The Global Housing Market is Broken, and It’s Dividing Entire Countries

Soaring property prices are forcing people all over the world to abandon all hope of owning a home. The fallout is shaking governments of all political persuasions.

It’s a phenomenon given wings by the pandemic. And it’s not just buyers — rents are also soaring in many cities. The upshot is the perennial issue of housing costs has become one of acute housing inequality, and an entire generation is at risk of being left behind.

“We’re witnessing sections of society being shut out of parts of our city because they can no longer afford apartments,” Berlin Mayor Michael Mueller says. “That’s the case in London, in Paris, in Rome, and now unfortunately increasingly in Berlin.”

That exclusion is rapidly making housing a new fault line in politics, one with unpredictable repercussions. The leader of Germany’s Ver.di union called rent the 21st century equivalent of the bread price, the historic trigger for social unrest.

Politicians are throwing all sorts of ideas at the problem, from rent caps to special taxes on landlords, nationalizing private property, or turning vacant offices into housing. Nowhere is there evidence of an easy or sustainable fix.

In South Korea, President Moon Jae-in’s party took a drubbing in mayoral elections this year after failing to tackle a 90% rise in the average price of an apartment in Seoul since he took office in May 2017. The leading opposition candidate for next year’s presidential vote has warned of a potential housing market collapse as interest rates rise.

China has stepped up restrictions on the real-estate sector this year and speculation is mounting of a property tax to bring down prices. The cost of an apartment in Shenzhen, China’s answer to Silicon Valley, was equal to 43.5 times a resident’s average salary as of July, a disparity that helps explain President Xi Jinping’s drive for “common prosperity.”

In Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised a two-year ban on foreign buyers if re-elected.

The pandemic has stoked the global housing market to fresh records over the past 18 months through a confluence of ultralow interest rates, a dearth of house production, shifts in family spending and fewer homes being put up for sale. While that’s a boon for existing owners, prospective buyers are finding it ever harder to gain entry.

What we’re witnessing is “a major event that should not be shrugged off or ignored,” Don Layton, the former CEO of U.S. mortgage giant Freddie Mac, wrote in a commentary for the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University.

In the U.S., where nominal home prices are more than 30% above their previous peaks in the mid-2000s, government policies aimed at improving affordability and promoting home ownership risk stoking prices, leaving first-time buyers further adrift, Layton said.

The result, in America as elsewhere, is a widening generational gap between baby boomers, who are statistically more likely to own a home, and millennials and Generation Z — who are watching their dreams of buying one go up in smoke.

Existing housing debt may be sowing the seeds of the next economic crunch if borrowing costs start to rise. Niraj Shah of Bloomberg Economics compiled a dashboard of countries most at threat of a real-estate bubble, and says risk gauges are “flashing warnings” at an intensity not seen since the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis.

In the search for solutions, governments must try and avoid penalizing either renters or homeowners. It’s an unenviable task.

Sweden’s government collapsed in June after it proposed changes that would have abandoned traditional controls and allowed more rents to be set by the market.

In Berlin, an attempt to tame rent increases was overturned by a court. Campaigners have collected enough signatures to force a referendum on seizing property from large private landlords. The motion goes to a vote on Sept. 26. The city government on Friday announced it would buy nearly 15,000 apartments from two large corporate landlords for €2.46 billion ($2.9 billion) to expand supply.

Anthony Breach at the Center for Cities think tank has even made the case for a link between housing and Britain’s 2016 vote to quit the European Union. Housing inequality, he concluded, is “scrambling our politics.”

As these stories from around the world show, that’s a recipe for upheaval.

Argentina

With annual inflation running around 50%, Argentines are no strangers to price increases. But for Buenos Aires residents like Lucia Cholakian, rent hikes are adding economic pressure, and with that political disaffection.

Like many during the pandemic, the 28-year-old writer and college professor moved with her partner from a downtown apartment to a residential neighborhood in search of more space. In the year since, her rent has more than tripled; together with bills it chews through about 40% of her income. That rules out saving for a home.

“We’re not going to be able to plan for the future like our parents did, with the dream of your own house,” she says. The upshot is “renting, buying and property in general” is becoming “much more present for our generation politically.”

Legislation passed by President Alberto Fernandez’s coalition aims to give greater rights to tenants like Cholakian. Under the new rules, contracts that were traditionally two years are now extended to three. And rather than landlords setting prices, the central bank created an index that determines how much rent goes up in the second and third year.

It’s proved hugely controversial, with evidence of some property owners raising prices excessively early on to counter the uncertainty of regulated increases later. Others are simply taking properties off the market. A government-decreed pandemic rent freeze exacerbated the squeeze.

Rental apartment listings in Buenos Aires city are down 12% this year compared to the average in 2019, and in the surrounding metro area they’re down 36%, according to real estate website ZonaProp.

The law “had good intentions but worsened the issue, as much for property owners as for tenants,” said Maria Eugenia Vidal, the former governor of Buenos Aires province and one of the main opposition figures in the city. She is contesting the November midterm elections on a ticket with economist Martin Tetaz with a pledge to repeal the legislation.

“Argentina is a country of uncertainty,” Tetaz said by phone, but with the housing rules it’s “even more uncertain now than before.”

Cholakian, who voted for Fernandez in 2019, acknowledges the rental reform is flawed, but also supports handing more power to tenants after an extended recession that wiped out incomes. If anything, she says greater regulation is needed to strike a balance between reassuring landlords and making rent affordable.

“If they don’t do something to control this in the city of Buenos Aires, only the rich will be left,” she says.

Australia

As the son of first-generation migrants from Romania, Alex Fagarasan should be living the Australian dream. Instead, he’s questioning his long-term prospects.

Fagarasan, a 28-year-old junior doctor at a major metropolitan hospital, would prefer to stay in Melbourne, close to his parents. But he’s being priced out of his city. He’s now facing the reality that he’ll have to move to a regional town to get a foothold in the property market. Then, all going well, in another eight years he’ll be a specialist and able to buy a house in Melbourne.

Even so, he knows he’s one of the lucky ones. His friends who aren’t doctors “have no chance” of ever owning a home. “My generation will be the first one in Australia that will be renting for the rest of their lives,” he says.

He currently rents a modern two-bedroom townhouse with two others in the inner suburb of Northcote — a study nook has been turned into a make-shift bedroom to keep down costs. About 30% of his salary is spent on rent; he calls it “exorbitant.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s conservative government announced a “comprehensive housing affordability plan” as part of the 2017-2018 budget, including 1 billion Australian dollars ($728 million) to boost supply. It hasn’t tamed prices.

The opposition Labour Party hasn’t fared much better. It proposed closing a lucrative tax loophole for residential investment at the last election in 2019, a policy that would likely have brought down home prices. But it sparked an exodus back to the ruling Liberals of voters who owned their home, and probably contributed to Labor’s election loss.

The political lessons have been learned: Fagarasan doesn’t see much help on housing coming from whoever wins next year’s federal election. After all, Labor already rules the state of Victoria whose capital is Melbourne.

“I feel like neither of the main parties represents the voice of the younger generation,” he says.

It’s a sentiment shared by Ben Matthews, a 33-year-old project manager at a university in Sydney. He’s moving back in with his parents after the landlord of the house he shared with three others ordered them out, an experience he says he found disappointing and stressful, especially during the pandemic.

Staying with his parents will at least help him save for a deposit on a one-bedroom flat. But even that’s a downgrade from his original plan of a two-bedroom house so he could rent the other room out. The increases, he says, are “just insane.”

“It might not be until something breaks that we’ll get the political impetus to make changes,” he says. -Jason Scott

Canada

Days after calling an election, Justin Trudeau announced plans for a two-year ban on foreigners buying houses. If it was meant as a dramatic intervention to blind-side his rivals, it failed: they broadly agree.

The prime minister thought he was going to fight the election — set for Monday — on the back of his handling of the pandemic, but instead housing costs are a dominant theme for all parties.

Trudeau’s Liberals are promising a review of “escalating” prices in markets including Vancouver and Toronto to clamp down on speculation; Conservative challenger Erin O’Toole pledges to build a million homes in three years to tackle the “housing crisis”; New Democratic Party leader Jagmeet Singh wants a 20% tax on foreign buyers to combat a crisis he calls “out of hand.”

Facing a surprisingly tight race, Trudeau needs to attract young urban voters if he is to have any chance of regaining his majority. He chose Hamilton, outside Toronto, to launch his housing policy. Once considered an affordable place in the Greater Toronto Area, it’s faced rising pressure as people leave Canada’s biggest city in search of cheaper homes. The average single family home cost 932,700 Canadian dollars ($730,700) in June, a 30% increase from a year earlier, according to the Realtors Association of Hamilton and Burlington.

The City of Hamilton cites housing affordability among its priorities for the federal election, but that’s little comfort to Sarah Wardroper, a 32-year-old single mother of two young girls, who works part time and rents in the downtown east side. Hamilton, she says, represents “one of the worst housing crises in Canada.”

While she applauds promises to make it harder for foreigners to buy investment properties she’s skeptical of measures that might discourage homeowners from renting out their properties. That includes Trudeau’s bid to tax those who sell within 12 months of a house purchase. Neither is she convinced by plans for more affordable housing, seeing them as worthy but essentially a short-term fix when the real issue is “the economy is just so out of control the cost of living in general has skyrocketed.”

Wardroper says her traditionally lower-income community has become a luxury Toronto neighborhood.

“I don’t have the kind of job to buy a house, but I have the ambition and the drive to do that,” she says. “I want to build a future for my kids. I want them to be able to buy homes, but the way things are going right now, I don’t think that’s going to be possible.”

Singapore

Back in 2011, a public uproar over the city-state’s surging home prices contributed to what was at the time the ruling party’s worst parliamentary election result in more than five decades in power. While the People’s Action Party retained the vast majority of the seats in parliament, it was a wake-up call — and there are signs the pressure is building again.

Private home prices have risen the most in two years, and in the first half of 2021 buyers including ultra-rich foreigners splurged 32.9 billion Singapore dollars ($24 billion), according to Singapore-based ERA Realty Network Pte Ltd. That’s double the amount recorded in Manhattan over the same period.

However, close to 80% of Singapore’s citizens live in public housing, which the government has long promoted as an asset they can sell to move up in life.

It’s a model that has attracted attention from countries including China, but one that is under pressure amid a frenzy in the resale market. Singapore’s government-built homes bear little resemblance to low-income urban concentrations elsewhere: In the first five months of the year, a record 87 public apartments were resold for at least SG$1 million. That’s stirring concerns about affordability even among the relatively affluent.

Junior banker Alex Ting, 25, is forgoing newly built public housing as it typically means a three-to-four-year wait. And under government rules for singles, Ting can only buy a public apartment when he turns 35 anyway.

His dream home is a resale flat near his parents. But even there a mismatch between supply and demand could push his dream out of reach.

While the government has imposed curbs on second-home owners and foreign buyers, younger people like Ting have grown resigned to the limits of what can be done.

Most Singaporeans aspire to own their own property, and the housing scarcity and surge in prices presents another hurdle to them realizing their goal, says Nydia Ngiow, Singapore-based senior director at BowerGroupAsia, a strategic policy advisory firm. If unaddressed, that challenge “may in turn build long-term resentment towards the ruling party,” she warns.

That’s an uncomfortable prospect for the PAP, even as the opposition faces barriers to winning parliamentary seats. The ruling party is already under scrutiny for a disrupted leadership succession plan, and housing costs may add to the pressure.

Younger voters may express their discontent by moving away from the PAP, according to Ting. “In Singapore, the only form of protest we can do is to vote for the opposition,” he says.

Ireland

Claire Kerrane is open about the role of housing in her winning a seat in Ireland’s parliament, the Dail.

Kerrane, 29, was one of a slew of Sinn Fein lawmakers to enter the Dail last year after the party unexpectedly won the largest number of first preference votes at the expense of Ireland’s dominant political forces, Fine Gael and Fianna Fail.

While the two main parties went on to form a coalition government, the outcome was a political earthquake. Sinn Fein was formerly the political wing of the Irish Republican Army, yet it’s been winning followers more for its housing policy than its push for a united Ireland.

“Housing was definitely a key issue in the election and I think our policies and ambition for housing played a role in our election success,” says Kerrane, who represents the parliamentary district of Roscommon-Galway.

Ireland still bears the scars of a crash triggered by a housing bubble that burst during the financial crisis. A shortage of affordable homes means prices are again marching higher.

Sinn Fein has proposed building 100,000 social and affordable homes, the reintroduction of a pandemic ban on evictions and rent increases, and legislation to limit the rate banks can charge for mortgages.

Those policies have struck a chord. The most recent Irish Times Ipsos MRBI poll, in June, showed Sinn Fein leading all other parties, with 21% of respondents citing house prices as the issue most likely to influence their vote in the next general election, the same proportion that cited the economy. Only health care trumped housing as a concern.

Other parties are taking note. On Sept. 2, the coalition launched a housing plan as the pillar of its agenda for this parliamentary term, committing over €4 billion ($4.7 billion) a year to increase supply, the highest-ever level of government investment in social and affordable housing.

Whether it’s enough to blunt Sinn Fein’s popularity remains to be seen. North of the border, meanwhile, Sinn Fein holds a consistent poll lead ahead of elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly due by May, putting it on course to nominate the region’s First Minister for the first time since the legislature was established as part of the Good Friday peace agreement of 1998.

For all the many hurdles that remain to reunification, Sinn Fein is arguably closer than it has ever been to achieving its founding goal by championing efforts to widen access to housing.

As Kerrane says: “Few, if any households aren’t affected in some way by the housing crisis.”

By Alan Crawford

Source: https://www.japantimes.co.jp/

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Global Boom in House Prices Becomes a Dilemma for Central Banks

Surging house prices across much of the globe are emerging as a key test for central banks’ ability to rein in their crisis support.

Withdrawing stimulus too slowly risks inflating real estate further and worsening financial stability concerns in the longer term. Pulling back too hard means unsettling markets and sending property prices lower, threatening the economic recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic.

Bubble Trouble

Countries seeing surging real house price growth

Source: OECD

With memories of the global financial crisis that was triggered by a housing bust still fresh in policy makers minds, how to keep a grip on soaring house prices is a dilemma in the forefront of deliberations as recovering growth sees some central banks discuss slowing asset purchases and even raising interest rates.

Federal Reserve officials who favor tapering their bond buying program have cited rising house prices as one reason to do so. In particular, they are looking hard at the Fed’s purchases of mortgage backed securities, which some worry are stoking housing demand in an already hot market.

In the coming week, central bankers in New Zealand, South Korea and Canada meet to set policy, with soaring home prices in each spurring pressure to do something to keep homes affordable for regular workers.

New Zealand policy makers are battling the hottest property market in the world, according to the Bloomberg Economics global bubble ranking. The central bank, which meets Wednesday, has been given another tool to tackle the issue, and its projections for the official cash rate show it starting to rise in the second half of 2022.

Facing criticism for its role in stoking housing prices, Canada’s central bank has been among the first from advanced economies to shift to a less expansionary policy, with another round of tapering expected at a policy decision also on Wednesday.

The Bank of Korea last month warned that real estate is “significantly overpriced” and the burden of household debt repayment is growing. But a worsening virus outbreak may be a more pressing concern at Thursday’s policy meeting in Seoul.

In its biggest strategic rethink since the creation of the euro, the European Central Bank this month raised its inflation target and in a nod to housing pressures, officials will start considering owner-occupied housing costs in their supplementary measures of inflation.

The Bank of England last month indicated unease about the U.K. housing market. Norges Bank is another authority to have signaled it’s worried about the effect of ultra-low rates on the housing market and the risk of a build-up of financial imbalances.

Beginning of the End of Easy Money: Central Bank Quarterly Guide

The Bank for International Settlements used its annual report released last month to warn that house prices had risen more steeply during the pandemic than fundamentals would suggest, increasing the sector’s vulnerability if borrowing costs rise.

While the unwinding of pandemic-era is support is expected to be gradual for most central banks, how to do so without hurting mortgage holders will be a key challenge, according to Kazuo Momma, who used to be in charge of monetary policy at the Bank of Japan.

“Monetary policy is a blunt tool,” said Momma, who now works as an economist at Mizuho Research Institute. “If it is used for some specific purposes like restraining housing market activities, that could lead to other problems like overkilling the economic recovery.”

But not acting carries other risks. Analysis by Bloomberg Economics shows that housing markets are already exhibiting 2008 style bubble warnings, stoking warnings of financial imbalances and deepening inequality.

New Zealand, Canada and Sweden rank as the world’s frothiest housing markets, based on the key indicators used in the Bloomberg Economics dashboard focused on member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The U.K. and the U.S. are also near the top of the risk rankings.

As many economies still grapple with the virus or slow loan growth, central bankers may look for alternatives to interest-rate hikes such as changes to loan-to-value limits or risk weighting of mortgages — so called macro-prudential policy.

Yet such measures aren’t guaranteed to succeed because other dynamics like inadequate supply or government tax policies are important variables for housing too. And while ever cheap money is gushing from central banks, such measures are likely to struggle to rein in prices.

“The best approach would be to stop the further expansion of central bank balance sheets,” according to Gunther Schnabl of Leipzig University, who is an expert on international monetary systems. “As a second step, interest rates could be increased in a very slow and diligent manner over a long time period.”

Another possibility is that house prices reach a natural plateau. U.K. house prices, for example, fell for the first time in five months in June, a sign that the property market may have lost momentum as a tax incentive was due to come to an end.

There’s no sign of that in the U.S. though, where demand for homes remains strong despite record-high prices. Pending home sales increased across all U.S. regions in May, with the Northeast and West posting the largest gains.

While navigating the housing boom won’t be easy for central banks, it may not be too late to ward off the next crisis. Owner-occupy demand versus speculative buying remains a strong driver of growth. Banks aren’t showing signs of the kind of loose lending that preceded the global financial crisis, according to James Pomeroy, a global economist at HSBC Holdings Plc.

“If house prices are rising due to a shift in supply versus demand, which the pandemic has created due to more remote working and people wanting more space, it may not trigger a crisis in the same way as previous housing booms,” said Pomeroy. “The problems may arise further down the line, with younger people priced out of the property ladder even more.”

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As they tip toe away from their crisis settings, monetary authorities in economies with heavily indebted households will need to be especially careful, said Alicia Garcia Herrero, chief economist for Asia Pacific at Natixis who used to work for the ECB and International Monetary Fund.

“Real estate prices, as with other asset prices, will continue to balloon as long as global liquidity remains so ample,” she said. “But the implications are much more severe than other asset prices as they affect households much more widely.”

— With assistance by Theophilos Argitis, and Peggy Collins

By:

Source: Global Boom in House Prices Becomes a Dilemma for Central Banks – Bloomberg

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Critics:

A housing bubble (or a housing price bubble) is one of several types of asset price bubbles which periodically occur in the market. The basic concept of a housing bubble is the same as for other asset bubbles, consisting of two main phases. First there is a period where house prices increase dramatically, driven more and more by speculation. In the second phase, house prices fall dramatically.

Housing bubbles tend to be among the asset bubbles with the largest effect on the real economy, because they are credit-fueled, because a large number of households participate and not just investors, and because the wealth effect from housing tends to be larger than for other types of financial assets.

References

  • Brunnermeier, M.K. and Oehmke, M. (2012) Bubbles, Financial Crises, and Systemic Risk NBER Working Paper No. 18398
  • see eg. Case, K.E., Quigley, J. and Shiller R. (2001). Comparing wealth effects: the stock market versus the housing market. National Bureau of Economic Research, Working Paper No. 8606., Benjamin, J., Chinloy, P. and Jud, D. (2004). ”Real estate versus financial wealth in consumption”. In: Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics 29, pp. 341-354., Campbell, J. and J. Cocco (2004), How Do Housing Price Affect Consumption? Evidence from Micro Data. Harvard Institute of Economic Research, Discussion Paper No. 2045
  • Stiglitz, J.E. (1990). “Symposium on bubbles”. In: Journal of Economic Perspectives Vol. 4 No. 2, pp. 13-18.
  • Palgrave, R.H. I. (1926), “Palgrave’s Dictionary of Political Economy”, MacMillan & Co., London, England, p. 181.
  • Flood, R. P. and Hodrick, R. J. (1990), “On Testing for Speculative Bubbles”, The Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 4 No. 2, pp. 85–101.
  • Shiller, R.J. (2005). Irrational Exuberance. 3nd. New Jersey: Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691- 12335-7.
  • Smith, M. H. and Smith, G. (2006), “Bubble, Bubble, Where’s the Housing Bubble?”, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Vol. 2006 No. 1, pp. 1–50.
  • Cochrane, J. H. (2010), “Discount Rates”, Working paper, University of Chicago, Booth School of Business, and NBER, Chicago, Illinois, 27 December.Lind, H. (2009). “Price bubbles in housing markets: concept, theory and indicators”. In: International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis Vol. 2 No. 1, pp. 78-90.

America’s Failure To Build Is Driving Home Prices Ever Higher

Some progressive groups oppose rezoning New York's wealthy Soho area to allow more housing

Another month, another explosive rise in home prices.  May’s median annual housing price rose 23.6%, a new monthly record.   Buyers are still buying, helped by low interest and mortgage rates.  But since housing construction hasn’t kept pace with demand and economic growth, it will take more housing production to reduce long-term pressure on prices.

The buying pressure in housing markets is setting records.  Although home sales fell slightly in May compared to April, houses aren’t sitting very long on the market.  According to the National Association of Realtors, total housing inventory is down 20.6% from a year ago.  Properties only last on the market for an average of 17 days, and 89% of sales in May “were on the market for less than a month.”

Given this high demand, we’d expect supply to respond.  Ronnie Walker at Goldman Sachs notes housing starts are rising, hitting their highest levels since 2006.  But it isn’t cooling the market off.  But Walker says despite these higher starts, “red-hot demand has brought the supply of homes available for sale down to the lowest level since the 1970s.”

Walker expects a “persistent supply-demand imbalance in the years ahead.”  New construction will come online, and more sellers eventually will enter the market, but his model foresees “home prices grow(ing) at double digit rates both this year and next.”

Tight future markets are confirmed by Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies (JCHS).  In their 2021 report, these experts say “the supply of existing homes for sale has never been tighter,” and is at its lowest level since 1982.

So where are the houses?  What happened to supply and demand?  JCHS notes several reasons for underproduction, but the primary blame goes to restrictive local policies such as single-family zoning, minimum lot sizes, parking requirements, etc.  A 2018 survey of over 2700 communities found “93 percent imposed minimum lot sizes” with 67 percent requiring lots of at least one acre in size and sometimes more, many in suburban towns.

What about big cities?  Despite perceptions that there’s a lot of development in many cities, not much housing has been built in some.  Between 2010 and 2018, jobs in New York City increased by 22% “while the housing stock only increased four percent.”  Jobs in San Francisco and San Mateo counties rose by over 30% between 2010 and 2019, while new housing permits only rose by 7%.

There are strong political biases in these cities against more construction, but other liberal places are re-examining their housing policies, especially single-family zoning.  A New York Times 2019 analysis confirmed that many cities’ land area is dominated by single-family zoning —70% in Minneapolis, 75% in Los Angeles, 79% in Chicago, 81% in Seattle, and 94% in San Jose.  Combined with excessive parking requirements, zoning policy effectively takes land out of production while pushing its price sky-high and preventing multifamily options.

Cities’ anti-development policy means new housing is pushed further out in the metropolitan area, adding to suburban sprawl, longer commute times, and environmental damage.  Ironically, some progressive environmental groups have allied with anti-development forces, with the net result of fostering suburban sprawl.

In New York City, the left Sunrise Movement has joined with many other groups to oppose “upzoning” for higher density and more development in Manhattan’s Soho neighborhood, one of the wealthiest in the nation.  In contrast, Berkeley California, one of the most liberal cities in the nation, has voted to end single family zoning, persuaded by the argument that such policies result in racially segregated neighborhoods and lack of affordable housing for people of color.

But it isn’t just liberal cities that face this problem.  Even though red states like North Dakota, Utah, and Texas lead the nation in home building, a recent study found that only four of America’s 25 largest metropolitan areas “built enough homes to match local job growth.”  And much of that growth was in outlying suburbs, adding to sprawl and pollution.

Urban economist Ed Glaeser locates a good deal of the problem in the rising power of local citizen groups, especially existing homeowners.  Their housing investments often rise in value with scarcity, and they usually like the existing neighborhoods where they reside and don’t want new residents.

This creates an “insider/outsider” problem that limits housing. As Glaeser notes, current homeowners don’t “internalize the interests of those who live elsewhere and would want to come to the city…their political actions are more likely to exclude than to embrace.”  These anti-housing groups often are labelled “NIMBYs”, for “Not In My Back Yard.”

In response, so-called “YIMBYs” (Yes In My Back Yard) are pushing for policies such as relaxed zoning, allowing multi-family housing (at least duplexes to quadplexes) on single family lots, and allowing denser housing near mass transit stops (“TOD”, for “Transit Oriented Development.”).  They are having some success, but anti-development forces are deeply entrenched and politically powerful in many places around the country.

But would more development create not just housing, but add to affordable housing?  What about the impact on low-income and non-white families, who could face rising rents or displacement from gentrification while still not being able to buy a house?  In my next blog, we’ll look at the tangled racial history of housing development and home ownership. Unless renters and lower-income people can be mobilized to support development, NIMBY opposition to more housing will be hard to overcome.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

I’m an economist at the New School’s Schwartz Center (https://www.economicpolicyresearch.org), currently writing a book for Columbia University Press on cities and inequality.  I have extensive public sector experience studying cities and states.  I’ve served as Executive Director of the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Policy, Deputy Commissioner for Policy and Research at New York State’s Department of Economic Development, and New York City Deputy Comptroller for Policy and Management.  I also worked as Director of Impact Assessment at the Ford Foundation.

Source: America’s Failure To Build Is Driving Home Prices Ever Higher

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Critics:

The United States housing bubble was a real estate bubble affecting over half of the U.S. states. It was the impetus for the subprime mortgage crisis. Housing prices peaked in early 2006, started to decline in 2006 and 2007, and reached new lows in 2012. On December 30, 2008, the Case–Shiller home price index reported its largest price drop in its history. The credit crisis resulting from the bursting of the housing bubble is an important cause of the Great Recession in the United States.

Increased foreclosure rates in 2006–2007 among U.S. homeowners led to a crisis in August 2008 for the subprime, Alt-A, collateralized debt obligation (CDO), mortgage, credit, hedge fund, and foreign bank markets. In October 2007, the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury called the bursting housing bubble “the most significant risk to our economy”.

Any collapse of the U.S. housing bubble has a direct impact not only on home valuations, but mortgage markets, home builders, real estate, home supply retail outlets, Wall Street hedge funds held by large institutional investors, and foreign banks, increasing the risk of a nationwide recession. Concerns about the impact of the collapsing housing and credit markets on the larger U.S. economy caused President George W. Bush and the Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben Bernanke to announce a limited bailout of the U.S. housing market for homeowners who were unable to pay their mortgage debts.

In 2008 alone, the United States government allocated over $900 billion to special loans and rescues related to the U.S. housing bubble. This was shared between the public sector and the private sector. Because of the large market share of Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac) (both of which are government-sponsored enterprises) as well as the Federal Housing Administration, they received a substantial share of government support, even though their mortgages were more conservatively underwritten and actually performed better than those of the private sector.

See also

7 Creative Tips To Setup Your Real Estate Marketing In 2021

8 Creative tips to setup your real estate marketing in 2021

In this post, Cash for Homes Arizona talks about how you can become a strategic marketer in 2021 with these tips:

Today’s real estate marketing landscape is highly competitive. That means you have to do more than add listings or send emails. On top of that, the pandemic has complicated things further. That’s why unique marketing tactics like virtual tours and video marketing are the need of the hour.

1. Observe real estate website best practices

MLS sites and applications continue to remain one of the most valuable marketing tools in real estate. It carries the potential to generate high-quality leads. But, to attract those leads, your site must observe the best SEO and marketing practices.

Below are some of the most effective SEO practices that can generate great leads:

  • Make sure that your site is user-friendly, responsive, and easy to navigate across pages
  • Keep the layout and design eye-catching
  • Place a search bar on the website that has been IDX-optimized
  • Fill up your website with high-quality videos, infographics, and professional photos
  • Place appealing CTAs (call-to-action) buttons at all the right places
  • Give interesting descriptions to each property listed on the site
  • Give brief but comprehensive information about the neighborhood along with real estate resources for each listing
  • Implement the best SEO marketing strategy to secure top rankings in SERPs
  • Make sure to supply your contact information including email and contact number so it’s convenient for potential buyers to find you
  • Place sign-up links for your newsletter and all the social media profiles on which you are active

2. Boost engagement with polls, contests, polls and Q&As

With social media platforms like Instagram rolling out new and interesting features every day, engagement has become easier than ever. If you want to engage your real estate clients use Q&A stickers and polls in Instagram stories. Use interesting GIFs and put out appealing questions.

The more you can engage users, the better likelihood they have of coming back to you. Also, high engagement tells IG algorithms that you offer great content. As a reward, you’ll score better organic reach. You can also run all kinds of contests, reveals, and conduct giveaways all from within the IG stories.

It’s all about mastering the art of getting and keeping users engaged so they want to keep coming back for more.

3. Invest in video marketing

2021 is going to be all about the video. Video marketing is hot right now and it’s here to stay. It makes more sense for real estate as real estate is all capturing the appeal visual; which videos do well. In 2021 you must leverage the power of video marketing using hyperlocal targeting.

Be sure to produce videos consistently capturing the neighborhoods that you represent. In videos, you can cover different aspects of living in that area such as lifestyle, entertainment, housing features, and other perks of living.

To reach the maximum number of viewers from the areas you serve, use keywords within your titles and all the YouTube and Facebook ads you run with strong CTAs. This practice will help to drive traffic towards your real estate site.

4. Be sure to run a blog actively

It’s a good practice to have an active blog that you update regularly. If you don’t already have one, it will be good to start one. A blog can help you on multiple fronts. First, it acts as a source of education for both potential and present clients.

It also makes your business come across as a credible one since people like to Google everything online. Other than that, it also creates an open dialogue with everyone who’s part of the real estate game in your area. Optimizing your blog content for all the right keywords can also help you score top rankings against local searches. This will help you attract higher organic traffic and bring more customers to the door.

5. Offer home valuation to capture leads

Offering home valuation is an excellent way to capture leads and something to think about in 2021. For this method, you will need to create a landing page that offers a free evaluation to property owners. The visitors can come on to your site and get to know the worth of their cost. It’s better if you do this free of charge.

In exchange for this small favor, you can ask for the user’s contact details. You can evaluate the property in two ways:

  • Instant evaluation
  • Delayed evaluation

If you want to go with instant evaluation, you will have to build a tool. For that, you will need to work with a developer so he can build the exact kind of evaluation tool you want and embed it to work seamlessly within the site.

In case of delayed evaluation, you will need to physically visit the property to perform an evaluation before giving the estimate. Check out both methods and see which one works best for you.

6. Collaborate with a real estate Influencer

Influencer marketing is the big boy on the block. The year 2021 is going to see more of it. It’s extremely effective and everyone’s doing it, including real estate agents. Influencers have millions of followers.

For a nominal fee, they can help spread the word on your behalf and get your details out to thousands and millions of their followers. You must work in collaboration with them to get the maximum juice out of your influencer marketing efforts.

7. Use more of email marketing

Remember, we’re living in corona times. During the pandemic, there’s no better way to reach people than via their inboxes. As you’re adapting to the ‘new normal’, email marketing is pretty effective in sending regular updates to attract potential leads and clients.

You can use Email marketing and newsletters to give 3D visual tours of the properties available and also inform your followers about new properties up for sale. Make sure to use email marketing and newsletters as a key marketing plan in 2021.

 

Source: 7 Creative tips to setup your real estate marketing in 2021 – All Ontario

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U.S. Households’ Net Worth Hits Record $123.5 Trillion As Stocks Boom, But Debt Is Also Surging

While unemployment has remained stubbornly above pre-pandemic levels, record highs in the stock market have pushed the net worth of all households in the U.S. to a new high, despite the fast growth in household debt.

The net worth of households in the United States climbed to $123.5 trillion in the third quarter, up 8% from a year ago, the Federal Reserve said in a report Wednesday.

The Fed, which calculates net worths by subtracting overall debt held from the sum of assets like savings and equities, attributed the gains to the surging value of stocks, which jumped $2.8 trillion in the third quarter, as well as real estate, which increased in net value by $400 billion.

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Meanwhile, household debt, which includes mortgages, credit card debt and personal loans, jumped at an annual rate of 5.6% in the third quarter, reaching $16.4 trillion; that’s the fastest growth this decade, beating out a 3.9% increase in 2017.

Business debt fell 0.9% to $17.5 trillion in the third quarter, while federal government debt jumped 9.1% to $26 trillion.

CRUCIAL QUOTE 

“We’ve seen home prices rise, market prices for tradable instruments rise and savings increase… but those gains skew to upper income people,” KPMG Chief Economist Constance Hunter told the Wall Street Journal. “It’s a vicious cycle,” she added of the pandemic’s disparate impact on lower-income Americans. “Not only are lower-income households more impacted, they also are less likely to have the resources to draw upon to support their families.”

KEY BACKGROUND

The S&P 500 jumped 8% in the third quarter, while the tech-heavy Nasdaq Composite soared nearly 12%, and both have reached record highs in the fourth quarter–as has the Dow Jones Industrial Average. But far from everyone benefits from those gains. According to a Gallup poll in March and April, just 22% of Americans making less than $40,000 annually said they owned any stocks, compared to 84% of people making at least $100,000 per year.

TANGENT

There were 10.9 million unemployed people in the country last month, when the U.S. economy added a much lower-than-expected 245,000 jobs, according to data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics last week. The number of unemployed people in the U.S. remains more than three times higher than it was before the pandemic, during which 22 million Americans have been forced into unemployment.

FURTHER READING

U.S. Household Net Worth Hits Record in Third Quarter (WSJ)

Unemployment Claims Spike Again As Covid-19 Spreads And Americans Wait For Federal Relief (Forbes)

10.9 Million Americans Are Still Unemployed—Rate Ticks Down To 6.7%, But Job Market Could Take Years To Recover (Forbes)Follow me on Twitter. Send me a secure tipJonathan Ponciano

I’m a reporter at Forbes focusing on markets and finance. I graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I double-majored in business journalism and economics while working for UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School as a marketing and communications assistant. Before Forbes, I spent a summer reporting on the L.A. private sector for Los Angeles Business Journal and wrote about publicly traded North Carolina companies for NC Business News Wire. Reach out at jponciano@forbes.com.

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Wall Street Journal

What’s News: American household net worth jumps $10 trillion to $80.7 trillion. Prosecutors charge four former leaders of defunct law firm Dewey & LeBeouf with fraud. Staples is closing 225 stores. Joanne Po reports. Photo: Getty Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy Visit the WSJ channel for more video: https://www.youtube.com/wsjdigitalnet… More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://online.wsj.com/home-page Follow WSJ on Facebok: http://www.facebook.com/wsjlive Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJLive Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Follow WSJ on Tumblr: http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/wall-str… Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM

The Housing Market Is Still On Fire

The housing market has been on a tear since the spring. In a trend the Morning Brief has called both a surprising and defining feature of this pandemic-induced recession.

On Thursday, existing home sales were just the latest piece of housing data to exceed expectations, with homes selling at an annualized rate of 6.85 million last month, the fastest pace since April 2007.

Read more: Buying a house: What you need to know about home ownership

At this pace of sales, the housing market’s biggest pre-pandemic problem — a lack of affordable inventory — has only been exacerbated: there is currently just 2.5 months of inventory on the market.

Housing starts data published Wednesday showed new homes under construction rose to the fastest pace since February while permits to build homes are at more than 13-year highs. But this uptick in home construction isn’t likely to do much to ease this tightness in the market.

Back in September, Bloomberg Opinion columnist Conor Sen outlined how major homebuilders like Lennar (LEN) have outlined a cautious approach for the coming years, emphasizing moderate new building and careful debt management.

The scars of the housing crisis are deep and won’t likely be forgotten for some time.

“Homebuilders’ confidence has soared even though the actual production has not,” said Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of Realtors. “All measures, such as reduction to lumber tariffs and expansion of vocational training, need to be considered to significantly boost supply and construct new housing.”

But a resurgence in the virus combined with this troubling inventory dynamic likely keeps a lid on further gains in home sales in the months ahead.

“The clear message from the mortgage applications numbers, which have been drifting gently downwards since late August, is that home sales have peaked,” said Ian Shepherdson, chief economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics. On Wednesday, the weekly report on mortgage applications showed a 0.3% decline in total applications last week.

“We don’t expect a significant reversal of recent gains,” Shepherdson added, “but the period of surging home sales — new and existing — is over. Tighter lending standards appear to be reducing the flow of new applications, and the current downshift in growth in the face of the third COVID wave can’t be helping, either.”

But as Shepherdson notes, a lack of inventory will prevent any softening in home prices even if plans to purchase a home are tempered somewhat.

Leaving the housing market in much the same place we found it before the pandemic — undersupplied and oversubscribed.

By Myles Udland, reporter and anchor for Yahoo Finance Live. Follow him at @MylesUdland

Top News

European markets mixed as Barclays warns of ‘foggy winter’ [Yahoo Finance UK]

Fed, Treasury Secretary Mnuchin at odds over letting emergency lending programs expire [Yahoo Finance]

Roblox files for IPO as pandemic drives video game growth [Bloomberg]

Biden says he’s decided on treasury secretary nomination [Reuters]

YAHOO FINANCE HIGHLIGHTS

How the pandemic could permanently change unemployment benefits

California and Hawaii lead the nation with the worst coronavirus-hit job markets

Trump blocking Biden team from accessing coronavirus data is ‘criminal’: ex-HHS secretary

Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flipboard, SmartNews, LinkedIn, YouTube, and reddit.

Find live stock market quotes and the latest business and finance news

For tutorials and information on investing and trading stocks, check out CashayTags

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Summit Properties NW

The US housing market has been on fire since the coronavirus pandemic. Some of the signs: Super low inventory, low-interest rates, and strong demand from buyers looking for something different. What is driving this upward trend in what should be a devastating time for the US economy? Join your host Sean Reynolds, owner of Summit Properties NW and Reynolds & Kline Appraisal as he takes a look at this developing topic. #housingmarket#marketupdate ➜➜➜ SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE VIDEOS ➜➜➜ To never miss a video about personal finance & real estate related topics, please subscribe to my channel & then hit the bell notification here ➜ https://bit.ly/3bOA04n 🎙 𝑺𝒆𝒂𝒕𝒕𝒍𝒆 𝑹𝒆𝒂𝒍 𝑬𝒔𝒕𝒂𝒕𝒆 𝑷𝒐𝒅𝒄𝒂𝒔𝒕 iTunes: https://apple.co/2MkFziJ Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2Dh8EoL Stitcher: https://bit.ly/2FDK0QC 👫 Follow Summit’s Socials! Facebook: https://facebook.com/summitpropertiesnw/ Instagram: https://instagram.com/summitpropertie… LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/company/summit-p… 💼 Summit Offers a Simple 80/20 Commission Split With No Other Associated Fees & A Low $10,000 Annual Cap! 👉 Learn More: https://summitpropertiesnw.com/career/ 🏡 Summit Properties NW, LLC. Office: (425) 451-3342 Email: inquiries@summitpropertiesnw.com 👍 Please Like, Share, and Subscribe For More News & Real Estate Insights

COVID-19 Has Changed The Housing Market Forever

Amid all the uncertainty brought on by COVID-19 over the past six months, one thing is assured: the pandemic has re-ordered real estate markets across the board on an unprecedented scale.

Some of this may be irreversible. Real estate’s re-sorting this time isn’t just based on markets crashing (the Great Recession), political turmoil (the 1979 oil embargo), or financial speculation (the first and second dot.com busts)—after which there’s generally confidence that overall consumer demand and buyer preferences will sooner or later snap back to normal.

Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, more deep-seeded, tectonic-sized questions beyond markets and interest rates are being asked this time around that no one really has the answers to yet—like will people feel safer living in the south and southwest where they can spend all year social distancing outside? What if companies let workers work remotely for the rest of their lives? Why go back to retail shopping when I’m already ordering everything online? What’s the point of living “downtown” if half of the restaurants, bars, and museums never open back up?

How these questions get answered will fundamentally re-order how Americans live in the “new” pandemic normal, and as a result will play a huge X-factor in which cities and states will experience growth, demand, and price appreciation over the next 3-5 years, and which ones will stagnate and lose out. More broadly for large metropolises like Washington, D.C., New York City, and Philadelphia, the answers risk slowing or even reversing a wave of gentrification and wildly profitable downtown revitalization that’s been accelerating since before the Great Recession.

Crowded subway station, Washington DC, USA
Crowded Washington, D.C. metro station. In the COVID age Americans are seeking less density, more … [+] getty

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Against this backdrop, real estate’s new normal is also creating huge swathes of opportunity. Dozens of cities and counties that were once considered too small, too southern, too hot, too flat, or lacking in amenities, culture, or sophistication are now finding themselves being swooned to the top of the real estate desirability lists as Americans seek warmer, healthier, less dense, better educated, and more mobile places to live that offer closer access to the outdoors, better hospitals, and more open space with no clear end to the pandemic in sight. 

To get a better view on what’s really happening to real estate in America right now I decided that it was time to do a deep dive into the actual data from the experts—including CoStar, Zillow, and Realtor—on how COVID-19’s great migration is actually shaking out and where the money and bodies are moving.

Here’s what I found out.

Downtown Miami Brickell at dusk
Downtown Brickell Miami. Real estate platforms like Zillow and CoStar show Americans are moving … [+] getty

No matter who I spoke with, a few words kept resurfacing as we lurch into the post-pandemic future: warmer, safer, smaller, stabler, lower taxes, less regulation, and fewer lockdowns.

Regardless of where people come from or where they’re going, these things aren’t new on the list of what most Americans generally expect from the places they live, especially as they get older. (Northeasterners have been moving south and west for generations). The more interesting pandemic sub-text is the acceleration factor—and how the places where Americans are moving in the midst of COVID-19 may finally be expressing a more fundamental preference for how they really want to live instead of where they have to stay because of their job location or where their kids go to school. It also says a lot about where many American’s heads are right now, and more importantly, the specific criteria with which they’re considering making one of the most important next decisions of their lives in an era of unprecedented uncertainty.

The repercussions of America’s great COVID migration has the potential to re-shuffle the essential demographic and economic balance of America for the next generation. Realtors, investors, and politicans should be paying attention.

Real estate agent wearing a facemask while showing houses during the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has transformed America’s real estate market forever getty

By every metric, Americans are moving faster now than they were before the pandemic.

Page-per-property views on real estate platforms like Realtor and Zillow are up over 50% year-over-year almost everywhere, inventory in America’s 100 top metro markets has been shrinking since March, along with days on market and the gap between list-to-sale price. A lot of real estate experts prefer the word “despite” when it comes to accounting for this phenomenon while the pandemic’s still raging, when it’s probably more accurately “because of”.  

“Real estate markets have undergone noticeable shifts since the start of the coronavirus pandemic,” George Ratiu, Senior Economist at realtor.com tells me. “In the wake of the lockdowns in March, Americans discovered that existing homes were not adequate for the new work, teach, exercise, cook and live at home reality. Based on realtor.com surveys of consumers, we learned that home shoppers are looking for more space, quieter neighborhoods, home offices, newer kitchens and access to the outdoors, traits which have revived a strong interest in the suburbs and smaller metro areas.”

Brick residential buildings along a tree lined sidewalk
Boston. Still rock solid when it comes to its real estate market even during the COVID-19 pandemic. … [+] getty

The other clear trend since the COVID-19 pandemic began is that residential real estate is on a tear virtually everywhere.

Previous recessions and economic shocks tended to pull some regions down while sparing or barnstorming others. This time, so far, every region’s a winner—as Americans put more stock in their quality of life, work, walkability, and community when it comes to where they root themselves next other than just the cables that previously tied them to their workplaces.

The Northeast real estate market remains strong, despite all omens otherwise since New York City was the original epicenter of COVID-19 flight back in March, and the overall low-tax, lower regulation trends across the country that aren’t in the region’s favor. According to realtor.com’s most recent data, five of America’s hottest real estate markets are in New England—Rochester, NY, Melrose, MA, Portland, ME, Hudson, NH, and Worcester, MA—each of which ranked in the top ten across more than three categories including lowest days on market, list-to-sale ratio, or page views per-property.

Columbus, Ohio
Columbus, OH. Home to three of Zillow’s hottest real estate market’s during the COVID-19 pandemic in … [+] getty

Data crunched by real estate platform Zillow’s research group paints a similar picture of strong regional growth across small cities as well suburbs within an hour of established major metro areas. I had Zillow look at the 100 largest metro areas based on five metrics—median sale price, median list price, days to pending, share of listings with a price cut, and page views—and grabbed the top and bottom seven in each one.

At the top of Zillow’s list as of October 2020, three of America’s hottest real estate markets are in Ohio: Columbus, Cincinnati, and Dayton. Boise and Salt Lake City also made the list, along with Stamford, CT outside of New York City. Austin came in number one. Louisville, KY, Memphis, TN, Honolulu, and Des Moines, IA were at the bottom on Zillow’s aggregate list, though Zillow’s economists were quick to point out that in today’s market that means “less good”.

“Even the coolest markets in America right now are generally performing well and tilted in favor of sellers,” says Cheryl Young, senior economist at Zillow. “There’s a lot of demand for housing right now and homes are typically selling quickly for prices above what we were seeing last year. It’s also worth noting that the bottom performers for the most part aren’t decreasing. They’re just increasing at a lower-than-average rate. The residential market is on fire right now in most of the country, so these ‘coolest’ markets aren’t necessarily doing all that poorly.”

Woman working on laptop in home office
Why wouldn’t you work here? getty

Trends show Americans are also still moving where businesses move, despite the work-from-home trend accelerated by COVID-19. Even if Americans don’t have to show up to the same office every day, the tax base, culture, vibrancy, hospitality backfill, and infrastructure (think school districts) that a thriving business and entrepreneurial community supports long-term is one of the essential underpinnings of a successful residential real estate market.

From this perspective, COVID is accelerating demographic trends that were already in place before the pandemic, especially when it comes to businesses seeking places to expand that are pro-growth, low-tax, politically stable, and stacked with an educated work force in advanced degrees like engineering, math, technology, business, and law. Austin, Salt Lake City, Raleigh, Charlotte, Nashville, and San Jose all top the list in 2020 in this respect according to CoStar, with occupied office growth expected to exceed 10% over the next five years. Dallas, Miami, Phoenix, Atlanta, San Antonio, and Boston aren’t far behind—all expected to grow by 8%+ as of Q3 2020 according to CoStar.

“Businesses will continue seeking low-cost alternatives to more expensive coastal markets COVID-19 or not, which has fueled growth in markets like Atlanta, Phoenix, or Dallas, though workers that might have once opted for downtown living have shown a preference for suburban locales in recent months,” says Andrew Rybczynski, Managing Consultant at CoStar. “Smaller, well-educated markets with similar structural advantages, like Raleigh, Charlotte, or Austin also qualify, especially because of their attractive workforces. While COVID and the recession it caused will hurt business growth and office absorption, we expect the structural advantages of many southern and southwestern markets to continue through foreseeable future.”

Aerial View of Spaghetti Junction in Atlanta, GA
Atlanta has been preparing for growth for decades. It’s time may finally be coming getty

When Rybczynski refers to “structural advantages”, what he means is governance. Using a simple measure of tax burden, CoStar correlates a rough relationship between lower taxes, pro-business governance, faster growth, and increased in-migration—all of which are currently skewing towards American metro areas with local and state governments that are willing to keep regulations and business costs low in exchange for job growth and economic opportunity.

For what it’s worth, these “structural advantages” also skew politically. 10 of 12 of America’s cities forecasted to experience the fastest growth in occupied office space according to CoStar over the next five years have Republican Governors, Legislatures, and Mayors. Nine of the top 15 cities where businesses are relocating and mopping up office space are in three states that predominantly lean Republican—Texas (4), Florida (3), and North Carolina (2)—including Austin, Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Miami, Tampa, Orlando, Raleigh, and Charlotte respectively.

Ogden, Utah
Ogden is the county seat of Weber County, Utah outside of Salt Lake City and one of Zillow’s hottest … [+] getty

At the same time, however, Americans and its companies are not always moving in the same direction, suggesting a de-coupling of one of the most fundamental drivers of American migration for generations—namely people living near where they work. In some instances there’s overlap, like Austin, Raleigh, Columbus, and Salt Lake City. But overall Americans appear to be moving during the pandemic for more personal reasons than being simply motivated by employment or corporate relocation.

“The hottest housing markets in the new landscape are cities which offer desirable amenities—larger homes, leafy neighborhoods, access to the outdoors, walkability and proximity to grocery stores—in a more affordable package,” says realtor.com’s Ratiu. “Home buyers still want to be within commuting distance of large employment centers, but with the prevalence of remote work, they are willing to extend the distance from urban downtowns.”

In addition to the five Northeastern locations on the top of realtor.com’s hottest real estate markets to watch list right now, Colorado Springs, CO, Columbus, OH, Topeka, KS, Springfield, VA, and Raleigh, NC also ranked in the platform’s top ten in at least three criteria for precisely these more emotional reasons, say Ratiu.

Joint rest. Guy and girl relaxing on couch with hands clasped behind head.
Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic America’s next generation of homebuyers is searching for something … [+] getty

“The current housing market is driven by several noteworthy factors. First, America’s demographics are skewing younger as the Millennial generation—the largest in U.S. history—is finally embracing home ownership. Second, the technological promise of the mid-1990s of freeing workers from their desks has come of age in 2020, as the coronavirus-induced quarantine has forced employers to rely on workers working-from-home. Americans have been resoundingly successful at navigating this transition, and in the process, discovered the benefits of shorter commutes and the flexibility of being able to work from anywhere.

In turn, this has shifted consumer preferences for housing, driving the transition into suburbs, smaller cities, second-home destinations and even rural areas. Third, riding in the wake of a decade’s worth of home price appreciation which has outpaced income growth, many Americans are seeking affordability again, leading many buyers into suburban neighborhoods and away from high-cost, high-density urban downtowns.”

Who’s notably absent from all the data?

Not a single city in California or the Pacific Northwest ranked anywhere near the top of anyone’s “Best Of” lists in terms of where Americans are moving, which suggests that the effects of COVID’s first flight from coastal cities last March may be fossilizing permanently. New York City, Long Island, northern New Jersey, Honolulu, Chicago, and Philadelphia were also conspicuously in the basement, reinforcing America’s net emotional migration away from high-priced real estate markets as well as high-tax, high-lockdown urban locations.

So what’s the bottom line? Keep your bathing suit and laptop ready to pack. The longer COVID-19 continues to push Americans into the “new” normal, the more of us will be moving south and west, working by the pool. Sometimes it’s worth just rolling with the data. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

Peter Lane Taylor

 Peter Lane Taylor

I’ve always been addicted to people who live their lives to the fullest. Most people’s memories fade over time. Mine become more crystal clear every day because forgetting them would be unforgivable. I’ve sailed to Antarctica, rappelled into an active volcano, shanked drives on the most exclusive golf courses in the US, eaten thymus cooked by one of the finest chefs in America, and smoked Cuban cigars in Havana’s cafes before most people even knew the Cold War had ended. I shoot the vintage Holland & Holland shotgun that my grandfather gave me every chance I get just because I can. The most adventurous and successful lives are lived without guilt, regret, or fear. I’m currently working on the biography on Hollywood’s top stuntman. Contact me at peterlanetaylor@earthlink.net

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Mortgage rates are now at their lowest point in history and they seem poised to go even lower. Danielle Hale, chief economist at Realtor.com joined Yahoo Finance’s The First Trade to discuss the possible impact the coronavirus could have on the housing market. #coronavirus#mortgagerates#housing market Subscribe to Yahoo Finance: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb About Yahoo Finance: At Yahoo Finance, you get free stock quotes, up-to-date news, portfolio management resources, international market data, social interaction and mortgage rates that help you manage your financial life. Connect with Yahoo Finance: Get the latest news: https://yhoo.it/2fGu5Bb Find Yahoo Finance on Facebook: http://bit.ly/2A9u5Zq Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2LMgloP Follow Yahoo Finance on Instagram: http://bit.ly/2LOpNYz

3 Reasons to Invest in Real Estate Right Now

My good friends Paul and Kelsey are known as The Flippin Experts. They’re my go-to for questions regarding real estate and house flipping. I went to Paul and Kelsey with one question, “How has the pandemic affected real estate?” and was pleasantly surprised with the tips they provided, which I have shared with you below.

It is no secret that real estate is used as a vehicle to generate wealth and create jobs across America. Studies show that the real estate industry — encompassing real estate finance, insurance, rentals, and leasing — added the most value to the Gross Domestic Profit (GDP) of the United States in 2019, adding 4.49 trillion U.S. dollars to the national
GDP.

Related: Is Passive Income Truly Achievable Through Real Estate?

The Flippin Experts forecast that real estate will continue to be a portfolio and profit builder for entrepreneurs, contrary to some skeptics citing that the global pandemic and recent national events could negatively have an impact on the real estate industry.

Here are three reasons why you should think about investing in real estate:

1. Supply and demand

Now, more than ever, people recognize the need for a safe place to call home. Home is no longer just the place you sleep. The recent pandemic may be forever changing the way business, school, shopping, social relations and life, in general, is done! As a result, the home space is now also becoming the office, classroom, restaurant, and place of entertainment. As the demand for housing is continuing to rise, so are the prices as inventory is decreasing. As a result of the low inventory coupled with an increasing demand, real estate investors will have the opportunity to sell their properties at the highest rate with less competition.

Related: Want to Start a Side Hustle Investing in Real Estate? Here’s How to Start with $500.

2. Low interest rates

Mortgage interest rates hit an all-time low this June. Making it the time for homeowners to purchase the home they have been longing to buy. This will also help investors by lowering lending and private lending rates. This will assist the housing market and benefit both buyers and sellers.

3. Economic uncertainty

There are companies who closed their doors for social distancing which are now announcing that they will not re-open. The future of businesses and careers are in question. Uncertainty and fear paralyze, but things will not stand still forever. Many people long to be safe, and as a result, they will look to the comfort of liquidating that second home or selling that short-term rental property that they were dabbling in, etc. While everyone else is waiting, saving, and eventually selling, it is the entrepreneurs who are going to take the risk, invest, and watch their profits soar.

Related: Thinking of Investing in Real Estate?

Government evictions and foreclosure sales have been on hold, but as soon as the green light is given, a flood of distressed properties will become available for sale, and in need of the perfect cash buyer/investors to buy, renovate, and resell.

The combination of these reasons above creates the perfect time. Invest in real estate now.

By: Randy Garn Entrepreneur Leadership Network VIP Investor / Entrepreneur

A Real Estate Investor Who Retires At Age of 37 Breaks Down How He Makes $15,000 a Month

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On a recent episode of the podcast “The Side Hustle Show,” hosted by Nick Loper, real estate investor Dustin Heiner explained how he was able to retire at the age of 37 by investing in rental properties.

Heiner breaks down the steps investors should take before buying a new property, and how those rental properties can make them money. He stressed picking the right city and state, assembling the right team, and the importance of the $250 monthly passive income benchmark.

Related: How to start a real estate business by investing of only 500$

Dustin Heiner is a seasoned real estate investor who retired at the age of 37 and makes roughly $15,ooo a month in passive income from his rental properties.

On a recent episode of the podcast “The Side Hustle Show,” hosted by Nick Loper, Heiner revealed how he went from working in a local government office to working for himself, and laid out the steps investors should take before deciding where to buy property.

Back in 2006, Heiner bought his first rental property in Ohio for $17,000 in cash. He explained on the podcast that in his first month of renting out a home, he made around $350 after expenses. That number would prove significant as Heiner began investing more and more.

In order to turn the side hustle into a full-time gig, he explained, he had to invest in more properties that gave him the same type of monthly cash flow.

“If I were to multiply that out, one property is $300, 10 properties, oh my goodness, that’s $3,000 a month. That is $36,000 a year.”

In 2016, he had around 26 properties, so he quit his day job and focused full-time on rental property investments. He said that today, he owns over 30 properties.

Heiner admitted he was lucky with that first deal he found in Ohio. “I did everything wrong,” he explained. However, over 10 years and many properties later, he said he had developed a system of steps he suggests everyone takes before making a new purchase.

First, pick the state you want to invest in

Once the state is decided, Heiner uses Zillow to do research on the cities within that state. He looks at highly populated cities with a lot of available properties, he explained. Then, once the city is narrowed down, he looks at all the properties within that city to see if they meet his criteria. This means looking for a property that matches up with the amount of money set aside for the investment and high rental income rates.

“Here’s a principle for everybody listening, you want to buy for $250 or more in passive income [a month] after every single expense,” he said on the podcast……

Read more:Business Insider

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How Much Real Estate Brokers And Real Estate Agents Earn In Every State

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Last year, we took a look at how much real estate agents earn on average in all 50 states based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) 2018 Occupational Employment Statistics data. Now, in 2020, the BLS has updated salary figures for both real estate agents and real estate brokers. Based on the latest BLS data, the average real estate agent annual wage in the United States is $62,060, while the average annual wage for real estate brokers is $81,450.

These two occupations inevitably have very different salaries depending on where you’re working. From state to state, the average salaries for real estate agents and real estate brokers can vary significantly. For example, while the national average annual wage for real estate agents is just over $60,000, in the top-earning state for real estate agents, the average salary is $111,800, which is close to double the national average. Read on to find out where real estate agents and brokers earn the most money and where they earn the least.

10 States Where Real Estate Agents and Real Estate Brokers Earn The Most Money

When comparing the highest-paying states for real estate agents versus real estate brokers, there are only three states that are among the top-10 states for both occupations. The other seven states where real estate agents earn the most are different than the ones where real estate brokers earn the most. Here’s a closer look at where real estate agent salaries are the highest.

10 States Where Real Estate Agents Earn The Most Money

Here’s a breakdown of the top-10 states in which real estate agents earn the most money on average:

  1. New York average real estate agent salary: $111,800
  2. Massachusetts average real estate agent salary: $84,180
  3. Connecticut average real estate agent salary: $79,780
  4. Alaska average real estate agent salary: $79,360
  5. Colorado average real estate agent salary: $76,850
  6. Utah average real estate agent salary: $75,170
  7. California average real estate agent salary: $74,140
  8. Texas average real estate agent salary: $72,830
  9. Wyoming average real estate agent salary: $71,460
  10. Hawaii average real estate agent salary: $71,140

Perhaps not surprisingly, New York, with the insanely expensive real estate of New York City, its suburbs and Long Island, is where real estate agents earn the most, an average of $111,800 a year. The top-10 states for real estate agent salaries are primarily in the Northeast and out West, including both Pacific Coast and the mountain states of Colorado and Utah.

10 States Where Real Estate Agents Earn The Least Money

Here’s a breakdown of the bottom-10 states in which real estate agents earn the least money on average:

  1. Illinois average real estate agent salary: $42,130
  2. Minnesota average real estate agent salary: $46,130
  3. Idaho average real estate agent salary: $47,350
  4. Ohio average real estate agent salary: $47,420
  5. Indiana average real estate agent salary: $47,670
  6. South Carolina average real estate agent salary: $48,560
  7. Delaware average real estate agent salary: $49,410
  8. Nebraska average real estate agent salary: $49,860
  9. New Hampshire average real estate agent salary: $49,970
  10. North Carolina average real estate agent salary: $50,160

The states in which real estate agents earn the least tend to be located in the U.S. Midwest and South regions, although Idaho is part of the West region. Illinois, where real estate agent salaries are the lowest, has seen a dramatic fall in real estate agent wages over the last five years. From an average annual wage of $75,270 in 2014, the average real estate agent salary has fallen by 44% as of 2019, where the current average is a mere $42,130 a year. Delaware, too, has seen a substantial decline in wages, with its average real estate agent salary dropping by 18.5% since 2014, when it stood at $60,600.

10 States Where Real Estate Brokers Earn The Most Money

The average real estate broker salaries tend to be a bit higher than real estate agent salaries in most states. As mentioned before, only three states overlap between these two lists of states: California, Massachusetts and Texas. One thing to note, however, about average wages for real estate brokers is that the BLS data is less complete than for real estate agents, in this case not having salary data for 11 states.

Here’s a breakdown of the top-10 states in which real estate brokers earn the most money on average:

  1. New Mexico average real estate agent salary: $112,860
  2. Massachusetts average real estate agent salary: $109,140
  3. California average real estate agent salary: $104,120
  4. New York average real estate agent salary: $99,930
  5. Texas average real estate agent salary: $95,150
  6. Nevada average real estate agent salary: $93,850
  7. Wisconsin average real estate agent salary: $93,400
  8. Maryland average real estate agent salary: $92,540
  9. Indiana average real estate agent salary: $89,720
  10. North Carolina average real estate agent salary: $84,770

New Mexico has experienced an incredible rise in real estate broker salaries. In 2016, the average annual wage for real estate brokers in the state was only $46,130. As of 2019, the average is $112,860, an increase of 144.7% in just three years. About half the states on this list, however, have actually seen salaries decline from 2014 to 2019, while real estate broker salaries increased in California, Wisconsin, Maryland and North Carolina.

10 States Where Real Estate Brokers Earn The Least Money

Here’s a breakdown of the bottom-10 states in which real estate brokers earn the least money on average:

  1. Illinois average real estate agent salary: $46,820
  2. Oklahoma average real estate agent salary: $47,350
  3. Utah average real estate agent salary: $47,460
  4. Louisiana average real estate agent salary: $50,590
  5. Alabama average real estate agent salary: $50,810
  6. South Dakota average real estate agent salary: $53,060
  7. Minnesota average real estate agent salary: $54,060
  8. Missouri average real estate agent salary: $54,920
  9. Vermont average real estate agent salary: $55,250
  10. Nebraska average real estate agent salary: $59,330

Once again, Illinois ranks as the worst state for real estate broker salaries. The state has witnessed a major decline in wages, with the average annual salary for real estate brokers being $90,700 in 2014, before falling by 48.4% to a current average of $46,820. Oklahoma, though having the second-lowest average annual wage, has at least seen real estate broker salaries rise by 24.7% over the last five years.

How Much Real Estate Agents and Real Estate Brokers Make In Every State

Below are two tables featuring a full breakdown of the average annual wages of real estate agents and brokers in every state there was available data for. Also included is the five-year change from 2014 to 2019.

How Much Real Estate Agents Earn in Every State

Here’s a breakdown of the average annual wage for real estate agents in all 50 U.S. states.

State Rank 2019 Mean Annual Wage 2018 Mean Annual Wage 2017 Mean Annual Wage 2016 Mean Annual Wage 2015 Mean Annual Wage 2014 Mean Annual Wage 5-Year Change (%)
Alabama     31 $53,300 $53,870 $55,960 $58,700 $61,130 $56,600 -5.8%
Alaska      4 $79,360 $78,190 $71,030 $68,040 $64,060 $66,790 18.8%
Arizona     34 $52,280 $66,360 $62,690 $70,050 $54,900 $49,330 6.0%
Arkansas     38 $50,570 $41,100 $41,660 $34,190 $35,270 $37,100 36.3%
California      7 $74,140 $73,450 $68,860 $65,790 $62,330 $58,180 27.4%
Colorado      5 $76,850 $67,350 $63,320 $72,480 $76,590 $71,880 6.9%
Connecticut      3 $79,780 $70,380 $45,230 $46,120 $50,070 $53,510 49.1%
Delaware     44 $49,410 $50,100 $46,670 $47,660 $52,460 $60,600 -18.5%
Florida     19 $62,790 $58,730 $57,520 $58,980 $54,090 $44,430 41.3%
Georgia     29 $54,670 $50,450 $46,220 $44,780 $45,620 $49,920 9.5%
Hawaii     10 $71,140 $65,720 $72,470 $85,110 $83,620 $58,340 21.9%
Idaho     48 $47,350 $57,490 $55,790 $57,800 $47,160 $40,790 16.1%
Illinois     50 $42,130 $52,800 $59,010 $59,150 $76,800 $75,270 -44.0%
Indiana     46 $47,670 $47,430 $43,230 $61,880 $65,350 N/A N/A
Iowa     30 $54,610 $54,610 $49,900 $46,520 $42,810 $41,600 31.3%
Kansas     36 $50,680 $48,520 $46,640 $63,640 $64,850 $57,150 -11.3%
Kentucky     39 $50,570 $48,680 $47,220 $41,410 $39,100 $36,850 37.2%
Louisiana     33 $52,440 $53,020 $54,100 $51,410 $41,660 $43,520 20.5%
Maine    27 $55,840 $64,690 $60,220 $69,210 $43,850 $38,280 45.9%
Maryland    32 $52,800 $57,450 $57,470 $59,980 $51,110 $55,270 -4.5%
Massachu  setts     2 $84,180 $67,470 $61,670 $66,430 $78,760 $72,500 16.1%
Michigan    22 $57,170 $51,870 $46,880 $43,620 $42,760 $44,970 27.1%
Minnesota    49 $46,130 $46,620 $48,250 $49,460 $51,300 $49,250 -6.3%
Mississippi    23 $57,030 $60,450 $50,110 $44,020 $38,140 $34,070 67.4%
Missouri    15 $65,040 $53,440 $50,400 $54,060 $53,360 $44,860 45.0%
Montana    11 $70,930 $47,290 $42,010 $45,560 $52,850 $57,330 23.7%
Nebraska    43 $49,860 $51,010 $46,340 $48,110 $42,060 $43,140 15.6%
Nevada    17 $64,280 $62,000 $59,240 $61,570 $61,850 $61,660 4.2%
New Hampshire    42 $49,970 $49,810 $48,530 $49,670 $43,150 $41,980 19.0%
New Jersey    13 $66,880 $63,790 $58,690 $61,860 $59,610 $50,080 33.5%
New Mexico    25 $55,900 $52,660 $53,240 $60,440 $58,170 $56,660 -1.3%
New York     1 $111,800 $116,460 $102,310 $103,490 $100,090 $94,410 18.4%
North Carolina    41 $50,160 $59,920 $61,580 $62,070 $59,860 $56,260 -10.8%
North Dakota    20 $62,570 $61,430 $57,060 $53,200 $51,140 $50,190 24.7%
Ohio    47 $47,420 $45,340 $41,650 $39,900 $38,700 $41,050 15.5%
Oklahoma    26 $55,850 $54,880 $49,380 $55,150 $56,370 $53,820 3.8%
Oregon    35 $52,120 $49,850 $55,500 $50,040 $42,050 $44,300 17.7%
Pennsylvania    21 $62,430 $64,490 $66,550 $58,130 $57,970 $55,140 13.2%
Rhode Island    12 $70,420 $84,280 $70,450 N/A $46,310 $46,630 51.0%
South Carolina    45 $48,560 $53,790 $52,070 $50,700 $43,410 $40,690 19.3%
South Dakota    16 $64,720 $62,660 $57,110 $57,150 $55,810 $54,830 18.0%
Tennessee    37 $50,670 $51,100 $45,960 $46,370 $43,080 $40,070 26.5%
Texas     8 $72,830 $70,520 $72,480 $64,070 $68,410 $60,130 21.1%
Utah     6 $75,170 $63,480 $62,050 $52,830 $50,050 $53,660 40.1%
Vermont    28 $55,770 $55,920 $47,990 $56,770 N/A N/A N/A
Virginia    18 $64,210 $66,230 $64,290 $62,910 $62,240 $58,650 9.5%
Washington    14 $66,020 $63,860 $59,590 $58,100 $53,640 $47,980 37.6%
West Virginia    24 $56,880 $63,620 $45,220 $53,860 $44,920 $54,790 3.8%
Wisconsin    40 $50,290 $49,360 $54,820 $53,640 $54,440 $51,630 -2.6%
Wyoming     9 $71,460 $75,570 $64,500 $81,920 $72,660 $75,580 -5.5%
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I’m a finance writer with years of experience covering topics such as taxation, Social Security, entrepreneurship, investing, real estate and housing markets. My work has appeared on MSN, Yahoo Finance, Fortune, CNBC, CBS, U.S. News and more.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/

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