card (or eSIM) that confirms you have a valid account on a particular cellular network, and you have to pay to get access to that network.

Today In: 5G
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All WiFi networks, on the other hand, use what’s called unlicensed or shared spectrum, meaning anyone has the right to create products that broadcast and receive signals on those frequencies. In addition, access to these networks (in most cases) is free, and devices don’t require anything like a SIM card to connect to them, just a radio capable of sending and receiving signals at certain frequencies.

For WiFi, the frequencies that are used are 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz. Importantly, these frequencies are available for use globally, meaning you can use the same WiFi device and chips that power a WiFi connection anywhere in the world. Finally, the signals on WiFi networks are sent at lower power rates, which means they don’t travel as far—typically within the walls of your house, a section of your office, etc.

For a long time, the technologies behind cellular networks and WiFi networks were fairly different. Over the last few years, however, as the latest generations of these technologies were developed, there has been a great deal of technology crossover between them. The reason? Some of the same challenges facing WiFi networks have also been issues in cellular networks.

Specifically, both of these network types have been facing problems with congestion, where more devices and faster connection are creating digital “traffic jams” that end up slowing down network response for everyone. As a result, both new WiFi networks have integrated similar capabilities and core technologies that are designed to battle these and other concerns, such as reducing latency or lag time.

To be perfectly clear, these similar technology additions do not mean that the two network types are merging (at least for now): they are and will continue to be fundamentally different animals because of the technology and business model differences described above. They are similar, however, in that you need to have new devices and new network equipment (or new routers in the case of WiFi) in order to take advantage of these networks.

In other words, you only get the benefits of 5G if you have a 5G-capable smartphone or other device connecting to a 5G network and the benefits of WiFi 6 (also sometimes referred to as 802.11ax) if you have a WiFi 6-enabled device connecting to a WiFi 6-certified router. Thankfully, many newer devices, such as Samsung’s Galaxy S20 phones and more, support both new network types in a single device.

The WiFi6 standard was officially ratified in September of 2019, and chips that support the standard from companies like Qualcomm, Intel, Broadcom, Marvell, MediaTek and others have been shipping for over a year. In addition to OFDMA, MU-MIMO and beamforming, some other key technology additions to WiFi6 include Target Wake Time, which can improve battery performance in mobile devices by signaling when radios can be turned on and off, support for wider frequency channels of transmission, and something called spatial frequency reuse, which lets more devices peacefully co-exist on different channels on the same network or across neighboring networks.

The other interesting new connection between WiFi 6, or more specifically, WiFi 6E, and 5G is the availability of new spectrum, or open airwaves, that can be used to transmit more data on each of these networks. In the case of WiFi 6, just last week the US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) approved the addition of a huge 1.2 GHz (1,200 MHz) wide band of spectrum for unlicensed WiFi use in the US—the first addition of new frequencies for WiFi in over 20 years. (As a point of reference, the unlicensed frequencies available for WiFi at 2.4 GHz are only 70 MHz wide, while there is 500 MHz available at 5 GHz.)

Specifically, the FCC enabled the use of frequencies from 5.9 to 7.1 GHz for unlicensed WiFi use, and devices that can support those new frequencies can be labelled with the brand new WiFi 6E standard (a name created by the WiFi Alliance industry consortium). The catch is that, right now, those frequencies are only available as unlicensed spectrum in the US, and it could take (although hopefully won’t) several years for other countries to make the same move.

Thankfully, the US is a large enough and influential enough market that chip makers have already started to produce the components that include support for 6E, but don’t count on WiFi 6E being a global standard for some time. Still, we should start to see WiFi 6E-capable routers and other devices here in the US by the end of this year.

The full story on WiFi 6E naming needs a bit of additional clarification. Despite the 6 in the name, “normal” WiFi 6 devices cannot connect to or take advantage of the new 6GHz frequencies. Only WiFi 6E devices can use those new frequencies. The good news is, new 6E-capable devices and routers will likely use that new set of frequencies exclusively, freeing up the older, lower frequency bands to be used solely by older devices.

That doesn’t really matter right now, of course, but eventually that will make a big difference in improving overall WiFi speeds, reducing WiFi network congestion and reducing network response time (i.e., improvements in latency). WiFi mesh routing systems, in particular, are likely to be the earliest benefactors of the new 6 GHz spectrum. Both WiFi 6 and WiFi 6E devices and routers can take advantage of all the new technologies described above.

The key difference is that WiFi 6E-equipped components can use them both on existing 2.4 and 5 GHz frequencies as well as the new 6 GHz frequencies, whereas “normal” WiFi 6 devices can only use those technologies at the older 2.4 and 5 GHz bands.

Despite all the improvements and potential around 6 GHz frequency spectrum, it is important to point out that signals sent at those frequencies are subject to the same physical laws as any other radio frequency transmissions. Specifically, the higher the frequency, the less distance a given signal travels at the same power transmission levels, and the more difficulty it has in passing through thick objects like cement walls.

Practically speaking, that means 2.4 GHz WiFi signals can travel the furthest, but the ability to use channels up to 160 MHz wide (which is one of the benefits of WiFi 6) and the addition of up to 7 different 160 MHz channels, or 14 new 80 MHz channels (which is what the new 6 GHz frequencies enabled by WiFi 6E bring to the table), should still translate to significantly faster real-world performance with 6GHz WiFi 6E.

In fact, the performance improvements with WiFi 6E could be so good in some situations—think large public venues like sports stadiums, concert halls, and potentially even some corporate campuses—some people believe it could be a competitive threat to 5G. Of course, conversely, there are some who would argue that the growing potential interest in creating private 5G networks could supersede the need for WiFi 6 or 6E. For 5G, the argument is primarily around security, because the need to have a SIM-authorized device to connect to a cellular network is inherently more secure than WiFi networks’ more open approach.

Of course, there are security standards for WiFi as well, so the argument isn’t really quite that simple. Another potentially interesting future dilemma is that there has been some work and discussion around using the newly released unlicensed 6 GHz spectrum as extensions to 5G networks, but nothing definitive has come to pass. Regardless, it’s clear that in some situations or certain physical environments, we could start to see 5G and WiFi 6E as more competitive technologies than the two have ever been.

Ultimately, however, because of the huge legacy base of both WiFi and cellular-enabled devices, the much more likely outcome is that both types of networks will exist for some time to come. Eventually, because of the increasing similarity of the underlying technologies, we could even start to see them come closer together, but there are a huge number of business model-related issues that would have to be figured out first. In the meantime, thanks to some surprisingly quick additions to the frequency spectrums of both 5G (see “CBRS Vs. C-Band: Making Sense Of Mid-Band 5G” and “Spectrum-Sharing Technologies Like CBRS Key To More Robust Wireless Networks” for more) and WiFi here in the US, the good news is that we’re about to have a faster, broader, and more robust set of connectivity options here than we’ve ever seen before.

Disclosure: TECHnalysis Research is a tech industry market research and consulting firm and, like all companies in that field, works with many technology vendors as clients, some of whom may be listed in this article.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

Bob O’Donnell is the president, founder and chief analyst at TECHnalysis Research, a technology market research and consulting firm that counts many of tech industry’s largest vendors among its clients. The firm’s research and O’Donnell’s opinions are also regularly used by major media outlets, including Bloomberg TV, CNBC, CNN, Investor’s Business Daily, the Wall Street Journal, Yahoo Finance, and more. O’Donnell writes regular columns for USAToday and Forbes, as well as a weekly blog for Tech.pinions.com that’s also published on TechSpot, SeekingAlpha and LinkedIn. Prior to founding TECHnalysis Research, O’Donnell served as Program Vice President, Clients and Displays for industry research firm IDC. O’Donnell is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame

Source: New WiFi 6E Standard Brings 5G-Related Technologies To Local Area Wireless

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Why WiFi 6E Is Way More Important Than WiFi 6 WiFi 6E is a big deal, and today I’m going to tell you how this is going to help you and your smart home, as well as just generally with WiFi reliability and WiFi signals in your home. There is a ton about WiFi 6E that is important and there are many reasons it’s above and beyond 802.11AX or what is known as WiFi 6. See, there’s this one component of the upgrade from WiFi 6 to WiFi 6E that’s so important to your smart home, and it resides in something that we have to talk about all the time on the channel. We have to constantly readjust our WiFi channels to avoid the neighbor next door. Or, we have to watch out where our ZigBee network is because it can be interfered with by our #WiFi. #WiFi6E gives us another option because it’s going to give us a 6 GHz frequency to use, and a ton of bandwidth within that range to use. It’s going to keep your neighbor’s network far away from yours in terms of channel and so you’re going to have WiFi that isn’t interfered with! This will again prove why WiFi is still the final smart home protocol we will all be using in the end, but in the mean time, we will continue to use ZigBee with less interference in my smart home. So kiss goodbye to #802.11AX and say hello to the E version of that standard. It’s part 1 of 3 parts of the upgrades before the next version of WiFi (7) in a few years. Enjoy! The charts we used: https://www.testandmeasurementtips.co… https://www.networkcomputing.com/wire… http://www.revolutionwifi.net/revolut… https://www.pcworld.com/article/32693… Research papers used directly in this video: https://www.nctatechnicalpapers.com/P… Subscribe to Take The Frustration Out Of Automation: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtRS… Join our Patreon Group to get direct access to me (and for even deeper content): https://patreon.com/automateyourlife Our recommended smart home products for every situation (affiliate link): https://amzn.to/2DwC6ah Are you unsure about putting a smart speaker or smart display in your home? Read our short e-book here: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07XKRM6XS AYL Merch! https://shop.spreadshirt.ca/automatel… Automate Your Life is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com and other Amazon websites. Thanks for watching, and Don’t Hate, Automate. Brian

Igniting Passion And Diversity In STEM

It wasn’t until my first job out of college—one in the wireless business—that I developed a passion for technology and saw how STEM impacts everything we do. This was the spark that led me to fall in love with the network engineering elements of wireless, and the more immersed I got in the industry, the more exposed and interested I was in other components of technology.

Now, as the father of a teenage daughter who’s interested in STEM subjects and potentially even computer science, I want her to find her own opportunities, discover where her passions lie, and to ensure she has the resources and encouragement to pursue them.

In the U.S., there simply aren’t enough people pursuing STEM to meet growing technology demands. According to the Smithsonian Science Education Center, “78 percent of high school graduates don’t meet benchmark readiness for one or more college courses in mathematics, science or English.” And then there are barriers to STEM advancement like four or six-year degree requirements for many jobs—which are remarkably difficult for most people to afford. So it’s not that surprising when people like Nasdaq vice chairman Bruce Aust say, “By 2020, there will be one million more computing jobs than there will be graduates to fill them, resulting in a $500 billion opportunity gap.”

What’s clear is we need to make it easier for people to experiment with STEM early in life, then create accessible and alternative opportunities to pursue their dreams. Equally important, we need to find ways to dramatically advance gender diversity in STEM fields to accelerate innovation around the world.

Fostering Excitement Around STEM Takes a Village

Organizations like the Washington Alliance for Better Schools (WABS)—which I’m on the board of—partners with school districts around Western Washington State, and is an example of families, teachers, schools, and public and private sector businesses uniting to develop meaningful STEM education and advancement opportunities, because everyone involved can benefit. Hands-on learning and vocational programs like their After School STEM Academy is a great way to help students connect the dots of scientific principles in a fun way. And WABS’ 21st Century Community Learning Centers leverage Title IV funds to help students meet state and local academic standards—from homework tutoring to leadership opportunities that can turn into summer internships or jobs.

As students’ interests in STEM grow, it creates a fantastic opportunity for businesses to see passions play out through hackathons, group ideation, and other challenges. Recently, for the second consecutive year, T-Mobile’s Changemaker Challenge initiative—in partnership with Ashoka—called on youth aged 13 to 23 from the U.S. and Puerto Rico to submit big ideas for how they would drive change in their communities. T-Mobile received 428 entries—a 28% increase over last year—133 in the ‘Tech for Good’ category. Interestingly, one quarter of all the tech entries were focused on STEM projects and even more interestingly, 63% of all technology category applications were from young women. We saw submissions from apps to robots to video games—all with the goal of changing the world for good. Next up, we’ll announce the Top 30 teams and each of them will receive a trip to T-Mobile’s HQ for the three-day Changemaker Challenge Lab to supercharge their projects along with some seed funding. Three category winners will pitch their ideas to T-Mobile leadership for a chance to win the $10,000 grand prize. To say that these young people’s ideas are inspiring is an understatement!

Accelerating Innovation Through Gender Diversity and Inner-Sourcing

Women aren’t typically well represented in many STEM-focused industries. Gender diversity is crucial to designing and building innovative solutions around the world, including T-Mobile’s products and services. At least half of our customers are female, and of the more than 50,000 employees who make up T-Mobile, 42% identify as female. If our product and technology employees don’t represent the diversity in our community, we stand to lose relevance in the market. By making diversity and inclusion a thoughtful, premeditated, sustained, and structural part of our recruitment and retainment of employees—including network engineers, software developers, data scientists, and other STEM professions—we’re able to foster a stronger company culture and build more innovative, customer experience obsessed products and services.

Let’s not forget that plenty of STEM-related jobs don’t include “engineer”, “developer”, or “scientist” in the job title across fields that intersect technology and digital customer experiences. One way we’ve cultivated the right talent at T-Mobile is “inner-sourcing” existing employees. For instance, through our Team of Pros program (TOPs), we provide opportunities for our frontline retail and customer care employees to apply for a 6 to 9-month program in a product management capacity to learn and work directly with engineering teams to ensure a tight coupling between what customers really want and the products, apps, training, and troubleshooting resources we design and develop. This is a great opportunity for our frontline employees to pivot into full-time STEM-related roles within T-Mobile corporate, without the need to pursue a formal technology-oriented education.

Championing STEM to Create a Better World

We live in a world where technology is omnipresent however connected, collaborative, and continuous STEM education isn’t equally accessible, and gender diversity is not well represented. To address pervasive global issues like climate change, resource inequality, economic stagnation, disease prevention, and others, we need diverse people who understand technical processes and technologies to work together to develop effective solutions. For those of us fortunate enough to reach a level of financial stability in STEM fields, we owe it to the future of our world to give back by leading and inspiring today’s and the next generation of technology leaders.

Cody Sanford is T-Mobile’s Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, leading the company’s digital transformation strategy fueling the Un-carrier revolution. He is responsible for spearheading the development of a product-centric technology organization that leverages the power of people, process and technology to bring to life T-Mobile’s innovative experiences for customers and frontline employees. Under Cody’s leadership, the Product & Technology organization is driving T-Mobile’s digital transformation, with an industry-leading software dev shop, expansion into adjacent products and services categories, and a leadership role in delivering open source innovations that solve large customer pain points.

Source: Igniting Passion And Diversity In STEM

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Many people in the world of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) have begun to question why the STEM workforce doesn’t reflect the diversity of society at large. In this talk, Jess Vovers tackles some key questions: What is diversity? Why does it matter? Why does STEM lack diversity? And what can we do about it? Jessica Vovers is a PhD candidate in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Melbourne, with a focus on sustainable solvents. When she’s not painting herself blue, she’s usually playing video games or riding her bike. Jess advocates for diversity in STEM through her work with Science Gallery Melbourne and mentoring with Curious Minds. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

 

The 7 Biggest Technology Trends In 2020 Everyone Must Get Ready For Now

We are amidst the 4th Industrial Revolution, and technology is evolving faster than ever. Companies and individuals that don’t keep up with some of the major tech trends run the risk of being left behind. Understanding the key trends will allow people and businesses to prepare and grasp the opportunities. As a business and technology futurist, it is my job to look ahead and identify the most important trends. In this article, I share with you the seven most imminent trends everyone should get ready for in 2020.

AI-as-a-service

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is one of the most transformative tech evolutions of our times. As I highlighted in my book ‘Artificial Intelligence in Practice’, most companies have started to explore how they can use AI to improve the customer experience and to streamline their business operations. This will continue in 2020, and while people will increasingly become used to working alongside AIs, designing and deploying our own AI-based systems will remain an expensive proposition for most businesses.

For this reason, much of the AI applications will continue to be done through providers of as-a-service platforms, which allow us to simply feed in our own data and pay for the algorithms or compute resources as we use them.

Currently, these platforms, provided by the likes of Amazon, Google, and Microsoft, tend to be somewhat broad in scope, with (often expensive) custom-engineering required to apply them to the specific tasks an organization may require. During 2020, we will see wider adoption and a growing pool of providers that are likely to start offering more tailored applications and services for specific or specialized tasks. This will mean no company will have any excuses left not to use AI.

Today In: Innovation

5G data networks

The 5th generation of mobile internet connectivity is going to give us super-fast download and upload speeds as well as more stable connections. While 5G mobile data networks became available for the first time in 2019, they were mostly still expensive and limited to functioning in confined areas or major cities. 2020 is likely to be the year when 5G really starts to fly, with more affordable data plans as well as greatly improved coverage, meaning that everyone can join in the fun.

Super-fast data networks will not only give us the ability to stream movies and music at higher quality when we’re on the move. The greatly increased speeds mean that mobile networks will become more usable even than the wired networks running into our homes and businesses. Companies must consider the business implications of having super-fast and stable internet access anywhere. The increased bandwidth will enable machines, robots, and autonomous vehicles to collect and transfer more data than ever, leading to advances in the area of the Internet of Things (IoT) and smart machinery. Smart cities

Autonomous Driving

While we still aren’t at the stage where we can expect to routinely travel in, or even see, autonomous vehicles in 2020, they will undoubtedly continue to generate a significant amount of excitement.

Tesla chief Elon Musk has said he expects his company to create a truly “complete” autonomous vehicle by this year, and the number of vehicles capable of operating with a lesser degree of autonomy – such as automated braking and lane-changing – will become an increasingly common sight. In addition to this, other in-car systems not directly connected to driving, such as security and entertainment functions – will become increasingly automated and reliant on data capture and analytics. Google’s sister-company Waymo has just completed a trial of autonomous taxis in California, where it transported more than Xk people.

It won’t just be cars, of course – trucking and shipping are becoming more autonomous, and breakthroughs in this space are likely to continue to hit the headlines throughout 2020.

With the maturing of autonomous driving technology, we will also increasingly hear about the measures that will be taken by regulators, legislators, and authorities. Changes to laws, existing infrastructure, and social attitudes are all likely to be required before autonomous driving becomes a practical reality for most of us. During 2020, it’s likely we will start to see the debate around autonomous driving spread outside of the tech world, as more and more people come round to the idea that the question is not “if,” but “when,” it will become a reality.

Personalized and predictive medicine

Technology is currently transforming healthcare at an unprecedented rate. Our ability to capture data from wearable devices such as smartwatches will give us the ability to increasingly predict and treat health issues in people even before they experience any symptoms.

When it comes to treatment, we will see much more personalized approaches. This is also referred to as precision medicine which allows doctors to more precisely prescribe medicines and apply treatments, thanks to a data-driven understanding of how effective they are likely to be for a specific patient.

Although not a new idea, thanks to recent breakthroughs in technology, especially in the fields of genomics and AI, it is giving us a greater understanding of how different people’s bodies are better or worse equipped to fight off specific diseases, as well as how they are likely to react to different types of medication or treatment.

Throughout 2020 we will see new applications of predictive healthcare and the introduction of more personalized and effective treatments to ensure better outcomes for individual patients.

Computer Vision

In computer terms, “vision” involves systems that are able to identify items, places, objects or people from visual images – those collected by a camera or sensor. It’s this technology that allows your smartphone camera to recognize which part of the image it’s capturing is a face, and powers technology such as Google Image Search.

As we move through 2020, we’re going to see computer vision equipped tools and technology rolled out for an ever-increasing number of uses. It’s fundamental to the way autonomous cars will “see” and navigate their way around danger. Production lines will employ computer vision cameras to watch for defective products or equipment failures, and security cameras will be able to alert us to anything out of the ordinary, without requiring 24/7 monitoring.

Computer vision is also enabling face recognition, which we will hear a lot about in 2020. We have already seen how useful the technology is in controlling access to our smartphones in the case of Apple’s FaceID and how Dubai airport uses it to provide a smoother customer journey [add link]. However, as the use cases will grow in 2020, we will also have more debates about limiting the use of this technology because of its potential to erode privacy and enable ‘Big Brother’-like state control.

Extended Reality

Extended Reality (XR) is a catch-all term that covers several new and emerging technologies being used to create more immersive digital experiences. More specifically, it refers to virtual, augmented, and mixed reality. Virtual reality (VR) provides a fully digitally immersive experience where you enter a computer-generated world using headsets that blend out the real world. Augmented reality (AR) overlays digital objects onto the real world via smartphone screens or displays (think Snapchat filters). Mixed reality (MR) is an extension of AR, that means users can interact with digital objects placed in the real world (think playing a holographic piano that you have placed into your room via an AR headset).

These technologies have been around for a few years now but have largely been confined to the world of entertainment – with Oculus Rift and Vive headsets providing the current state-of-the-art in videogames, and smartphone features such as camera filters and Pokemon Go-style games providing the most visible examples of AR.

From 2020 expect all of that to change, as businesses get to grips with the wealth of exciting possibilities offered by both current forms of XR. Virtual and augmented reality will become increasingly prevalent for training and simulation, as well as offering new ways to interact with customers.

Blockchain Technology

Blockchain is a technology trend that I have covered extensively this year, and yet you’re still likely to get blank looks if you mention in non-tech-savvy company. 2020 could finally be the year when that changes, though. Blockchain is essentially a digital ledger used to record transactions but secured due to its encrypted and decentralized nature. During 2019 some commentators began to argue that the technology was over-hyped and perhaps not as useful as first thought. However, continued investment by the likes of FedEx, IBM, Walmart and Mastercard during 2019 is likely to start to show real-world results, and if they manage to prove its case, could quickly lead to an increase in adoption by smaller players.

And if things are going to plan, 2020 will also see the launch of Facebook’s own blockchain-based crypto currently Libra, which is going to create quite a stir.

If you would like to keep track of these technologies, simply follow me on YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram, or head to my website for many more in-depth articles on these topics.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Bernard Marr is an internationally best-selling author, popular keynote speaker, futurist, and a strategic business & technology advisor to governments and companies. He helps organisations improve their business performance, use data more intelligently, and understand the implications of new technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, blockchains, and the Internet of Things. Why don’t you connect with Bernard on Twitter (@bernardmarr), LinkedIn (https://uk.linkedin.com/in/bernardmarr) or instagram (bernard.marr)?

Source: The 7 Biggest Technology Trends In 2020 Everyone Must Get Ready For Now

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In this Intellipaat’s top 10 technologies to learn in 2019 video, you will learn all the trending technologies in the market in 2019. The end goal of this video is to educate you about the latest technologies to learn and all the top 10 trending technologies you can watch for in order to make a fantastic career in IT technologies in 2019. Do subscribe to Intellipaat channel to get regular updates on them: https://goo.gl/hhsGWb Intellipaat Online Training: https://goo.gl/LeiW5S AI & Deep Learning Training: https://goo.gl/amnqEK Blockchain Training: https://goo.gl/CgDPyu Cloud Computing Training: https://goo.gl/PY2nbX Big Data Hadoop Training: https://goo.gl/NJaDuf BI Tools Training: https://goo.gl/SbkRXT DevOps Training: https://goo.gl/zz15qn Salesforce Training: https://goo.gl/zN3tLj SAP HANA Training: https://goo.gl/x2Jiu7 Python Programming Training: https://goo.gl/8urtdD Oracle DBA Training: https://goo.gl/LhYLTS Are you interested to learn any of the trending technology 2019 mentioned in the video? Enroll in our Intellipaat courses & become a certified Professional (https://goo.gl/LeiW5S). All Intellipaat trainings are provided by Industry experts and is completely aligned with industry standards and certification bodies. If you’ve enjoyed this top technologies to learn video, Like us and Subscribe to our channel for more trending technologies of 2019 tutorials. Got any questions about the top technologies to learn in 2019? Ask us in the comment section below. —————————- Intellipaat Edge 1. 24*7 Life time Access & Support 2. Flexible Class Schedule 3. Job Assistance 4. Mentors with +14 yrs 5. Industry Oriented Course ware 6. Life time free Course Upgrade #Top10TechnologiesToLearnIn2019 #TrendingTechnologies2019 #Top10ITTechnologiesIn2019 —————————— For more Information: Please write us to sales@intellipaat.com, or call us at: +91- 7847955955 Website: https://goo.gl/LeiW5S Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/intellipaato… LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/intellipaat/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Intellipaat

Stellar Challenges Swift, XRP Hits Microsoft Outlook, and Bitcoin Bull Says Crypto Set to Rally

IBM’s Stellar-powered global remittance platform now has six banks on board. Today, the tech giant announced World Wire will power payments and foreign exchange services across 72 countries.“World Wire provides a more straight-through model for cross border payments using the Stellar protocol that makes money transfers point-to-point in lieu of the complexities of conventional correspondent banking. It reduces intermediaries and allows users to accelerate settlement time often in seconds by transmitting monetary value in the form of digital assets, commonly known as cryptocurrencies or ‘stablecoins.’ This simplified approach improves operational efficiency and liquidity management, streamlining payment reconciliation and reducing overall transaction costs for financial institutions.”

Source: Stellar Challenges Swift, XRP Hits Microsoft Outlook, and Bitcoin Bull Says Crypto Set to Rally

IBM Signs 6 Banks to Issue Stablecoins and Use Stellar’s XLM Cryptocurrency

Announced Monday, six international banks have signed letters of intent to issue stablecoins, or tokens backed by fiat currency, on World Wire, an IBM payment network that uses the Stellar public blockchain. The network promises to let regulated institutions move value across borders — remittances or foreign exchange — more quickly and cheaply than the legacy correspondent banking system. So far three of the banks have been identified — Philippines-based RCBC, Brazil’s Banco Bradesco, and Bank Busan of South Korea — the rest, which are soon to be named, will offer digital versions of euros and Indonesian rupiah, “pending regulatory approvals and other reviews,” IBM said. The network went live Monday, although while the banks await their regulators’ blessings, the one stablecoin running on World Wire at the moment is a previously announced U.S. dollar-backed token created by Stronghold, a startup based in San Francisco.

Source: IBM Signs 6 Banks to Issue Stablecoins and Use Stellar’s XLM Cryptocurrency

IBM Launches Blockchain Platform on Cloud Service in Melbourne

IBM has released its blockchain main net out of its data center located in Melbourne, Australia. This will purportedly allow their customers to run their applications on the company’s cloud, according to an article published on news outlet ZDNet on Feb 11. The IBM platform was built on Hyperledger Fabric. Hyperledger is a project that aims to improve cross-industry blockchain technologies that is hosted by the Linux Foundation…………….

Source: IBM Launches Blockchain Platform on Cloud Service in Melbourne

3 Things IBM Sees In Red Hat That Others Missed – Panos Mourdoukoutas

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Red Hat was up for sale for quite some time, according to some sources. Several potential buyers passed on the opportunity, including Google. But not IBM. IBM paid big bucks for the open source software solutions company. At a price tag of $33 Billion. That makes Red Hat valued at one-third of IBM’s current market cap, and more than twice Big Blue’s cash chest. What did IBM see in Red Hat that others are missing? Simple. A strategic fit that could help the technology giant expand into emerging segments of the IT industry, and turn its fortunes around…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2018/11/03/3-things-ibm-sees-in-red-hat-that-others-missed/#3d745c4924cf

 

 

 

 

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How Augmented Reality is Being Implemented in the Real World – Umeed Kothavala

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Augmented Reality (AR) is the imposing of digitally generated images into a viewer’s real-world surroundings. Unlike Virtual Reality, which creates a completely artificial environment, AR uses the existing environment and overlays it with new information. Augmented reality apps are usually written using special 3D programs which allow developers to superimpose animation in the computer program, to an AR “marker” in the real world. It is now popularly being used by advertisers to create 3D renders of products, such as cars, the inside of buildings, and machinery. This provides consumers with a 360-degree product view.

The term ‘Augmented Reality’ was coined by Boeing researcher Thomas Caudell in 1990, to explain how head-mounted displays of electricians worked during the assembling of complicated wiring. Since then, the technology has been used in CAD programs for aircraft assembly, architecture, digital advertising, simulation, translation, military, and various medical procedures.

Tech giant Google, unveiled Google Glass in 2013, propelling AR to a more wearable interface – glasses. It works by projecting on the user’s lens screen while responding to voice commands, overlaying images, videos, and sounds.

Real-World Examples

AR has proven to be very useful across several industries when tied with location-based technology. Investments in this market continue to grow as several applications, which leverage the power of AR, are now available across different sectors. Its use in marketing is particularly appealing, as more detailed content be put within a traditional 2D advert with very interactive, engaging results with a high possibility of generating viral campaigns. Other fields utilizing AR with commendable results include:

  • Education: Academic publishers are developing applications which embed text, images, videos, and real-world curriculum with classroom lessons.
  • Travel: AR has enabled travellers to access real-time information of historical places and tourist sites, by pointing their camera’s viewfinders to specific subjects.
  • Translation: Globalization has propelled the development of translation applications to interpret text to different languages such as French, Afrikaans, Spanish and many more.
  • Locators: With location applications, users can access information about places near their current location along with user reviews.
  • Gaming: It is being used to develop real-time 3D games, through Unity 3D engines.
  • Defense: Several governments are now implementing AR solutions for their military. The US military has begun to use Google Glass designed for the battlefield. The glasses display virtual icons which are superimposed on a real-world view increasing the soldiers awareness.
  • Automotive: Back in 2013, Volkswagen launched an application for the Audi luxury brand which enabled potential customers to experience AR based car drives through the use of graphics, audio, and videos to enhance real-world vehicle motions.
  • Healthcare: Some optical manufacturers are now using AR to design smart contact lenses which repel optical radiation that could cause poor sight and eye cancer.

Statistics and Projected Growth

The growth and demand of AR applications and platforms in commercial, aviation, defense, and other fields is expected to be worth at least 56.8 billion dollars by 2020 according to a new research report by Markets and Markets.

The presence of several tech giants such as Google, Qualcomm, and Microsoft in the industry will boost AR growth within several geographies. This begins with North America, followed by the European market, due to growth in the automotive and aerospace sectors. Followed by the Asia Pacific region as a result of the growing industrial and manufacturing sectors, especially in China and Japan.

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Industries expected to heavily embrace augmented reality technologies include healthcare, automotive, defense, education, and travel sectors. In fact, high calibre investors are planning to invest in AR startups. Magic Leap, a giant AR startup which designs 2D generated imagery, has received over 590 million dollars in investment funding since 2014.

Threats and Barriers to AR

Although AR seems to have huge market potential, there are specific threats which may restrict its mass adoption:

  • Lack of public or social awareness of mobile AR
  • Lack of profitability for enterprises
  • Huge monopolies within the AR market
  • Limitations in user experience
  • Poor marketing and advertising compared to VR
  • Budget limitations mostly among SME’s
  • Privacy, security issues, and other concerns
  • Poor mobile internet connectivity in emerging markets

With the population of smartphones rising, augmented reality is definitely here to stay. More and more consumers are carrying phones with AR application capabilities. For as long as augmented reality content remains engaging, and innovative while embracing superior user experience, consumers will gravitate towards AR friendly applications.

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