Teaching Diversity And Inclusion To The Billions Of Intelligent Systems Making Autonomous Decisions

Engineers Meeting in Robotic Research Laboratory

The idea that diversity and inclusion should be core drivers of the new economy and the emerging global society are mostly understood at a human level. The more people who are part of one system, being offered the same opportunities regardless of their gender, race, ethnic origin, and many other diverse variables, the higher the tide rises for everybody. But even with that intrinsic understanding of the idea that diversity and inclusion will generate a different and better world, significant barriers still exist to making this human truth a practical reality in our daily lives.

The power of all genders, all races, and all languages can change the world. Even each of these pieces, though, has its blind spots if taken as a standalone viewpoint — in effect, by seeing the world through a single lens, that lens can act as a deep barrier. Imagine how much is lost with only a single way of seeing, thinking, learning, and maybe even applying those learnings.

Digital companies talk about the power of the individual or the customer to be the center of the service. Yet how can we build around individuals without recognizing and servicing the unique combinations of needs or opinions that diverse thinking and actions entail? McKinsey has, since 2014, leaned into the idea of measuring diversity and inclusivity as a driver of business value creation. The intent is to show every year that companies that live and deliver diverse and inclusive strategies outperform their industry peers.

The gap (between diverse and inclusive leaders and the poorest performers) has gotten bigger year by year, growing from 33% percent in 2018 to 36% in 2019. Even with clear and longitudinal data, we still struggle against many inherent biases to accept and act on the fact that diversity and inclusion widen the lens for viewing ideas, thinking, processes, and customers in an increasingly global market.

The world will get more diverse over time. By 2044 it is projected that over half of Americans will belong to a minority group. We will in effect be a collection of diversities, with one in five of us not being born in the USA but living here. Multiply this American future by the nuances of each of the 195 countries in the world and together we will be the largest collection of diversities the planet has ever seen.

Now imagine a world of not just 7 billion people, but 40 billion devices computing, connecting, sensing, predicting, and running autonomously in an intelligent systems world. PwC estimated that 70% of all global GDP growth between 2020 and 2030 will come from this machine economy (AI, robotics, IoT devices).

U.S. GDP is expected to grow $10T between now and 2030. If 70% of that is from these machines sensing, predicting, computing, and connecting on the intelligent edge, then that is a $7T economy. Will these machines be more capable than humankind has been to think about diversity and inclusion in the way they work with data, humans, and other machines?

These devices don’t have a McKinsey to explain to them where and how inclusion and diversity will drive a better result. They make decisions in milliseconds based on the programming instructions they receive, and they learn as they execute their many, often complex and intelligent, tasks.

How these machines learn to think (constantly) are driven by rules set by humans and by other machines that were in part or wholly programmed by humans. How can the right behaviors be instilled in these intelligent systems? Think of two basic dynamics we must pay attention to in an increasingly intelligent systems world:

Human experiences drive diversity and inclusive design

Learning — and applying — how to be aware of the needs of diverse groups has more value than ever before. This acquired knowledge will act as the codex for how we program the devices that live and work with us globally by 2030 and beyond. There is a narrow time window in which to take our own personal experiences and the experience of others around us into account in the design and programming process for intelligent systems that will manage autonomous vehicles, medical devices, and manufacturing environments where cobots will be working alongside humans.

All machines might look and behave in the same way, but the humans around them do not, so what machine biases will exist in the intelligent systems world? Understanding how to design and program for inclusive and diverse thinking without bias means intelligent systems need to have a progressive learning ability (e.g., machine learning and digital feedback loops), as well as mission-critical capacities that mean they can safely and securely function around humans who may look, sound, move, or think differently from those whom the machines have been designed or operated around.

Machines will be diverse too and will need to be inclusive of each other

Once we live in an intelligent systems world, we will need intelligent systems to recognize each other in near instant time. These systems might be doing completely different tasks, but they might need to share data, space, or compute capacity in milliseconds. Knowing when, where, and how to have that network effect in an intelligent systems world (for example, consider autonomous vehicles) requires a capacity for inclusiveness and maybe even a clear comprehension about the power of diverse data sets from different devices to create value far greater than the sum of all parts.

Nurturing that capacity to create systems for a diversity of design and operations, as well as for an inclusiveness to allow constant learning, is a challenge that will be essential in an intelligent systems world.

We will not be able to make the right world for these intelligent systems and all that they can bring to humanity if we do not design, operate, and build them to be inclusive, diverse, and without bias in how they operate. While not suggesting that there should be a soul to an intelligent system, we should recognize that the moment in our own human world to encourage as much diversity and inclusion in our thinking is right now, and how well we do it will have major consequences for how we teach our intelligent systems to thrive in a world dominated with a diversity of machines and humans.

PRESIDENT AND CEO

With more than 25 years of experience driving digital innovation and growth at technology companies, Kevin Dallas is responsible for all aspects of the Wind River business globally. He joined Wind River from Microsoft, where he most recently served as the corporate vice president for cloud and AI business development. At Microsoft, he led a team creating partnerships that enable the digital transformation of customers and partners across a range of industries including: connected/autonomous vehicles, industrial IoT, discrete manufacturing, retail, financial services, media and entertainment, and healthcare.

Prior to joining Microsoft in 1996, he held roles at NVIDIA Corporation and National Semiconductor (now Texas Instruments Inc.) in the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East in roles that included microprocessor design, systems engineering, product management, and end-to-end business leadership. He currently serves as a director on the board of Align Technology, Inc. He holds a B.S.c. degree in electrical and electronic engineering from Staffordshire University, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, England.

Source: Teaching Diversity And Inclusion To The Billions Of Intelligent Systems Making Autonomous Decisions

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Related Links:

Understood.Org -Loneliness Can Impact Kids Who Learn and Think Differently

Beyond Differences – Consequences of Social Isolation

Vox – America’s Loneliness Epidemic and Coronavirus Pandemic Together

New York Times – Learning Pods

CDC.Gov – Parent Checklist

Tyler Clementi Foundation’s Cybersafety Guide

Connecticut Children’s – Mindfulness Exercises for Kids

Beyond Tolerance

Teaching Tolerance

National Seed Project Curriculum

Everyday Feminism: What is Heteronormativity?

https://www.weareteachers.com/mirrors-and-windows/

5 Remote Friendly Teaching Strategies to Deepen Empathy

During Universal Human Rights Month this December and every month, optimizing classroom activities to foster learning and caring about global human rights is a crucial task of modern educators. For all of the vital information that is available about histories of struggles for human rights and coverage of ongoing struggles, teaching this material demands parallel attention to deepening our capacities for empathy and perspective taking. Based on a bedrock of social-emotional learning (SEL) methodology, Facing History offers these 5 remote-friendly teaching strategies to aid thoughtful teaching in remote and mixed learning environments:

Contracting for Remote Learning
Contracting is the process of openly discussing with students how classroom members will engage with each other and with the learning experience, and it is an important strategy for making the classroom a reflective and respectful community. Since remote learning deeply affects the progression of classroom communication, it is important to update your class contract so it accounts for any new logistical circumstances so students can feel engaged, valued, respected, and heard.

Bio-poem: Connecting Identity and Poetry
“Who am I?” is a question on the minds of many adolescents. This activity helps students clarify important elements of their identities by writing a poem about themselves or about a historical or literary figure. By providing a structure for students to think more critically about an individual’s traits, experiences, and character, bio-poems allow students to build peer relationships and foster a cohesive classroom community.

Reflection upon the complexity of one’s own identity is also crucial for building an empathic bridge to the inner worlds and social lives of others.
[NOTE: We invite you to make logistical tweaks to ensure alignment with your current teaching situation.]

Text-to-Text, Text-to-Self, Text-to-World
Reading comes alive when we recognize how the ideas in a text connect to our experiences and beliefs, events happening in the larger world, our understanding of history, and our knowledge of other texts. This strategy helps students develop the habit of making these connections as they read. When students are given a purpose for their reading, they are able to better comprehend and make meaning of the ideas in the text.

Promoting processing on these multiple levels also trains students to carry this mode of analysis beyond the classroom and apply it in situations where they have the potential to make a difference.
[NOTE: We invite you to make logistical tweaks to ensure alignment with your current teaching situation.]

Graffiti Boards
Virtual Graffiti Boards are a shared writing space (such as Google Docs, Google Jamboard, Padlet, Flipgrid, or VoiceThread) where students can write comments or questions during a synchronous session or during a defined asynchronous time. The purpose of this strategy is to help students “hear” each other’s ideas. Virtual Graffiti Boards create a record of students’ ideas and questions that can be referred to at a later point, and give students space and time to process emotional material.

Students’ responses can give you insight into what they are thinking and feeling about a topic and provide a springboard for both synchronous and asynchronous discussions. Further, this strategy allows students to practice taking in the perspectives of others and trying on others’ experiences in a manner that also provides them with space to process material that may be challenging.

Journals in Remote Learning
Journals play a key role in a Facing History classroom, whether the learning is in person or remote. Many students find that writing or drawing in a journal helps them process ideas, formulate questions, retain information, and synthesize their perspectives and experiences with those of classmates.

Journals make learning visible by providing a safe, accessible space for students to share thoughts, feelings, and uncertainties.

They also help nurture classroom community and offer a way for you to build relationships with your students through reading and commenting on their journals. And frequent journal writing helps students become more fluent in expressing their ideas in writing or speaking.

Facing History and Ourselves invites educators to use our resource collection for remote and hybrid learning, Taking School Online with a Student-Centered Approach.

Topics: Online Learning, Empathy

By Kaitlin Smith
Kaitlin Smith is a Marketing and Communications Writer for Facing History and Ourselves. At Facing History and Ourselves, we value conversation—in classrooms, in our professional development for educators, and online. When you comment on Facing Today, you’re engaging with our worldwide community of learners, so please take care that your contributions are constructive, civil, and advance the conversation.

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WATCH NEXT ▶ https://youtu.be/-mzXW_uBU1w *Hey Hey!* Do you need some remote, distance, online learning hacks to incorporate into your teaching? These tips and strategies for remote teaching will enhance your work-life balance as a teacher and (hopefully) keep you sane during this time. Let me know in the comments if you have any other distance learning/teaching tips that may help other teachers; especially if you are further along in the remote teaching journey than I am! #distancelearning#remotelearning#remoteteaching *SIGN UP* for regular updates HERE https://mailchi.mp/4b53faf5e751/kafoo… *SUBSCRIBE HERE* https://goo.gl/njMj9G Please consider subscribing as I am keen to hit 2000 subscribers this year. 🙂 I’m currently at 1789 at the time of this upload…) *GET* your 2020 Digital Teacher Planner HERE https://gum.co/KHetUa *WATCH* SIMILAR VIDEOS HERE Remote Teaching playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list… Teach From Home Teacher Tag https://youtu.be/sW9TF7v8l1E Classroom Management Tips https://youtu.be/X3TJjNXVcWI 5 Mistakes New Teachers Make https://youtu.be/qygFew2gjZ0 Google Classroom for Beginners https://youtu.be/fRlmgO4FVa0 Remote Teaching in Australia https://youtu.be/-mzXW_uBU1w *CURRENT FAVES* These are the YouTube channels that I am currently watching (and LOVING!) … Janice Wan Vlogs https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvEp… Chronicles of Teacher Tay https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0He… The Michelaks https://www.youtube.com/user/alittleb… Sarah’s Day https://www.youtube.com/user/sarahsda… *GET* your 2020 Digital Teacher Planner HERE https://gum.co/KHetUa Here at Kafoople Land my passion is for you to be able to: 🌸TEACH WELL 🌸LIVE WELL and 🌸BE WELL

Everything You Need to Know Before Applying for Your First TEFL Job

The TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) market is quickly evolving and expanding. Recent TEFL graduates have a lot to look forward to in their future careers or first TEFL job due to the worldwide demand for English teachers creating fantastic and diverse opportunities.

Beginning a career in an ever-growing, the fast-developing market is definitely appealing, especially when you’re fed up with the routine of your current job and are looking to launch yourself into something new. TEFL is one of the few careers allowing you to travel the world right away.

The current climate makes it difficult to attend courses however, with TEFL you can cover everything you need online. There are many benefits of completing a course online beyond the ability to qualify without leaving your home.

You can take your time with the course, factoring in your studies when it suits you. The likelihood is that you’ve decided to take a TEFL course alongside your current job or studies, so knowing that there’s no pressure to complete the course within a set period of time is very reassuring.

Below are a few important points to help you navigate entering the world of teaching English as a foreign language. Having an awareness of these before both purchasing a course and beginning applications will be invaluable. As always, it’s important that you’re well researched before you commit to any course or job. 

TEFL Certification – What to Prioritize 

The quality of your TEFL certification will impact your job search. The endless pages of results following a quick Google search for ‘TEFL’ are evidence enough of its growing popularity and relevance.

This increase in demand for English teachers has not gone unnoticed by ambitious business opportunists catching on to the current learning trends. As a result, there are many course providers offering a range of courses but this also means there are plenty on the market that simply won’t be enough for employers. 

Prioritizing a highly-accredited TEFL provider couldn’t be more important. The accreditation of your provider is everything when it comes to getting TEFL certified. Why? Because it verifies that you’ve completed a high-quality course upholding academic integrity and respect in the world of teaching English.

There is no overarching regulating body for these courses, so at least with accreditation, you can be confident that your provider has been approved by authorities that count.

Some TEFL providers will stretch the term ‘accredited’, so it’s seriously important that you know what to look out for and prioritize when searching for the right provider.

You should be able to do a quick investigation on their site as to where they’ve received their accreditation. Ideally, they are from the government or established education bodies. If this information is difficult to find, you’re perhaps best shopping elsewhere. 

Surprisingly low-cost TEFL courses should also raise some red flags. The cost of a quality course should be reflected in the price, and if it’s very low how can you expect it to cover everything you need to know?

120-hour TEFL courses are standard procedure for most employers and consequently should be the minimum amount of time you commit to your studies. Any less doesn’t uphold much credit with employers and will severely impact your job search.

English Teacher - Career Paths of English Teaching

TEFL Career Options Are Available to Anyone Proficient in English

Newly qualified TEFL teachers aren’t necessarily individuals with extensive experience in the education sector. While experience is a bonus, anyone proficient in English can get TEFL certified.

You could be right out of university, middle-aged and looking to take your career in a new direction, or just looking to find part-time work alongside your current job or studies. There are multiple ways to TEFL, each bringing their own advantages and flexibilities to the table.

You could also use your time living abroad to learn another language. Making the effort in your free time to pick up some of the languages will be greatly appreciated and help boost your confidence. It’ll significantly help you settle in and meet new people, too. Plus, another language always looks great on your CV. 

There are plenty of ways you can make language learning fun and part of your daily routine.  Studying a language will make you a better teacher as you’ll be able to relate to the learning process. Check out this article for some tips on learning a language while you travel.

What Kind of TEFL Teaching Suits You?                            

Beginning your TEFL course with a clear objective of how and where you want to teach will help motivate you along the way, but there is no definitive way to TEFL so if you’re unsure what the best option for you is, you can take your time making a decision. After you qualify to teach English a lot of paths will be an option for you, dependent of course on certain visa and employer requirements. 

1. Teach in a School or Language Centre

Teaching abroad isn’t limited to teaching a certain curriculum to school students. You could also teach in a language center, outside of the typical working day to suit students of all ages looking to expand their learning before or after school or work. 

2. Business English

There’s also a demand for Business English teachers as a decent grasp of English increasingly becomes a standard requirement to navigate international markets. Those best suited to this style of teaching either have a background in business or previous experience teaching adult learners.

Although it’s not a realistic first-time teaching job, with a bit of experience you can work towards it and potentially have a higher income as a result. You’ll find many free educational resources online to help you to plan and conduct the most effective business English lessons.

3. Teach Online and Travel as a Digital Nomad

Most people associate teaching English as a foreign language with relocating to pursue a career teaching abroad, which is also one of the most popular options but not the only one.

Online teaching is quickly becoming one of the most popular ways to teach English and it can all be done without even having to leave your home. Many benefits are associated with home working making it easy to understand why.

Including fewer expenses (no more commuting is one example!), choosing when and how often you work, and being your own boss which comes with its own perks, too.

That being said, you don’t have to stay home to teach English online. Those eager to use their TEFL certification as a worldwide travel ticket is in a great position to pursue the digital nomad lifestyle.

As a digital nomad, you can use your earnings from your online career to fund your travels as you go from one location to the next. You just need an internet connection, a quiet workspace, and a laptop! 

Visa and Work Requirements: What Might They Include?

An awareness of the varying visa requirements across different countries is essential. You want to be sure that you’re eligible to teach in your desired destination before you start planning the logistics of moving there. 

Employers will often have specific requirements too. It’s important that you can evidence that you meet all the correct criteria.

1. A Degree in Any Discipline

Some countries will require you to have a degree in any discipline to meet their working visa requirements. While some employers may also require you to have a Master’s degree, although this is less common. You’d be more likely to see this requirement for jobs at universities or in the Middle East.

Asia is where you will be most limited without a degree, with the exception of Cambodia. However, it’s not a requirement across South America and Europe – so there are still plenty of opportunities. Read more about TEFL opportunities open to you without a degree.

2. Previous Teaching Experience

Some employers will list previous teaching experience as a requirement. For example, to teach in Saudi Arabia and the UAE, which offers some of the highest-paid TEFL positions, you’ll need at least two years of teaching experience before you can apply. Regardless of where you apply, teaching experience will benefit your application.

However, don’t worry if you don’t have previous experience as that’s very common for newly qualified EFL teachers. There are still plenty of options out there– everyone has to start somewhere!

Once you’ve gained some teaching experience with your TEFL qualification you’ll find that many more options will open up to you. Don’t be discouraged if you miss out on your first choice as you may well be in a better position to get it further down the line.

3. Non-Native English Speakers May Experience Bias but Don’t Let That Stop Your Job Search!

If you’re a non-native English speaker, you unfortunately may experience some bias when applying for jobs. However, don’t let this stop you following your aspirations as there are still many countries and employers who do not prioritize this. Again, it’s all about the research you put in before applying as this will spare you from wasted time and disappointment. 

You might be asked to have a passport or degree from an English-speaking country. Or you might have to provide evidence of your fluency with the likes of the IELTS certificate. China, for example, will employ non-native EFL teachers but will also require you to have received your degree from a university in an English-speaking country.

Wherever you’re aiming to go, look into individual countries and employer-specific criteria to get a better idea of your options.

4. Legalized Documents

Making sure you have the documentation to evidence any of the above criteria, plus a criminal background check will likely be required for your visa and/or employer. For example, as mentioned, certification showing your English proficiency could be one of these. 

Collating all the necessary documents is one thing, but you might have to have them legalized so that employers can trust their validity. This will be an extra cost but could potentially be covered for you.

Be Aware of the Job Market in Different Countries

Securing a TEFL position in some countries can be more difficult than others. This can be down to a number of reasons beyond specific visa requirements. The level of demand for teachers, investment in English language education from governments, and employee package benefits are all factors that can influence the competition for positions.

However, don’t let competition put you off finding the perfect job! Your TEFL qualification is designed to prepare you for whatever TEFL role you take on. Be reassured that you have a marketable skill set and have confidence in your ability to communicate this to employers.

A Teacher Infront of a Classroom

Where You Should Look to Find Positions

Once your CV is ready to go, you’ll be keen to start applying for jobs. If you’re aiming to secure a job before you go, your best option is to search and apply online. There are lots of reputable platforms for regularly advertising positions. 

In some countries, it can be easier to find work once you arrive, rather than before you go. It mostly depends on whether it’s possible to secure a working visa while in the country, rather than beforehand. 

Watch Out for Online Scams 

While most of the teaching positions you’ll come across online will be genuine, it’s important that you know how to recognize those that aren’t. 

Do thorough research about employers, search them on the web, check out their reviews, contact details, and general online presence. Ask to be put in contact with a current employee. Compare what is being advertised to other posts for the same company. If it looks too good to be true, that’s most likely because it is.

Plan Your Finances Carefully

You’ll be grateful to yourself for calculating your initial expenses and planning your finances before you arrive. This will definitely help ease the stress of settling in. 

Dependent on your destination and your employer, some of your expenses may be covered or reimbursed. Whether you’re offered any financial support/incentives or not, you’ll still need to make sure you have enough money to tide you over until your first paycheque. 

Costs to consider year-round include accommodation, bills, food, transport, leisure, and health insurance if not already covered by your employer. If you decide to find work once-in country, planning expenses for at least a month is strongly recommended should the search take longer than anticipated.

Your working visa and other legal documents are usually dealt with before you make the move abroad and it’s important to know that it can be costly – potentially more so if done away from home. You then have to think about flights, which are naturally more expensive when flying further afield. Some employers will reimburse your flights but this won’t be done until later on, or at the end of your contract. 

Be Persistent

Finding your first TEFL job will require time and effort on your part. Be prepared to apply for multiple positions and also be prepared to be unsuccessful. It can be a challenge getting started, especially if your country of choice is a competitive TEFL destination. But don’t be disheartened, the demand for English language teachers worldwide is high and the right job for you is out there.

Be willing to adapt and be flexible. You may not find your first TEFL job in your first-choice location, but this doesn’t mean you have to settle. Once you have more experience teaching, you’ll stand a better chance of being recruited for more competitive positions.

Picking up your life to move abroad and start a new job is an overwhelming idea for most. There’s a lot to consider before you start planning your first TEFL job. Hopefully, this article helps to clarify some of your queries. And remember, the more planning and preparation you do, the easier the application process will be – and the sooner you can get started teaching!

By: Naomi

Naomi works as a Digital Marketing Assistant for The TEFL Org. She is also in her final year of studies at the University of Glasgow. She previously taught English in France as an English Language Assistant and loves to travel at any given opportunity.

3 Things Coca-Cola, AWS And Smartsheet Taught Me About Innovation

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In today’s market, companies that are not constantly evolving or changing go extinct very quickly. Back in 1950, the average age of a company on the S&P 500 was 60 years old; today, it’s 20. With so many companies failing, disappearing, or getting consolidated, transformation is critical for businesses seeking to survive, let alone compete and win.

To be successful in product innovation, start with the customer and work backwards to determine the products you need to design and build.Smartsheet

Some companies are really good at transformation and continuous innovation; disruption is built into their DNA. Others struggle with their legacies of success, becoming overly focused on self preservation, which leads to slow decision making and aversion to risk.

But it’s not impossible for large companies to reinvent their business; indeed, it’s essential for their survival. During the course of my career, I’ve been fortunate to work at three amazing companies — all very different — each of which has been integral in transforming their industry.

Through these experiences, I learned important lessons about innovation and business transformation that can be applied to almost any company. Here are three critical keys to success:

1. Start with the customer

To be successful in product innovation, start with the customer and work backwards to determine the products you need to design and build. Only by truly understanding your customers can you deliver products that they will love.

When I worked on Coca-Cola Freestyle, we knew we had to start with the consumer and figure out what they wanted, so we did a ton of research. We started with focus groups in five different cities, five groups per city, all different age groups and demographics. The insights we gathered in these sessions informed our quantitative research, in which we ultimately talked to more than 7,000 consumers.

By truly understanding consumer preferences, we were able to build the Coca-Cola Freestyle in a way that appealed to consumers, with striking results: Installing a Freestyle machine led to increased beverage sales for restaurants by 17- 20 percent, and increased Coca-Cola sales volume by 30-40 percent in those locations. What’s more, about 25 percent of consumers who knew about Freestyle told us that they chose which restaurant they went to based on whether it had a Freestyle machine!

To innovate at Smartsheet, we set out to understand what problems our customers are trying to solve and then build solutions that help them do that. Smartsheet is a cloud-based work-execution platform that makes it easy for anyone to get work done without having to wire together a bunch of other tools. Today, most of the companies chasing this market overestimate the technical bar that most business users can clear, which results in overly complex products that are not easy for most business users to adopt. At Smartsheet, we really focus on how we can meet the needs of the average business user.

Every time we build a new product, we start by writing a document called a “PR/FAQ” (Press Release/Frequently Asked Questions”), which outlines what we’re going to build — and why — before we actually go to code (an exercise I brought with me from Amazon.) This means we create the story that we want to tell customers on the day the product launches — before we actually build anything. Then, we iterate on the press release until we like what it says about the product and how it solves a problem for the customer. We validate it with existing customers. Only when we’re satisfied that what we have is the right product definition do we begin work on building the proposed product.

2. Small independent teams move faster

Once you determine what to build based on research and customer feedback, assign a small team to the project and empower them to make decisions and innovate. Keeping the team small and focused helps prevent scope creep and eliminates the management overhead required to coordinate work across a large group. It is important to establish mechanisms for the team to escalate when they need help, but try to limit the amount of energy the team has to expend reporting up. This will speed innovation.

To develop Coca-Cola Freestyle, I built a small dedicated team that was completely isolated from the rest of the organization. We reported to a board of advisors on a quarterly basis but were empowered to make decisions without having to ask for permission.This was pretty game-changing, as it allowed us to move fast, experiment and learn, and be singularly focused on capturing the opportunity we saw in the market.

Coke’s idea of isolating a small, scrappy team to work on product innovation is the Amazon model as well. In fact, Amazon has a name for it: a “two-pizza team.” Almost every new service that starts at Amazon starts with a two-pizza team — a team small enough to feed with two pizzas.

Small, scrappy teams can help you make better decisions by forcing you to make trade-offs based on the constraints faced by the team. They’re better able to innovate quickly and course correct as needed to keep the project on track.

3. Take a long view

Another key to supporting innovation is to take a long view of the business. Rather than expecting an immediate return on an innovative new idea, focus on how you’ll develop the product to best serve your target market.

At Amazon, they take a very long view of the business. When we launched a service at Amazon, no one was pushing us with the question: How fast can you get to profitability? Instead, the discussion was framed around:

●    What’s the market you’re going after?

●    How much of the market do you think you can serve with the MVP (Minimum Viable Product — the first, solid foray to market)?

●    Where do you think you’d go after that?

Rather than worry about getting a very quick return on investment, the idea is that if we build meaningful, compelling products, we’ll figure out how to make money over the long term.

At Smartsheet, we not only take a long view of our business, but also encourage our customers to do the same. For example, when customers come to us for a solution, we try to understand the problem they are trying to solve or the pain point they want our help to address. This deep understanding enables us to build solutions that are both opinionated and flexible. We bring best practices to the table, along with a real point of view on ways that our customers can change how they work, and how we can help their businesses innovate faster as they navigate a constantly changing market — now, and into the future.

Gene Farrell Gene Farrell Brand Contributor

Source: 3 Things Coca-Cola, AWS And Smartsheet Taught Me About Innovation

Why We’re Teaching Reading Comprehension In A Way That Doesn’t Work

As the documentary details, many teachers—and professors of education—are unfamiliar with the overwhelming evidence that systematic phonics is the most effective way to teach children how to decode written language. While there’s been some pushback, quite a few teachers who have listened to the documentary or an accompanying piece on NPR—or read the New York Times op-ed by the documentary’s producer, Emily Hanford—have expressed dismay that they were never given this information as part of their training……….

Source: Why We’re Teaching Reading Comprehension In A Way That Doesn’t Work

These 5 Innovative AI Companies Are Changing The Way We Live – Rosie Brown

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It’s 2018 and the world doesn’t quite look like a scene from “The Jetsons.” However, technological innovation spurred by advancements in computing has allowed for artificial intelligence to bring significant changes to the way businesses operate, impacting our everyday lives. Here are five industries impacted by AI…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/nvidia/2018/11/01/these-5-innovative-ai-companies-are-changing-the-way-we-live/#2dc9a60e5a7f

 

 

 

 

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The Startup Postmates and Visa Use To Watch Their Language Just Raised $11.5 Million To Expand – Alex Konrad

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When the startup Qordoba first met with California venture capitalists to share its software idea, its founders faced an uphill battle for attention. Its chief executive was a female ex-banker. Its chief technology officer was Syrian and had taught himself English. And their business was based in Dubai. But Qordoba was operating in a market that resonated across geographies: translation. Initially focused on helping businesses manage local teams to translate their projects and copywriting to different languages…….

Read more : https://www.forbes.com/sites/alexkonrad/2018/10/11/the-startup-postmates-and-visa-use-to-keep-their-language-consistent-just-raised-115-million-to-expand/#3d45b10a768c

 

 

 

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How To Improve Your Digital Journey With The Right Partners – Derek Klobucher

Compared to a classic IT solution, [partnership] enables you to go much further along the way in a short period of time,” Carlo Schots, from The Netherlands-based IT service provider Ordina, stated in a video shown at SAP Leonardo Now last month. “Together they enable you to innovate digitally.” Ordina partnered with SAP to help Brussels-based telecom Proximus expand its fiberoptic network, shipping materials from a central warehouse to contractors and subcontractors spread across the country. Proximus used some of SAP Leonardo’s intelligent technologies to…….

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/sap/2018/09/21/how-to-improve-your-digital-journey-with-the-right-partners-video/#1cd590056567

 

 

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10 Ways to use Twitter in Teaching | Mastering Facebook, Google+, Twitter

A collection of uses for Twitter to enhance learning and teaching

Source: 10 Ways to use Twitter in Teaching | Mastering Facebook, Google+, Twitter

 

 

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Reclaiming a Sense of Joy – Quick Strategies for Easing the Stress of Teaching by Shane Safir

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It’s the end of the school year and I’m sitting with a young principal I coach who has deep expertise, heart, and know-how. Suddenly, she breaks down sobbing. “I’m miserable in this job,” she says. “I want to stay the course, but I don’t know how to get my head above water. I just don’t feel any joy in this work.”

When we live in constant stress, our brains start to downshift. According to scholars Geoffrey Caine and Renate Nummela Caine, downshifting is a psychophysiological response to threat that results in a sense of helplessness or fatigue. A downshifted person has a nagging sense of fear or anxiety and begins to lose the ability to feel excitement or pleasure.

The good news is that we can upshift our brains by actively infusing joy into our work life. Joyful experiences—even brief ones—flood the brain with chemicals like dopamine and serotonin that overwhelm our primitive stress responses. So how can we find more joy?

8 Ways to Reclaim Joy

Since my conversation with the principal, I’ve been practicing and modeling the reclamation of joy. Here are eight ways you can join me.

1. Get outside during the school day. Hold a collaboration meeting, coaching session, or class outdoors to shift the group energy. So many of us spend our days locked inside the school building—stepping outside for a five-minute walk or simply to feel the breeze or sun on our face can change our perception and our brain chemistry. Even a small dose of movement can release endorphins and provide a much-needed brain break.

Recently, I met an Oakland principal and her leadership team at a nearby lake to open their back-to-school meeting. The principal led three rounds of a community circle: “Share your favorite summer moment,” “share something we don’t know about you,” and “share an artifact that tells a story about your journey as a leader.” Afterward she randomly assigned partners for a lakeside walk and talk, inviting everyone to reflect on the legacy they want to leave behind. It was simple, mobile, and powerful.

2. Bring music. If your classroom or staff room feels solemn, enliven it with your favorite music. Better yet, invite students or colleagues to share their favorite song or artist on a rotating basis. Music releases positive neurotransmitters, calms the brain’s high-alert settings, and can build cultural proficiency as community members share their musical interests.

3. Model micro-affirmations. Researcher Mary Rowe defines micro‐affirmations as “tiny acts of opening doors to opportunity, gestures of inclusion and caring, and graceful acts of listening.” Micro‐affirmations can take many forms, such as offering a hug to someone experiencing a setback, giving a colleague some positive feedback, or facilitating an appreciations ritual that invites people to publicly celebrate one another.

4. Start class or professional development with a guided visualization. If people seem stuck in a downshifted state, help them access joy by leading a guided visualization. Ask participants to close their eyes or focus on a soft gazing point—not letting their eyes wander—and settle comfortably in their chairs. Then lead them to slow their breathing down and imagine a moment or place that brought them joy. Invite them to explore the colors, thoughts, and feelings that come up when they think of this place. Afterward, ask people to share how the experience felt and how they can bring those feelings into the school day.

5. Cancel a staff meeting. This might be my favorite joy hack, and it was my first piece of advice to that sobbing principal. Everyone’s feeling burned out? Don’t let your task list trump the reclamation of joy. Cancel a staff meeting and give the time back to teachers.

You might plan an alternative, just-for-fun activity like a hike or happy hour, but make it optional for folks who really just need a break.

6. Write a card to someone who’s had your back. It feels great to appreciate others. Think about a colleague in any capacity at your school who holds you up in ways big or small. This could be another teacher, the custodian who cleans your room, or the person who ensures that you’re paid each month. Write that person a card and tell them what you appreciate about them.

7. Practice three to five minutes of mindfulness. Consider starting your day with a few minutes of mindfulness. Just close your eyes, slow down your breathing, and notice the rise and fall of your chest, the sounds that typically act as background noise, the sensation of your heartbeat, your meandering thoughts.

8. Keep a joy journal. I often ask my own children, who are 9 and 12, “What brought you joy today?” Ask yourself that question at the end of each day, taking time to jot down your reflections in a journal. Writing is a form of story editing, as explained in the wonderful book Redirect by psychologist Timothy Wilson. When we take time to write or rewrite the stories we carry about our work life, we can change negative narratives into hopeful ones, and reconnect with our sources of joy and energy.

As you prepare to go back to school, remember that learning should be a joyful enterprise. Look for opportunities to laugh, breathe, and smile as an educator, and you’ll find your energy is contagious.

 

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