Uber, Facebook, Instagram and Other Apps That are Slowly Killing Your Smartphone

Uber, Facebook, Instagram and other apps that are slowly killing your smartphone

What is the first thing you do when you launch a new smartphone ? Download all the apps you need, of course. After a few hours (or days) downloading applications, your entry menu ends up covered in colorful squares, giving you the satisfaction that you have everything: apps for social networks, transport, dating, online commerce, for video conferencing and fitness, for name the most popular.

However, recent research found that many of them are slowly killing your smartphone. The pCloud company, which offers cloud storage services, conducted a study to discover which applications are most demanding for our mobile devices.

The research looked at 100 of the most popular apps based on three criteria: the features each app uses (such as location or camera), the battery consumption, and whether dark mode is available. Thus they found which of these not only drain the battery of our phone, they also occupy the most memory and make it slower.

These are the apps classified as ‘smartphone killers’

According to the study, the Fitbit and Verizon apps turned out to be the biggest ‘smartphone killers. Both allow 14 of the 16 available functions to run in the background, including the four most demanding: camera, location, microphone and WiFi connection. This earned them the highest score in the study: 92.31%.

Of the 20 most demanding applications for mobile battery, 6 are social networks . Facebook , Instagram , Snapchat , Youtube , WhatsApp, and LinkedIn allow 11 functions to run in the background, such as photos, WiFi, location, and microphone. Of these, only IG allows dark mode to save up to 30% battery, just like Twitter , which did not enter the top 20.

Dating apps Tinder , Bumble and Grinder account for 15% of the top 20 most demanding apps. On average, they allow 11 functions to run in the background and none have a dark mode.

In terms of the amount of memory they require, travel and transportation apps dominated the list. The United Airlines app is the one that consumes the most storage on the phone, as it requires 437.8 MB of space. Lyft follows with 325.1 MB and then Uber , which occupies 299.6 MB.

Among the video conferencing apps, Microsoft Teams is the one that consumes the most memory, occupying 232.2 MB of space. In comparison, Zoom only requires 82.1 MB and Skype 111.2 MB.

The 20 apps that wear out your phone the most

The top 20 of the most demanding applications, based on the functions they execute and all the activity they generate, was as follows:

  1. Fitbit – 92%
  2. Verizon – 92%
  3. Uber – 87%
  4. Skype – 87%
  5. Facebook – 82%
  6. AirB & B – 82%
  7. BIGO LIVE – 82%
  8. Instagram – 79%
  9. Tinder – 77%
  10. Bumble – 77%
  11. Snapchat – 77%
  12. WhatsApp – 77%
  13. Zoom – 77%
  14. YouTube – 77%
  15. Booking – 77%
  16. Amazon – 77%
  17. Telegram – 77%
  18. Grinder – 72%
  19. Likke – 72%
  20. LinkedIn – 72%

Among the 50 applications that kill the battery and memory of the phone are also Twitter (no. 25), Shazam (30), Shein (31), Spotify (32), Pinterest (37), Amazon Prime (38), Netflix (40), TikTok (41), Duolingo (44) and Uber Eats (50).

If you are already considering doing a general cleaning of apps, you can consult the complete list here .

By: Entrepreneur en Español / Entrepreneur Staff

Source: Uber, Facebook, Instagram and other apps that are slowly killing your smartphone

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Our smartphones have become such an integral part of our lives that we can’t imagine life without it. Just like any object, phones are also subjected to wear and tear as well as our mishandling. Here are some things that you should stop if you want to prolong your phone’s life.

Draining your phone’s battery
Most smartphones have lithium-ion batteries with limited life cycles. If you’re constantly draining your phone to 1% before charging, it reduces the battery’s life cycles.

Exposing your phone to drastic temperatures
We understand that your phone can’t be left in your bag or pocket all the time. However, don’t leave it out in temperatures below 0 and above 35 degrees celsius as permanent damages may be done to the handset.

Maxing out your storage
Your phone needs extra storage space in order for the operating system to continue functioning. Maxing out your storage causes your phone to lag or crash. Avoid this by backing up your phone’s content regularly to either your computer or cloud storage.

Leaving your phone in the shower
Doesn’t a nice hot shower feels good at the end of the day? Not so much for your phone. Steam can seep into your phone and condense into water, which may short circuit the hardware.

Constantly dropping your phone
No matter how good the protective casing your phone is in, dropping it constantly will affect its internal hardware. Be thankful if it’s just a cracked screen; more often than not, the damages are more serious than that.

Too many background apps
Is it really necessary to keep Candy Crush, Facebook, Instagram, Calendar and Whatsapp all opened at the same time? This causes your phone to dedicate extra RAM to these apps and drains your battery.

Not turning your phone off
Like humans, your phone also needs a break once in a while. Leaving it on 24/7 can shorten the lifespan of the battery and decrease its performance.

Overnight charging
Most smartphones are clever enough to cut off the power supply to the battery once it’s fully charged. However, lithium-ion batteries don’t fare well against high heats. When you leave your phone plugged in overnight, especially with the casing on, overheating can occur and decrease the battery life.

Relying on cellular data
If you’re only using 3G/4G for internet connectivity, think again. Connecting to Wi-Fi consumes less energy than data network which helps make your battery lasts longer.

Cleaning your phone with household products
There’s a reason why cleaning agents exist specifically for phones. The chemicals in your household bleach or detergent can damage the protective layer often found on your phone’s screen.

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Tiny Graphene Microchips Could Make Your Phones & laptops Thousands of Times Faster, Say Scientists

Graphene strips folded in similar fashion to origami paper could be used to build microchips that are up to 100 times smaller than conventional chips, found physicists – and packing phones and laptops with those tiny chips could significantly boost the performance of our devices.

New research from the University of Sussex in the UK shows that changing the structure of nanomaterials like graphene can unlock electronic properties and effectively enable the material to act like a transistor.  

Innovation

The scientists deliberately created kinks in a layer of graphene and found that the material could, as a result, be made to behave like an electronic component. Graphene, and its nano-scale dimensions, could therefore be leveraged to design the smallest microchips yet, which will be useful to build faster phones and laptops. 

SEE: Hiring Kit: Computer Hardware Engineer (TechRepublic Premium)

Alan Dalton, professor at the school of mathematical and physics sciences at the University of Sussex, said: “We’re mechanically creating kinks in a layer of graphene. It’s a bit like nano-origami.  

“This kind of technology – ‘straintronics’ using nanomaterials as opposed to electronics – allows space for more chips inside any device. Everything we want to do with computers – to speed them up – can be done by crinkling graphene like this.” 

Discovered in 2004, graphene is an atom-thick sheet of carbon atoms, which, due to its nano-sized width, is effectively a 2D material. Graphene is best known for its exceptional strength, but also for the material’s conductivity properties, which has already generated much interest in the electronics industry including from Samsung Electronics. 

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The field of straintronics has already shown that deforming the structure of 2D nanomaterials like graphene, but also molybdenum disulfide, can unlock key electronic properties, but the exact impact of different “folds” remains poorly understood, argued the researchers.  

Yet the behavior of those materials offers huge potential for high-performance devices: for example, changing the structure of a strip of 2D material can change its doping properties, which correspond to electron density, and effectively convert the material into a superconductor.  

The researchers carried an in-depth study of the impact of structural changes on properties, such as doping in strips of graphene and of molybdenum disulfide. From kinks and wrinkles to pit-holes, they observed how the materials could be twisted and turned to eventually be used to design smaller electronic components.  

Manoj Tripathi, research fellow in nano-structured materials at the University of Sussex, who led the research, said: “We’ve shown we can create structures from graphene and other 2D materials simply by adding deliberate kinks into the structure. By making this sort of corrugation we can create a smart electronic component, like a transistor, or a logic gate.” 

SEE: Microsoft’s quantum cloud computing plans take another big step forward

The findings are likely to resonate in an industry pressed to conform to Moore’s law, which holds that the number of transistors on a microchip doubles every two years, in response for growing demand for faster computing services. The problem is, engineers are struggling to find ways to fit much more processing power into tiny chips, creating a big problem for the traditional semiconducting industry. 

A tiny graphene-based transistor could significantly help overcome these hurdles. “Using these nanomaterials will make our computer chips smaller and faster. It is absolutely critical that this happens as computer manufacturers are now at the limit of what they can do with traditional semiconducting technology. Ultimately, this will make our computers and phones thousands of times faster in the future,” said Dalton. 

Since it was discovered over 15 years ago, graphene has struggled to find as many applications as was initially hoped for, and the material has often been presented as a victim of its own hype. But then, it took over a century for the first silicon chip to be created after the material was discovered in 1824. Dalton and Tripathi’s research, in that light, seems to be another step towards finding a potentially game-changing use for graphene.

Daphne Leprince-Ringuet

By: Daphne Leprince-Ringuet

Subject Zero Science

Graphene Processors and Quantum Gates Since the 1960s, Moore’s law has accurately predicted the evolution trend of processors as to the amount of transistor doubling every 2 years. But lately we’ve seen something odd happening, processor clocks aren’t getting any faster. This has to do with another law called Dennard Scaling and it seems that the good old days with silicon chips are over. Hello everyone, subject zero here! Thankfully the solution might have been available for quite some time now and Graphene offers something quite unique to this problem, not only for your everyday processor types, but also Quantum computing. In 2009 it was speculated that by now we would have the famous 400GHz processors, but this technology has proven itself to be a bit more complicated than previously thought however most scientists including me, believe that in the next 5 years we will see the first Graphene commercial hardware come to reality. References https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum…https://www.nature.com/articles/s4153…https://www.hpcwire.com/2019/05/08/gr…https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graphen…https://www.computerhope.com/history/…http://www.tfcbooks.com/teslafaq/q&a_…https://www.rambus.com/blogs/understa…https://www.technologyreview.com/s/51…https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/13…https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases…https://www.nature.com/articles/srep2…http://infowebbie.com/scienceupdate/s…https://graphene-flagship.eu/field-ef…https://github.com/karlrupp/microproc…https://aip.scitation.org/doi/full/10…https://www.theglobeandmail.com/repor…

Chinese Scientists Claim Breakthrough in Quantum Computing Race

Chinese scientists claim to have built a quantum computer that is able to perform certain computations nearly 100 trillion times faster than the world’s most advanced supercomputer, representing the first milestone in the country’s efforts to develop the technology.

The researchers have built a quantum computer prototype that is able to detect up to 76 photons through Gaussian boson sampling, a standard simulation algorithm, the state-run Xinhua news agency said, citing research published in Science magazine. That’s exponentially faster than existing supercomputers.

The breakthrough represents a quantum computational advantage, also known as quantum supremacy, in which no traditional computer can perform the same task in a reasonable amount of time and is unlikely to be overturned by algorithmic or hardware improvements, according to the research.

While still in its infancy, quantum computing is seen as the key to radically improving the processing speed and power of computers, enabling them to simulate large systems and drive advances in physics, chemistry and other fields. Chinese researchers are competing against major U.S. corporations from Alphabet Inc.’s Google to Amazon.com Inc. and Microsoft Corp. for a lead in the technology, which has become yet another front in the U.S.-China tech race.

Read more: Why Quantum Computers Will Be Super Awesome, Someday: QuickTake

Google said last year it has built a computer that could perform a computation in 200 seconds that would take the fastest supercomputers about 10,000 years, reaching quantum supremacy. The Chinese researchers claim their new prototype is able to process 10 billion times faster than Google’s prototype, according to the Xinhua report.

Xi Jinping’s government is building a $10 billion National Laboratory for Quantum Information Sciences as part of a big push in the field. In the U.S., the Trump administration provided $1 billion in funding to research into artificial intelligence and quantum information earlier this year and has sought to take credit for Google’s 2019 breakthrough.

By Shiyin Chen

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Global Tech News

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DW News

Chinese scientists have announced their development of the most powerful quantum computer in the world. It works 100 trillion times faster than the fastest supercomputers out there and comes little more than a year after Google unveiled Sycamore, their own quantum computer. Chinese scientists have announced their development of the most President Xi Jinping has said research and development in quantum science is an urgent matter of national concern. And the country has invested heavily in this technology, spending billions in recent years. It has become a world leader in the field. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ►Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dwnews Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts…#QuantumComputer#Cybersecurity#China

How the Pandemic Finally Ushered in the Golden Age of the QR Code

Last month, Denso Wave Inc., an obscure Japanese conglomerate that sounds vaguely made up, received a prestigious award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the largest association of technical professionals in the world. 

Ordinarily, this would be one of those tossed-off bits of corporate news that appears in press releases before sinking to the bottom of the internet archives like a high school lacrosse score. But the timing was noteworthy. After all, Denso Wave, the venerable honoree, was being celebrated in 2020 for something its workers had invented all the way back in 1994: the QR Code. 

Given the rapid adoption and even more rapid obsolescence of technology, having a 25-year-old invention showered with laurels seems weird — like if the Recording Academy decided to award the Smashing Pumpkins a Grammy for Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness next January. But that’s 2020 for you. Fanny packs and wide-leg jeans are back, Russia is a menace again, Boomers run the show, and everyone is kinda pissed off at Smash Mouth. It’s like the 1990s all over again.


And despite all our rage, the QR code is suddenly very relevant again. After many polarizing years — in which Quick Response codes became a cultural punchline, started to appear on tattoos and gravestones, earned the scorn of Tumblrs and were declared dead — the pandemic has put two-dimensional black-and-white pixel patterns back in our life again, perhaps permanently.

Recently, the payment platform Venmo introduced its very first credit card, which features a huge QR code right on the front. “When you’re out for dinner and everyone throws their card into the folio, the waiter has to split the check between four or five cards,” explained Venmo Senior Vice President Darrell Esch. “Whereas here, I can throw my card into the center, and everybody else can quickly scan my code, link to my Venmo and push the funds to settle.”

The irritating specter of split-check dinners may seem quaint in the era of social distancing, but what the QR code also offers for this surreal time is a way to limit the amount of physical touching strangers and consumers have to do, which is a huge reason why we’re hearing so much about QR codes again. They’re easy enough to use and they help us keep space. Over the summer, the British government released a contact-tracing app using the technology to keep track of attendees at potential super-spreader events, and later this year, CVS will roll out touchless payment using QR codes at 8,000 of its stores. (God willing, the foot-long receipts will remain.) 

Another feature of the QR renaissance revolves around the reality that, in spite of American and European dismissals, QR codes have been insanely popular across much of Asia this whole time. In China, consumers buy everything, from street-cart jianbing to Swarovski crystals, using quick response-enabled payments. In recent years, QR codes have accounted for a full third of mobile transactions there to the tune of a trillion dollars in overall sales.

It’s wild to think that after many clumsy debuts (especially in guerilla marketing campaigns), QR codes are finally having their moment — in fancy restaurants, in social justice protests, in doctors’ offices — but the truth is that we had to grow into our QR codes on this side of the world. And sometimes, that takes many years to do. 

When Americans first started seeing square-patterned panels, we weren’t initially well-equipped to deal with them. The weak cellular data of the “Can you hear me now?” era often made processing a QR code an infuriating experience that belied the whole point of the technology. And then, of course, there were Apple-induced inefficiencies at the head of the trend. “If you wanted to actually scan one of these things, you [needed] to download a separate bespoke app to be able to do it,” Nicolás Rivero recently vented about the early days of consumer QR codes. 

Despite being technologically more prepared, we still have a ways to go before the QR wave means we’ll all be buying street meat or tipping buskers with the whip of a phone. After all, tens of millions of Americans still don’t carry smartphones and tens of millions more are cranky about their tech. And so, like cash, vinyl, or paper books, the old analog ways have a funny tendency to stick around. 

By Adam Chandler @AllMyChandler

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The coronavirus pandemic has opened up a new frontier for collecting your personal details. Across much of the country customers are having to use their mobile phones to register before they can sit down in a café or restaurant. Some of these online check-ins are run by marketing companies and there are concerns the information could be snatched up by data merchants. Subscribe: http://ab.co/1svxLVE

Read more here: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-3…#QRCodes#QRCodeCovidCheckIns ABC News provides around the clock coverage of news events as they break in Australia and abroad, including the latest coronavirus pandemic updates. It’s news when you want it, from Australia’s most trusted news organisation. For more from ABC News, click here: https://ab.co/2kxYCZY Watch more ABC News content ad-free on iview: https://ab.co/2OB7Mk1 Go deeper on our ABC News In-depth channel: https://ab.co/2lNeBn2 Like ABC News on Facebook: http://facebook.com/abcnews.au Follow ABC News on Instagram: http://instagram.com/abcnews_au Follow ABC News on Twitter: http://twitter.com/abcnews#ABCNews#ABCNewsAustralia#breakingnews

This Japan Startup Is Using Deep Learning To Detect Early-Stage Cancer In Blood Samples

Imagine going for a routine blood test during an annual health checkup and being able to select a screening option that could tell you whether you have early-stage cancer. A Japanese startup is using deep learning technology to realize this dramatic advance in the fight against cancer, one of the top causes of death around the world.

A technician prepares samples at PFDeNA’s lab in Tokyo
A technician prepares samples at PFDeNA’s lab in Tokyo, where researchers are developing a screening system for early detection of cancer from blood samples. Japan BrandVoice

Unique skillsets

PFDeNA Inc. was established in 2016 as a joint venture between DeNA, a Japanese internet giant, and Preferred Networks, Japan’s leading artificial intelligence startup, to solve complex problems. One such problem is cancer detection.

PFDeNA’s cancer research can be traced back to the vision of one of Japan’s pioneering entrepreneurs. In 1999, Namba Tomoko founded DeNA, a mobile and online services company that had extraordinary success in e-commerce and gaming. Namba stepped down from her role as CEO in 2011 to care for her cancer-stricken husband, but her commitment to fighting the disease inspired DeNA to launch a healthcare business with its own bioscience lab in 2014. Meanwhile, Preferred Networks had been conducting research on cancer screening with National Cancer Center Japan since 2015, but needed a partner with expertise in lab operations and business. The two companies decided to use PFDeNA as a platform for collaboration, which began in 2018.

DeNA founder Namba Tomoko
DeNA founder Namba Tomoko’s commitment to fighting cancer inspired DeNA’s healthcare business. Japan BrandVoice

Led by board members including DeNA President and CEO Moriyasu Isao and Preferred Networks CEO Nishikawa Toru, PFDeNA is harnessing the power of deep learning, an artificial intelligence technique modeled on the brain, as a way to detect cancer as early as possible. To do that, the venture is building computer tools as well as a state-of-the art lab that will be able to find almost undetectable signs of cancer in routine blood samples. This “liquid biopsy” approach contrasts greatly with current methods such as radiographic imagining and tissue biopsies.

“We want to transform healthcare from a sick-care model, in which patients are cared for when they become ill, to one based on preventive medicine,” says Yoneyama Hiroshi, executive officer at DeNA and vice president of PFDeNA. With a background in business development and healthcare, Yoneyama is keenly aware of the challenges faced by the medical care system in Japan.

“There’s a dire need for early-cancer detection, not only in Japan but overseas as well,” Yoneyama says. “There are hurdles in the liquid biopsy field but we believe we can overcome them based on the strengths of our two founding companies.”

Each partner brings a unique skillset to the challenge. Preferred Networks’ specialty is developing cutting-edge AI solutions. DeNA is able to quickly make decisions on large-scale investments based on its long experience in mobile services. It’s also a player in the healthcare business, and has accumulated significant experience in negotiating with medical centers as well as lab operations. In 2014, DeNA began a direct-to-consumer genetic testing service called MYCODE, which can detect predisposition to a variety of illnesses. About 90% of MYCODE users have made lifestyle modifications to protect their health.   

Looking for molecular changes

PFDeNA aims to screen for 14 types of cancer, including lung and pancreatic cancer, and estimates the domestic market for such services could be worth about 400 billion yen ($3.8 billion). The startup is working to develop a system that can rapidly detect telltale signs of the 14 cancers with just one blood test. These can include changes in the number of molecules that can indicate the likelihood or presence of cancer.

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), for instance, is a protein produced by the prostate gland that is used to screen for prostate cancer. Genetic mutations can also suggest whether a patient may be more likely to develop certain kinds of cancer. PFDeNA is examining the expression patterns of extracellular ribonucleic acid (exRNA) including microRNA (miRNA) as a potential screening tool for multiple types of cancer. Many cancer researchers expect that certain changes in these miRNA biomarkers can indicate the presence of cancer in various organs.

PFDeNA Vice President Yoneyama Hiroshi
Healthcare must be transformed from a sick-care model to one based on preventive medicine, says PFDeNA Vice President Yoneyama Hiroshi. Japan BrandVoice

“In addition to massive computational resources, high-quality data is indispensable for the high-precision deep learning computations needed to create an accurate screening system,” says Abe Motoki, a bioinformatics engineer at Preferred Networks. Abe is in charge of developing a predictive model using deep learning. He also has access to Preferred Networks’ computational resources including the MN-3 supercomputer, recently ranked as the world’s most energy efficient on the Green500 list.

“With a disease like prostate cancer, we only need to look at the levels of just one biomarker, PSA,” Abe says. “But with we are trying to detect multiple types of cancer by analyzing over a thousand exRNA expression levels, which is way more than humans can possibly handle. That’s why we need technology like deep learning.”

A powerful collaboration

Japan provides an ideal location for medical startups such as PFDeNA, in part because of readily available medical checkups covered by employers and municipalities, as well as a wealth of high-quality medical data. At its lab in Tokyo, PFDeNA is analyzing thousands of blood samples provided, with patient consent, by medical institutions such as National Cancer Center Japan. The company is working with more than 10 medical centers as it works toward its goal of building a rapid-screening system that could be part of annual medical checkups in the future. These partnerships, along with collaborations with industry and academia, form a solid foundation that’s giving PFDeNA the best chance of succeeding in its quest.

Abe Motoki, a bioinformatics engineer at Preferred Networks
An accurate cancer-screening system requires high-quality data, says Abe Motoki, a bioinformatics engineer at Preferred Networks. Japan BrandVoice

The Japanese government has also pivoted to support such efforts. With their universal healthcare system, Japanese tend to focus on treating problems, paying less attention to prevention. This tendency, along with the aging population, has increased demand for medical care. While grappling with these issues, the Japanese government is trying to transform the national healthcare system into one that focuses more on prevention. The state is also backing R&D projects in the field of early disease prediction and intervention through programs such as the Cabinet Office’s Moonshot R&D program.

“The Japanese government is very keen to come up with measures for cancer detection and prevention, so we fit into the context of what it’s doing,” says Yoneyama. “We were able to receive cooperation from more than 10 medical institutions because they’re working on this issue, and it’s now a trend. So Japan, as a government and as a whole, is very much backing this movement and taking leadership in this area.”

While PFDeNA works toward publishing the results of its research in academic journals, it’s consulting with the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, the authority responsible for certifying drugs and medical devices in Japan, in order to streamline approval of its services when they’re ready for the market. 

PFDeNA’s lab
PFDeNA’s lab has already processed thousands of samples in its quest to build an early cancer detection service. Japan BrandVoice

“Japan is an aging society, and early cancer detection is one way in which the burden of healthcare costs can be reduced,” says Ishikura Kiyo, associate director of PFDeNA’s healthcare business. “Liquid biopsies are a hot international topic right now. This service would be the first of its kind in the world and it’s a complex challenge to overcome. It’s a long-term journey but we have already begun.”

Note: All Japanese names in this article are given in the traditional Japanese order, with surname first.

To learn more about PFDeNA, click here (Japanese).  

To learn more about DeNA, click here.

To learn more about Preferred Networks, click here.

Japan

Japan

Japan is changing. The country is at the forefront of demographic change that is expected to affect countries around the world. Japan regards this not as an onus but as a bonus for growth. To overcome this challenge, industry, academia and government have been moving forward to produce powerful and innovative solutions. The ongoing economic policy program known as Abenomics is helping give rise to new ecosystems for startups, in addition to open innovation and business partnerships. The Japan Voice series explores this new landscape of challenge and opportunity through interviews with Japanese and expatriate innovators who are powering a revitalized economy. For more information on the Japanese Government innovations and technologies, please visit https://www.japan.go.jp/technology/.

Why 5G Technology Will Lead to a Better Quality of Life

It’s easy to forget what communications life was like before 4G. Since its introduction around 2010, mobile subscribers using 4G have enjoyed excellent connectivity. They can stream music, videos and movies, even while conducting video chats.

But over the next few years, the rollout of 5G networks around the world will usher in exciting capabilities that are much more advanced and promise to boost commerce. In its report entitled “Study on Socio-Economic Benefits of 5G Services Provided in mmWave Bands,” the GSMA, which represents the interests of mobile operators worldwide, predicts that “by 2034, 5G can be expected to generate US$2 trillion in GDP globally and US$588 billion in tax revenue.” All industries—agriculture, mining, financial services, public services, manufacturing and more—are expected to benefit.

Advanced capabilities

Due to 5G’s higher connection speeds, mobility and capacity, as well as its lower latency, this next-generation network is expected to enable innovative software for a range of advanced applications. The GSMA identifies several key use cases, including: 

  • Remote object manipulation, which lets surgeons perform microscopic surgery from remote locations
  • Industrial automation, which allows artificial intelligence (AI)- and machine learning (ML)-enabled robots to collaborate to improve production line efficiency using data analytics
  • Virtual and augmented reality, which enables workers to learn how to operate new equipment using holograms rather than physical equipment
  • Next-generation transport connectivity, which can lead to improved commute times and reduced pollution through use of streaming and real-time data to optimize travel routes

Software-defined infrastructure drives 5G

These services won’t appear overnight. Communications service providers (CSPs) will continue to support existing networks while they invest in new infrastructure to support 5G.

In a recent blog, Jean-Pierre Brulard, VMware senior vice president and general manager, Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA), writes: “For CSPs, it is a major undertaking, which is why it is likely that rather than a pure 5G network, the majority of people will see a blended approach, where 4G is available to deliver basic services, and 5G introduced for specific tasks. It is therefore critical [for CSPs] to have what’s known as the telco cloud. This is software-defined technology that supports both current 4G and lays the groundwork for 5G.”

The telco cloud uses a common architecture that simplifies a CSP’s infrastructure so it can be a foundation for deploying new services. CSPs use the telco cloud to connect their existing environments with private, edge and public networks.

The telco cloud is based on Network Functions Virtualization (NFV), which streamlines the design and deployment of networking services and automates their operation. VMware helps CSPs like Vodafone create new revenue streams, open new industry opportunities, drive down costs and improve overall customer satisfaction by enabling them to become nimbler and more responsive.

VMware provides an optimal infrastructure for all telco applications and services: custom built, packaged, virtualized, cloud native and software as a service (SaaS). With this infrastructure, CSPs can deliver those applications securely to any endpoint across a telco-distributed cloud, including private and public cloud, branch/edge, micro data center, gateway or end user.

5G creates new possibilities for enterprises

Becoming 5G-ready isn’t an opportunity only for CSPs. 5G provides huge possibilities for businesses to deliver new services and applications, allowing them to reimagine how they engage with customers. Imagine restaurants delivering freshly prepared food via drones, for example.

According to Brulard: “With 5G, enterprises can access the levels and speeds of connectivity they need to take advantage of the game-changing technologies—such as Internet of Things (IoT), edge computing and AI—that are going to shape the next stage of the digital revolution.”

Processing IoT and AI in an accelerated 5G world means computing, storage and networking need to be done closer to the end user, an approach that is poles apart from the traditional data center method of data processing. The voluminous amount of real-time data generated by the IoT and AI makes it inefficient to stream to a cloud or data center for processing. A more efficient solution is to implement edge computing, which processes data closer to where it is generated.

VMware EdgeTM, for example, is a software-defined edge platform that enables providers and IT teams to run applications and analytics anywhere, with consistent infrastructure and operations from edge to cloud. Organizations can remotely manage, monitor and secure thousands of locations and millions of diverse devices. This helps to ensure the rapid delivery of the latest apps, containers and infrastructure updates via granular over-the-air lifecycle management.

Such a robust infrastructure will help CSPs and businesses fulfill 5G’s potential to significantly enhance quality of life. 5G can lead to better, accelerated access to healthcare and education, and people can enjoy safer driving conditions and reduced pollution, among other digitally fueled benefits.

By VMware

About a year ago, the talk of 5G kind of made me yawn. Nobody could really explain to me why I should care, or what difference it would really make. But now, as we start into 2020 and I’ve learned a little more about not just what 5G is but how much it has the potential to change … everything, I’m finally starting to freak out just a little bit about 5G. And my goal today is to help you start to freak out. In a good way! ———- Get the full low-down on 5G here: What is 5G?: https://www.reviews.org/mobile/what-i… Explaining Mbps: https://www.reviews.org/internet-serv… ———- We are on the cusp of another technological leap like we haven’t seen in over a decade. Are you ready for it? Hit the comments and let me know what you most want from 5G, or whether you think about it at all. And if you don’t care right now, I promise, you will soon.

Apple Will Allow Game Streaming Services, But Its Rules Are Still Restrictive

Apple overhauled its App Store guidelines on Friday to allow for game streaming services that had previously been denied—but the rules are still restrictive and it’s unclear if major players, such as Microsoft and Google, will be keen to follow them.

Game streaming services Google Stadia, Facebook Gaming, Nvidia’s GeForce Now and Microsoft’s xCloud don’t offer gameplay on iOS because of Apple’s policies limiting cloud streaming and third-party titles. 

On Friday, Apple adjusted its rules to allow for these services to operate on iOS, but each game needs to be a separate app available on the App Store subject to Apple’s review process.

Under the rules, game streaming services are allowed to have a main “catalogue app” that links out to individual games and allows users to sign up for the service, but games can’t be played directly inside the app like Android allows.

Apple did not change its policies about App Store fees, meaning that Apple will still take its usual cut of any subscription sign ups, game downloads or in-app purchases, which remains a major sticking point for the games industry.

It’s unclear if gaming services launch on Apple devices, or if they will continue to skip out on iOS altogether. Both Google and Nvidia declined to comment about their plans for iOS. Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Forbes.

Chief Critic

A Microsoft spokesperson told CNBC the changes are “a bad experience for customers.” 

“Gamers want to jump directly into a game from their curated catalog within one app just like they do with movies or songs, and not be forced to download over 100 apps to play individual games from the cloud,” the spokesperson said.

Key Background

Apple’s conflict with the gaming industry extends beyond streaming. Fortnite maker Epic Games is embroiled in a tense legal battle with the tech giant over its App Store fees. Epic argues that Apple’s 30% commission from in-app purchases is anti-competitive and forces companies to increase prices to cover the cost of the so-called “Apple Tax.” Apple, meanwhile, countersued Epic this week and said the company “simply wants to pay nothing for the tremendous value it derives from the App Store.”

Tangent

In Friday’s update, Apple also slightly loosened some rules for in-app purchases outside of gaming. One-on-one digital classes, like tutors or fitness classes, won’t be subject to the 30% fee. Follow me on Twitter. Send me a secure tip.

Rachel Sandler

 Rachel Sandler

I’m a San Francisco-based reporter covering breaking news at Forbes. I’ve previously reported for USA Today, Business Insider, The San Francisco Business Times and San Jose Inside. I studied journalism at Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and was an editor at The Daily Orange, the university’s independent student newspaper. Follow me on Twitter @rachsandl or shoot me an email rsandler@forbes.com

Source: Forbes

Lenovo Laptops Hit By Serious Windows 10 Update Bugs

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Lenovo has issued a warning that several models of its laptops have been plagued with problems when upgrading to the latest version of Windows 10. The Windows 10 May 2020 update (version 2004) has been out for almost a fortnight now, in which time Lenovo has discovered numerous issues with various models of its laptops, ranging from minor flaws to showstopping bugs.

ThinkPad P70 Blue Screen of Death

The most serious problem afflicts the ThinkPad P70 laptop. Lenovo warns that after the upgrade, customers may experience the dreaded Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) intermittently, after the system is resumed from sleep or hibernate modes. Lenovo says it suspects the problem is connected with the BIOS and is being investigated, but recommends customers roll back to the previous version of Windows (1909) until a fix can be found.

Elsewhere, owners of several models of ThinkPad laptops are warned that they may see a yellow warning mark against their disk drives in Windows 10. This appears to be a bug with the BitLocker encryption system, with Lenovo curiously describing it as “a limitation of the operating system”.

Fortunately, this problem is easily resolved by turning BitLocker on and off on the selected drives, although it’s not clear whether you’ll have to wait for the entire disk to be encrypted first, which is a process that could take many hours.

The full list of affected ThinkPad laptops can be found on Lenovo’s support page.

ThinkPad touchpad errors

Alas, the list of potential pitfalls doesn’t end there. Owners of the ThinkPad E570p and L570 are warned that they may see error messages relating to the Alps Pointing device application when they upgrade their machines. This concerns a problem with the touchpad’s software driver, which can be fixed by upgrading to the latest version of the drivers.

ThinkPad X395 owners who see a green border around the Movies & TV software on their PC when resizing the windows are told this is a problem with another driver, this time AMD’s. Lenovo says a fix is due by the middle of this month.

Finally, ThinkPad X1 Tablet Gen3 users are warned of a problem with the F11 shortcut key failing after the upgrade. Owners can either use the Lenovo Keyboard Manager utility to fix the problem or wait for a fix to be released at the end of this month.

Windows Update woes

All told, it’s been a problematic round of Windows updates for Microsoft. The company has listed nine major issues that are preventing millions of customers from even being offered the Windows 10 May 2020 update at this point, through fear that installation may cause a serious problem with their PC.

That list of bugs was last updated on May 27, and given that Microsoft will likely need to test fixes for such serious issues with Windows Insiders, it could still be weeks before many customers are even offered the chance to download and install the latest update.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I have been a technology writer and editor for more than 20 years. I was assistant editor of The Sunday Times’ technology section, editor of PC Pro magazine and have written for more than a dozen different publications and websites over the years. I’ve also appeared as a tech pundit on television and radio, including BBC Newsnight, the Chris Evans Show and ITN News at Ten. Hit me up if you’ve got a tech story that needs breaking at barry@mediabc.co.uk.

Source: https://www.forbes.com

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Igniting Passion And Diversity In STEM

It wasn’t until my first job out of college—one in the wireless business—that I developed a passion for technology and saw how STEM impacts everything we do. This was the spark that led me to fall in love with the network engineering elements of wireless, and the more immersed I got in the industry, the more exposed and interested I was in other components of technology.

Now, as the father of a teenage daughter who’s interested in STEM subjects and potentially even computer science, I want her to find her own opportunities, discover where her passions lie, and to ensure she has the resources and encouragement to pursue them.

In the U.S., there simply aren’t enough people pursuing STEM to meet growing technology demands. According to the Smithsonian Science Education Center, “78 percent of high school graduates don’t meet benchmark readiness for one or more college courses in mathematics, science or English.” And then there are barriers to STEM advancement like four or six-year degree requirements for many jobs—which are remarkably difficult for most people to afford. So it’s not that surprising when people like Nasdaq vice chairman Bruce Aust say, “By 2020, there will be one million more computing jobs than there will be graduates to fill them, resulting in a $500 billion opportunity gap.”

What’s clear is we need to make it easier for people to experiment with STEM early in life, then create accessible and alternative opportunities to pursue their dreams. Equally important, we need to find ways to dramatically advance gender diversity in STEM fields to accelerate innovation around the world.

Fostering Excitement Around STEM Takes a Village

Organizations like the Washington Alliance for Better Schools (WABS)—which I’m on the board of—partners with school districts around Western Washington State, and is an example of families, teachers, schools, and public and private sector businesses uniting to develop meaningful STEM education and advancement opportunities, because everyone involved can benefit. Hands-on learning and vocational programs like their After School STEM Academy is a great way to help students connect the dots of scientific principles in a fun way. And WABS’ 21st Century Community Learning Centers leverage Title IV funds to help students meet state and local academic standards—from homework tutoring to leadership opportunities that can turn into summer internships or jobs.

As students’ interests in STEM grow, it creates a fantastic opportunity for businesses to see passions play out through hackathons, group ideation, and other challenges. Recently, for the second consecutive year, T-Mobile’s Changemaker Challenge initiative—in partnership with Ashoka—called on youth aged 13 to 23 from the U.S. and Puerto Rico to submit big ideas for how they would drive change in their communities. T-Mobile received 428 entries—a 28% increase over last year—133 in the ‘Tech for Good’ category. Interestingly, one quarter of all the tech entries were focused on STEM projects and even more interestingly, 63% of all technology category applications were from young women. We saw submissions from apps to robots to video games—all with the goal of changing the world for good. Next up, we’ll announce the Top 30 teams and each of them will receive a trip to T-Mobile’s HQ for the three-day Changemaker Challenge Lab to supercharge their projects along with some seed funding. Three category winners will pitch their ideas to T-Mobile leadership for a chance to win the $10,000 grand prize. To say that these young people’s ideas are inspiring is an understatement!

Accelerating Innovation Through Gender Diversity and Inner-Sourcing

Women aren’t typically well represented in many STEM-focused industries. Gender diversity is crucial to designing and building innovative solutions around the world, including T-Mobile’s products and services. At least half of our customers are female, and of the more than 50,000 employees who make up T-Mobile, 42% identify as female. If our product and technology employees don’t represent the diversity in our community, we stand to lose relevance in the market. By making diversity and inclusion a thoughtful, premeditated, sustained, and structural part of our recruitment and retainment of employees—including network engineers, software developers, data scientists, and other STEM professions—we’re able to foster a stronger company culture and build more innovative, customer experience obsessed products and services.

Let’s not forget that plenty of STEM-related jobs don’t include “engineer”, “developer”, or “scientist” in the job title across fields that intersect technology and digital customer experiences. One way we’ve cultivated the right talent at T-Mobile is “inner-sourcing” existing employees. For instance, through our Team of Pros program (TOPs), we provide opportunities for our frontline retail and customer care employees to apply for a 6 to 9-month program in a product management capacity to learn and work directly with engineering teams to ensure a tight coupling between what customers really want and the products, apps, training, and troubleshooting resources we design and develop. This is a great opportunity for our frontline employees to pivot into full-time STEM-related roles within T-Mobile corporate, without the need to pursue a formal technology-oriented education.

Championing STEM to Create a Better World

We live in a world where technology is omnipresent however connected, collaborative, and continuous STEM education isn’t equally accessible, and gender diversity is not well represented. To address pervasive global issues like climate change, resource inequality, economic stagnation, disease prevention, and others, we need diverse people who understand technical processes and technologies to work together to develop effective solutions. For those of us fortunate enough to reach a level of financial stability in STEM fields, we owe it to the future of our world to give back by leading and inspiring today’s and the next generation of technology leaders.

Cody Sanford is T-Mobile’s Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer, leading the company’s digital transformation strategy fueling the Un-carrier revolution. He is responsible for spearheading the development of a product-centric technology organization that leverages the power of people, process and technology to bring to life T-Mobile’s innovative experiences for customers and frontline employees. Under Cody’s leadership, the Product & Technology organization is driving T-Mobile’s digital transformation, with an industry-leading software dev shop, expansion into adjacent products and services categories, and a leadership role in delivering open source innovations that solve large customer pain points.

Source: Igniting Passion And Diversity In STEM

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Many people in the world of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) have begun to question why the STEM workforce doesn’t reflect the diversity of society at large. In this talk, Jess Vovers tackles some key questions: What is diversity? Why does it matter? Why does STEM lack diversity? And what can we do about it? Jessica Vovers is a PhD candidate in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Melbourne, with a focus on sustainable solvents. When she’s not painting herself blue, she’s usually playing video games or riding her bike. Jess advocates for diversity in STEM through her work with Science Gallery Melbourne and mentoring with Curious Minds. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

 

Regulation & Reimbursement Strategies Should Not Get In the Way of ‘Smart’ Electronic Skin Patches

Recent IDTechEx research in their report: Electronic Skin Patches 2019-2029, has revealed significant opportunities in the development and use of electronic skin patches, with over $7.5bn in revenue made from the technology in 2018 and a growth forecast of over $20bn per year over the next decade.

However, it also shows that reimbursement and regulatory consideration aren’t necessarily keeping pace. James Hayward, Principal Analyst at IDTechEx, highlights the dangers of a closed market driven by regulation and reimbursement strategies which favour devices for simplicity and cost rather than effectiveness; deterring new entrants.

Electronic skin patches are wearable products attached to the skin of a user incorporating sensors, actuators, processors and communication technology, allowing the device to connect to the internet to become ‘smart’. Skin patches are one of the latest waves in health monitoring; their non-intrusive design meaning they are comfortable and discrete. Unsurprisingly, interest in electronic skin patches has soared, driven by significant hype and market growth around wearable devices starting in 2014.

A number of significant applications of electronic skin patches are now having a profound impact on health and quality of life. Some of the foremost use cases center around healthcare and medical applications, while the consumer health market is another early adopter. As such, several product areas, particularly in diabetes management and cardiovascular monitoring, have grown exponentially to create billions of dollars of new revenue each year for the companies at the forefront of this wave.

Cardiovascular monitoring faces reimbursement and competitive roadblocks

Alongside this growth has come the need for forward-thinking regulation and reimbursement, especially given the life-changing medical context of their applications. Following regulatory approval, the funding of medical devices can come from different sources, including government-led reimbursement schemes. These provide funding for medical devices defined within certain categories according to central definitions and understandings of the performance and cost of the device. While systems do vary by country, it is typical for central procedural terminology to be linked to reimbursement amounts for each device.

Take cardiovascular skin patches for example, which exist in a highly competitive landscape alongside consumer wearables such as watches and chest straps (which provide cardiac data but with limited medical usefulness due to a lack of medical approval) as well as cardiac implants which offer a more accurate but less safe approach.

Effectiveness must have a role to play in future developments 

Electronic skin patches for cardiovascular monitoring must strike a compromise between data quality and patient comfort. A patient can remain active while wearing the device, minimizing additional issues caused by remaining in a hospital bed for too long. However, they also typically produce simpler data sets than the full 12-lead standard monitor and offer less control over the quality of the data produced. These competitive landscapes drive positive product development but it is often the central regulatory and funding bodies that have the power to drive change.

Previously, these mobile cardiac telemetry products have benefited from a favorable reimbursement scenario in the US, defined under a Category 3 CPT code for “extended Holter monitoring”. This code entitles them to twice the amount of reimbursement as “event monitoring” and more than eight times the amount afforded to generic “Holter monitoring” (both Category 1 CPT codes). If the reimbursement situation were to change, the entire revenue structure for these devices will change with it. Should reimbursement strategies be allowed to shape developments rather than consumers and effectiveness?

Diabetes management reveals a confusing system

One of the biggest revenue generators in the electronic skin patches market has been continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) for diabetes management, which posted annual revenues of over $2.5bn in 2018. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given four companies approval to sell CGM products, three of the four companies offer a skin patch with a small needle to test glucose levels in interstitial fluid. Only one organisation offers a subcutaneous implant which is then read using a skin patch as a communication hub. In such a closed market, regulations and reimbursements are shaping its course.

The three large players offering a needle-based skin patch have benefited from multiple geographies now offering partial or full reimbursement for CGM products under national healthcare schemes. Yet each of the three products is treated under a single regulatory category and receive the same reimbursement per device, regardless of performance, longevity or functionality. This opens up the potential for a closed market which favours devices because of simplicity and cost rather than effectiveness.

The fourth player is a new market entrant with lower revenue but offers a much longer-lasting CGM solution with significant differentiation from its rivals, but because of limited regulation and reimbursement, however, it may struggle to break the market stranglehold from larger players with cheaper solutions.

New entrants need to be encouraged

This reimbursement and regulatory environment provide an even bigger barrier to entry for new and innovative electronic skin patches. If the product is to be offered as a medical device, it must go through regulatory approval processes, either showing equal performance to existing equivalents or going through a de novo process to prove its efficacy and safety.

These hurdles often result in new electronic skin patch devices being pushed towards the consumer health market, where regulatory roadblocks aren’t as stringent but offer less long-term returns than in direct healthcare. This is already proving to be the case with the promising area of temperature sensing for fever and fertility monitoring, as well as other patient monitoring devices.

Healthcare Sensors Cambridge Event

This is exactly why IDTechEx has been tracking the emergence of electronic skin patches and the reimbursement and regulatory landscape back to 2010, across 26 application areas and over 100 market players, in its report Electronic Skin Patches 2019-2029. The report forecasts the market through 2019-2029 and aims to help innovative healthcare organisations make more informed business decisions before deciding how to roll-out one of the hottest technologies in patient monitoring.

In addition to detailed reports on this topic, IDTechEx are hosting an event: Healthcare Sensor Innovations 2019, in Cambridge, UK which is a conference and table-top exhibition focusing on the latest developments in the use of wearables and sensors in continuous monitoring of individuals and point-of-care diagnostics.

Register here: www.IDTechEx.com/Cambridge


About the Author

James Hayward, Principal Analyst at IDTechEx. James is a Principal Analyst at IDTechEx. Joining in 2014, he initially developed IDTechEx’s wearable technology platform. He now oversees a team of analysts across varied topic areas, as well as oversight over the wearable technology research efforts.

Featured Image: Peshkova

Source: Regulation and reimbursement strategies should not get in the way of ‘smart’ electronic skin patches – TechNative

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Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person’s blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content. The device consists of a temporary tattoo—which sticks to the skin, induces sweat and electrochemically detects the alcohol level—and a portable flexible electronic circuit board, which is connected to the tattoo by a magnet and can communicate the information to a mobile device via Bluetooth. Lots of accidents on the road are caused by drunk driving. This technology provides an accurate, convenient and quick way to monitor alcohol consumption to help prevent people from driving while intoxicated. The device could be integrated with a car’s alcohol ignition interlocks, or friends could use it to check up on each other before handing over the car keys. Blood alcohol concentration is the most accurate indicator of a person’s alcohol level, but measuring it requires pricking a finger. Breathalyzers, which are the most commonly used devices to indirectly estimate blood alcohol concentration, are non-invasive, but they can give false readouts. For example, the alcohol level detected in a person’s breath right after taking a drink would typically appear higher than that person’s actual blood alcohol concentration. A person could also fool a breathalyzer into detecting a lower alcohol level by using mouthwash. Recent research has shown that blood alcohol concentration can also be estimated by measuring alcohol levels in what’s called insensible sweat—perspiration that happens before it’s perceived as moisture on the skin. But this measurement can be up to two hours behind the actual blood alcohol reading. On the other hand, the alcohol level in sensible sweat—the sweat that’s typically seen—is a better real-time indicator of the blood alcohol concentration, but so far the systems that can measure this are neither portable nor fit for wearing on the body. Now, UC San Diego researchers have developed an alcohol sensor that’s wearable, portable and could accurately monitor alcohol level in sweat within 15 minutes. News Source: http://jacobsschool.ucsd.edu/news/new…
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