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 Miami Deep House & Lounge DJ Paulo Arruda

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I need of your support to pay host, bandwidth and to buy music. You can do any donate on our website: http://pauloarruda.com/donate.html Thank you so much guys! ————————————————— Necesito de tu apoyo para pagar el ancho de banda, host y para comprar música. Usted puede hacer cualquier donativo en nuestro sitio web: http://pauloarruda.com/donate.html Muchas gracias amigos! ————————————————— DOWNLOADS:: www.pauloarruda.com ————————————————— • Follow me on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/DJPauloArruda • Follow me on Facebook: www.facebook.com/DJPauloArruda ————————————————— • Booking: info@pauloarruda.com —————————————————

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Vocal Deep House Mix 2019 Relaxing Music

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tag deep house 2019 , deep house , deep house mix , vocal deep house 2019 , vocal deep house mix 2019 #vocalhouse #deephouse #bestofdeephouse2019 #bestofdeephouse #deephouse2019 #newsongs #newmusic #remix

Relax Autumn Smooth Jazz – Piano and Saxophone Music

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The Best Playlist of Fall Jazz Music! 10 Hours of Relaxing Autumn Smooth Jazz Piano and Saxophone Instrumental Background Music

Jazz Loungebar Selection of 44 Saxophone Bar Jazz (5+ Hours) Smooth Jazz Saxophone Music

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Welcome to my Youtube-Channel “Jazz Loungebar” …a smooth & jazzy lounge trip. Jazz Loungebar Selection #44 “Saxophone Bar Jazz” (5+ Hours) Smooth Jazz Saxophone Music Your donations are welcome ! Please send your donation for our free music program to Donation@Maretimo-Records.com – We say thanxxx ❤ in advance ! Listen to my tracks and mixes online ————————————————————- ► iTunes http://apple.co/1PeDYFE
► Spotify http://bit.ly/1T9wqSi With Musical Regards Your DJ Jazzy James Jr. Weekly new mixes, subscribe to my Youtube-Channel Become a Facebook fan: https://www.Facebook.com/DJMaretimo
Track/Artist/Title ————————————————————- 01. Vladi Strecker – over the sea 02. Vladi Strecker – de el mar a la luna 03. Vladi Strecker – contemplation 04. Vladi Strecker – el instante en el mar 05. Vladi Strecker – el aliento del cielo 06. DJ Maretimo – el momento de despertar 07. Vladi Strecker – tenderness 08. Vladi Strecker – birds over the sea 09. Vladi Strecker – the journey to perfect 10. Vladi Strecker – my city 11. Vladi Strecker – cosmopolitan people 12. Vladi Strecker – taste of life 13. Vladi Strecker – he and she 14. Vladi Strecker – sadness of the warrior 15. Vladi Strecker – old clock 16. Vladi Strecker – red wine 17. Vladi Strecker – three white birds 18. Vladi Strecker – accept yourself 19. Vladi Strecker – first dance 20. Vladi Strecker – en el costa 21. Vladi Strecker – when all sleep 22. Vladi Strecker – sunlight in my yard 23. Vladi Strecker – nostalgie du voyage 24. Vladi Strecker – saxo en la playa 25. DJ Maretimo – el momento de despertar 26. Vladi Strecker – sea and soul 27. Vladi Strecker – night breeze 28. Vladi Strecker – a smooth day for you 29. Vladi Strecker – deep in your eyes 30. DJ Maretimo – el momento de despertar 31. Vladi Strecker – dwelling in the sky 32. Vladi Strecker – across the sea 33. Vladi Strecker – intimate kiss 34. Vladi Strecker – lilia 35. Vladi Strecker – do you remember 36. Vladi Strecker – lloret de mar 37. Vladi Strecker – midnight ocean 38. Vladi Strecker – sailor’s dream 39. Vladi Strecker – sweet home 40. Vladi Strecker – smooth chillin´ 41. Vladi Strecker – short dream 42. Vladi Strecker – yes 43. Vladi Strecker – the moon in the pool 44. Vladi Strecker – sun sea and mountains 45. Vladi Strecker – my story 46. Vladi Strecker – night distance 47. Vladi Strecker – your big world 48. Vladi Strecker – with you 49. Vladi Strecker – trip to the ocean 50. Vladi Strecker – the joy of travel 51. Vladi Strecker – diving 52. Vladi Strecker – m 53. Vladi Strecker – a look inside 54. Vladi Strecker – jungle city 55. Vladi Strecker – meditation in the city #jazzsaxophone #saxophonejazz #saxjazz #pubmusic #loungemusic #jazzlounge #loungemusic2018jazz #saxloungemusic #djmaretimo #maretimosessions #maretimorecords #jazzloungebar #jazzyjamesjunior CAT-SAX

 

Rod Stewart The Legend Of Pop Rock Still Standing Hard In Music Industry

1

Sir Roderick David Stewart, CBE (born 10 January 1945)[1] is a British rock singer and songwriter. Born and raised in London, he is of Scottish and English ancestry. Stewart is one of the best-selling music artists of all time, having sold over 120 million records worldwide.[2] He has had nine number-one albums in the UK Albums Chart and his tally of 62 UK hit singles includes 31 that reached the top ten, six of which gained the #1 position.[3] Stewart has had 16 top ten singles in the US, with four reaching #1 on the Billboard Hot 100. He was knighted in the 2016 Birthday Honours for services to music and charity.[4]

With his distinctive raspy singing voice, Stewart came to prominence in the late 1960s and the early 1970s with The Jeff Beck Group, and then with Faces, though his music career had begun in 1962 when he took up busking with a harmonica. In October 1963, he joined The Dimensions as a harmonica player and part-time vocalist. In 1964, Stewart joined Long John Baldry and the All Stars, and in August, Stewart signed a solo contract, releasing his first single, “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl“, in October. He maintained a solo career alongside a group career, releasing his debut solo album, An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down in 1969. Stewart’s early albums were a fusion of rock, folk music, soul music, and R&B.[5][6]

From the late 1970s through the 1990s, Stewart’s music often took on a new wave or soft rock/middle-of-the-road quality, and in the early 2000s, he released a series of successful albums interpreting the Great American Songbook. In 1994, Stewart staged the largest free rock concert in history when he performed in front of 3.5 million people in Rio de Janeiro.[7]

In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked him the 17th most successful artist on the “Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists”.[8] A Grammy and Brit Award recipient, he was voted at #33 in Q Magazines list of the Top 100 Greatest Singers of all time,[9] and #59 on Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Singers of all time.[10] As a solo artist, Stewart was inducted into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994, the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2006, and was inducted a second time into the US Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2012 as a member of Faces.[11][12]

The family were also great fans of the singer Al Jolson and would sing and play his hits.[24][28] Stewart collected his records and saw his films, read books about him, and was influenced by his performing style and attitude towards his audience.[24][26][29] His introduction to rock and roll was hearing Little Richard‘s 1956 hit “The Girl Can’t Help It“, and seeing Bill Haley & His Comets in concert.[28] His father bought him a guitar in January 1959; the first song he learned was the folk tune “It Takes a Worried Man to Sing a Worried Song”; the first record he bought was Eddie Cochran‘s “C’mon Everybody“.[23] In 1960, he joined a skiffle group with schoolfriends called the Kool Kats, playing Lonnie Donegan and Chas McDevitt hits.[23][29]

Stewart left school at age 15[30] and worked briefly as a silk screen printer.[29] Spurred on by his father, his ambition was to become a professional footballer.[27][30] In summer 1960, he went for trials at Brentford F.C.,[31] a Third Division club at the time.[32] Contrary to some longstanding accounts, Stewart states in his 2012 autobiography that he was never signed to the club and that the club never called him back after his trials.[nb 2] In any case, regarding possible career options, Stewart concluded, “Well, a musician’s life is a lot easier and I can also get drunk and make music, and I can’t do that and play football. I plumped for music … They’re the only two things I can do actually: play football and sing.”[24][30]

Music career

1961–1963: Early work and The Dimensions

Stewart worked in the family shop and as a newspaper delivery boy.[35] He then worked briefly as a labourer for Highgate Cemetery, which became another part of his biographical lore.[nb 3] He worked in a North Finchley funeral parlour[35] and as a fence erector and sign writer.[29] In 1961 he went to Denmark Street with The Raiders and got a singing audition with well-known record producer Joe Meek, but Meek stopped the session with a rude sound.[37] Stewart began listening to British and American topical folk artists such as Ewan MacColl, Alex Campbell, Woody Guthrie, Ramblin’ Jack Elliott, and especially Derroll Adams and the debut album of Bob Dylan.[37][38]

Stewart became attracted to beatnik attitudes and left-wing politics, living for a while in a beatnik houseboat at Shoreham-by-Sea.[37] He was an active supporter of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament at this time, joining the annual Aldermaston Marches from 1961 to 1963 and being arrested on three occasions when he took part in sit-ins at Trafalgar Square and Whitehall for the cause.[29][37] He also used the marches as a way to meet and bed girls.[37][39] In 1962 he had his first serious relationship, with London art student Suzannah Boffey (a friend of future model and actress Chrissie Shrimpton); he moved to a bed-sit in Muswell Hill to be near her.[40] She became pregnant, but neither Rod nor his family wanted him to enter marriage; the baby girl was given up for adoption and Rod and Suzannah’s relationship ended.[40]

In 1962, Stewart began hanging around folk singer Wizz Jones, busking at Leicester Square and other London spots.[41] Stewart took up playing the then-fashionable harmonica.[42] On several trips over the next 18 months Jones and Stewart took their act to Brighton and then to Paris, sleeping under bridges over the River Seine, and then finally to Barcelona.[41] Eventually, this resulted in Stewart being rounded up and deported from Spain for vagrancy during 1963.[34][41][43] At this time, Stewart, who had been at William Grimshaw School with three of their members, was briefly considered as singer for the embryonic Kinks.[21][38][44][45][46]

In 1963, Stewart adopted the Mod lifestyle and look, and began fashioning the spiky rooster hairstyle that would become his trademark.[47] (It was made possible with sugar water or large amounts of his sisters’ hair lacquer, backcombing, and his hands holding it in place to protect it from the winds of the Highgate Underground station.[47][48][49]) Disillusioned by rock and roll, he saw Otis Redding perform in concert and began listening to Sam Cooke records; he became fascinated by rhythm and blues and soul music.[47]

After returning to London, Stewart joined a rhythm and blues group, the Dimensions, in October 1963 as a harmonica player and part-time vocalist.[33][50] It was his first professional job as a musician, although Stewart was still living at home and working in his brother’s painting and picture frame shop.[51][52] A somewhat more established singer from Birmingham, Jimmy Powell, then hired the group a few weeks later, and it became known as Jimmy Powell & the Five Dimensions, with Stewart being relegated to harmonica player.[33][50] The group performed weekly at the famed Studio 51 club on Great Newport Street in London, where The Rolling Stones often headlined;[50] this was Stewart’s entrée into the thriving London R & B scene,[53] and his harmonica playing improved in part from watching Mick Jagger on stage.[42] Relations soon broke down between Powell and Stewart over roles within the group[51] and Stewart departed. Contrary to popular legend, during this time Stewart likely did not play harmonica on Millie Small‘s 1964 hit “My Boy Lollipop“. That was probably Peter Hogman of the Dimensions, although Powell has also claimed credit.[33][54] Powell did record and release a single during this period, though Stewart did not appear on it.[50]

1964–67: Steampacket and “Rod the Mod” image

In January 1964,[nb 4] while Stewart was waiting at Twickenham railway station after having seen Long John Baldry and the All Stars at Eel Pie Island,[33][54][56] Baldry heard him playing “Smokestack Lightnin’” on his harmonica, and invited him to sit in with the group (which passed into his hands and was renamed the Hoochie Coochie Men when Cyril Davies died of endocarditis on 7 January); when Baldry discovered Stewart was a singer as well, he offered him a job for £35 a week, after securing the approval of Stewart’s mother.[54] Quitting his day job at the age of nineteen, Stewart gradually overcame his shyness and nerves and became a visible enough part of the act that he was sometimes added to the billing as “Rod the Mod” Stewart,[42][54][55] the nickname coming from his dandyish style of grooming and dress.[38] Baldry touted Stewart’s abilities to Melody Maker magazine and the group enjoyed a weekly residence at London’s fabled Marquee Club.[55] In June 1964, Stewart made his recording début (without label credit) on “Up Above My Head“, the B-side to a Baldry and Hoochie Coochie Men single.[57] While still with Baldry, Stewart embarked on a simultaneous solo career.[58] He made some demo recordings,[nb 5] was scouted by Decca Records at the Marquee Club, and signed to a solo contract in August 1964.[59] He appeared on several regional television shows around the country and recorded his first single in September 1964.[58][59]

Turning down Decca’s recommended material as too commercial, Stewart insisted that the experienced session musicians he was given, including John Paul Jones, learn a couple of Sonny Boy Williamson songs he had just heard.[60] The resulting single, “Good Morning Little Schoolgirl“, was recorded released in October 1964; despite Stewart performing it on the popular television show Ready Steady Go!, it failed to enter the charts. Also in October Stewart left the Hoochie Coochie Men after having a row with Baldry.[59]

Stewart played some dates on his own in late 1964 and early 1965, sometimes backed by the Southampton R & B outfit The Soul Agents.[61] The Hoochie Coochie Men broke up, Baldry and Stewart patched up their differences (and indeed became lifelong friends),[62] and legendary impresario Giorgio Gomelsky put together Steampacket, which featured Baldry, Stewart, Brian Auger, Julie Driscoll, Micky Waller, Vic Briggs and Ricky Fenson; their first appearance was in support of The Rolling Stones in July 1965.[63] The group was conceived as a white soul revue, analogous to The Ike & Tina Turner Revue, with multiple vocalists and styles ranging from jazz to R & B to blues.[64] Steampacket toured with the Stones and The Walker Brothers that summer, ending in the London Palladium;[64] seeing the audience react to the Stones gave Stewart his first exposure to crowd hysteria.[65] Stewart, who had been included in the group upon Baldry’s insistence, ended up with most of the male vocal parts.[64] Steampacket was unable to enter the studio to record any material due to its members all belonging to different labels and managers,[64][66] although Gomelsky did record one of their Marquee Club rehearsals.[nb 6]

Stewart’s “Rod the Mod” image gained wider visibility in November 1965, when he was the subject of a 30-minute Rediffusion, London television documentary titled “An Easter with Rod” that portrayed the Mod scene.[34][67] His parallel solo career attempts continued on EMI‘s Columbia label with the November 1965 release of “The Day Will Come”, a more heavily arranged pop attempt, and the April 1966 release of his take on Sam Cooke‘s “Shake“, with the Brian Auger Trinity.[67] Both failed commercially and neither gained positive notices.[68] Stewart had spent the better part of two years listening mostly to Cooke; he later said, “I didn’t sound like anybody at all … but I knew I sounded a bit like Sam Cooke, so I listened to Sam Cooke.”[52] This recording solidified that singer’s position as Stewart’s idol and most enduring influence; he called it a “crossing of the water.”[38][52][64]

Stewart departed from Steampacket in March 1966,[67] with Stewart saying he had been sacked and Auger saying he had quit.[64] Stewart then joined a somewhat similar outfit, Shotgun Express, in May 1966 as co-lead vocalist with Beryl Marsden.[64][67] The other members included Mick Fleetwood and Peter Green (who would go on to form Fleetwood Mac), and Peter Bardens.[67] Shotgun Express released one unsuccessful single in October 1966, the orchestra-heavy “I Could Feel The Whole World Turn Round”, before disbanding.[64][67] Stewart later disparaged Shotgun Express as a poor imitation of Steampacket, and said “I was still getting this terrible feeling of doing other people’s music. I think you can only start finding yourself when you write your own material.”[67] By now, Stewart had bounced around without achieving much success, with little to distinguish himself among other aspiring London singers other than the emerging rasp in his voice.[53]

1967–69: Jeff Beck Group period

Guitarist Jeff Beck recruited Stewart for his new post-Yardbirds venture,[69] and in February 1967, Stewart joined the Jeff Beck Group as vocalist and sometime songwriter.[70] This would become the big break of his early career.[38] There he first played with Ronnie Wood[64] whom he had first met in a London pub in 1964;[59] the two soon became fast friends.[69] During its first year, the group experienced frequent changes of drummers and conflicts involving manager Mickie Most wanting to reduce Stewart’s role; they toured the UK, and released a couple of singles that featured Stewart on their B-sides.[70][71] Stewart’s sputtering solo career also continued, with the March 1968 release of non-hit “Little Miss Understood” on Immediate Records.[70]

The Jeff Beck Group toured Western Europe in spring 1968, recorded, and were nearly destitute; then assistant manager Peter Grant booked them on a six-week tour of the United States starting in June 1968 with the Fillmore East in New York.[70][72][73] Stewart, on his first trip to America, suffered terrible stage fright during the opening show and hid behind the amplifier banks while singing; only a quick shot of brandy brought him out front.[70] Nevertheless, the show and the tour were a big success,[38][73] with Robert Shelton of The New York Times calling the group exciting and praising “the interaction of Mr. Beck’s wild and visionary guitar against the hoarse and insistent shouting of Rod Stewart,”[72] and New Musical Express reporting that the group was receiving standing ovations and pulling receipts equal to those of Jimi Hendrix and The Doors.[70]

In August 1968, their first album Truth was released; by October it had risen to number 15 on the US albums chart but failed to chart in the UK.[70] The album featured Beck’s masterly guitar technique and manipulated sounds as Stewart’s dramatic vocalising tackled the group’s varied repertoire of blues, folk, rock, and proto-heavy metal.[53][71][74] Stewart also co-wrote three of the songs,[74] and credited the record for helping to develop his vocal abilities and the sandpaper quality in his voice.[52] The group toured America again at the end of the year to a very strong reception, then suffered from more personnel upheaval[70][75] (something that would continue throughout Beck’s career). In July 1969, Stewart left, following his friend Wood’s departure.[52][76] Stewart later recalled: “It was a great band to sing with but I couldn’t take all the aggravation and unfriendliness that developed…. In the two and a half years I was with Beck I never once looked him in the eye – I always looked at his shirt or something like that.”[70]

The group’s second album, Beck-Ola, was released in June 1969 in the US and September 1969 in the UK, bracketing the time the group was dissolving; it also made number 15 in the US albums chart and placed to number 39 in the UK albums chart.[38][76][77] During his time with the group, Stewart initially felt overmatched by Beck’s presence, and his style was still developing; but later Stewart felt the two developed a strong musical, if not personal, rapport.[70][78] Much of Stewart’s sense of phrasing was developed during his time with the Jeff Beck Group.[52] Beck sought to form a new supergroup with Carmine Appice and Tim Bogert (of the similarly just-breaking-up Vanilla Fudge) joining him and Stewart, but Stewart had other plans.[79]

1969–75: Solo career established and Faces albums

Mercury Records A&R man Lou Reizner had seen Stewart perform with Beck, and on 8 October 1968 signed him to a solo contract;[70] but contractual complexities delayed Stewart’s recording for him until July 1969.[76][80] Meanwhile, in May 1969, guitarist and singer Steve Marriott left English band The Small Faces.[76] Ron Wood was announced as the replacement guitarist in June and on 18 October 1969, Stewart followed his friend and was announced as their new singer.[76] The two joined existing members Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan, and Kenney Jones, who soon decided to call the new line-up Faces.[81]

An Old Raincoat Won’t Ever Let You Down became Stewart’s first solo album in 1969 (it was known as The Rod Stewart Album in the US). It established the template for his solo sound: a heartfelt mixture of folk, rock, and country blues, inclusive of a British working-class sensibility, with both original material (“Cindy’s Lament” and the title song) and cover versions (Ewan MacColl‘s “Dirty Old Town” and Mike d’Abo‘s “Handbags and Gladrags“). The backing band on the album included Wood, Waller and McLagan, plus Keith Emerson and guitarists Martin Pugh (of Steamhammer, and later Armageddon and 7th Order) and Martin Quittenton (also from Steamhammer).[82]

Faces released their début album First Step in early 1970 with a rock and roll style similar to the Rolling Stones. While the album did better in the UK than in the US, the Faces quickly earned a strong live following. Stewart released his second album, Gasoline Alley that autumn. Stewart’s approach was similar to his first album and mandolin was introduced into the sound. He then launched a US tour with the Faces. Stewart sang guest vocals for the Australian group Python Lee Jackson on “In a Broken Dream”, recorded in April 1969 but not released until 1970. His payment was a set of seat covers for his car. It was re-released in 1972 to become a worldwide hit.

Stewart’s 1971 solo album Every Picture Tells a Story made him a household name when the B-side of his minor hit “Reason to Believe”, “Maggie May”, (co-written with Martin Quittenton) started receiving radio play. The album and the single occupied number one in both the US and the UK simultaneously, a chart first, in September.[83] Set off by a striking mandolin part (by Ray Jackson of Lindisfarne), “Maggie May” was also named in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, one of three songs by him to appear on that list. The rest of the album was equally strong, with “Mandolin Wind” again showcasing that instrument; “(I Know) I’m Losing You” adding hard-edged soul to the mix; and “Tomorrow Is a Long Time”, a cover of a Bob Dylan song. But the ultimate manifestation of the early Stewart solo style was the Stewart-Wood-penned “Every Picture Tells a Story” itself: powered by Mick Waller’s drumming, Pete Sears’s piano and Wood’s guitar work in a largely acoustic arrangement; it is a song relating to the picaresque adventures of the singer.[citation needed]

The second Faces album, Long Player, was released in early 1971 and enjoyed greater chart success than First Step. Faces also got their only US Top 40 hit with “Stay With Me” from their third album A Nod Is as Good as a Wink…To a Blind Horse released in late 1971.[84] This album reached the Top 10 on both sides of the Atlantic on the back of the success of Every Picture Tells A Story.[84][85] Steve Jones from The Sex Pistols regarded the Faces very highly and named them as a main influence on the British punk rock movement.[86]

The Faces toured extensively in 1972 with growing tension in the band over Stewart’s solo career enjoying more success than the band’s. Stewart released Never a Dull Moment in the same year. Repeating the Every Picture formula, for the most part, it reached number two on the US album charts and number one in the UK,[87] and enjoyed further good notices from reviewers. “You Wear It Well” was a hit single that reached number 13 in the US and went to number one in the UK, while “Twisting the Night Away” made explicit Stewart’s debt to Sam Cooke.

For the body of his early solo work Stewart earned tremendous critical praise. Rolling Stone’s 1980 Illustrated History of Rock & Roll includes this in its Stewart entry:[53]

Rarely has a singer had as full and unique a talent as Rod Stewart; rarely has anyone betrayed his talent so completely. Once the most compassionate presence in music, he has become a bilious self-parody – and sells more records than ever [… A] writer who offered profound lyricism and fabulous self-deprecating humour, teller of tall tales and honest heartbreaker, he had an unmatched eye for the tiny details around which lives turn, shatter, and reform […] and a voice to make those details indelible. [… His solo albums] were defined by two special qualities: warmth, which was redemptive, and modesty, which was liberating. If ever any rocker chose the role of everyman and lived up to it, it was Rod Stewart.

The Faces released their final album Ooh La La, which reached number one in the UK and number 21 in the US in 1973.[84][85] During the recording of the album, the rift between Stewart and the rest of the Faces grew further, as (according to Ian McLagan), Stewart didn’t participate until two weeks into the sessions, “and then complained that some songs were in the wrong key for him. So we recorded them again and waited a week for him to come back. We cut the track for ‘Ooh La La’ three times before he eventually passed on it, leaving it for Woody to sing. […] The week the album came out he did all he could to scuttle it and told anyone who would listen how useless it was.”.[88] The band toured Australasia, Japan, Europe and the UK in 1974[89] to support the album and the single “Pool Hall Richard”.

In late 1974, Stewart released his Smiler album. In Britain, it reached number one, and the single “Farewell” number seven, but only number 13 on the Billboard pop album charts and the single “Mine for Me” only number 91 on the Billboard pop singles charts. It was his last original album for Mercury Records. After the release of the double album compilation The Best of Rod Stewart he switched to Warner Bros. Records and remained with them throughout the vast majority of his career (Faces were signed to Warner Bros., and Stewart’s solo releases in the UK appeared on the Riva label until 1981). In 1975, Faces toured the US twice (with Ronnie Wood joining The Rolling Stones‘ US tour in between)[89] before Stewart announced the Faces’ break-up at the end of the year.[90]

1975–88: Height of fame and critical reaction

On stage in Dublin, 1981

In 1975, Stewart moved to Los Angeles. He released the Atlantic Crossing album for his new record company, using producer Tom Dowd and a different sound based on the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section. Atlantic Crossing marked both a return to form and a return to the Top 10 of the Billboard album charts. The first single, a cover of the Sutherland Brothers song “Sailing“, was a number-one hit in the UK, but it only reached the Top 60 of the US charts. The single returned to the UK Top 10 a year later when used as the theme music for a BBC documentary series about HMS Ark Royal. Having been a hit twice over, “Sailing” became, and remains, Stewart’s biggest-selling single in the UK. His Holland-Dozier-Holland cover “This Old Heart of Mine” was also a Top 100 hit in 1976.[84] In 1976 Stewart covered The Beatles‘ song “Get Back” for the musical documentary All This and World War II.[91]

Later in 1976, Stewart topped the US Billboard Hot 100 for eight weeks and the Australian ARIA chart with the ballad “Tonight’s the Night“, with an accompanying music video featuring actress Britt Ekland.[84] It came from the A Night on the Town album, which went to number two on the Billboard album charts and was Stewart’s first album to go platinum. By explicitly marking the album as having a “fast side” and a “slow side”, Stewart continued the trend started by Atlantic Crossing. “The First Cut Is the Deepest“, a cover of a Cat Stevens song, went number one in the UK in 1977, and top 30 in the US.[84][87]The Killing of Georgie (Part 1 and 2)”, about the murder of a gay man, was also a Top 40 hit for Stewart during 1977.[84]

Foot Loose & Fancy Free (1977) featured Stewart’s own band, the original Rod Stewart Group that featured Carmine Appice, Phil Chen, Jim Cregan, Billy Peek, Gary Grainger and John Jarvis. It continued Stewart’s run of chart success, reaching number two. “You’re in my Heart” was the hit single, reaching number four in the US.[84]

Hot Legs” achieved a lot of radio airplay as did the confessional “I Was Only Joking“. In appearance, Stewart’s look had evolved to include a glam element, including make-up and spandex clothes. Stewart scored another UK number one and US number one single with “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy?“, which was a crossover hit reaching number five on the Billboard black charts due to its disco sound.[84] This was the lead single from 1978’s Blondes Have More Fun, which went to number one on the Billboard album charts and sold 3 million albums.[92]

In May 2000, Stewart was diagnosed with thyroid cancer, for which he underwent surgery in the same month. It had been previously reported he suffered from a benign vocal cord nodule.[136] Besides being a major health scare, the resulting surgery also threatened his voice, and he had to re-learn how to sing.[137] Since then he has been active in raising funds for The City of Hope Foundation charity to find cures for all forms of cancer, especially those affecting children.[136] In September 2019, Stewart revealed that he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2017, and has been given the all-clear after treatment.[138]

Before returning to the UK, Stewart played for his LA Exiles team made up of mostly English expatriates plus a few celebrities, including Billy Duffy of The Cult, in a senior soccer league in Palos Verdes, California.[139]

Despite his father being a supporter of Hibernian,[140] Stewart is a supporter of Celtic, which he mentions in “You’re in My Heart“. He supports the Scotland national team and follows Manchester United as his English side, and he explains his love affair with both Celtic and Manchester United in Frank Worrall’s book, Celtic United.[141] Stewart clarifies this more in his 2012 book (pp 163–64), Rod: The Autobiography, mentioning he “only had an attachment to Manchester United in the 1970s, but that was because they had so many great Scottish players in the 1970s, including Denis Law … When I did eventually click with a team, it was Celtic”. He presented Celtic with the trophy after they won the 2015 Scottish League Cup Final.[142]

Stewart is a model railway enthusiast. His 23 ft × 124 ft (7.0 m × 37.8 m) HO scale layout in his Los Angeles home is modelled after the New York Central and the Pennsylvania Railroads during the 1940s. Called the Three Rivers City, the layout was featured in the cover story of the December 2007, December 2010, February 2014, and June 2017 issues of Model Railroader magazine. In the 2007 article, Stewart said that it meant more to him to be in a model railroad magazine than a music magazine. The layout, which has a mainline run of 900 ft (270 m), uses code 70 flextrack and a Digital Command Control (DCC) system made by Digitrax.[143][144] Stewart has a second, smaller layout at his UK home, based on Britain’s East Coast Main Line. In a sidebar[145] to the 2014 Model Railroader article, Stewart admitted (in an anecdote about his having unwittingly mixed red scenery texturing material into a “turf” mix he used around the bases of buildings) that he is colour-blind.[146][147]

A car collector, Stewart owns one of the 400 Ferrari Enzos. In 1982, Stewart was car-jacked on Los Angeles’ Sunset Boulevard while he was parking his $50,000 Porsche.[148] The car was subsequently recovered.

In September 2002, Stewart’s son, Sean, was sentenced to three months in jail for attacking a man outside a restaurant in Los Angeles. Sean Stewart was also required to pay compensation and to attend anger management, drug and alcohol treatment courses.[149]

Rod Stewart was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in the 2007 New Year Honours for services to music. Collecting it in July 2007 at Buckingham Palace, Stewart commented: “It’s a marvellous occasion. We’re the only country in the world to honour the common man.”[150] He was knighted in the 2016 Birthday Honours for “services to music and charity”.[4]

In 2017, Stewart endorsed Conservative Party leader and incumbent Prime Minister Theresa May ahead of the snap general election held that year.[151]

Stewart was estimated to have a fortune of £180 million in the Sunday Times Rich List of 2018, making him one of the 20 wealthiest people in the British music industry.[152]

Music Publishers Double Claims Against Peloton To $300 Million For Using Taylor Swift, Adele Songs

Music publishers are continuing to fight Peloton over how it uses music in its workout classes. On Thursday, the National Music Publishers’ Association filed a request to amend its complaint to now seek $300 million in damages after discovering an additional 1,200-plus songs that Peloton had allegedly used but not paid artists for, including Ray Charles’ recording of “Georgia On My Mind” and the Beatles’ “I Saw Her Standing There”.

“Since filing this lawsuit we have now discovered more than double the number of songs for which the plaintiffs’ songwriters were never paid by Peloton. The fact that Peloton has gone this long without proper music licenses is astounding,” NMPA President and CEO David Israelite said in a statement.

The request for increased damages comes right as Peloton prepares to go public. On Tuesday, the company set a share price range of $26 to $29 for its IPO, which would value it at around $8 billion, double its current valuation set by private investors.

Today In: Innovation

In its registration filing, the company noted that music was an “important element” to its content and also a particular business risk: “We depend upon third-party licenses for the use of music in our content. An adverse change to, loss of, or claim that we do not hold necessary licenses may have an adverse effect on our business, operating results, and financial condition.”

The fitness company rose in popularity thanks to its instructors mixing bike and treadmill workouts to pop hits. The cohort of music publishers first filed suit against Peloton in March and the company subsequently removed some classes from its service. Now, the NMPA is asking the courts to consider its amended complaint now that it has uncovered more songs used by Peloton.

The New York-based company plans to fight the lawsuit, calling the NMPA “anti-competitive.”

“This platform could only have been developed with the close collaboration of our trusted music partners, which include all of the major labels, major music publishers and performance rights organizations, among many others,” the company said in a statement. “We will continue to defend ourselves against claims made in this matter and look forward to pursuing our counterclaims.”

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I’m a San Francisco-based staff writer for Forbes with a focus on Uber, the sharing economy, and startups. I previously worked for Business Insider, Gigaom, and Wired. I also spent a year as newspaper designer for Gannet. I’m a native of Atlanta, Georgia and a proud graduate from Indiana University’s journalism school. Email me story tips at bcarson [at] forbes.com or follow me on Twitter @bizcarson

Source: Music Publishers Double Claims Against Peloton To $300 Million For Using Taylor Swift, Adele Songs

CNBC’s Julia Boorstin joins “Closing Bell” to report the latest news from Peloton as music publishers seek $300 million from the company in damages for wrongly using songs in its workouts.

 

Inside The Winning, Spinning World Of Steve Aoki, Music’s $30 Million DJ

Deep inside a hilltop hideaway on the outskirts of Las Vegas, an elusive engine of perpetual motion thrums to a beat: not in mechanical form, but in the person of Steve Aoki. The 41-year-old DJ has just returned to his high-desert lair after a gig in Houston, one of 200-plus shows he’s played over the past year. Aoki celebrates being home by diving into a pit full of blue foam cubes in his basement for a moment—but only a moment—before heading back to his studio.

“As long as my train is moving and the momentum is going, I’m good,” Aoki says. “And because I know that, I don’t stop. Because the second I do this and I’m like, ‘I’m just going to chill,’ someone else is going to jump on my train and start driving.”

Thanks to his insatiable appetite for performing—as well as his music and fashion ventures, plus endorsements with Samsung, Diesel and the airline ANA—Aoki ranks No. 4 on Forbes’ annual list of highest-paid DJs, pulling in $30 million pretax over the past 12 months. He has built an empire on more than just cash earnings: Aoki’s realm includes the record label Dim Mak; a museum-level collection of art in his home, including works by Kaws and Banksy; investments in clothing (Vision Street Wear) and esports (Rogue); and stakes in companies from Uber to SpaceX.

As his career took off in the early aughts, Aoki found himself spending only 50 days a year at his $1.1 million, 3,000-square-foot-home in the Hollywood Hills. So at the end of 2013, around the time he inked a residency deal at Hakkasan in Las Vegas, he made the move to Sin City. Aoki bought his current, 16,000-square-foot mansion for $2.8 million in an all-cash short sale—though it would take more than that to complete his dream house.

“It wasn’t like a custom home where I could just step in and I’m like, ‘Okay, everything’s here, I don’t need to worry about anything.’ I was like, ‘Oh, I don’t have a choice, I have to, so let’s get crazy,’” he says—and he shelled out $5 million to remake the property to his exact specifications. Now? “It’s like my brain is this house.”

Welcome to Aoki’s Playhouse—welcome to his brain.

Long before he became an electronic cash king, Aoki spent a summer as a teenager peeling onions at Benihana in Dallas—his father, Rocky Aoki, founded the restaurant chain in 1964. Though the younger Aoki soon realized that his passion lay in music, his experience provided a valuable entrepreneurial foundation.

“You can’t just go from zero to 100 just because your dad owns the business. You’re going to ruin the whole business,” he says. “The very important lesson for me is that you have to have the discipline to learn all the different facets.”

When Aoki founded Dim Mak in 1996, he did exactly that, involving himself in everything from visiting vinyl pressing houses and negotiating with distributors to keeping the books and spending time in the studio with his artists. He went on to boost acts like the Kills and Bloc Party before releasing his solo debut, Wonderland, in 2012, just in time to catch the electronic dance music (EDM) wave as it washed across the United States.

“Before then, people were just going into these clubs, the DJ was hidden in the back corner,” Aoki recalls. “But when that shift happened where you went to the club to see the DJ … that was a critical change

Steve Aoki’s very first job had nothing to do with Dim Mak or Benihana: as a 10-year-old he sold hats at a Southern California flea market on weekends. “I only worked there one day,” he says. “I was awful selling hats. [My boss] just was like, ‘Here’s 20 bucks—get out of here.’”

For his next gig, Aoki worked at a video game arcade—a passion that lingers to this day. A self-proclaimed Street Fighter junkie before graduating to three-dimensional games, Aoki was a founding partner of the esports team Rogue in 2016 before selling a chunk of his stake to industry giant ReKTGlobal last year (neither Aoki nor the company would discuss figures).

His investment also proved to be an incredible cheat code for new games that capture his attention. “I invite team Rogue over here so they can help beat very difficult bosses,” he says.

Rogue is one of many business ventures into which Aoki has plowed the fruits of his musical labor—$155 million before taxes over the past seven years, by Forbes’ estimate. He also boasts an expansive portfolio of startups and has poured additional resources into his clothing brand, which shares the name of his record label. Launched in 2014, Dim Mak is equal parts Los Angeles skater punk and high fashion, with a touch of kung fu tossed in: Its namesake is the signature move of Bruce Lee, a childhood hero of Aoki.

One of the first things you see when you walk into Aoki’s Playhouse is his giant Banksy installation: a python, perhaps a dozen feet long, that appears to have swallowed Mickey Mouse whole. The piece debuted at Banksy’s Dismaland, a dystopian theme park exhibition staged in the United Kingdom four years ago, before Aoki purchased it and brought it to his living room. It’s part of a vast collection that’s easily worth millions, though some pieces, like the two-headed monster mural by Los Angeles artist Neck Face isn’t exactly a liquid asset. No matter: “I’m not moving,” he says. “This is my home.”

Behind the Banksy in his living room, floor-to-ceiling windows open up onto a golf course far below—and beyond that, the shimmer of the Las Vegas skyline—which Aoki will soon soar over in a helicopter en route to his headlining set at Electric Daisy Carnival (EDC), the annual EDM festival attended by nearly 500,000 people this year. He’s still one of the biggest attractions in a lineup that includes dozens of DJs, including twentysomething stars like Alesso and Martin Garrix.

“Steve’s longevity is a function of being to adapt to changing tastes while broadening out his demos,” says Randy Phillips, chief of the EDM festival company LiveStyle. “He also has that star personality which resonates well in the age of social media.”

The morning after EDC, Aoki rolls into the convention center at Planet Hollywood on the Vegas Strip, right on time for a comic book signing. Never mind that he didn’t get home until well after three o’clock in the morning—and promptly went back into his studio to work on more music—there’s a bionic sort of energy to him. “I’m not sure how much sleep he’s on right now,” says his manager, Dougie Bohay. “But it’s not a lot.”

And he’s already focusing on his next big project—early next year, Aoki will release his next album, Neon Future IV.  Not that he needs the money.

“At the end of the day, besides having whatever I have in the bank or whatever great investments I’ve worked, the things I create and that I offer to people, that is where I feel the most appreciation about my purpose of life,” Aoki says. “I want to have the appreciation. I’m always yearning for it.”

Photographs by Jamel Toppin for Forbes

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Zack O’Malley Greenburg is senior editor of media & entertainment at Forbes and author of three books, including Empire State of Mind: How Jay-Z Went From Street Corner To Corner Office. His work has also appeared in the New York TimesWashington Post, Billboard, Sports Illustrated, Vibe, McSweeney’s and others. In a decade at Forbes, Zack has investigated topics from Wu-Tang Clan’s secret album in Morocco to the return of tourism in post-conflict Sierra Leone to the earning power of Hip-Hop’s Cash Kings, writing cover stories on subjects ranging from Richard Branson to Ashton Kutcher to Katy Perry. A recovering child actor, Zack played the title role in the film Lorenzo’s Oil (1992) and arrived at Forbes in 2007 after graduating from Yale with an American Studies degree. For more, follow him on Twitter, Facebook, newsletter and via www.zogreenburg.com. Got a tip on a music, media & entertainment story? Send it over via SecureDrop. Instructions here: www.forbes.com/tip

 

Source: Inside The Winning, Spinning World Of Steve Aoki, Music’s $30 Million DJ

How Rihanna Created A $600 Million Fortune—And Became The World’s Richest Female Musician

Famous first as a singer, Robyn Rihanna Fenty, age 31, has since evolved into a style icon and makeup entrepreneur—and soon she’ll be the first black woman in charge of a major luxury fashion house. All those efforts add up to a $600 million fortune, making her the wealthiest female musician in the world, ahead of the likes of Madonna ($570 million), Céline Dion ($450 million) and Beyoncé ($400 million).

[Read more | Artist, Icon, Billionaire: How Jay-Z Spun Fame Into A $1 Billion Fortune]

Most of that comes not from music but from her partnership with LVMH, the French luxury goods giant run by billionaire Bernard Arnault. Rihanna (pronounced “Ri-ann-ah,” not “Ri-ah-nah,” as she recently clarified) and LVMH co-own the makeup brand Fenty Beauty. It launched in September 2017 at Sephora, another LVMH brand, and online at FentyBeauty.com, quickly becoming a viral success. Fenty Beauty racked up a reported $100 million in sales in its first few weeks, propelled by Rihanna’s fame and 71 million Instagram followers.

The entire personal care industry in America has grown huge in recent years. According to Grand View Research, it could swell to more than $200 billion in sales by 2025, up from closer to $130 billion in 2016. The market saw a record 134 M&A deals last year, including P&G’s $250 million purchase of 10-year-old First Aid Beauty. Perhaps the most telling data point: 11 of the 80 women on Forbes‘ list of the Richest Self-Made Women made their money in beauty or skin care products. Many did what Rihanna did, turn to the low-cost marketing opportunity presented by social media. That works best for existing celebrities, as Kylie Jenner and her Kylie Cosmetics proved out, who can push their new products at their existing followers.

Fenty Beauty has differentiated itself in another way, releasing 40 shades of foundation, far more than the handful of hues sold by other brands. “It challenged the standard convention that you only needed a very defined set of shades to satisfy a market,” says Stephanie Wissink, a research analyst at Jefferies. “Not only did [Fenty Beauty] achieve meaningful sales, but it potentially changed the industry permanently.”

Sales continue to soar. Fenty Beauty generated an estimated $570 million in revenue last year, after only 15 months in business. The entire operation is worth, conservatively, more than $3 billion. Forbes estimates thatLVMH owns an estimated 50% of it, while Rihanna has about 15%, a figure a spokesperson for the artist disputed but wouldn’t clarify further.

The Barbados native, who overcame hardships including an abusive addict father and a well-publicized assault by then-boyfriend Chris Brown in 2009, also co-owns the Savage X Fenty lingerie line with Los Angeles-based online fashion firm TechStyle Fashion Group and has millions in earnings from her career touring and releasing as a singer, which make up the rest of her fortune.

Her empire continues to grow. In May, LVMH and Rihanna announced Fenty, a new clothing house that will make high-end clothes, shoes, accessories and jewelry.

“They extended the offer to me and it was a no-brainer because LVMH is a machine,” Rihanna told The New York Times Style Magazine. “Bernard Arnault was so enthusiastic; he trusted me and my vision.”

The fashion line, which launched online in May, includes sizes up to U.S. 14, embodying the same inclusive ideal of Fenty Beauty. It will exist under the same umbrella as famous brands such as Dior and Givenchy, marking LVMH’s first new house in more than 30 years.

“What Fenty Beauty did to beauty, Fenty lifestyle is going to do to fashion,” says Wissink. “It’s going to raise the bar for what it looks like to build a brand that’s inclusive, game changing, global and iconic.”

Inset photographs: Getty Images

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Source: How Rihanna Created A $600 Million Fortune—And Became The World’s Richest Female Musician

Ave Maria – Luciano Pavarotti 

Ave Maria de Schubert interpretada por Luciano Pavarotti.

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