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No More Snooze Button: A Complete Guide To Waking Up Feeling Fantastic – Linda Geddes

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Do you wake up to the sound of birdsong or an electronic ringtone? Perhaps you use a dawn simulator or an app that won’t stop beeping until you have walked at least 100 paces. It is increasingly unlikely that you groggily grope for the stop button on a traditional alarm clock. According to John Lewis, alarm clock sales are down 16% on 2017. Instead, many people are relying on phone alarms or dawn simulators, which claim to more gently rouse you from slumber. Now the clocks have gone back and the days are shortening, it may seem harder than ever to get out of bed. So, what is the best way to wake up……….

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/oct/29/complete-guide-to-waking-up-feeling-fantastic

 

 

 

 

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The Dangers of Eating Late at Night – Jamie A. Koufman

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ACID REFLUX is an epidemic affecting as many as 40 percent of Americans. In addition to heartburn and indigestion, reflux symptoms may include postnasal drip, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, chronic throat clearing, coughing and asthma. Taken together, sales of prescribed and over-the-counter anti-reflux medications exceed $13 billion per year.The number of people with acid reflux has grown significantly in recent decades. Reflux can lead to esophageal cancer, which has increased by about 500 percent since the 1970s……..

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/opinion/sunday/the-dangers-of-eating-late-at-night.html

 

 

 

 

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The Scientific Argument For Waking Up Early – Leon Biss

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If you want to become elite at what you do, you need to consistently get better. High performance is all about putting in more and “reps.” Doing the same workout every day won’t make you stronger or faster. Just showing up to work every day and doing your job won’t make you better at your job. It’s been shown that most doctors become worse at their job over their career. They are at their height when they come out of medical school and slowly get worse over time…….

Read more: https://medium.com/thrive-global/the-scientific-argument-for-waking-up-early-b3d93c4d74cd

 

 

 

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The Best Foods to Eat For a Good Night’s Sleep – Sophie Medlin

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Sleep has become widely recognized as playing a really important role in our overall health and wellness—alongside diet, stress management, and exercise. Recently, researchers have been learning more about how poor sleep influences our dietary choices, as well as how diet influences sleep quality. Not sleeping for long enough or poor quality sleep are associated with increased food intake, a less healthy diet and weight gain……..

Read more: https://qz.com/quartzy/1415076/the-best-foods-to-eat-for-a-good-nights-sleep/

 

 

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Polyphasic Sleep: When Productivity Becomes Madness – Ben Mulholland

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It sounds like a miracle pill or silver bullet. Polyphasic sleep. How to rest for two hours a day with no ill effects.Imagine everything you could get done with that free time! No more rushing for work deadlines, wishing you could read that book that’s been haunting your bag for a year, or trying to find time to just relax.

Unfortunately, as with most miracle solutions, polyphasic sleep has major associated health risks and little in the way of proven benefits. Most of its good press is down to urban myths and overestimating the positives.

We don’t sleep just for the hell of it – humans need solid rest to process the information gained in waking hours and properly order memories. Unfortunately, the idea of periodically napping throughout the day to replace regular sleep is consistently brought up in productivity discussions.

Source: https://www.process.st/polyphasic-sleep/

 

 

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A lack of sleep is slowly killing you | Physical and Mental Health – Exercise, Fitness and Activity

AUSTRALIANS aren’t getting nearly enough sleep each night — and it’s slowly killing us.

Source: A lack of sleep is slowly killing you | Physical and Mental Health – Exercise, Fitness and Activity

 

 

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Sleep Apnoea in Chronic Kidney Disease — MEDICINE FOR ALL

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Sleep apnoea can affect up to 50% of people with eGFR < 15 ml/min/1.73m2 and is a significant cause of refractory hypertension. Management: Weight reduction Avoid central nervous depressant (including alcohol)

via Sleep apnoea in chronic kidney disease — MEDICINE FOR ALL

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Can You Catch Up on Lost Sleep On the Weekends? Here’s What Experts Think – Jamie Ducharme

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Sleep experts have long preached the importance of a sleep routine. Going to bed and rising at roughly the same time every day helps to regulate circadian rhythms and improve overall sleep quality and quantity.

But a new study published in the Journal of Sleep Research, offers a surprising asterisk to that advice: If you don’t get enough sleep during the week, it says, sleeping in on the weekends may cancel out at least some of the associated health risks.

The findings are based on survey responses from more than 38,000 Swedish adults who answered questions about their lifestyle habits, medical histories and average weekday and weekend sleep durations. The researchers used this data to draw conclusions about how total sleep, as well as workday versus day-off sleep, relates to mortality.

The researchers analyzed 13 years of data and found that people who slept for five hours or less each night had a 65% higher risk of premature death, compared to those who consistently slept for six or seven hours per night. (This association largely disappeared among adults older than 65, who tend to keep consistent sleep schedules, and who the researchers posit may need less rest overall.)

But when the researchers looked at people who made up for scant weeknight sleep with longer weekend snoozes, they observed something interesting: These people did not seem to have a higher mortality risk than the group that slept about seven hours a night.

This suggests that short weekday sleep may be compensated for during the weekend, and that this has implications for mortality,” the authors write in the paper—though they stress that the results are speculative, as they’re based on self-reported data.

Dr. David Dinges, chief of the division of sleep and chronobiology at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, was not involved in the research but calls the findings “intriguing.” He cautions, however, that more studies are needed, especially since there’s very limited research looking at “yo-yo sleeping” over long periods of time.

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“Thirteen years is long, but it’s not 30 years; it’s not 40,” Dinges says. “The real question is whether there is, in fact, a build-up of deficit, or biological changes that are gradual over time, even though you get recovery sleep.”

The new study focused only on the link between sleep duration and longevity, yet sleep loss can also have negative effects on cognitive, behavioral and metabolic health. “We’re still in a fairly early stage of understanding the mechanism by which amount of sleep relates to different health risks,” Dinges says.

Sleep is also highly individual. Certain people may be more or less vulnerable to yo-yo sleeping—meaning it may provide adequate recovery for some, but not others.

Another part of the new paper deserves attention, says Jerome Siegel, a professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the University of California Los Angeles Center for Sleep Research (who was not involved with the study). People who regularly slept longer than seven hours per night had a 25% higher mortality risk than the control group, a result that appears to be independent of chronic health issues that could cause excess sleep.

Being an inactive ‘couch potato’ is not good for you,” Siegel said in an email to TIME. “It may well be that just as sitting all day is bad for you, lying in bed for extended periods of time is also bad for you. The key issue is determining whether restricting sleep in long sleepers improves their health.” Siegel also notes that multiple epidemiological studies, including this one, have suggested that seven hours of sleep—not the often-recommended eight—is the optimal amount for increasing lifespan.

While it will take more than one epidemiological study to prove anything definitively, the experts says the new paper is a step toward better sleep understanding.

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Researchers Found a 10 Percent Higher Risk of Early Death In Late Night Sleepers – Kristen Knutson

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Do you wake up bright eyed and bushy-tailed, greeting the sunrise with cheer and vigor? Or are you up late into the night and dread the sound of your alarm clock? We call this inherent tendency to prefer certain times of day your “chronotype” (chrono means time). And it may be more than a scheduling issue. It has consequences for your health, well-being and mortality.

Being a night owl has been associated with a range of health problems. For example, night owls have higher rates of obesity, high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. Night owls are also more likely to have unhealthy behaviors, such as smoking, alcohol and drug use, and physical inactivity.

We study the health effects of being a night owl. In our recent study published in Chronobiology International, we found even worse news for the owls of the world: a higher risk of early death.

Our bodies have their own internal time-keeping system, or clock. This clock would keep running even if a person were removed from the world and hidden away in a dark cave (which some dedicated researchers did to themselves years ago!). We believe these internal clocks play an important role in health by anticipating the time of day and preparing the body accordingly.

For example, as humans, we typically sleep at night, and our bodies start preparing for our habitual bedtime even before we try to fall asleep. Similarly, we eat during the day, so our body is prepared to process the food and nutrients efficiently during the daytime.

Our chronotype is also related to our biological clock. Morning larks’ biological clocks are set earlier. Their habitual bedtimes and wake times occur earlier in the day. Night owls have internal clocks set for later times. But are there any problems related to being a lark or owl, other than scheduling difficulties? Research suggests that there are; night owls tend to have worse health.

And, in our new study, we compared risk of dying between night owls and morning larks. In this study, death certificates were collected for an average of 6.5 years after the initial study visit to identify those who died. We found that night owls had a 10 percent increased risk of death over this six-and-a-half year period compared to larks. We also found that owls are more likely to have a variety of health problems compared to larks, particularly psychiatric disorders like depression, diabetes and neurological disorders.

The switch to daylight saving time in the U.S. (or summer in the U.K.) only makes things more difficult for night owls. There are higher rates of heart attacks following the switch to daylight savings, and we have to wonder if more night owls are at risk.

Night owls
Night owls, or people who have a hard time waking up in the morning, face health risks as a result. (aslysun/Shutterstock.com)

We researchers do not fully understand why we see more health problems in night owls. It could be that being awake at night offers greater opportunity to consume alcohol and drugs. For some, being awake when everyone else is sleeping may lead to feelings of loneliness and increased risk of depression. It could also be related to our biological clocks.

As explained above, an important function of internal biological clocks is to anticipate when certain things, like sunrise, sleep and eating, will occur. Ideally, our behavior will match both our internal clock and our environment. What happens when it doesn’t? We suspect that “misalignment” between the timing of our internal clock and the timing of our behaviors could be detrimental over the long run.

A night owl trying to live in a morning lark world will struggle. Their job may require early hours, or their friends may want to have an early dinner, but they themselves prefer later times for waking, eating, socializing and sleep. This mismatch could lead to health problems in the long run.

It is true that someone’s “chronotype” is (approximately) half determined by their genes, but it is not entirely preordained. Many experts believe that there are behavioral strategies that may help an individual who prefers evening. For example, gradually advancing your bedtime – going to bed a little earlier each night – may help to move someone out of the “night owl zone.”

A gradual advance is important because if you try to go to bed two to three hours earlier tonight, it won’t work, and you may give up. Once you achieve an earlier bedtime, maintain a regular schedule. Avoid shifting to later nights on weekends or free days because then you’ll be drifting back into night owl habits. Also, avoiding light at night will help, and this includes not staring into smartphones or tablets before bed.

On a broader scale, flexibility in work hours would help to improve the health of night owls. Night owls who can schedule their day to match their chronotype may be better off.

It is important to make night owls aware about the risks associated with their chronotype and to provide them with this guidance on how to cope. We researchers need to identify which strategies will work best at alleviating the health risks and to understand exactly why they are at increased risk of these health problems in the first place.
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Maintaining a Daily Rhythm Is Important For Mental Health,Study Suggests

Setting an alarm might be the only thing that helps you get up in the morning, but try setting one at night to remind you when it&#39;s time to go to bed. Click through our gallery for other tips for better sleep.

The study, published Tuesday in the journal The Lancet Psychiatry, looked at disruptions in the circadian rhythms — or daily sleep-wake cycles — of over 91,000 adults in the United Kingdom. It measured these disruptions using a device called an accelerometer that is worn on the wrist and measures one’s daily activity levels. The participants were taken from the UK Biobank, a large cohort of over half a million UK adults ages 37 to 73.
The researchers found that individuals with more circadian rhythm disruptions — defined as increased activity at night, decreased activity during the day or both — were significantly more likely to have symptoms consistent with bipolar disorder or major depression. They were also more likely to have decreased feelings of well-being and to have reduced cognitive functioning, based on a computer-generated reaction time test.
For all participants, activity levels were measured over a seven-day period in either 2013 or 2014, and mental health proxies such as mood and cognitive functioning were measured using an online mental health questionnaire that participants filled out in 2016 or 2017.
“It’s widely known that a good night’s sleep is a good thing for well-being and health. That’s not a big surprise,” said Dr. Daniel Smith, professor of psychiatry at the University of Glasgow and a leading author on the study. “But I think what’s less well-known and what comes out of this work is that not only is a good night’s sleep important, but having a regular rhythm of being active in daylight and inactive in darkness over time is important for mental well-being.”
The findings were found to be consistent even when controlling for a number of influential factors including age, sex, lifestyle, education and body mass index, according to Smith.
“I think one of the striking things that we found was just the consistency in the direction of our association across everything we looked at in terms of mental health,” Smith said.
Daily circadian rhythm is controlled by a collection of neurons in an area of the brain called the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus helps regulate a number of important behavioral and physiological functions such as body temperature, eating and drinking habits, emotional well-being and sleep, according to the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.
The findings are consistent with research indicating a link between sleep disruptions and mood disorders. A 2009 study, for example, showed that men who worked night shifts for four years or more were more likely to have anxiety and depression than those who work during the day.
However, the new study is the first to use objective measurements of daily activity and is among the largest of its kind, according to Aiden Doherty, senior research fellow at the University of Oxford, who was not involved in the research.
“This study is the first large-scale investigation of the association of objectively measured circadian rhythmicity with various mental health, well-being, personality and cognitive outcomes, with an unprecedented sample size of more than 90 000 participants,” Doherty wrote in an email.
“Previous studies have been very small (in just a few hundred people), or relied on self-report measures (asking people what they think they do). … However, this study used objective device-based measures in over 90,000 participants; and then linked this information to standard measures of mood disorders, subjective well-being, and cognitive function,” he added.
The findings have significant public health consequences, particularly for those who live in urban areas, where circadian rhythms are often disrupted due to artificial light, according to Smith.
“By 2030, two-thirds of the world’s population will be living in cities, and we know that living in an urban environment can be pretty toxic to your circadian system because of all the artificial light that you’re exposed to,” Smith said.
“So we need to think about ways to help people tune in to their natural rhythms of activity and sleeping more effectively. Hopefully, that will protect a lot of people from mood disorders.”
For those who struggle to maintain a consistent circadian rhythm, certain strategies — such as avoiding technology at night — have proven to be an important part of good sleep hygiene.
“Not using your phone late at night and having a regular pattern of sleeping is really important,” Smith said. “But equally important is a pattern of exposing yourself to sunshine and daylight in the morning and doing activity in the morning or midday so you can actually sleep properly.”
Based on the observational nature of the study, the researchers were unable to show causality, meaning it is unclear whether the sleep disturbances caused the mental health problems or vice versa.
“It’s a cross-sectional study, so we can’t say anything about cause and effect or what came first, the mood disorder or the circadian disruption,” said Kristen Knutson, associate professor of neurology at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine, who was not involved in the study.
“And it’s likely they affect each other in a circular fashion,” she added. The researchers also looked exclusively at adults between age 37 and 73, meaning the results may not apply to younger individuals, whose circadian rhythms are known to be different than those of older adults, according to Smith.
“The circadian system changes throughout life. If you’ve got kids, you know that very young kids tend to be nocturnal,” Smith said. “My suspicion is that we might observe even more pronounced effects in younger samples, but that hasn’t been done yet, to my knowledge.”
But the study adds more credence to the idea that sleep hygiene — including maintaining a consistent pattern of sleep and wake cycles — may be an important component of good mental health, according to Smith.
“It’s an exciting time for this kind of research because it’s beginning to have some real-world applications,” Smith said. “And from my point of view as a psychiatrist, I think it’s probably under-recognized in psychiatry how important healthy circadian function is, but it’s an area that we’re trying to develop.”

 May 15, 2018

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