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When Employers Ask About Your Salary Range, Try This

A client recently remarked on that weird moment when a potential employer asks for your salary range. She wondered, “Should it be X% over what I’m making now? Based entirely on salary calculators?”

For my money, the employer should tell you what the range is since they actually know specifics of what the job entails, their budget, and the market value/going rate. Or as Vu Le says, when you don’t disclose salary range on a job posting, a unicorn loses its wings.

But, for my client and the purposes of this article, let’s assume they’re expecting you to say the number first. Figuring out an appropriate salary range for a new position can feel like a ridiculous high stakes guessing game. Ask for too little, they won’t take you seriously and you’ll end up underpaid forever. Ask for too much, you’ll cut yourself out of the running for the job. No pressure.

It doesn’t have to be so fraught. Here are four tools to help you determine an appropriate range:

1. Many professional associations do an audit of salaries in the industry. Ask around to find out what membership groups or professional associations aggregate that data in your industry. Even if there’s not a formal study, there are likely people who you can chat with about industry trends.

Your email could say something like, “I’m seeking ___ type of position at ___ kinds of organizations. Based on my experience and the region, I’m looking to get a sense of the industry standards surrounding compensation. Are there any resources you recommend or individuals I could speak with on the subject?”

2. Networking can be a huge value, but studies show that people tend to network in single sex groups – basically, men network with men, women with women.  If you’re only talking salaries with other women, odds are decent you’re not getting good fair wage data. Remember that thanks to the wretched wage gap, there’s a good chance your lady friends are getting paid less than their male peers. Be sure you’re talking with both men and women so you’re getting the most fair and accurate wage information.

3. You can ask someone who was in the role previously or is familiar with the position, “Would you be comfortable sharing the salary range that’s appropriate for this role based on your experience?”  This way, you’re not asking them to disclose what they made but asking for their perspective.

4. Online salary calculators like payscale.com and glassdoor.com can be invaluable resources in determining your market value, but note that searching for salary info based only on a job title and your city won’t give you accurate results. Would you trust OKCupid’s suggested matches if all you’d entered was your gender?  You want data that’s specific to your region, level of experience, and the size of the company you’re considering, so be sure you’re putting in as much info as possible about yourself and the role to get the most accurate info.

Tools in Action

You probably won’t be able to use each of these tools for every job offer. Salary calculators couldn’t even generate a report for my client because of the specific context of the international job she’s considering. She did better interpersonally.

She told me, “I tend to confide in my closest friends and colleagues, most of whom happen to be female, but I reached out to a [male] former colleague tonight who’s held similar positions and that was helpful.”

The conversation also evoked additional questions for her hiring manager about compensation more broadly including:

  • Does the offer include housing? A driver?
  • What’s the tax situation in the posting country?
  • Will I be paid in USD or will my paycheck be subject to currency fluctuations?

The answers to these sorts of industry or job-specific questions should of course inform your salary expectations, and it’s appropriate to say as much. I recommended she send a warm, enthusiastic note to the person who interviewed her to the effect of,

“I’ve done a lot of thinking about the salary range and have a few questions before I’m able to share the salary range I’d be seeking in this position.” or

“Do you have an outline of the benefits the organization provides to team members overseas? I know these vary considerably among organizations.”

While we wait for the unicorn job offers that include the salary range in the job description, these strategies will position you to learn more about compensation for the role and determine a salary range that accurately reflects your market value.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I use a strengths-based approach to encourage women to navigate and negotiate work on their terms. A New Orleans native and enthusiast, I use a playful, approachable style when consulting nationally with businesses and professional associations that want to attract, retain, and support female talent. Women have been coming to me for years for help in workplace negotiations, so I launched my business to help women negotiate a raise, a promotion, a new position, and maternity leave. Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire recently profiled me for my unique approach, and I am regularly asked to speak at national conferences about negotiations, work-life balance, and leading as a female executive. Learn more at gowlandllc.com.

Source: When Employers Ask About Your Salary Range, Try This

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British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

British Airways has gone to court to seek an injunction to prevent its pilots from striking after union members voted, by an overwhelming majority, to strike rather than accept the airline’s proposed pay increase.

British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA) members voted 93% in favor of a strike on 90% turn out. British Airways is offering pilots a pay increase of 11.5% spread over three years, and said that both Unite and GMB trade unions—which represent almost 90% of BA staff—have recommended the airline’s offer to their members.

The three unions made a joint claim for better compensation in November of last year. They cited the airline’s improved financial performance —from a £230 million ($238 million) operating loss in 2009 to a £1.8 billion ($2.24 billion) profit in 2017 — as justification.

BA has said the threat of a pilot strike could disrupt summer holiday travel for thousands of its passengers. However, BALPA have not set dates for the strike and the airline has yet to make any changes to its schedule.

BALPA General Secretary, Brian Strutton, claims the aim is not to disrupt summer holidays and blames the airline for the timing of the breakdown in talks.

“We have tried to resolve this matter through negotiation starting last November – it is BA who has regrettably chosen to drag this out into the summer months,” he stated.

Headed to court

British Airways went to court today for an injunction against industrial action by BALPA members, but the court has decided against the airline.

The airline claimed that the union had failed to comply with balloting rules. This claim has previously brought BA success in court, but has also caused controversy with the decision reversed on appeal.

The decision to go to court had put a halt to negotiations, though both parties said they would like to avoid strike action through negotiations.

Brian Strutton, general secretary of the BALPA union, indicated they would like to return to negotiations after the court’s decision. “Although legally clear to do so, we have still not set any strike dates to give BA one last chance to commit to negotiating on pilots’ pay and rewards with us,” he said in a statement.

British Airways said it will return to negotiations but seems unwilling to compromise.

“We will continue to pursue every avenue to protect the holidays of thousands of our customers this summer,” the airline said in a statement. “Our proposed pay offer of 11.5% over three years is fair.”

Balancing the books

The union says that one day of strikes would cost BA more than BALPA members are asking for, and the airline industry faces a critical shortage of pilots, but labor is a significant portion of airline costs and European airlines face pressures on yields. IATA estimates that the European airline industry generated $12 billion in operating profits during 2018, with an average operating margin of only 6%.

Ryanair isn’t budging either

The court’s decision is still welcome news for BALPA, as they negotiate with BA competitor and European low-cost behemoth Ryanair.

The pilots’ union has also warned of potential industrial action against Ryanair and those talks are going worse than talks with British Airways.

Strutton said, “We have not been able to make any progress with Ryanair at all on any of our areas of concern. As usual with Ryanair, it’s their way or the highway, and we are not prepared to put up with that.”

Ryanair has a history of tackling industrial actions by adjusting service as needed, even if it means shutting down bases, but the airline has a strong base at Stansted Airport that is critical to its operations.

BALPA will issue a ballot to its members to decide on a strike tomorrow, and the results will be announced on August 7. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I worked in aviation from 1994-2010 before turning my experience to writing about airlines and airports for leading industry and consumer publications in 2013. I’ve spent months in the hangars of airlines and aircraft manufacturers, dressed aircraft seats by hand, and worked with crew at training centres around the world. I’ve negotiated with airline CEOs and worked with buyers, engineers, leading design firms, suppliers and aircraft manufacturers on the launch of new programs. I was the executive responsible to international regulators on the approval of cabin equipment, with oversight of production facilities, product testing laboratories, a maintenance center, and a certified hazardous materials repair station. I even hold a patent for a military-spec life raft. Now, I translate “aviation speak” into English, breaking barriers of acronyms and jargon to make the beautiful business of flight easier to value. I also really, really love being on a plane—even in the middle seat.

Source: British Airways Pins Hopes On Friendly Court As Pilot Negotiations Unravel​

17 Surprising Remote Jobs With A Great Salary -Zack Friedman

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It sounds like a dream comes true. Or is the grass just greener? Working from home is not for everyone – but if you find a job that works for you, it may be your ticket to a more flexible career and lifestyle. Here are 17 surprising remote jobs and the salary that you can earn, according to FlexJobs…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/zackfriedman/2018/09/18/17-surprising-remote-jobs-with-a-great-salary/#19ef8e0a13fa

 

 

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