How To Find The Perfect Recruiter For Your Job Search (And Get Them To Respond) – Mike Podesto

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Searching for a job is difficult, especially for the more senior level roles. Finding the perfect recruiter for your job search can save you a ton of time and effort. In this article, I will explain what a recruiter is, how to find them and what to do when you finally find them.

A recruiter’s job is to help hiring managers and companies find talent for their open positions. Notice how I didn’t say: A recruiter’s job is to help job seekers find companies that fit their skills. That’s almost never the case. Since recruiters are paid by the companies, it only makes sense for them to cater towards the hiring company’s needs.

Where To Find The Perfect Recruiter

There is no better place to find recruiters than LinkedIn.com. According to a 2016 survey from Jobvite, 87 percent of recruiters find LinkedIn most effective when vetting candidates during the hiring process. During my time as a recruiter, LinkedIn was responsible for nearly 90 percent of the hires that I made.

There is always the possibility that a recruiter will find you, but I would highly recommend being proactive about your job search, rather than waiting for something to come your way. This is especially true for senior-level job seekers. The higher you climb the corporate ladder, the fewer jobs you will find that match your salary and job title. Networking becomes extremely important as a senior level executive because it is no longer as simple as going to a job board and quickly applying to jobs.

How To Find The Perfect Recruiter

After navigating to LinkedIn, click on the search bar at the top of the page. Next, type in the kind of role you are looking for, followed by “recruiter.” In this example, I’ll use the keywords “sales recruiter.” Most recruiter profiles will not state the exact roles that they recruit for but will mention a general area of focus such as “sales, marketing, engineering or finance.” Notice how I did not mention anything related to seniority (Manager, Director, VP).

Once you enter your search, you will notice a huge number of recruiters. I have over 138,000 results for the search “sales recruiter.” To filter this list a bit further, click on the “Locations” tab. You will see a drop-down menu, where you can enter the location(s) where you are looking to work. Click the “Apply” button. By filtering my search to San Francisco alone, my results went from 45,412 to 1,877. This is a significant difference and will save you a lot of time when looking for the perfect recruiter to help with your job search. If you still have a large number of results (over 100), try using additional filters.

Additional LinkedIn Search Filters

Next, use the “Connections” filter. Any sort of warm introduction you can get to your target recruiter will go a long way. Business owners and senior level professionals should excel in this, as they should have a solid amount of connections.

In my experience, a third-degree connection is likely to respond 10 percent of the time, a second-degree connection will respond 25 percent of the time and a first-degree connection will respond 50 percent of the time.

Filter the “Connections” tab to focus specifically on first-degree connections. If you don’t have enough first-degree connections, try second-degree ones and then third. By filtering to first-degree only, I was able to refine my search results from 1,877 to 231. Of course, your search results will vary from mine, but you get the idea.

 With 231 solid results, it’s time to start networking.
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Craft Your Message

Recruiters receive dozens of messages each day. That’s why it is crucial to say something that will set you apart from the low quality, templated messages requesting favors. Try something catchy. The less promotional your message is, the more likely you will receive a response and build a genuine relationship (something you should desperately want with recruiters).

A LinkedIn connection of mine, Kacy Knight, uses the following messages, for example. I encourage you to draw inspiration from them:

“Mike … I love your content and think your company is awesome. While I can’t promise that I’ll provide a ridiculous amount of ‘value,’ I make this promise: If we’re ever working together during a zombie apocalypse, you’ll likely survive as I’m a super slow runner and I’m sure you’ll get away while they eat me.”

“I’ve been following your company and am a huge fan. I’d love to connect. I get it if you’re reluctant. I’ll tell you this, I’m pretty strong. If we connect and start developing a relationship now, it won’t be awkward if you ask me to help move a refrigerator down a couple flights of stairs later. You in?”

Notice how these messages are not asking for favors, advice, handouts, a job, etc. They are solid attempts at building a relationship with the individual you are contacting.

Give it a try yourself. Reach out to someone you admire on LinkedIn and play around with different messages. The more you are willing to try, the faster you will find what works for you. Start building relationships now, before you need to cash out on your kindness. It will pay off tenfold in the future.

If everyone who read the articles and like it, that would be favorable to have your donations – Thank you.

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Women in Communication Earn Less, Experience Negative Company Cultures & Still Face a Glass Ceiling – Jennifer Lacayo

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FIU’s Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver Center released the results of a national survey that found that women are more likely to be in middle management or junior level positions in the communication industries, while men dominate top management positions.

In addition, the survey found that the culture of the company most often prevents women from being promoted and keeps them from advancing in their careers and that women are more likely to spend fewer years in the communications professions than men, lacking longevity in their current positions.

“This survey has given us critical results to help us understand the current role and status of women working in those industries,” said Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver, executive director of the Kopenhaver Center for the Advancement of Women in Communication. “Interestingly, workplace culture came to the forefront as inhibiting advancement for women, a factor that companies need to have more awareness of in order to provide equity for all employees.”

Women dominate lower salary level positions in all communications professions. However, those working in public relations, advertising and market communications do slightly better than those in the journalism. Women also said they had been passed over for advancement into a management position because of a “men only” culture in their companies.

The survey, which was distributed to 22 national professional organizations across the U.S., used nearly 900 responses to come up with its findings.

The first survey was conducted by the Kopenhaver Center in 2016, and comparisons to 2018 responses show little progress in all areas except salaries, where there were some advancements.

If everyone who read the articles and like it, that would be favorable to have your donations – Thank you.

New Study Shows Correlation Between Employee Engagement And The Long-Lost Lunch Break – Alan Kohll

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Many American employees strive to perform their best in the workplace. They work overtime, agree to take on extra projects and rarely take a step away from their desk. In reality, this “work hard” mentality isn’t effective – and it’s definitely unhealthy. Employees who believe that they must work 24/7 to achieve a good standing in the workplace have the wrong idea. And unfortunately, employees often gain this idea through employers’ attitudes.

Chaining yourself to a desk or scarfing down your lunch in your cubicle isn’t a recipe for success – it’s a recipe for disaster. Without taking adequate breaks from work, employee productivity, mental well-being and overall work performance begin to suffer. Overworked employees often deal with chronic stress that can easily lead to job burnout. While this not only negatively affects employee health and well-being, it negatively affects the bottom line, too.

This is why it’s important that employers start encouraging employees to take breaks throughout the workday – especially lunch breaks. These breaks are essential in helping employees de-stress and re-charge for the rest of the workday. Regular breaks can also help improve overall job satisfaction. A recent survey by Tork shows exactly how important lunch breaks are, along with how rare they are in the North American workplace.

According to the survey:

  • Nearly 20% of North American workers worry their bosses won’t think they are hardworking if they take regular lunch breaks, while 13% worry their co-workers will judge them.
  • 38% of employees don’t feel encouraged to take a lunch break.
  • 22% of North American bosses say that employees who take a regular lunch break are less hardworking.

These statistics are really a shame because regular breaks create better employees. In fact, according to the Tork survey, nearly 90% of North American employees claim that taking a lunch breaks helps them feel refreshed and ready to get back to work. There are many research-backed health, wellness and performance benefits of taking breaks. Here are just a few examples of the benefits of regular breaks:

  • Increased productivity. While taking breaks might sound counterintuitive when it comes to boosting productivity, it’s one of the best ways to do so. Employees gain focus and energy after stepping away from their desks. A lunch break can help prevent an unproductive, mid-afternoon slump.
  • Improved mental well-being. Employees need time to recharge. Stress is incredibly common in the North American workplace, and it has detrimental effects on employees. Taking some time away from the desk to go for a quick walk or enjoy a healthy lunch helps release some of this stress and improves mental well-being.
  • Creativity boost. Taking a break can give employees a fresh perspective on challenging projects. It’s hard for employees to develop new ideas or solutions when they’ve been looking at the same thing all day. A lunch break will most certainly help get those creative juices flowing.
  • More time for healthy habits. Regular breaks, including a lunch break, give employees time to practice healthy habits in the workplace. They can use break times to make a healthy lunch, exercise, meditate, or engage in a self-care activity.

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Besides these awesome benefits of regular breaks, the Tork survey also revealed that employees who take a lunch break on a daily basis feel more valued by their employer, and 81% of employees who take a daily lunch break having a strong desire to be an active member in their company.

North American employees who take a lunch break every day scored higher on a range of engagement metrics, including job satisfaction, likelihood to continue working at the same company and likelihood to recommend their employer to others.

I recently spoke with Jennifer Deal, the Senior Research Scientist at the Center for Creative Leadership and Affiliated Research Scientist at the Center for Effective Organizations at University of Southern California (USC). She had this to say about Tork’s research and employee lunch breaks:

“The Tork research shows that employees who take a lunch break are more likely to be satisfied with their job, and say they are as effective and efficient as they would like to be. This is consistent with other research, which shows that taking breaks from work is important for recovery – and adequate recovery is critical for top performance.

Energy isn’t unlimited, and just as athletes have halftime to rest during a game, employees need to rest so they can do their best work. Taking a break in the middle of the day for lunch is a recovery period, allowing employees to come back refreshed and reinvigorated for the second half – as this research clearly shows.”

Both Tork and Jennifer agree: employers will benefit from employees who take breaks. But how can employers change the mentality that “breaks are for slackers” in the workplace? Below are a few tips for encouraging employees to take breaks at your office:

  • Revamp break rooms. Be sure that the office has at least one break room for employees to retreat to whenever they need some time away from their desks. Provide comfortable furniture along with table and chairs for eating lunch. Employees will be more inclined to take breaks and lunch breaks when they have a comfortable space to do so.
  • Provide incentives. As a part of your workplace wellness program, offer employees some sort of incentive for taking regular breaks and a daily lunch break. Try creating a “break challenge” and have employees document their breaks throughout the day. Reward employees for their participation.
  • Discuss the benefits. Many employees aren’t aware of all the health and productivity benefits of regular breaks. Send out an email blast, put up some flyers or have managers give talks about the importance of taking some time away from the desk.
  • Take breaks yourself. Leading by example is always the best route. When employees see that their managers are taking lunch breaks and taking short breaks throughout the day, they’ll feel more encouraged to take breaks, too.

While the act of encouraging breaks is a huge step in the right direction, it’s also important to ensure that these breaks are healthy. For example, employees could potentially use break time for unhealthy habits such as getting fast food, smoking or scrolling through social media. Spending break time practicing poor health habits won’t yield productivity and wellness benefits.

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Although employers can’t necessarily control how employees utilize their break time, they can certainly encourage healthy habits in the workplace. Here are some healthy break ideas:

  • Walking clubs. Team walking clubs are an excellent way to encourage regular breaks and physical activity. Encourage employees to form walking clubs with their colleagues and take two 10-minute walks each workday.
  • Healthy snacking. Stock company kitchens and break rooms with healthy snacking options like fresh fruit, veggies, hummus, and nuts. Encourage employees to take a midday break and do some healthy snacking together
  • Gym time. If employees really don’t want to leave the workplace for lunch, encourage them to use the gym instead. If you have an onsite gym, allow employees 30-minutes of on-the-clock time to use the facility. If you don’t have an onsite gym, consider bringing in a weekly yoga instructor or providing vouchers for gym memberships.
  • Socialize. Quality work relationships improve both mental and physical health. They help reduce stress and boost job satisfaction. Encourage employees to take breaks together by providing a game room or fun weekly team activities.
  • Quiet time. Sometimes break time is best spent as quiet time. Offer employees a quiet area to retreat to when they need to clear their minds and recharge. Employees can use this space to meditate, read or listen to some relaxing music.

Encouraging employees to take regular breaks throughout the day, including lunch breaks, is an easy way for employers to boost employee wellness along with work performance. Employers don’t want overworked employees running their business – it’s terrible for the bottom line. Help your employees feel refreshed and reduce some stress by allowing them to take regular breaks throughout the workday.

If everyone who reads our articles and likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure by your donations – Thank you.

Was Starbucks’ Racial Bias Training Effective? Here’s What These Employees Thought

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One Northern California-based Starbucks barista said she contemplated leaving her job after the controversial arrest last month of two black men sitting at a Philadelphia location of the coffee chain for several minutes without having purchased anything.

That employee, an African-American woman who asked TIME to remain anonymous due to concerns of losing her job, was angry. And when Starbucks later announced more than 8,000 stores across the country would participate in racial bias education training, she didn’t understand why.

“I was angry we had to educate people on how to not be racist,” she recalled in an interview with TIME Tuesday night shortly after attending the hours-long training that shuttered nearly all of Starbucks’ U.S. locations.

But, after completing Starbucks’ racial bias training program Tuesday afternoon with her coworkers, the California-based barista felt her perspective had changed. “I’m a black woman; I’ve already known all of this,” she said, referring to one section of the program that detailed living day-to-day in public spaces as a person of color. “But the fact that it was a video all employees had to watch, it really warmed me.”

More than 175,000 Starbucks employees participated in the mandatory racial bias education program Tuesday afternoon at thousands of U.S.-based locations as part of an initiative spurred by the high-profile incident in Philadelphia last month. Gathered around a few iPads at locations around the nation, Starbucks employees watched nearly two dozen videos featuring the rapper Common, documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson, Starbucks executives and other prominent figures, while participating in wide-ranging discussions about race and identity with their colleagues.

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The curriculum, released in full by Starbucks online Tuesday night, placed an emphasis on encouraging some employees to become “color brave” instead of “color blind” and meditated on the Starbucks’ responsibility as the “third place” for some members of the community, akin to a home and workplace.

TIME spoke with five Starbucks employees on what it was like to attend Tuesday’s training sessions. These employees shared differing perspectives on the impact of the curriculum and detailed how effective they each thought it truly was.

Jason, the only African-American employee at his Hollywood-based Starbucks location who asked TIME to identify him by his first name out of concerns over job security, said the program reiterated common conversations surrounding race like inclusion, acceptance and understanding.

But he said the training failed to address how to end instances like what happened in Philadelphia from occurring in the future. While a number of the videos featured the perspectives of people of color — and particularly African-Americans — Jason wrote in a message to TIME that “there were times where I felt they missed the mark.”

“It seems like a lot of talking from the videos,” he added, “and not enough discussion from us.”Employees said they were also given workbooks that included prompts for them to discuss their first experiences with racial identity and discuss in pairs questions like, “What makes me, me? And you, you?” The company also gave employees personal journals to write in and keep for the months ahead. The curriculum as a whole, Jason said, could have used some improvement.

“Helpful? [I don’t know],” Jason wrote. “It kinda reaffirms things that I know already.”

Jason was not alone. Mohamed Abdi, an employee at a Starbucks location in Alexandria, Virginia, told TIME he wished the program featured more discussions between coworkers as well. “Honestly I think they should have more hands-on courses speaking to different people and customers to figure out where they’re coming from,” he said. “It’s easy sitting through something and saying you learned something than actually learning something from the course,” he added.

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His reception of the course, however, was generally positive. He particularly enjoyed the documentary produced by Stanley Nelson that displayed “the different things people of color go through just by leaving the house day by day.” That video featured an array of people of color who discussed how they access and experience public spaces than their white peers. (“When I go into stores, sometimes I get followed,” one woman said in the video. “Especially being a teen of color, they assume that you’re doing something bad.”)

The California-based, female employee told TIME that same video strongly resonated with her and — at one point — almost drove her to tears. “I often find myself even at other Starbucks locations where I don’t work at, and when I say I’m a partner, they look at me a certain kind of way,” she said in a phone interview after her store’s training session Tuesday night. “Just the fact that they really touched on that, it definitely made a lot of people in my job who work with me understand better.”

Ryan Curran, a white employee at a Sewell, New Jersey, location, said he and his coworkers learned a lot from the Starbucks training and wouldn’t change anything about the curriculum. “It would be helpful to continue the program when needed, for example, if a problem occurs in a certain store,” he said.

However, an Arkansas-based Starbucks employee who asked to remain anonymous out of concern over her employment, said she couldn’t imagine the curriculum would have much of an impact. “While this may be the most cost efficient way to handle the situation, I don’t feel like it will change much of anything,” the employee told TIME over text message before the training started.

She added that the store she works at initially didn’t plan on closing for Tuesday’s training, but eventually did once Starbucks’ higher ups stepped in. “Just driving an hour down the road takes you to towns where racism is alive and well,” she added.

According to estimates detailed by USA Today, Starbucks likely lost around $12 million by closing its U.S.-based stores on Tuesday afternoon. Since announcing it would close down the afternoon of May 29 for the training, Starbucks has emphasized the session was just the beginning of a long-term commitment to diversity and combating racial bias.

Researchers and social scientists recently told TIME that a one-time education program isn’t enough to combat racism and eradicate the use of racial biases. Hours before the programs began on Tuesday, Starbucks Executive Chairman Howard Schultz said the company plans to globalize these efforts and make similar initiatives part of the on-boarding process for new employees.

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Indeed, in the weeks after Donte Robinson and Rashon Nelson were arrested at the Philadelphia location, Starbucks implemented new policies that allow people to sit in stores or use their bathrooms without purchasing anything. Hakeem Jefferson, a political science doctorate student at the University of Michigan who will join Stanford University’s faculty in the summer, told TIME ahead of Starbucks’ training day that structural and systematic changes like these policies could help prevent “negative outcomes” of unconscious biases manifest themselves

Starbucks’ curriculum, the company has said, is a launching pad for further initiatives as well as a tool for other companies to refer to and a program that may be used in the on-boarding of new employees in the future. But while movements within a company like Starbucks come as the result of a high-profile, racially charged incident, “I think we should worry that that doesn’t lead to the kind of change that we might want,” Jefferson, the social scientist, said.

“This has to be a core component of every company’s mission, particularly in an increasingly diverse world.”

If everyone who reads our articles and likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure by your donations – Thank you.

New Technologies Allow You to Do Business (and Compete) From Anywhere – Amarillo

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Everyone knows just how much of an impact technology has had on global business, but if there’s one segment that has benefited the most from technological innovation it’s entrepreneurs. With mobile phones, cloud computing, do-it-yourself accounting software and ubiquitous connectivity, business owners can now create successful companies quickly and from anywhere.

However, with so much technology out there, it can be hard to know what programs and tools are essential for getting a company off the ground and growing. There are some must-haves, though, including these five types of tech.

Super-Size Your Storage

In today’s world, most budding businesses need far more storage than their computers can provide. Things like high-resolutions photos, data-heavy PowerPoints and an endless stream of documents will max out CPU storage in no time. Fortunately, cloud-based companies like Dropbox, Box, Apple and Google offer several terabytes of data for a reasonable monthly cost.

These programs also make collaboration easier as you can quickly share files and folders with contractors and employees. Thanks to these storage sites that many small companies can create a global workforce from the start.

Keep Up With Collaboration

Whether you’re in an office or have a remote workforce located in different cities, being able to collaborate and connect with staffers quickly is a must. Over the last few years, sites like Slack, Basecamp, Trello and others have revolutionized the way small business employees interact with one another.

Forget e-mail–you can now send messages to individuals or teams in an instant, you can work together, in real-time, on complex projects, and you can even build camaraderie by creating “channels” dedicated to more social communication. Messages and files are also easily searchable, making it difficult to lose something important.

Crunch The Numbers

As excited you may be about your brilliant idea, you still need to run a business. That means keeping receipts, adding up bills, doing taxes and other more mundane work. While it may still be a good idea to have an accountant nearby, technology can, and should, take care of most of this work.

Quicken, the classic accounting software, is still popular for tax work, but other programs like Wave Accounting, Xero and Zoho Books come with a variety of features like invoicing, payroll, bill payments and other mission critical applications and fall well within the budgets of most small businesses.

Show Your Face

Instant messaging and email only goes so far. In many cases, you still want to see clients or employees face-to-face–maybe you have to walk them through a presentation or just want to catch up. That’s why having a good video program is critical for small businesses today.

You’ll want to find software that allows you hold meetings with multiple participants, share files with people on a call and you may want to be able to record conferences for future viewing. Google Hangouts, Skype for Business, Zoom.us and GoToMeeting are just some of the popular video conferencing sites to choose from. While it may not be quite as good as a face-to-face meeting, it saves a fortune in travel costs and wear and tear.

Set Up A Store

There was once a time when creating a consumer-focused e-commerce website was a painstaking process. Now, though, sites like Shopify and Tictail let even the smallest companies create sleek websites with all the e-commerce fixings. Companies like these have been a boon to entrepreneurs-

They let users create online shops in snap and take a variety of payment options, such as credit card and PayPal, so that every potential customer can buy what you’re selling. It only takes a few hours to get a store up and running and turn your company into a potentially global business.

While there are plenty of other useful technologies out there–security software, customer relationship management programs and so on–incorporate these five tools into your budding business and you could find yourself ahead of the competition in no time.

If everyone who reads our articles, who likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure. For as little as $5 you can donate us – and it only takes a minute. Thank you.

The Best 7 Jobs for People Who Like to Read, Write and Share Content

 

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Writing and reading can turn into full-time jobs in the content marketing industry. Recent years have brought new job roles. Specialists become more and more essential in digital advertising, branding and inbound marketing departments. If you consider a career change, you can turn to professional reading and writing. You will share content and decipher the secrets of social media and how to create and engaging audience.

We have compiled a top of the best 7 jobs in the content marketing industry. They are usually available in digital marketing companies, advertising agencies and even online startups. Before we begin, keep in mind that other applicants will compete with you for the job. Some of them are highly experienced in the inbound marketing field. Others stand out for impressive projects they have completed. You should have a complete application file prepared for each potential employer. Find resumes and cover letters resources, along with guidelines and tips to emphasize your traits and background!

7. Content Writer

As a content writer, you create fun and engaging articles on given topics. You follow a brief set of indications, which includes tone of voice, key word insertion and article length. Once you start writing, you can let your imagination run free and exploit numerous fields and information resources. You compile your findings and add them a personal note through your writing. Then, you move on to another subject and experiment with new writing styles.

Salary: According to PayScale, content writers earn $42,042 per year in average.

Career potential: Most specialists have less than 20 years of experience in content writing. You can specialize by becoming a tech writer or a creative copywriter (we will discuss this job below). The common career paths lead to content and marketing management.

6. SEO Specialist

The SEO (Search Engine Optimization) specialist develops and/or implements a strategy to maximize the potential number of visits of a website. You don’t get to write a lot. Yet, this job allows you to play with words, and discover the public’s concerns and interests. You also find new communication paths between a website and its public. You can become a SEO specialist even as an entrepreneur regardless if you research enough and take online specialized courses. The job teaches you to learn how to grow your website based on searches.

Salary: SEO Specialists usually earn around $44,000 yearly in the USA.

Career potential: You can become a marketing manager, a business development director or a SEO director after some years of experience.

5. Proofreader

Reading enthusiasts can become either book editors or online proofreaders. Both jobs involve reading content, checking spelling and grammar and verifying information and sources. A proofreader thoroughly verifies content from writers in a digital marketing agency. The book editor works in a publishing house and works by project.

Salary: Proofreaders with less than 5 years of experience can earn around $34,000 per year. The book editor usually earns $50,000 yearly. Bloomberg LP is one of the top employers in the field and offers proofreaders salaries of around $120,000 per year.

Career potential: Publishing house employees can later become editors-in-chief. However, proofreaders can become copywriters, copy editors or tech writers.

4. Social Media Specialist

Social media specialists create and implement marketing and communication campaigns on platforms such as Facebook, Google+, Instagram, Twitter and others. They measure results and develop guidelines based on the brand’s audience. Simply put, as a social media specialist you begin the day with a fun and attractive short text on a brand page and see how your public responds.

Salary: A regular social media specialist with a few years of experience usually earns around $45,781 every year.

Career potential: Experienced social media specialists may become communication managers or even brand managers.

3. Web Publisher

Web publishers analyze platforms and make changes to a website’s content. They update, design and create online content. As a web publisher, you may occasionally write and even edit content you receive from specialized colleagues. Also, you will study website specs and find ways to make it more responsive, friendly and intuitive.

Salary: The average pay for web publishers lies around $69,010 every year.

Career potential: If you are fond of learning technical information, you may become a front-end website developer after a few years’ experience. The creative side of this job might make you an online marketing manager.

2. Copywriter

Copywriters create persuasive ads, taglines and any advertising content for online and offline campaigns. Working as a copywriter involves plenty of creativity and understanding a brand and its public. You will create short and long-sized content which is adapted for all types of campaigns and products. You will deliver a brand message through words accompanied by images.

Salary: Copywriters earn on average $49,000 per year. Some of them receive bonuses based on their deliverables. These can go up to $6,000.

Career potential: After becoming a senior copywriter, your career path might lead to marketing and creative management.

1. Content Strategist

The content strategists gather data from the brand manager and SEO specialist. They develop a plan for the content and evaluate former plans. They need to make a coherent and persuasive message for a brand, which is visible in the online world.

Salary: The average salary of a content strategist is $60,000 per year. They usually also receive bonuses and profit shares.

Career potential: The career path of content strategists leads to marketing management.

These 7 reading, writing and editing jobs are essential in online marketing campaigns and/or advertising agencies. Find your dream job in the above list and start researching!

By: Elizabeth Heron

 

What Should a Salesperson’s Résumé and LinkedIn Profile Look Like in 2018? | Linkedin for Business Marketing

Whether or not you’re actively looking for a job, it’s a good idea to ensure your résumé is up-to-date and reflective of all you have to offer.

Source: What Should a Salesperson’s Résumé and LinkedIn Profile Look Like in 2018? | Linkedin for Business Marketing

Being Unable to Work Is Not a Vacation | itsyourbiz – Travel – Enjoy Life!

Lisa Prins explains why being unable to work due to chronic illness does not mean she is on vacation or has time to help out friends.

Source: Being Unable to Work Is Not a Vacation | itsyourbiz – Travel – Enjoy Life!

40 Legitimate Work-at-Home Jobs & Side Gigs for 2018 | itsyourbiz

If you are planning to start working from home this year then check out this massive list of work at home jobs and side gigs you can do.

Source: 40 Legitimate Work-at-Home Jobs & Side Gigs for 2018 | itsyourbiz

Working Too Hard? How to Achieve a Better Work

So, you’ve started a new business, you’re working your ass off to make it a success, but did you forget all about your personal life? Starting a new business is exciting, especially when you do something you love, and it can be very easy to fall into the trap of dedicating all your time towards…

via Working Too Hard? How to Achieve a Better Work-Life Balance [Infographic] — Red Website Design Blog