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50 Ways To Live On Your Own Terms – Benjamin Hardy – Pocket

Although people think they perform better on caffeine, the truth is, they really don’t. Actually, we’ve become so dependent on caffeine that we use it to simply get back to our status-quo. When we’re off it, we under perform and become incapable.

Source: 50 Ways To Live On Your Own Terms – Benjamin Hardy – Pocket

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The Scientific Argument For Waking Up Early – Leon Biss

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If you want to become elite at what you do, you need to consistently get better. High performance is all about putting in more and “reps.” Doing the same workout every day won’t make you stronger or faster. Just showing up to work every day and doing your job won’t make you better at your job. It’s been shown that most doctors become worse at their job over their career. They are at their height when they come out of medical school and slowly get worse over time…….

Read more: https://medium.com/thrive-global/the-scientific-argument-for-waking-up-early-b3d93c4d74cd

 

 

 

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How to Stop Wasting Your Life Watching TV & Do Something Worthwhile With Your Downtime – Elizabeth Grace Saunders

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You get home from work, eat dinner, clean up, flop on the couch, and doze off watching TV or mess with your phone. Then you repeat the same routine Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. Before you know it, you’ve hit the weekend, and it felt like all you did all week was work. In reality, you had an hour or two to do whatever you wanted each night. But because you didn’t consciously invest that time in meaningful or satisfying activities, every day felt like a grind……

Read more: https://www.fastcompany.com/90244574/how-to-stop-wasting-your-life-watching-tv-do-something-worthwhile-with-your-downtime

 

 

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Why Nordic Countries Might Not Be As Happy As You Think

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Nordic countries like Finland and Norway may regularly come out on top of world happiness indexes for wellbeing year-on-year – but new research shows the happiness is far from universal.

A report authored by the Nordic Council of Ministers and the Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen aims to provide a more nuanced picture of life in the Nordic nations – suggesting their reputations as utopias for happiness are masking significant problems for some parts of the population, especially young people.

The researchers behind In the Shadow of Happiness looked at data collected across five years between 2012-2016 to try and build a better picture of the so-called “happiness superpowers”.

It asked people to mark their satisfaction with life out of 10 – with people above a seven categorizedm as thriving, fives and sixes as struggling and anyone scoring below a four deemed to be suffering.

A stock model laughing on the Trolltunga, in Norway

It found that in total 12.3% of people living in the Nordic region said they were struggling or suffering, with 13.5% of young people ranking themselves as such.

It found general health and mental health were both closely associated with happiness ratings – with unemployment, income and sociability also playing a role.

Mental Health As a Factor

Researchers found mental health to be one of the most significant barriers to subjective well-being.

Their data found these problems being reported by young people in particular.

“More and more young people are getting lonely and stressed and having mental disorders,” one of the report’s authors, Michael Birkjaer, told the Guardian newspaper.

“We are seeing that this epidemic of mental illness and loneliness is reaching the shores of the Nordic countries.”

Image copyright Getty Images
Image caption The report said young women reported the highest levels of unhappiness in some areas

In Denmark, 18.3% of people aged 16 to 24 said they suffered from poor mental health – with the number rising to 23.8% for women in that age bracket.

Norway saw a 40% increase over the five-year-period of young people seeking help for mental health difficulties.

The report notes that in Finland, which ranked as the happiest world country in 2018, suicide was responsible for a third of all deaths among the age bracket.

It found that young women consistently reported feeling depressed more than young men did.

What Other Patterns Did it Find?

The authors say that in Nordic countries high incomes protected people against feeling they were suffering or struggling.

They also found that people were more than three times more likely to report a low score if they were unemployed, especially men, who were also more likely to report mental health problems when unemployed.

Image copyright Reuters
Image caption Nordic countries regularly appear in the top five happiest places, according to the survey, with Finland coming top this year
People enjoy a sunny day on the Esplanade in Helsinki, Finland, in May 2017

It said that research shows lack of social contact was a greater problem among Nordic men than women.

Other conclusions included:

  • Ethnic minorities living in Nordic countries were less happy
  • Very religious people were more likely to be happier
  • No difference was found between people living in the country and those in cities

Is It Really That Bad Then?

While the figures may seem stark, it is in isolation in some of the happiest – overall – countries on earth.

Although the report particularly focuses on Nordic countries, it does compare some of the data to that recorded elsewhere.

So while 3.9% of people in the Nordic region may report scores so low they are classed as “suffering” – that level is as high as 26.9% in Russia and 17% in France.

So the picture in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden does remain relatively rosy – just not as perfect as some may have painted.

 

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