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8 Time Management Hacks to Optimize Your Life In and Outside Work – The Oracles

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Time is everyone’s most valuable and scarce resource. Managing it effectively can be the difference between success and failure. These Advisors in The Oracles share how they manage their day to optimize their business success and personal life. To really manage and maximize your time — to squeeze every opportunity out of it — you have to appreciate how much you have. Take control of your time, and don’t allow others to. Get family, friends, colleagues, and employees to agree on the most important priorities……..

Read more : https://www.entrepreneur.com/slideshow/322152

 

 

 

 

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The Top Project Management Methodologies: Which Is Right For You – Laura Binder

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Kanban, PMBOK, Scrumban…no, these aren’t the names of villains in the newest Star Wars movie, but are rather some of the world’s top project management methodologies. We’re not fans of clunky project management tools. Many of these products treat people as a resource, a byproduct, or a secondary consideration that gets lost in a web of hierarchies, dependencies, and endless subtasks. That’s a grave mistake—you don’t manage projects; you only ever manage people. But that doesn’t mean we snub all project management methodologies. In fact, with monday.com, we ourselves use a variety of project management methodologies on a daily basis…….

Read more: https://monday.com/blog/top-project-management-methodologies/?utm_source=mb&utm_campaign=pockettab

 

 

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Reclaim Your Time – Branding Yourself As An Authority Figure While Giving Life-Changing Information To Your Customers

Reclaim Your Time is our Best Creation in Self-Help niche yet! And we’re handing it over to you so that you can offer tremendous value to your existing self-help audiences or even kickstart your very own self-help empire! So here’s your chance to grab Reclaim Your Time along with Private Label Rights! Meaning you can take this product and brand it as your OWN.

Reclaim Your Time is a 100% brand new and unique Ebook that contains the latest and most up-to-date information on “Time-Management” that was written with heart and real-life experience. Packed with over 10,000+ words written in thoughtful way that will ‘talk’ to your readers, creating 100% engagement and bring your readers into the awe. Every bit of information has no fluff, but quality content that your users are gonna LOVE……

Read more: https://abundanceprint.com/reclaimyourtime-plr/

 

Social Media Content Management: How to save time sharing quality content on social media – Ruby Rusine

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For most people, it’s somewhat a non-issue to let time pass them by as there’s still another tomorrow to try. But for busy business owners and project managers, lost time is tantamount to money lost. If you are a business no matter the size, it’s likely that you devote a good part of your day scheduling content for your brand’s social media profiles along with other sundry tasks you need to do…..

Read more: http://socialsuccessmarketing.com/how-to-save-time-sharing-quality-content-on-social-media/

 

 

 

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How To Spend Your Working Day Wisely And Actually Get Things Done – Bryan Collins

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Time doesn’t discriminate.

The CEO of a Fortune 500 company with an overloaded schedule and a college graduate procrastinating about starting a business each get 168 hours per week to spend as they see fit.

Some people are able to accomplish a lot from Monday to Friday (or to Sunday if you count weekends) while others struggle to get much done at all.

So what’s the best way to spend your time wisely and divide the working day so you can achieve what you want? And how do other successful people spend their 168 hours every week?

By Habit

“Don’t expect to be motivated every day to get out there and make things happen. You won’t be. Don’t count on motivation. Count on discipline.” – Jocko Willink

Author, former Navy seal and podcaster Jocko Willink gets up every morning about4:30 a.m. to exercise intensely before working on his business or the most important task for the day.

On Instagram, he posts black-and-white photographs of his wristwatch displaying his rising time. Willink also posts black-and-white photographs of “the aftermath” of his workout, for example a sweat-drenched towel or a barbell. Typically, the photo captions tell his many thousands of followers to “Get after it.”

Willink has cultivated a habit of rising early. Although getting up at 04:30 is an extreme rising time, you can still cultivate a habit of getting up early and working on your most important task for the day each day.

Then, like pennies filling a jar, these early mornings will accumulate over time!

By Energy Level

“By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” – Benjamin Franklin

Portrait of Benjamin Franklin (1706 -1790), American politician, United States of America, engraving by Vernier from Etats-Unis d’Amerique, by Roux de Rochelle, L’Univers Pittoresque, published by Firmin Didot Freres, Paris, 1837.

American founding father, inventor and writer Benjamin Franklin wrote about personal development long before Tony Robbins or Jim Rohn.

In his autobiography, Franklin described how he got maximum value from a regular working day.

Like our favorite Navy seal, Franklin rose about 05:00 a.m. and worked on what he valued most first thing. Typically he started each day by asking himself, “What good shall I do this day?”

In the late evening, Franklin put things back where they belonged and reviewed how his day went. He also reflected on his accomplishments or failures.

In other words, Franklin understood when he had the energy for attending difficult tasks (morning), when he was best suited to administrative tasks (afternoon) and when his mind was geared toward reflection (before and after sleeping).

By Theme

“The great opportunities and great ideas…get crowded out because you say yes to too many things.” – Tim Ferriss

A master of productivity, Tim Ferris is a believer in the power of deep work.

When in the midst of a project, such as writing a book, he sets rules for himself, whereby he goes on “no meeting diets,” or “no conference call diets” and so on and works instead on that one thing.

Thirty minutes into this podcast episode, Ferriss explains, he avoids activities unrelated to his book project while focused on that project.

Although you might not be writing a book, you could still dedicate a single day or even an entire week to an important project or theme and say no to everything else, like Ferriss.

For example, you could spend Mondays on business planning, Tuesdays on customer research, Wednesdays on marketing and so on.

Days of Week via Shutterstock

Spend Your Week Wisely

The trick to effective time management is deciding how and when you’re going to spend your time rather than letting other people decide for you.

You could create a habit you stick to each day, use self-knowledge to decide when to work on what or plan your days and weeks by project.

After all, depending on your approach, 168 hours is more and less than you possibly need.

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The Importance Of Time Management In Online Learning  | E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching

Want to know about the importance of Time Management In Online Learning? Check how to master your time management skills when you’re an online student.

Source: The Importance Of Time Management In Online Learning  | E-Learning, Instructional Design, and Online Teaching

 

 

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How to Succeed at Work/Life Balance Without Going Crazy – Monica Harrison

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The first secret to work/life balance is recognizing that it’s not about balance. It is about balancing work and life. What appears to be a state of balance is something entirely different — an act of prioritizing and counterbalancing. (For example, a ballerina appears to be perfectly balanced on her toes, but a closer look reveals her toe shoes vibrating rapidly, making minute adjustments for balance.)

The second secret of work/life balance is recognizing there are two types of balancing: the balancing between work and personal life and the balancing within each. Think about two balancing buckets. Separate your work life and personal life into two distinct buckets — not to compartmentalize them, just for counterbalancing.

  • Your work life is divided into two distinct areas — what matters most and everything else. You will have to take what matters to the extremes and be okay with what happens to the rest. Professional success requires it.
  • Your personal life has multiple areas, and each requires a minimum of attention. Drop any one and you will feel the effects. This requires constant awareness.

An extraordinary life is a counterbalancing act. Let the right things take precedence when they should. Get to the rest when you can.

Does it seem like every day you and your team have more and more that “simply must get done”? Do you often feel overbooked, overextended, overcommitted, and “in the weeds”? Do you (or your direct reports) feel like a human pinball, bouncing from task to task throughout the day, hoping to check as many things as possible off your to-do list — but later realizing you didn’t actually accomplish anything that truly matters?

To-do lists (whether in our head, on paper, or in an electronic system) can help collect our best intentions, but they also tyrannize us with trivial, unimportant stuff that we feel obligated to get done. If allowed, a to-do list or inbox can dictate our priorities — keeping us busy but not letting us achieve real success for ourselves and our organization.

Activity is not related to productivity or success — and certainly not to extraordinary results. So how do you decide what to do, or what to do first?

Successful people have an eye for the essential. They:

  • Pause long enough to decide what matters.
  • Do sooner what others plan to do later.
  • Defer to later (or indefinitely) what others do sooner.
  • Work from a clear sense of priority.

In this episode, Jesse shares what he’s learned from chapter 4 of the book The ONE Thing and provides examples of applying the lessons. His personal tips include:

  • Success list: At the end of each day, selecting and writing down the ONE Thing you will do tomorrow that will make it a successful day for you; any other to-dos are relegated to a different list and generally not worked on until the ONE Thing is done.
  • Cerato or Scleranthus: Gentle herbs in the family of Bach remedies; these two options can help your mind be more clear and decisive about setting priorities. They are inexpensive and available many places online or in many health food stores.
  • Decision points: As discussed in episode 165, these are moments in your day when you have the opportunity to decide what to work on next, based on your priorities, your energy, and the amount of available time.
  • Mindfulness meditation and prayer: Helps you become more aware of what really matters in your work and personal life; helps improve your focus and resistance to distractions throughout the day; helps you make the most of each moment for maximum effectiveness, satisfaction, and fulfillment.
  • Pareto’s Principle, also known as 80/20 Rule: Apply this lens to your to-do list to identify the few things that matter more than the rest. Then with your shorter list, apply it again, and again, until you identify the essential, imperative ONE Thing that matters the most.

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5 Ways to Stop Wasting Valuable Time – Sheri Coburn

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If I had a penny for every time I have heard “I don’t have time”, “If only I had the time” or “I’ll have time when I’m dead,” I would be rich. This seeming lack of time has become the new politics: we are invested in complaining about it, yet feel powerless to change it. Our culture of martyrdom, perfectionism, helicopter parenting and over-scheduling has stolen from us the one thing we can’t get back.

Time.

And not just any time – our most valuable time. Because as we all know, “Time stands still”, “Time drags on” and “Can’t go by fast enough” the entire weekend our in-laws are in town for a visit.

The reality is that we have plenty of time for plenty of things. But in order to tap into this promised land of abundance, we must first be aware, and then be willing to stop or at least spend a lot less time doing the unnecessary and the unfulfilling.

Stop Saying Yes When You Want to Say No

Do an honest assessment of how much time you spend doing things you don’t want to do. Are you motivated by guilt, a misplaced sense of obligation, or fear of judgement? If yes, your time would be better spent learning to set boundaries, determining who (if anyone) you really “owe time” to, and partaking in some self reflection. Doing these things will actually save you time in the long run and free up time immediately to do the things you want with the people you enjoy.

Stop Being Resentful

When you have to say yes, own your yes. You own your time, and only you can decide when to give it away and for what price. So stop spending time being angry and resentful at the people and things that you allow to steal time from you. This includes being mad at the friend, family member or boss who “has no respect for your time.”

Time is not taken; it is given. We all have to do things sometimes that we don’t want to do. But don’t waste time on anger. You said yes: do it and move on.

Stop Trying to Prove Your Value

Know the difference between what you “want” to do and what you “need” to do to feel valuable. The things we “want” to do, we choose to make us feel good, productive, honest and responsible. The things we “need” to do, we do in hopes other people will think we are good, productive, honest and responsible. “Want” is about us taking opportunities to feed our already existing sense of value. “Need” is about seeking the approval of others to feel valued.

A tremendous loss of time happens when we don’t know our own value. Instead we rely on an endless search for the right validation from the right people, a time-sucking search that will never end if our only sense of value comes from external factors.

Stop Depriving Yourself

Live life under a new rule: short term gain, long term gain. No, I don’t mean short term pain for long term gain, unless of course you find the idea of taking care of yourself painful.

In a culture of perfectionism, people have bought the idea that taking a rest, going for a massage, packing a picnic lunch, walking the dog, practicing meditation or taking a 20 minute shower is solely for the self indulgent; that somehow running a full marathon is the only version of “self care.” I am not dissing long distance running, I am just suggesting that not everything we do has to be hard, challenge us or be about reaching our “personal best”.

Make daily brief “indulgence-driven” investments in yourself. This kind of investment takes ownership of our relationship with time and divorces us from the idea that our relationship with time must be conflictual and punishing. Learning to relax and see time as a gift, and not something that always needs to be managed and goal-driven, means that we will not always be fighting against time or looking to buy more of it.

Stop Waiting for Time

Not only does time not wait for anyone, it also doesn’t coming looking for us.

Take a look at steps 1 through 4. Where are you giving away your precious time?

  1. Do you say yes, when you really want to say no?
  2. Do you harbour resentments that take up space in your brain and time in your life?
  3. Do you spend time on exhausting efforts to solicit the validation and approval of others?
  4. Do you fail to engage in activities that remind you time is a gift not a punishment?

Make some small changes.Remember, time is of the essence.

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Time Management Skills for Sales Professionals – Andrew Quinn

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We’ve all heard the saying “time is money.” This is especially true for salespeople. Allotting time to one prospect over another could be the difference between closing a million dollar deal and having the door closed on you. Spending a certain amount of time on one group of activities could set a rep up for record week, while concentrating on something else might launch you down the path to a slump.

Time management is one of the most challenging disciplines for salespeople to master. Reps always have several important tasks competing for their attention at once. How do they prioritize and maximize their time?

Short of adding more hours to the day, a few solid time management hacks can help reps boost their productivity. Here are 13 of my favorites.

1. Eliminate administrative tasks

To maximize your selling time, look for administrative tasks you can automate. Saving a few minutes here and there will quickly add up — and as an added benefit, you can direct more energy toward activities that are actually challenging, like giving demos or answering tough questions.

Here are a few examples:

  • PandaDoc, which integrates with HubSpot, is a good tool for reps who send sales collateral and quotes. It automatically pulls in data from your CRM so you don’t have to tediously copy and paste key details. You can send an error-free, personalized, professional-looking proposal in a few clicks.
  • Route planning software can help you figure out the most efficient way to travel to your prospects’ offices, meaning you’ll never have to manually plan your route again.
  • HubSpot Meetings lets buyer book open slots on your calendar instantly. Say goodbye to long email chains of “What about X time?” “Sorry, I’m busy …. What about Y?”
  • Todoist, a to-do list app, uses AI to learn your personal productivity habits and schedule your overdue tasks accordingly. In other words, the app will figure out the optimal time for you to get everything done.

The best tools will depend on your industry, daily tasks, and specific role, so this is by no means a comprehensive list. The gist is: Automate as much of your non-selling activities as possible.

2. Be prepared to pivot

When I was in outside sales, I would organize my leads by location and always have the date of my last contact for each lead noted. If I got stood up for an appointment, I could quickly regroup and connect with other nearby prospects to secure a new meeting rather than drive back to the office or cool my heels in a coffee shop until the next appointment.

This tactic also applies to inside sales. Prospects cancel all the time, so salespeople should always be prepared to pivot into other profitable activities. The trick is to not shift gears on those activities. Say you’re prepared to have an exploratory call scheduled to run an hour and the prospects flakes on you. Since you’re already in the mindset of the exploratory call, spend that reclaimed hour prepping for other exploratory calls you have booked that week. Your mind is already focused on the exploratory process. Keep it there.

I’m sure some of you are saying to yourselves, that’s foolish advice — you should use that time to prospect or make follow-up calls. But here’s the thing. Unless you have your leads at the ready and you’re fully prepped to prospect, the odds are you’ll waste time getting ready to make those calls.

From my point of view, prospecting is an activity that tends to be more effective when it is deliberate, planned, and scheduled. This brings us to the next point.

3. Stick with the task you’re on

Multitasking is a myth. Studies have clearly shown that people cannot actually do two things at once; they’re really just quickly switching between tasks. And that switching dilutes focus and slows people down because their brains have to adjust to each task. Here are two great books about the subject if you’re interested: “Your Brain at Work” by David Rock and “Focus” by Daniel Goleman.

From a sales perspective, different tasks engage different mental muscles. For instance, giving demos requires a much different mindset and focus than pre-call prep or pipeline management. Sales reps can gain efficiency by grouping similar activities.

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Take prospecting, for instance. Let’s say your organization advocates using voicemail and email as critical components to prospecting, and you’ve got two hours planned to make prospecting calls. One approach is to dial the phone, get the prospect’s voicemail, leave a message, write a follow-up email, send the email, document the activity in the CRM, set a new activity to try and reach the prospect again, and then move on to the next prospect on your call list and keep repeating this cycle for two hours.

This approach can chew up a ton of time because of all the activity switching. There are a lot of ways to streamline it. One way is to group activities:

  • Figure out how many prospects you can reasonably call in the two hours if all you did was dial the phone and leave voicemail messages. Research that many prospects before your planned and scheduled prospecting time.
  • When it’s time for your two hours of prospecting, pull up the list of researched prospects you want to call.
  • Call each prospect and leave personalized voicemails based on your pre-call research.
  • Log just the call activity in the CRM and quickly move onto the next prospect on the list. Repeat.
  • Later in the day during scheduled administrative time, revisit the set of prospects you called to send out the follow-up emails and set the times you want to reach out again in the CRM.

This simple move to grouping activities will yield a much higher volume of calls, which improves the odds of actually talking to someone on the phone about what you’re selling. And that’s what it’s all about, right?

4. Swallow the frog

Every rep has at least one task in particular that they simply can’t stand. Prospecting, logging activity, writing follow-up emails, etc. I’ve got mine. I’m sure you’ve got yours.

The funny thing is we can all find plenty of ways to appear productive and avoid those important tasks we dread the most. But by overinvesting in one area to avoid doing work in another, time gets away from you. And behavior like that always catches up to you in the end.

The bottom line: Just do the thing you’re uncomfortable with and get it over with. In fact, do it first if you can.

5. Keep going

When a rep experiences success or reaches an activity goal, they often take a break to pat themselves on the back. While I’m not against a quick coffee run, the best time to make a call or book an appointment is … right after you had a great call or booked an important appointment. So if you’ve allotted a certain amount of time to an activity — say, two hours for prospecting — don’t stop before the time is up even if you have some success right out of the gate.

Momentum is a powerful thing. Once you’ve got it, don’t squander it. You’ll have even more to pat yourself on the back for if you just keep going.

6. Structure your day around your buyer

According to experts, the best time to connect with prospects is in the afternoon, the very early morning, the evening, the late-mid early morning, or on weekends. I think that about covers it.

As you probably know, there is no perfect time to connect with your target buyers. It really depends on that particular buyer’s behavior and the way they allocate time to get their jobs done. If a salesperson is selling to contractors, calling at 10:00 a.m. isn’t going to work because they’re already busy on the job site. Calling on a restaurant with a thriving lunch and dinner business any time after noon is probably not going to yield a favorable conversation. Strive to structure your day around your target buyer’s schedule to avoid wasted time and unanswered calls.

7. Streamline repeatable tasks

I’m not a fan of sales scripts, but the fact remains that if your company targets a certain type of buyer, many of your prospects will be similar to each other. So instead of formulating a brand new list of questions each time you talk to a prospect, develop a core set you can work from and customize.

Developing a framework you use to research prospects is another smart idea. Look at previous deals you won and look for details that came in handy again and again. For instance, maybe you incorporated the knowledge you found on Crunchbase in seven of the last 10 deals you closed. Once you know which data sources are the most valuable, you can immediately go to those sources when researching new opportunities.

8. Have a concise value proposition

Another area where salespeople can waste time is during introductory conversations. At some point in every sales engagement, your prospect will ask some form of the question, “So what do you do, anyway?” If you have crisp, concise answers to the common questions you get asked every day, you’ll have more time to discuss the things that really matter to your prospects and to gain an understanding of how you can help them. Having a clear, well-articulated value proposition at the ready lessens the possibility that you stumble through the explanation. And the more articulate you are with the buyer, the faster your sale will progress.

9. Create email templates

It’s vastly inefficient to write a brand-new email every time you contact a prospect. While you should tailor each message to the individual and their situation, you’ll save a huge amount of time if you start with a template rather than a blank slate.

Look through your “Sent” folder to find the emails you send repeatedly. That doesn’t just include outreach emails — you should also make templates for following up, scheduling meetings, recapping calls, and so forth.

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10. Reduce distractions

It can be hard to stay focused when your favorite time-wasting site is just a click away. To ensure you stay focused, ruthlessly get rid of every distraction. If you don’t use a website for your job, block it using the Chrome extension Blocksite or by following these instructions for restricting sites on Safari.

Reps should also stow their cell phones out of sight. It’s all too tempting to check social media or your texts if you can see or hear notifications come up.

11. Create your to-do list the night before

Instead of wasting your productive mornings organizing your day, do it right before you leave for the night. That way, you can get right to work when you come into the office the next day. Save tasks like these for when your burned out in the evenings, and make the most of the time you have.

12. Chunk your time

The Pomodoro Technique encourages people to work in 25-minute chunks to maximize productivity. There are similar techniques that share the benefits of working in 90-minute increments. Chunking your time allows you to find a flow and squeeze the most productivity out of every day.

13. Take breaks

The Pomodoro Technique I mentioned above also recommends taking a five-minute break between each time chunk. Get up, move around, go for a quick walk, or grab some water — but give your brain a chance to rest, recoup, and stay fresh.

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