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Stunning Huawei Confirmation—1 Million Cyberattacks Every Day

China’s under fire Huawei is being attacked by more than just the U.S., says a company exec. The Chinese tech giant endures around a million cyberattacks per day on its computers and networks—and that’s according to its security chief, John Suffolk. This will be the most unexpected Huawei cyberattack story of the year so far.

As reported in the Japanese press, Suffolk implied such attacks are focused on IP-theft, which given Huawei leads the world for 5G network innovation and files more patents than any other company in the world, will come as little surprise. That said, the company has also accused the U.S. government of mounting cyberattacks as part of its concerted campaign against them.

In September, Huawei alleged in the media that U.S. law enforcement has “threatened, coerced and enticed” existing and former employees, and has executed “cyberattacks to infiltrate Huawei’s intranet and internal information systems.”

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Suffolk did hot attribute the attacks to any country or particular threat actor—including the U.S., and did not confirm whether they were from nation-states or competitors. But he did acknowledge that although almost all are defended, some attacks on older systems get through. The implication of this was not clear, although the media reported that these “cyberattacks have included a type of theft of confidential information by sending a computer virus by email.”

Such phishing or business email compromise attacks are universal, it would be more surprising if Huawei didn’t receive its fair share. They often rely on social engineering to trick employees into installing malware disguised as attachments, or visiting fake sites or viewing social media clips that are laced with harmful code.

Suffolk used the media to confirm his claims that although Huawei is embroiled in its own allegations around cybersecurity, no tangible backdoors or cyber compromises have been found. He also reiterated the company’s pledge to work with customers to shore up their cyber defences when using equipment from the Chinese company.

The focus of the U.S. allegations is that in addition to receiving Chinese state support, Huawei is vulnerable to intelligence tasking by Beijing within overseas markets—either to steal or disrupt. Suffolk told the media that if the company’s CEO Ren Zhengfei was ever asked to compromise the company, “he would blankly refuse to do that—if he was pressurized to do that, he would close the company down.”

Earlier in the week, a surprise EU report warned that the combination of new technologies and 5G networks risks hostile state control of critical infrastructure, logistics, transportation even law enforcement. The report didn’t name China or Huawei, but did reference sole 5G suppliers from countries “with poor democratic standards,” for which the reference to Huawei and China was clear.

There will more surprises with this latest revelation from Huawei—the sheer scale of the cyberattacks will raise eyebrows, as will the obvious references back to the company’s claims against the U.S. last month.

October could prove to be a significantly better month for the tech giant than September. Having managed to launch the Mate 30 Series absent U.S. tech, and with U.S. President Trump now signalling a softening in blacklist restrictions and progress in trade talks with China, Huawei execs will be hopeful of some welcome relief from both the sanctions and the headlines.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

I am the Founder/CEO of Digital Barriers, developing AI surveillance solutions for national security, counter-terrorism and critical infrastructure organisations in the US, EMEA and Asia. I write about the intersection of geopolitics and cybersecurity, as well as breaking security and surveillance stories. I also focus on the appropriate balance of privacy and public safety. Contact me at zakd@me.com.

Source: Stunning Huawei Confirmation—1 Million Cyberattacks Every Day

 

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Amazon Employees Ask Bezos To Stop Selling Facial Recognition To Cops – Thomas Fox-Brewster

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Amazon employees have written a letter to CEO Jeff Bezos in which they ask the company to stop selling its facial recognition tool to American law enforcement.

The tech giant’s sales to U.S. cops were revealed by an American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) investigation earlier this month, as it emerged Amazon Web Services’ Rekognition tool was shipped to police in Florida and Oregon. The cost of the tool was also revealed to be remarkably low, as evidenced by a Forbes test of the product, in which a facial recognition project was set up for free across the publication’s Jersey City and London offices.

In a letter posted to an internal forum, first revealed by The Hill and published in full by Gizmodo, some employees expressed the same concerns as the ACLU about the power of Amazon’s Recognition being abused by American officers. The letter also called on Amazon to cease providing computing infrastructure to Palantir, the Peter Thiel-backed surveillance company, over concerns about the company’s work with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) department that’s been caught up in the furor over the forced separation of children from their parents at the border.

“Our company should not be in the surveillance business; we should not be in the policing business; we should not be in the business of supporting those who monitor and oppress marginalized populations,” the letter, signed off by “Amazonians,” read.

“We refuse to build the platform that powers ICE, and we refuse to contribute to tools that violate human rights.

“As ethically concerned Amazonians, we demand a choice in what we build, and a say in how it is used.”

 Employee activism is alive

It comes after a recent spate of protests across workforces in Silicon Valley about tech giants’ work with the U.S. government. As uncovered by Gizmodo’s Kate Conger, Google employees were up in arms about the company’s work with the Pentagon on an artificial-intelligence-powered drone footage analysis initiative known as Maven. Google subsequently decided to stop working on the project.

Microsoft staff this week called on the company to cease working with ICE. While CEO Satya Nadella slammed the practice of separating children and parents, he said the company was not providing any tech aiding in ICE’s work on separating families.

Palantir, which The Intercept last year revealed provides a $20 million Investigative Case Management service for ICE, has not responded to Forbes’ request for comment on its work for the immigration department. Recent contracts show Palantir received $250,000 from ICE this month and $12.2 million in May 2017, among many other orders.

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