Richard Branson Plans To Get To Space Before Jeff Bezos

US-ECONOMY-NYSE-VIRGIN

The “billionaire space race” just got a bit more literal Thursday, as Virgin Galactic announced that it would be opening up the flight window for its first fully crewed mission to space on July 11, and that one of its first passengers would be Richard Branson. That’s 9 days prior to Jeff Bezos’ planned launch on July 20 on a capsule from his company Blue Origin.

If everything goes as planned, Branson wouldn’t be the first billionaire to go to space, but he would be the first to go on his own company’s spacecraft. Shares of Virgin Galactic stock soared in after-hours trading, up to over $51 at the time of publication. The stock had closed down at $43.19 on Thursday.

The “Unity 22” mission, as the company has dubbed it, is part of a series of test flights Virgin Galactic is conducting before it opens up its space tourism business to paying customers. The mission’s goal, the company says, is to accomplish several things: first, to evaluate the customer experience, including the periods of weightlessness and views of Earth. Second will be to test aspects of conducting research experiments, another revenue stream for the space. Third is to ensure that the company’s training program adequately prepares customers for the experience.

Joining Branson on the flight are Beth Moses, Virgin’s chief astronaut instructor; Colin Bennett, the company’s lead operations engineer; and Sirisha Bandla, the company’s VP of researcher operations, who will be conducting a science experiment for the University of Florida.

Virgin Galactic was founded by Branson in 2005, and began publicly trading on the New York Stock Exchange in 2019. If July’s flight is successful, the company plans two more test flights evaluating other aspects of the experience before beginning commercial service in 2022.

“It’s one thing to have a dream of making space more accessible to all; it’s another for an incredible team to collectively turn that dream into reality,” Branson said in a statement. “As part of a remarkable crew of mission specialists, I’m honoured to help validate the journey our future astronauts will undertake and ensure we deliver the unique customer experience people expect from Virgin.”

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website. Send me a secure tip.

I’m a senior editor at Forbes covering healthcare, science, and cutting edge technology.

Source: Richard Branson Plans To Get To Space Before Jeff Bezos

.

Critics:

Virgin Galactic is not the only corporation pursuing suborbital spacecraft for tourism. Blue Origin is developing suborbital flights with its New Shepard spacecraft. Although initially more secretive about its plans, Jeff Bezos has said the company is developing a spacecraft that would take off and land vertically and carry three or more astronauts to the edge of space.

New Shepard has flown above the Karman line and landed in 2015 and the same vehicle was reflown to above the Karman line again in 2016. In April 2021, they completed their fifteenth test flight, with the next mission, NS 16, aiming to carry a crew as early as 20 July 2021.

On 16 September 2014, SpaceX and Boeing were awarded contracts as part of NASA’s CCtCap program to develop their Crew Dragon and CST-100 Starliner spacecraft, respectively. Both are capsule designs to bring crew to orbit, a different commercial market than that addressed by Virgin Galactic.

Now-defunct XCOR Aerospace had also worked on rocket-powered aircraft during many of the years that Virgin Galactic had; XCOR’s Lynx suborbital vehicle was under development for more than a decade, and its predecessor, the XCOR EZ-Rocket experimental rocket powered airplane did actually take flight, but the company closed its doors in 2017.

See also

 

This 29 Year Old Cancer Survivor Will Be The Youngest American Woman In Space

This year, the once-restricted world of space travel is about to open up in a way the nation has never seen, and a 29-year-old woman will help usher in that change.

Hayley Arceneaux, a physician assistant at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, was the first person selected last week to participate in the country’s first commercial spaceflight, scheduled to take off in the fall from Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard a SpaceX rocket bound for Earth’s orbit.

The crew will all be non-astronauts, led by billionaire Jared Isaacman, who bought the flight from SpaceX in January and set aside two seats for St. Jude. Arceneaux, who was treated at St. Jude for bone cancer when she was 10, will join Isaacman and two other passengers who have not yet been announced on the flight. One will be a sweepstakes winner as part of a campaign to raise $200 million in donations for St. Jude.

Isaacman had previously said he wanted to give the seat to a frontline health care worker and someone who was a cancer survivor. Arceneaux, who started working at the hospital early last year with children who have leukemia and lymphoma, got an out-of-the-blue call in early January asking if she’d take the first seat.

“Yes! Please!” she replied, before agreeing to ask her mom first.

“[My mom], Colleen, is a tough lady, she has been through a lot. And I love to travel, I love going to new places, and so while this was so surprising to hear, at the same time, it kind of fit,” Arceneaux told The 19th. “When I told her about this, she was in total agreement that I couldn’t pass it up.”

With that “yes,” Arceneaux also agreed to shatter some existing limitations in the rapidly expanding industry of space travel.

Under current NASA medical guidelines, Arceneaux would have not been able to participate in the mission: She has an artificial joint in her leg and a titanium rod in her left thigh bone stemming from her treatment. She spent a year undergoing intensive chemotherapy and surgery to remove a lump that had formed on her left knee. She had to learn to walk again.

Astronauts undergo stringent physical tests to qualify for flight, and a prosthesis would have disqualified her for a mission if it weren’t for the commercial nature of the flight. Women were initially excluded from spaceflight because of assumptions around physical fitness and gendered expectations.

Although space is becoming more diverse — about half of the new astronaut class is made up of women — just 40 years ago, American women hadn’t flown to space at all. Even now, only about 12 percent of all the astronauts in the world who have been to space have been women; SpaceX, for example, has only launched one woman since it started operating missions last year.

Arceneaux would be the youngest American to go to space, as well as the first pediatric cancer patient. She will also be among the first civilian American women to reach space, following Anousheh Ansari, who flew to the ISS in 2006. Beth Moses, who flew on a suborbital flight in 2019 and is considered by some to have been a civilian when she flew, is a professional commercial astronaut. Christa McAuliffe, the first civilian woman selected to go to space, tragically died shortly after take-off in the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion that claimed seven lives in 1986.

“Women belong in space … I’m not going to be the last,” Arceneaux said. “And I am incredibly excited to represent women, and then represent those who aren’t physically perfect.”

Arceneaux’s experience at St. Jude — where she grew up playing pranks on staff and organizing dance recitals — marked her in such a way that she declared early on that she wanted to work there. In the years since, the occupations changed. Maybe she’d be a doctor, a nurse, or maybe a researcher, a fundraiser, a dietician. She eventually landed on physician assistant.

Arceneaux at St. Jude. (Photos courtesy of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis)

Since finding out about the flight, Arceneaux has become quite popular with patients who want to hear about her mission. She has already been to SpaceX’s California headquarters a few times, and she’ll be in Florida to watch a launch later this spring before her own takes off. She also has plenty of preparations ahead: centrifuge training to prepare for G-force, simulations in the capsule and learning the principles of orbital mechanics.

She will also serve as the chief medical officer on the mission.

Arceneaux will be in space about three to four days circling Earth before splashing down off the Florida coast.

She said she’s most excited about serving as a beacon of hope for other cancer patients who often don’t see themselves represented in historic milestones. The mission is aptly named “Inspiration4.”

Just recently, a mother and daughter approached Arceneaux at St. Jude and asked if she was the Hayley they’d heard about who was going to space. The little girl had just had a difficult night and she confided in Arceneaux that she was discouraged because she couldn’t run or jump.

Arceneaux perked up. “I can’t run or jump, either, but it’s not stopping me from going in space,” she told her.

“I hope that that shows them to not limit themselves,” Arceneaux said, “because they really can do more than they even imagine.”

As Arceneaux prepares for the mission, her family is excited to see her take on the responsibility. Her brother and sister-in-law are both aerospace engineers in Alabama, and they’ve helped reassure her about the safety of the flight. Her dad, too, instilled a big love of space in Arceneaux when she was a kid, encouraging her to watch space movies like “Apollo 13” and visit the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, which she did when she was younger.

She has a photo with her parents and brother in front of a green screen floating in what appears to be the inside of the International Space Station. It won’t be too different from what Arceneaux will do from orbit inside SpaceX’s Dragon capsule.

Ahead of the flight, she is also preparing to take something into space with her that holds some significance for her family. Three years ago, Arceneaux’s father, Howard, died of kidney cancer. She said whatever she decides to take, it’ll be to honor him.

Chabeli Carrazana portrait

 

 

Source: This 29-year-old cancer survivor will be the youngest American woman in space

.

.

Hayley Arceneaux, a 29-year-old cancer survivor who has been selected as the second civilian member of the SpaceX Inspiration 4 crew, joins TODAY for her first official interview as a civilian astronaut. “It came out of the blue,” she says. “Immediately I said ‘yes, put my name down.’” » Watch TODAY All Day: http://www.youtube.com/today » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY
.
.
More Contents:
An Indian American Women In Space | Menti Quiz | Chapter Discussion | Unacademy 6th | Sonam Sudan
http://www.youtube.com – February 8
0
National History Day: A Partnership Between the David & Lorraine Cheng Library and the Paterson Public Schools – A Tale of Three High Schools –
teachingsocialstudies.org – January 30
[…] Many of the students chose to research topics like; The first African-American Women in Space, Jackie Robinson, President Barack Obama, the civil rights sit-ins, the 21st Amendment, In vitr […]
N/A
What to expect from Future Human’s virtual sci-tech experience
http://www.siliconrepublic.com – October 15, 2020
[…] open and close with visits to space, starting with former NASA astronaut and one of the first black American women in space, Joan Higginbotham, in conversation with author and science communicator Dr Niamh Shaw […]
2
Netflix’s Away and the working mother
http://www.syfy.com – September 19, 2020
[…] Showrunners Andrew Hinderaker and Jessica Goldberg drew from the history of American women in space while researching for the project and depiction of Emma’s role — both as an astronaut and a leader […]
3
How Sally Ride blazed a trail for women in space
[…] There have been other American women in space, however—more than 40 of them—and in 2019, American astronauts completed a historic all-woma […]
218
Who Will the Famous Astronauts of the 21st Century Be?
http://www.theatlantic.com – March 2, 2020
[…] After spending 328 days living on the International Space Station, Koch had set a new record for American women in space […]
N/A
Future Human announces diversity ticket bursary with Amazon Web Services
http://www.siliconrepublic.com – January 30, 2020
[…] already announced include engineer and former astronaut Joan Higginbotham, one of the first black American women in space; Brittany Kaiser, the Cambridge Analytica whistleblower who rose to fame in Netflix’ […]
1
World Questions with Julia Gillard and Hillary Rodham Clinton | Feature from King’s College London
http://www.kcl.ac.uk – November 16, 2019
[…] increased as there are more women running now, continuing to say that “when I  ran, there were more American women in space than running for President […]
11
Clinton Book Honors Gen-Z Activists Like Greta Thunberg
http://www.refinery29.com – October 24, 2019
[…] am pleased that we had so many women running this time, because when I ran in 2016 there were more American women in space — two — than there were running for president […]
22
Luisa Dörr
luisadorr.com – August 19, 2018
[…] From Serena Williams to Oprah to the First American women in space, this visual package reveals why these are the most significant women of our time whom have broke […]
33
Emily Lakdawalla’s Recommended Kids’ Space Books | The Planetary Society
http://www.planetary.org – August 2, 2018
[…] of the book (covering the Mercury Thirteen, the four women cosmonauts, and the beginning of American women in space) are pretty depressing for their stories of barriers and blatant sexism […] (If your kid throws it down in disgust after 20 pages, tell them to skip to page 73; the chapter on American women in space starts out depressing but things improve from there […]
32
List of female astronauts – Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org – June 1, 2018
[…] A span of one year separated the first and second American women in space […]
132
NASA’s Early Stand on Women Astronauts: “No Present Plans to Include Women on Space Flights”
airandspace.si.edu – March 17, 2016
[…] (After Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in space in 1963, the idea of including American women in space flights was dismissed as a political stunt […]
6
NASA’s Early Stand on Women Astronauts: “No Present Plans to Include Women on Space Flights”
airandspace.si.edu – March 17, 2016
[…] (After Valentina Tereshkova became the first woman in space in 1963, the idea of including American women in space flights was dismissed as a political stunt […]
N/A
List of female spacefarers – Wikipedia
en.wikipedia.org – January 4, 2008
[…] A span of one year separated the first and second American women in space, as well as the first and second Chinese women in space, taking place on consecutive missions […]

A Mars Orbiter Just Detected Something It’s Never Seen Before

water on mars

  • The atmosphere of Mars is thin and, compared to Earth, barely even there at all, but it can still teach us about the history of the planet and its present-day status.
  • The ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, which is a project from the European Space Agency and Russia’s Roscosmos, recently detected a gas that it never found before.
  • Hydrogen chloride, which requires specific conditions in which to form, has been detected in the atmosphere, raising many questions. 

The Mars we see today is mostly dry, dusty, and barren. Sure, there is some water locked away in ice near the poles, and possibly some melting that happens during the Martian year, but aside from that there’s very little that offers clues as to the planet’s potentially rich and life-giving history. Projects like the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, sent to Mars by the European Space Agency and Russia’s Roscosmos space group, are helping to pull the curtain back and reveal some of the secrets the planet still holds.

Now, in a pair of new studies published in Science Advances, researchers using data from the Trace Gas Orbiter reveal that they’ve found a gas they’ve never seen before around Mars. The newfound gas, hydrogen chloride, which is the first halogen gas found in the Martian atmosphere, seems to be linked to seasonal changes, but the discovery ultimately raises more questions than it answers.

Today’s Top Deal  Amazon’s beloved Blink Mini camera is down to $28 today List Price:$29.99 Price:$26.99 ($6.75 / Piece) You Save:$3.00 (10%) Buy Now Available from Amazon BGR may receive a commission

A planet’s atmosphere might not seem like a super important thing to study, especially in the case of an atmosphere as thin as that of Mars. But while the atmosphere of Mars may not be enough to support life on its surface, it can still serve as an indicator of what processes are playing out on the surface of the planet. The exciting part about discovering hydrogen chloride in the Martian atmosphere is that it suggests that water was (or still is) a significant component of the planet’s climatology.

“You need water vapour to free chlorine and you need the by-products of water—hydrogen—to form hydrogen chloride. Water is critical in this chemistry,” Kevin Olsen, co-author of the research, said in a statement. “We also observe a correlation to dust: we see more hydrogen chloride when dust activity ramps up, a process linked to the seasonal heating of the southern hemisphere.”

But what exactly does this mean? It’s still hard to say. Whatever is generating the gas appears to be linked to summer in the planet’s southern hemisphere, but beyond that, it’s difficult to determine the chain of events that is leading to its generation.

In the second paper, researchers reveal that measurements of the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in the planet’s atmosphere point to huge losses of water over the planet’s history. This supports the idea that Mars was once rich with water and potentially even supported massive lakes, rivers, and oceans on its surface.

Mike Wehner has reported on technology and video games for the past decade, covering breaking news and trends in VR, wearables, smartphones, and future tech. Most recently, Mike served as Tech Editor at The Daily Dot, and has been featured in USA Today, Time.com, and countless other web and print outlets. His love of reporting is second only to his gaming addiction.

Source: A Mars orbiter just detected something it’s never seen before – BGR

.

.

The US space agency NASA has released the first audio from Mars, a faint crackling recording of wind captured by the Perseverance rover. A microphone did not work during the rover’s descent to the surface, but it was able to capture audio once it landed on Mars. The first-of-its-kind audio has been released along with extraordinary new video footage of the rover as it descended and landed last Thursday.
On the show we are joined by Dr Swati Mohan, the Indian American scientist who led the guidance and control operations of the Mars 2020 mission. She talks about the what the ‘Seven Minutes Terror’ was and about the tiny bindi she wore that has generated a huge buzz on social media. NDTV is one of the leaders in the production and broadcasting of un-biased and comprehensive news and entertainment programmes in India and abroad. NDTV delivers reliable information across all platforms: TV, Internet and Mobile. Subscribe for more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/ndtv?sub… Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ndtv Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ndtv Download the NDTV Apps: http://www.ndtv.com/page/apps Watch more videos: http://www.ndtv.com/video?yt​.
More Contents:
Start Rolling Your Blunts: Watch This Chill 33-Minute ‘Glide-By’ Tour of Mars
[…] 33-Minute ‘Glide-By’ Tour of Mars “Red Planet Rise,” a movie by Seán Doran made with images from a Mars orbiter, will give you the Martian fix you need […]
N/A
Watch as NASA lands its Perseverance rover on Mars
http://www.theverge.com – February 18
[…] it decelerates to 940mph during its descent, and an enhanced navigation system that links up with a Mars orbiter to calculate exactly where in Jezero the rover will land […]
9
Watch: China’s Tianwen-1 captures video of Mars two days after entering planet’s orbit
http://www.eastmojo.com – February 15
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 which translates as “Questions to Heaven” includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover […]
1
We Just Got The First Photo of Mars From China’s Tianwen 1 Probe, And It’s Breathtaking
[…] (China National Space Administration) The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
34
China’s Tianwen-1 captures video of Mars two days after it enters the planet’s orbit- Technology News, Firstpost
http://www.firstpost.com – February 15
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 — which translates as “Questions to Heaven” — includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
1
China releases footage from Mars probe showing red planet
http://www.trtworld.com – February 15
[…] Rivalling with US The five-tonne Tianwen-1 – which translates as “Questions to Heaven” – includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
N/A
Recruiting Brainfood for the week ahead – Issue #227 | Revue
newsletters.recruitingbrainfood.com – February 14
[…] Last Monday, the UAE successfully deployed a Mars orbiter, becoming the first Arab and Muslim majority nation to achieve the feat […]
0
Missed News 492
jtm71.com – February 13
[…] Speak After Trump Acquittal Watch “Mike Pence’s Ignorance Defense | The Daily Show” on YouTube A Mars orbiter just detected something it’s never seen before Trump Can’t Even Get Impeached Right | The Dail […]
2
China’s Mars Probe Tianwen-1 Sends Back Video of Red Planet After Successfully Entering Orbit | Technology News
gadgets.ndtv.com – February 13
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 – which translates as “Questions to Heaven” – includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
24
A Mars orbiter just detected something it’s never seen before –
bgr.com – February 13
The atmosphere of Mars is thin and, compared to Earth, barely even there at all, but it can still teach us about the history of the planet and its present-day status.
2
China spacecraft sends Mars footage for first time | Science and Technology News | Al Jazeera
http://www.aljazeera.com – February 12
[…] The 5,000-kilogramme (five-tonne) Tianwen-1 – which translates to “Questions to Heaven” – includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
30
China’s Mars probe sends back video of red planet, East Asia News & Top Stories
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 – which translates as “Questions to Heaven” – includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
8
China’s Mars probe sends back video of Red Planet
phys.org – February 12
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1—which translates as “Questions to Heaven”—includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
1
China releases first video of Mars taken by Tianwen-1 in orbit | Daily
[…]  The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
N/A
China’s Mars probe sends back video of Red Planet
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 — which translates as “Questions to Heaven” — includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover and launched from southern China last July […]
N/A
China’s space dream is moving in overdrive: A Long March to the Moon, Mars and beyond- Technology News, Firstpost
http://www.firstpost.com – February 11
[…] It includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s Tianwen-1 probe enters Mars orbit: state media
http://www.marsdaily.com – February 11
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 — the name of which translates as “Questions to Heaven” — includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover […]
3
China’s ‘space dream’: A Long March to the Moon and beyond
http://www.spacedaily.com – February 11
[…] It includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
3
China’s ‘space dream’: A Long March to the Moon and beyond
opoyi.com – February 10
[…] It includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
0
China’s ‘space dream’: A Long March to the Moon and beyond
phys.org – February 10
[…] It includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
2
China’s Tianwen-1 probe enters Mars orbit, state media says
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 — the name of which translates as “Questions to Heaven” — includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover […]
1
China’s Tianwen-1 probe enters Mars orbit: state media
[…] AFP The five-tonne Tianwen-1 — the name of which translates as “Questions to Heaven” — includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover […]
N/A
Missions to Mars: What China and the UAE hope to find
[…] China already lost a Mars orbiter mission, Yinghuo-1, back in 2011 […]
N/A
China’s Tianwen-1 space probe successfully enters orbit of Mars | Daily
[…]  The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
1
UAE’s Hope probe safely reaches Mars orbit | Daily
[…]   China’s mission includes a Mars orbiter, that will carry the lander and rover until release, a lander, that will parachute down the th […]
2
China’s Tianwen-1 Mars probe returns first photos showing canyons on the Red Planet surface- Technology News, Firstpost
http://www.firstpost.com – February 9
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
Mars missions from China and UAE are set to go into orbit – here’s what they could discover
[…] China already lost a Mars orbiter mission (Yinghuo-1) back in 2011 […]
1
A brief history of Mars missions | Space
http://www.space.com – February 8
[…] Phobos-Grunt was also carrying China’s first attempt at a Mars orbiter, along with an experiment run by the U […]
7
Mars missions from China and UAE are set to go into orbit – here’s what they could discover
phys.org – February 8
[…] China already lost a Mars orbiter mission (Yinghuo-1) back in 2011 […]
N/A
UAE’s ‘Hope’ Probe To Be First In Trio of Mars Mission | Majalla
eng.majalla.com – February 8
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
0
Popular Mechanics
[…] These include a Mars orbiter, lander, and a rover […]
4
» China’s Space Probe Sends Back First Image of Mars
http://www.cryptogon.com – February 8
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
1
It Looks Like The UAE Is About to Win The ‘Race to Mars’
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
20
Mars Missions From China and UAE Are Set to Go Into Orbit – Here’s What You Need to Know
en.brinkwire.com – February 8
[…] China already lost a Mars orbiter mission (Yinghuo-1) back in 2011 […]
N/A
Mars Missions From China and UAE Are Set to Go Into Orbit – Here’s What You Need to Know
scitechdaily.com – February 8
[…] China already lost a Mars orbiter mission (Yinghuo-1) back in 2011 […]
9
UAE’s Mars probe ‘Hope’ to be 1st Arab space mission, 5th to reach Red Planet | The Times of Israel
[…] The five-ton Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that for three months will study the planet’s soil an […]
N/A
Next stop Mars: Three spacecraft arriving at Red Planet from tomorrow | Daily
[…]   China’s mission includes a Mars orbiter, that will carry the lander and rover until release, a lander, that will parachute down the th […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.marsdaily.com – February 7
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
2
UAE’s ‘Hope’ probe to be first in trio of Mars missions
http://www.marsdaily.com – February 7
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
1
UAE’s ‘Hope’ probe to be first in trio of Mars missions
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
1
Mars missions: UAE’s ‘Hope’ probe to be first in trio of Mars missions
economictimes.indiatimes.com – February 7
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
3
UAE’s ‘Hope’ probe to be first in trio of Mars missions
phys.org – February 7
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a solar-powered rover that will for three months study the planet’s soil an […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.msn.com – February 7
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
Chinese Probe Sends Back Its First Picture of Mars – Slashdot
science.slashdot.org – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, lander, and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
phys.org – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.msn.com – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s space probe Tianwen-1 snaps its first image of Mars as it heads towards the planet to study its soil – ABC News
http://www.abc.net.au – February 6
[…] China could set world record with inaugural mission The 5 tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.thehindu.com – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
1
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.msn.com – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.msn.com – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
N/A
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.msn.com – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
0
China’s space probe sends back first image of Mars, landing scheduled this year
http://www.france24.com – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]
72
China’s space probe sends back its first image of Mars
http://www.sbs.com.au – February 6
[…] The five-tonne Tianwen-1 includes a Mars orbiter, a lander and a rover that will study the planet’s soil […]

Newly Discovered Ghostly Circles In The Sky Cant Be Explained By Current Theories And Astronomers Excited

In September 2019, my colleague Anna Kapinska gave a presentation showing interesting objects she’d found while browsing our new radio astronomical data. She had started noticing very weird shapes she couldn’t fit easily to any known type of object.

Among them, labelled by Anna as WTF?, was a picture of a ghostly circle of radio emission, hanging out in space like a cosmic smoke-ring. None of us had ever seen anything like it before, and we had no idea what it was. A few days later, our colleague Emil Lenc found a second one, even more spooky than Anna’s.

Anna and Emil had been examining the new images from our pilot observations for the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) project, made with CSIRO’s revolutionary new Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope.

EMU plans to boldly probe parts of the Universe where no telescope has gone before. It can do so because ASKAP can survey large swathes of the sky very quickly, probing to a depth previously only reached in tiny areas of sky, and being especially sensitive to faint, diffuse objects like these.

Join our readers who subscribe to free evidence-based news

I predicted a couple of years ago this exploration of the unknown would probably make unexpected discoveries, which I called WTFs. But none of us expected to discover something so unexpected, so quickly. Because of the enormous data volumes, I expected the discoveries would be made using machine learning. But these discoveries were made with good old-fashioned eyeballing.


Read more: Expect the unexpected from the big-data boom in radio astronomy


Hunting ORCs

Our team searched the rest of the data by eye, and we found a few more of the mysterious round blobs. We dubbed them ORCs, which stands for “odd radio circles”. But the big question, of course, is: “what are they?”

At first we suspected an imaging artefact, perhaps generated by a software error. But we soon confirmed they are real, using other radio telescopes. We still have no idea how big or far away they are. They could be objects in our galaxy, perhaps a few light-years across, or they could be far away in the Universe and maybe millions of light years across.

When we look in images taken with optical telescopes at the position of ORCs, we see nothing. The rings of radio emission are probably caused by clouds of electrons, but why don’t we see anything in visible wavelengths of light? We don’t know, but finding a puzzle like this is the dream of every astronomer.


Read more: The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder finally hits the big-data highway


We know what they’re not

We have ruled out several possibilities for what ORCs might be.

Could they be supernova remnants, the clouds of debris left behind when a star in our galaxy explodes? No. They are far from most of the stars in the Milky Way and there are too many of them.

Could they be the rings of radio emission sometimes seen in galaxies undergoing intense bursts of star formation? Again, no. We don’t see any underlying galaxy that would be hosting the star formation.

Could they be the giant lobes of radio emission we see in radio galaxies, caused by jets of electrons squirting out from the environs of a supermassive black hole? Not likely, because the ORCs are very distinctly circular, unlike the tangled clouds we see in radio galaxies.

Could they be Einstein rings, in which radio waves from a distant galaxy are being bent into a circle by the gravitational field of a cluster of galaxies? Still no. ORCs are too symmetrical, and we don’t see a cluster at their centre.

A genuine mystery

In our paper about ORCs, which is forthcoming in the Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, we run through all the possibilities and conclude these enigmatic blobs don’t look like anything we already know about.

So we need to explore things that might exist but haven’t yet been observed, such as a vast shockwave from some explosion in a distant galaxy. Such explosions may have something to do with fast radio bursts, or the neutron star and black hole collisions that generate gravitational waves.


Read more: How we closed in on the location of a fast radio burst in a galaxy far, far away


Or perhaps they are something else entirely. Two Russian scientists have even suggested ORCs might be the “throats” of wormholes in spacetime.

From the handful we’ve found so far, we estimate there are about 1,000 ORCs in the sky. My colleague Bärbel Koribalski notes the search is now on, with telescopes around the world, to find more ORCs and understand their cause.

It’s a tricky job, because ORCS are very faint and difficult to find. Our team is brainstorming all these ideas and more, hoping for the eureka moment when one of us, or perhaps someone else, suddenly has the flash of inspiration that solves the puzzle.

It’s an exciting time for us. Most astronomical research is aimed at refining our knowledge of the Universe, or testing theories. Very rarely do we get the challenge of stumbling across a new type of object which nobody has seen before, and trying to figure out what it is.

Is it a completely new phenomenon, or something we already know about but viewed in a weird way? And if it really is completely new, how does that change our understanding of the Universe? Watch this space!

By: Ray Norris Professor, School of Science, Western Sydney University

NASA Goddard

A new study using observations from NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope reveals the first clear-cut evidence that the expanding debris of exploded stars produces some of the fastest-moving matter in the universe. This discovery is a major step toward meeting one of Fermi’s primary mission goals. Cosmic rays are subatomic particles that move through space at nearly the speed of light. About 90 percent of them are protons, with the remainder consisting of electrons and atomic nuclei.

In their journey across the galaxy, the electrically charged particles become deflected by magnetic fields. This scrambles their paths and makes it impossible to trace their origins directly. Through a variety of mechanisms, these speedy particles can lead to the emission of gamma rays, the most powerful form of light and a signal that travels to us directly from its sources. Two supernova remnants, known as IC 443 and W44, are expanding into cold, dense clouds of interstellar gas.

This material emits gamma rays when struck by high-speed particles escaping the remnants. Scientists have been unable to ascertain which particle is responsible for this emission because cosmic-ray protons and electrons give rise to gamma rays with similar energies. Now, after analyzing four years of data, Fermi scientists see a gamma-ray feature from both remnants that, like a fingerprint, proves the culprits are protons. When cosmic-ray protons smash into normal protons, they produce a short-lived particle called a neutral pion.

The pion quickly decays into a pair of gamma rays. This emission falls within a specific band of energies associated with the rest mass of the neutral pion, and it declines steeply toward lower energies. Detecting this low-end cutoff is clear proof that the gamma rays arise from decaying pions formed by protons accelerated within the supernova remnants. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11209 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA’s Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f… Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard

Should you wish to make a donation, it will help us continue to provide future research and contents due to crisis

NASA Finally Contacts Voyager 2 After Unprecedented Seven-Month Silence

In the history of spaceflight, only five spacecraft ever launched by humanity possess enough energy to leave the gravitational pull of our Solar System. While thousands upon thousands of objects have been launched into space, overcoming the gravitational pull of planet Earth, the Sun is more than 300,000 times as massive as our home planet, and is far more difficult to escape from. A combination of fast launch speeds and gravitational assists from other planets were required to leave our Solar System, with only Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager 1 and 2, and New Horizons attaining “escape velocity” from our Sun.

While Pioneer 10 and 11 are now inactive, New Horizons and both Voyager spacecrafts remain operational, powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Voyager 1 has overtaken all other spacecrafts and is now the most distant: 22 billion km away, pulling away from the slightly slower Voyager 2 at “only” 18.8 billion km distant. Since the coronavirus pandemic in mid-March, NASA has had no contact with Voyager 2, but an upgraded deep space network dish made a successful call on October 29. Here’s the fascinating science that keeps us in touch with the most distant objects ever launched from Earth.

A logarithmic chart of distances, showing the Voyagers, our Solar System, and more.
At distances of 148 and 125 Astronomical Units, respectively, both Voyager 1 and 2 have passed the … [+] NASA / JPL-Caltech

When it comes to sending and receiving signals across astronomical distances, there are three enemies you have to overcome:

  1. distance,
  2. time,
  3. and power.

Recommended For You

The farther away a spacecraft is from you, the farther a signal that you send has to travel before it reaches it, the longer it takes to get there, and the lower in power that signal is when it arrives. If a spacecraft is twice as distant as another, the distance to it is twice as great, the time it takes a light signal to travel to it is twice as great, and the signal power that it receives is only one-fourth as great, since light signals spread out in the two dimensions perpendicular to the spacecraft’s line-of-sight. The farther away a spacecraft is, it’s harder to contact, it takes longer to contact it, and it requires more energy to send-or-receive the same signal.

PROMOTED Google Cloud BrandVoice | Paid Program Is Data The Answer To Scaling Compassion In Healthcare? UNICEF USA BrandVoice | Paid Program UNICEF To Lead Procurement And Supply Of Future COVID-19 Vaccines Grads of Life BrandVoice | Paid Program Disrupting Economic And Racial Inequity With Three Practical Steps

Illustration of the relationship between distance and how flux spreads out.
The way that sunlight, or any form of electromagnetic radiation, spreads out as a function of … [+] Wikimedia Commons user Borb

The way an electromagnetic signal works — whether you’re detecting it with a refracting lens, a reflecting dish, or a linear antenna — is straightforward: it spreads out in a spherical shape from its source. Because there’s a certain amount of inherent background noise to any observation you’d make, from both terrestrial and celestial sources, you need your signal to cross a certain threshold to be detectable, rising above the noise background. On the receiving end, that means larger detectors are better, while on the transmitting end, that means a higher-powered transmitter is better.

Unfortunately, the spacecraft that have already been launched cannot have their hardware upgraded in any way; once they’re launched, they’re simply stuck with the technology they’ve been outfitted with. To make matters worse, the spacecraft themselves are powered by radioactive sources, where specially chosen material, such as plutonium-238, radioactively decays, emitting heat that gets converted into electricity. As time goes on, more and more of the material decays away, decreasing the power available to the spacecraft for both transmitting and receiving signals.

A pellet of Plutonium Oxide, which is warm to the touch and glows under its own power.
A pellet of Plutonium Oxide, which is warm to the touch and glows under its own power. Pu-238 is a … [+] Public Domain / Los Alamos National Laboratory

As the amount of heat energy produced by radioactive material decreases, the conversion from heat energy into electrical energy becomes less successful: the thermocouples degrade over time and lose efficiency at lower powers. As a result, the power available to the spacecraft through radioisotope thermoelectric generators has decreased precipitously. As of 2020, the plutonium-238 onboard is producing just 69% of the initial heat energy, and that translates into only about ~50% of the original output power.

Even though Voyager 1 and 2 are now 43 years old and farther from Earth than any other operating spacecraft in history, however, they’re not lost to us yet. The reason is simple: as we improve our transmission and receiving capabilities back here on Earth, we can both send out more powerful signals to be received by these distant spacecraft, and we can do a better job of detecting the spacecrafts’ responses even at low powers. The key is through NASA’s Deep Space Network: a collection of radio antennae designed to communicate with humanity’s most distant spacecraft.

Repairs being conducted to the 70-meter dish that's part of NASA's Deep Space Network.
Crews conduct critical upgrades and repairs to the 70-meter-wide (230-foot-wide) radio antenna Deep … [+] CSIRO

There are three major radio antenna facilities around the world: one in Canberra, Australia, one in Madrid, Spain, and one in Goldstone, California. These three facilities are spaced roughly equidistant around the globe; for almost any location that you can imagine putting a spacecraft, at least one of the antennae will have a direct line-of-sight to that spacecraft at any given time.

Almost, of course. You might recognize that the facility in Canberra, Australia, is the only one located in Earth’s southern hemisphere. If a spacecraft is very far south — so far south that it’s invisible from locations like California or Spain — then the Australian dish would be the only one capable of communicating with it. While both Pioneers, New Horizons, and the Voyager 1 spacecraft could all be contacted (in theory) by all three of these facilities, Voyager 2 is the exception for one major reason: its 1989 flyby of Neptune and its giant moon, Triton.

The illuminated crescents of Neptune (foreground) & its largest moon Triton (background).
The illuminated crescents of Neptune (foreground) and its largest moon Triton (background) showcase … [+] NASA / Jet Propulsion Lab

The trip to Neptune still, even to this day, represents the only close encounter humanity has ever had with our Solar System’s eighth and final (for now) planet, as well as with Triton, the largest known object to originate in our Kuiper belt. The discoveries from that flyby were spectacular, as a number of fantastic features were discovered: Neptune’s ring system, a number of small, inner moons, and a series of features on Triton, including cryovolcanoes and varied terrain similar to what we’d discover some 26 years later when New Horizons flew past Pluto.

In order to have a close encounter with Triton, however, Voyager 2 needed to fly over Neptune’s north pole, deflecting Voyager 2’s trajectory far to the south of the plane in which the planets orbit the Sun. Over the past 31 years, it’s continued to follow that trajectory, rendering it invisible to every member of the Deep Space Network except for the one dish in Australia. And since mid-March, 2020, that dish — which includes the radio transmitter used to talk to Voyager 2 — has been shut down for upgrades.

NASA's Deep Space Station 43 (DSS43) radio telescope is massive: 70 meters in size.
This image of NASA’s Deep Space Station 43 (DSS43) radio telescope belies its massive size. At 70 … [+] NASA/CSIRO

The dish itself is a spectacular piece of technology. It’s 70 meters (230 feet) across: a world-class radio antenna. The instruments attached to it include two radio transmitters, one of which is used to send commands to Voyager 2. That instrument, as of early 2020, was 47 years old, and hadn’t been replaced in all that time. Additionally, it was using antiquated heating and cooling equipment, old and inefficient electronics, and a set of power supply equipment that limited any potential upgrades.

Fortunately, the decision was made to upgrade all of these, which should enable NASA to do what no other facility can do: send commands to Voyager 2. While the spacecraft is still operating — including sending health updates and science data that can be received by a series of smaller dishes also located in Australia — it has been unable to receive commands, ensuring that it will just keep doing whatever it was last doing until those new commands are received.

With its close flyby of Neptune and Triton, Voyager 2's trajectory was severely altered.
With its close flyby of Neptune and Triton, Voyager 2’s trajectory was severely altered, plunging it … [+] Image: Phoenix7777/Wikimedia Commons; Data: HORIZONS System, JPL, NASA

On October 29, 2020, enough of the upgrades had been executed that mission operators for Voyager 2 decided to perform a critical test: to send a series of commands to Voyager 2 for the first time since the upgrades began. According to the project manager of the Deep Space Network for NASA, Brad Arnold:

“What makes this task unique is that we’re doing work at all levels of the antenna, from the pedestal at ground level all the way up to the feedcones at the center of the dish that extend above the rim.”

Although it takes about 36 light-hours for a signal to travel round-trip from Earth to Voyager 2, NASA announced on November 2 that the test was successful. Voyager 2 returned a signal that confirmed the call was received, followed by a successful execution of the commands. According to Arnold, “This test communication with Voyager 2 definitely tells us that things are on track with the work we’re doing.”

Triton, at left, as imaged by Voyager 2, and Pluto, at right, as imaged by New Horizons.
Triton, at left, as imaged by Voyager 2, and Pluto, at right, as imaged by New Horizons. Both worlds … [+] NASA/JPL/USGS (L), NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI (R)

The upgrades to this member of the Deep Space Network are on track for completion in early 2021, where they will not only be critical for the continued success of the Voyager 2 mission, but will prepare NASA for a series of upcoming missions. The upgraded infrastructure will play a critical role in any upcoming Moon-to-Mars exploration efforts, will support any crewed missions such as Artemis, will provide communication and navigation infrastructure, and will also assist with communications to NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover, scheduled to land on Mars on February 18, 2021.

This particular dish was constructed in 1972, where it had an original size of 64 meters (210 feet). It was expanded to 70 meters (230 feet) 15 years later, but none of the subsequent repairs or upgrades compare to the work being done today. According to NASA, this is “one of the most significant makeovers the dish has received and the longest it’s been offline in over 30 years.”

Position and trajectory of Voyager 1 and the positions of the planets on 14 February 1990.
Position and trajectory of Voyager 1 and the positions of the planets on 14 February 1990, the day … [+] Wikimedia Commons / Joe Haythornthwaite and Tom Ruen

As Voyager 2 and the other escaping spacecraft continue to recede from the Sun, their power levels will continue to drop and it will become progressively more difficult to issue commands to them as well as to receive data. However, as long as they remain functional, even at incredibly low and inefficient power levels, we can continue to upgrade and enlarge the antennae that are a part of NASA’s Deep Space Network to continue to conduct science with them. As long as these spacecraft remain operational in some capacity, simply continuing to upgrade our facilities here on Earth will enable us to gather data for years, and likely even decades, to come.

Voyager 1 and 2 are already the most distant operational spacecraft ever launched from Earth, and continue to set new records. They’ve both passed the heliopause and entered interstellar space, probing different celestial hemispheres as they go. Each new piece of data they send back is a first: the first time we’ve directly sampled space outside of our Solar System from so far away. With these new upgrades, we’ll have the capacity to see what we’ve never seen before. In science, that’s where the potential for rich, new discoveries always lies. Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website or some of my other work here

Ethan Siegel

Ethan Siegel

I am a Ph.D. astrophysicist, author, and science communicator, who professes physics and astronomy at various colleges. I have won numerous awards for science writing since 2008 for my blog, Starts With A Bang, including the award for best science blog by the Institute of Physics. My two books, Treknology: The Science of Star Trek from Tricorders to Warp Drive, Beyond the Galaxy: How humanity looked beyond our Milky Way and discovered the entire Universe, are available for purchase at Amazon. Follow me on Twitter @startswithabang.

.

.

V101 Science

Part 2 – The Voyager two space probe was the second human-made object to reach interstellar space. But what did it see during its historic 42 year trip out of the solar the system? If you haven’t watched part 1, which follows Voyager 1 on its journey then here is the link – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Du5he… I would like to say a massive thank you to my generous Patrons. Every donation helps me improve the channel, by purchasing better software and equipment. I will always strive to make V101 Science as good as it can possibly be. Thank you so much. My Patreon *Star* list – Silverfleur LunaGirl (aka Claire) Want to help support my channel and also get added benefits? Then why not become a Patron today? https://www.patreon.com/V101Science Or maybe purchase some of our awesome merchandise! T-shirts, hoodies, mugs, Phone cases, it’s all available now on YouTube! Also, check out our Amazon store! Just click on the link below to find loads of awesome items – https://www.amazon.com/shop/v101science (US Version) https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/v101sci… (UK Version) **REMEMBER TO SUBSCRIBE FOR MUCH MORE TO COME** Subscribe – https://www.youtube.com/c/V101Science Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/V101Science Twitter – https://twitter.com/V101Science Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/v101__science/ Music attribution – Ambient-wave-13 – Erokia Sound Design All content is Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

.

What Is ‘Panspermia?’ New Evidence For The Wild Theory That Says We Could All Be Space Aliens

Imagine if NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover—now on its way to the red planet—discovered microbial life there.

It would change everything we know about life in the Solar System and far beyond.

Or would it? What if we accidentally transported life to Mars on a spacecraft? And what if that is how life moves around the Universe?

A new paper published this week in Frontiers in Microbiology explores the possibility that microbes and extremophiles may migrate between planets and distribute life around the Universe—and that includes on spacecraft sent from Earth to Mars.

What is ‘panspermia?’

It’s an untested, unproven and rather wild theory regarding the interplanetary transfer of life. It theorizes that microscopic life-forms, such as bacteria, can be transported through space and land on another planet. Thus sparking life elsewhere.

It could happen by accident—such as on spacecraft—via comets and asteroids in the Solar System, and perhaps even between star systems on interstellar objects like ʻOumuamua.

However, for “panspermia” to have any credence requires proof that bacteria could survive a long journey through the vacuum, temperature fluctuations, and intense UV radiation in outer space.

Cue the “Tanpopo” project.

The bacterial exposure experiment took place from 2015 to 2018 using the Exposed Facility located on the exterior of Kibo, the Japanese Experimental Module of the International Space Station.
The bacterial exposure experiment took place from 2015 to 2018 using the Exposed Facility located on … [+] JAXA/NASA

What is the ‘Tanpopo’ mission?

Tanpopo—dandelion in English—is a scientific experiment to see if bacteria can survive in the extremes of outer space.

The researchers from Tokyo University—in conjunction with Japanese national space agency JAXA—wanted to see if the bacteria deinococcus could survive in space, so had it placed in exposure panels on the outside of the International Space Station (ISS). It’s known as being resistant to radiation. Dried samples of different thicknesses were exposed to space environment for one, two, or three years and then tested to see if any survived.

They did, largely by a layer of dead bacteria protecting a colony beneath it. The researchers estimate that a colony of 1 mm of diameter could potentially survive up to 8 years in outer space conditions. MORE FROM FORBESThe Brightest Star In The Night Sky Rises Today (And No, It’s Not The North Star)By Jamie Carter

What does this mean for ‘panspermia?’

“The results suggest that deinococcus could survive during the travel from Earth to Mars and vice versa, which is several months or years in the shortest orbit,” said Akihiko Yamagishi, a Professor at Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences and principal investigator of Tanpopo.

That means spacecraft visiting Mars could theoretically carry microorganisms and potentially contaminate its surface.

However, this isn’t just about Earth and Mars—the ramifications of panspermia, if proven, are far-reaching.

“The origin of life on Earth is the biggest mystery of human beings (and) scientists can have totally different points of view on the matter,” said Dr. Yamagishi. “Some think that life is very rare and happened only once in the Universe, while others think that life can happen on every suitable planet.”

“If panspermia is possible, life must exist much more often than we previously thought.” MORE FROM FORBESA Waxing Moon Visits Jupiter And Saturn: What To Watch For In The Night Sky This WeekBy Jamie Carter

What is ‘lithopanspermia?’

This is bacteria surviving in space for a long period when shielded by rock—typically an asteroid or a comet—which could travel between planets, potentially spreading bacteria and biologically-rich matter around the Solar System.

However, the theory of panspermia goes even further than that.

What is ‘interstellar panspermia’ and ‘galactic panspermia?’

This is the hypothesis—and it’s one with zero evidence—that life exists throughout the galaxy and/or Universe specifically because bacteria and microorganisms are spread around by asteroids, comets, space dust and possibly even interstellar spacecraft from alien civilizations.

In 2018 a paper concluded that the likelihood of Galactic panspermia is strongly dependent upon the survival lifetime of the organisms as well as the velocity of the comet or asteroid—positing that the entire Milky Way could potentially be exchanging biotic components across vast distances.

Such theories have gained credence in the last few years with the discovery of two extrasolar objects Oumuamua and Borisov passing through our Solar System.

However, while the ramifications are mind-boggling, panspermia is definitely not a proven scientific process.

There are still many unanswered questions about how the space-surviving microbes could physically transfer from one celestial body to another.

Illustration of NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover studying a Mars rock outcrop (not to scale). Mars 2020 is targeted for launch in July/August 2020 aboard an Atlas V-541 rocket from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.
Illustration of NASA’s Mars 2020 Perseverance rover studying a Mars rock outcrop (not to scale). … [+] NASA/JPL-Caltech

How will Perseverance look for life on Mars?

NASA’s Perseverance rover is due to land on the red planet on February 18, 2021. It will land in a nearly four billion-year-old river delta in Mars’ 28 miles/45 kilometers-wide Jezero Crater. 

It’s thought likely that Jezero Crater was home to a lake as large as Lake Tahoe more than 3.5 billion years ago. Ancient rivers there could have carried organic molecules and possibly even microorganisms.

Perseverance’s mission will be to analyze rock and sediment samples to see if Mars may have had conditions for microorganisms to thrive. It will drill a few centimeters into Mars and take core samples, then put the most promising into containers. It will then leave them on the Martian surface to be later collected by a human mission in the early 2030s. 

Wishing you clear skies and wide eyes. Follow me

on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

Jamie Carter

 Jamie Carter

I’m an experienced science, technology and travel journalist interested in space exploration, moon-gazing, exploring the night sky, solar and lunar eclipses, astro-travel, wildlife conservation and nature. I’m the editor of WhenIsTheNextEclipse.com and the author of “A Stargazing Program for Beginners: A Pocket Field Guide” (Springer, 2015), as well as many eclipse-chasing guides.

Source: FORBES

NASA’s Mars-Bound Spacecraft Is Back Online After Experiencing Technical Difficulties

1

Mars 2020, the spaceship carrying NASA’s new rover Perseverance to the Red Planet, experienced technical difficulties and was temporarily running on essential systems only, the agency said Thursday.

“Data indicate the spacecraft had entered a state known as safe mode, likely because a part of the spacecraft was a little colder than expected while Mars 2020 was in Earth’s shadow,” NASA said.

The spaceship has left Earth’s shadow and the temperatures are now normal.

When a vessel enters safe mode, it shuts down all but essential systems until it receives new commands from mission control. “Right now, the Mars 2020 mission is completing a full health assessment on the spacecraft and is working to return the spacecraft to a nominal configuration for its journey to Mars,” added NASA.

The spacecraft also experienced a delay in setting up its communications link with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, its mission control.

Mars 2020 sent its first signal to ground controllers at 9:15 am (1315 GMT) but it was not until 11:30 am (1530 GMT) that it established telemetry – more detailed spacecraft data.

Matt Wallace, the mission’s deputy project manager, said that the fact that the spaceship had entered safe mode was not overly concerning.

“That’s perfectly fine, the spacecraft is happy there,” he said.

“The team is working through that telemetry, they’re going to look through the rest of the spacecraft health.

“So far, everything I’ve seen looks good, so we’ll know more in a little bit.”

© Agence France-Presse

Comet Neowise Is a Photographer’s Dream Tips For Capturing It

1

NASA says comet Neowise is the brightest space iceball to fly by Earth since at least 1997, and it’s now putting on a show in the evening sky, sending hopeful astrophotographers out into the dark.

Plenty of gorgeous images of the comet appearing over the horizon just before sunrise or shortly after sunset have been circulating online, even as most people still were needing binoculars to locate the speeding space visitor. This leads to an obvious question: How the heck did they get those great shots?

It takes a little planning and patience, but with the right equipment and a little cooperation from the weather, just about anyone can do it. Here are some basic tips to get you started.

Pick the right time and place

During the rest of its run, comet Neowise will appear primarily in the northwest and western evening skies. See my earlier post for more details on exactly where to look or use an online sky mapping tool like TheSkyLive.com for your time and location.

Once you know which direction to face, you’ll need to get as far away from all light pollution as possible and make sure you’ll have as clear and broad a view of the night sky as you can find. Clouds and city lights can really ruin your astrophotography plans.

bestmining780

Some more intrepid photographers have taken to late-night or early-morning mountain climbs to get the best vantage points possible, often with remarkable results. Just be sure to prepare and be safe if you’re going to make an expedition out of it.

Grab your gear

While a comet zips through space at 17,500 miles per hour (28,159 kilometers per hour), it appears almost stationary from our perspective. That means photographing Neowise is about precision and long exposures rather than any sort of action shots. As such, you’ll need a sturdy tripod and a camera with a good telephoto zoom lens. You’ll need to be able to set the lens and camera to manual focus and exposure, as well as use a Bulb, Time or long-exposure preset mode to handle the exposure. If you really want to go the extra mile, use a camera with a shutter release cable, self-timer or some other remote operation capability to prevent any shaking or blurring that might come from pressing the shutter button.

It doesn’t hurt to bring a wide-angle lens as well. The tail of a comet can take up a wide enough area that a zoom lens might not always be practical. That’s how many have been able to grab especially stupendous images of both Neowise and the aurora borealis.

“I was excited to see my wide-angle lens could capture the span from STEVE (an aurora-related phenomenon) to Neowise, and got about 10 photos,” Manitoba-based photographer Donna Lach told NASA. “I observed the incredible aurora for about three hours, and it sometimes stretched above me. At times Neowise was outshone by the brilliant aurora, but it was visible the entire time.”

Experiment!

Once you’ve found the right spot, located the comet and set up your equipment, the real work begins. First, ditch auto-focus on your camera and play with different focal lengths, exposure times and frame compositions. You might want to isolate the comet, or capture it against the landscape.

When NASA’s Bill Dunford photographed the comet while it was visible with the naked eye before dawn, he found a certain sweet spot for getting the best images.

“I zoomed in on it and exposed each shot for about four seconds,” he explains in the above video.

Trust the processing

We live in a photoshopped world, but with astrophotography you can use image processing to make Neowise look more as it appears in person.

This will again require some experimentation and good image-editing software, but Dunford advises playing around to see if you can brighten the image and bring out the brilliance of the comet and reduce noise. This is more likely to be how your brain actually processed the image received from your retinas in real life.

50103972537-5f447dbcfa-k
Neowise over Washington, D.C.

NASA/Bill Ingalls

Share the wealth

Be sure to share whatever you capture with the world. Some of us are staring down a forecast of cloudy evening skies for the next week, despite living in the southwest desert. Please share your images with me on Twitter and Instagram @EricCMack.

2

How To See Comet NEOWISE From Your Backyard This Week

1

It’s time to see a comet in 2020—complete with a tail! After a few weeks of will-it, won’t-it, Comet NEOWISE appears to have survived a close encounter with the Sun (unlike Comet ATLAS and Comet SWAN, which both fell apart) and has become easy to see in binoculars in the northern hemisphere—and has even become a naked-eye object.

Imaging Comet NEOWISE on July 5, 2020, Flagstaff, Arizona-based photographer Jeremy Perez described it on Twitter as “an easy naked-eye object, but really rewarding through binoculars.”

Comet NEOWISE was also captured on July 5, 2020 from Austria by astrophotographer Philipp Salzgeber:

It might be wise to catch Comet NEOWISE before it potentially wanes.

It’s destined to be at its brightest and easiest to see in mid-July as it races back to the outer Solar System, but Comet F3 NEOWISE (also called C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) is already surpassing expectations for its naked-eye brightness.

In fact, a few weeks before its predicted naked-eye visibility Comet NEOWISE is already being observed and photographed from the northern hemisphere.

However, comets are notoriously unreliable, and it could fizzle-out at any moment. How it looks now could be the best it gets.

Here’s another image of Comet NEOWISE, this time from the UK by space writer Paul Sutherland, who has written a guide to spotting Comet NEOWISE:

Best time to see Comet NEOWISE

The best time and place to look will be about 10º above the northeastern horizon before dawn. Comet NEOWISE is currently in the constellation of Taurus. It will soon enter Gemini, then visit Auriga, Lynx and Ursa Major.

However, as July wears on, Comet NEOWISE should—if it remains this bright—be easier to see because it will be higher above the horizon.

Comet NEOWISE will be closest to the Earth on July 23, 2020, so that’s going to be the peak week to look if it remains bright.

That’s also when Comet NEOWISE will be visible before midnight and during a New Moon, so the night skies will be dark.

That’s all well and good, but it could fizzle out at any time, so have a look soon if you can get up (very) early.

How to see Comet NEOWISE

For now, your best chance is binoculars—any pair will do (I recommend 10×50 binoculars for all kinds of astronomy)—but by mid-July it could well be a naked-eye object. Typically, comets are faint, so comet-spotting usually requires a telescope.

Who discovered Comet NEOWISE?

A long period comet, Comet NEOWISE was first discovered by NASA’s Near Earth Objects Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) space telescope on March 27, 2020.

It got closest to the Sun—its perihelion— on July 3, 2020, which is the most dangerous time for a comet. Often comets break-up and reduce in size around their perihelion, but not so Comet NEOWISE—at least, so far.

Comet NEOWISE is next expected back in the Solar System in about 6,800 years.

Wishing you clear skies and wide eyes.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

I’m an experienced science, technology and travel journalist interested in space exploration, moon-gazing, exploring the night sky, solar and lunar eclipses, astro-travel, wildlife conservation and nature. I’m the editor of WhenIsTheNextEclipse.com and the author of “A Stargazing Program for Beginners: A Pocket Field Guide” (Springer, 2015), as well as many eclipse-chasing guides.

Source: https://www.forbes.com

financecurrent

Whether you’re a bitcoin trader or new to the market, you can buy, sell, and trade cryptocurrency with AUD, USD, and other major currencies. We service clients globally, including Australia, the United States, Singapore, Canada, New Zealand, and Europe.

NASA Teases ‘Psyche,’ A Robot To Explore An Asteroid Worth More Than Our Global Economy

1

NASA is about to begin building its latest spacecraft. Called “Psyche” it will explore a 140 miles/226 kilometers-wide asteroid called “16 Psyche.” Today it’s passed a major milestone.

Why is NASA going to ‘16 Psyche?’

Located in the Solar System’s main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, metal-rich 16 Psyche is thought to be the exposed metallic iron, nickel and gold core of a protoplanet. Most asteroids are rocky or icy.

The Psyche mission is part of NASA’s Discovery Program of low-cost robotic space missions.

16 Psyche’s core is tantalisingly similar to Earth’s, which means that it could be the heart of a dead planet that lost its rocky outer layers or suffered from violent collisions. The metals that make-up this one-of-a-kind asteroid could, according to some, be worth $10,000 quadrillion.

When will NASA’s ‘Psyche’ launch?

Due to launch from Pad 39A at Cape Canaveral, Florida, in August 2022 on top of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket, fly-past Mars in 2023, and begin orbiting the asteroid in January 2026, Psyche has just passed its “critical design review” stage.

Now the mission moves to actually making the space hardware.

What happens to ‘Psyche’ now?

“It’s one of the most intense reviews a mission goes through in its entire life cycle,” said Lindy Elkins-Tanton, principal investigator for the Psyche mission. “And we passed with flying colors. The challenges are not over, and we’re not at the finish line, but we’re running strong.”

The team now has to build its three science instruments:

  • a magnetometer to measure the asteroid’s magnetic field.
  • a multispectral imager to capture images of its surface and data, about what its made of, and its geological features.
  • spectrometers that analyze the neutrons and gamma rays coming from the surface to reveal what the asteroid is made of.

Assembly and testing of the full robotic spacecraft begins in February 2021, and everything has to be in the clean room at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) by April 2021.

The main spacecraft chassis is now being built at Maxar Technologies in Palo Alto, California.

“One of the things we pride ourselves on in these deep-space missions is the reliability of the hardware,” said Henry Stone, Psyche Project Manager at JPL. “The integrated system is so sophisticated that comprehensive testing is critical. You do robustness tests, stress tests, as much testing as you can … you want to expose and correct every problem and bug now because after launch, you cannot go fix the hardware.”

The mission will also test NASA’s new laser communications technology called Deep Space Optical Communications.

Wishing you clear skies and wide eyes.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

I’m an experienced science, technology and travel journalist interested in space exploration, moon-gazing, exploring the night sky, solar and lunar eclipses…

financecurrent
%d bloggers like this: