Advertisements

Uber Claims It Won’t Need To Change Its Business Despite Landmark Gig-Worker Law

Uber says it does not expect to make any changes to the way it classifies drivers in California, despite a landmark bill passed by California lawmakers on Wednesday that effectively requires businesses across industries to reclassify independent contractors as employees. Instead, Uber says it is prepared to fight any legal challenges in court and has set aside an additional $30 million for a ballot measure to provide workers with other benefits.

“We expect we will continue to respond to claims of misclassification in arbitration and in court as necessary, just as we do now,” Tony West, Uber’s chief legal officer, told reporters during a press call on Wednesday.

Uber’s argument hinges on the belief that it will meet the standards of the stricter employment test set forth by the bill. California lawmakers passed Assembly Bill 5 on Wednesday, which largely requires companies to convert independent contractors to employees if their work is part of the company’s main business or the company exerts control over their work.

Today In: Innovation

Uber argues its main business is not drivers and rides, but being a “technology platform for several different types of digital marketplaces.” It also allows drivers to be signed into multiple services, from Lyft to food delivery companies, at once. Because the company believes its workers will still be classified correctly under the new measure, West said Uber will not be automatically reclassifying drivers to be employees in January, when the measure is likely to take effect.

Both Uber and Lyft stock closed in the green on Wednesday on the news that Governor Gavin Newsom, who had already promised to sign the ball, remains in talks with the companies, as first reported by the Wall Street Journal.

Uber’s defiant stance is a throwback to its earliest days of ride-hailing where it made similar arguments that existing laws around taxis and transportation also didn’t apply to its business. There were a lot of lawsuits and a lot of compromises, but Uber eventually tried working through the regulatory red-tape (once it recognized it was there in the first place.)

The employment status of its workers has also been a long-standing fight, and one that the company is clearly anticipating to continue to fight in court. The “gig economy” was largely built off companies from Uber to TaskRabbit to DoorDash utilizing independent employees who could set their own schedules, but didn’t receive benefits like healthcare.

West made it clear that he doesn’t think Uber should be exempt from the rules – the company just doesn’t believe the new bill would result in any change to its employment workforce. “Just because the test is hard, it doesn’t mean we will not be able to pass it,” West said. If anyone disagrees with them, including cities, they would have to challenge Uber directly in court. The company has repeatedly faced court cases, often settling with drivers, but not changing their employment status.

As part of its response, Uber is also coordinating with its rival Lyft to propose a new ballot measure that would offer better benefits for their independent contractor workforce, including a base pay rate. The companies had tried to float it as a compromise during the bill talks, but AB5 passed regardless.

Lyft, who also committed $30 million to the ballot measure, said the state had “missed an important opportunity” when it came to regulating the space.

“The fact that there were more than 50 industries carved out of AB5 is very telling,” Lyft said. “We are fully prepared to take this issue to the voters of California to preserve the freedom and access drivers and riders want and need.”

Follow me on Twitter. Send me a secure tip.

I’m a San Francisco-based staff writer for Forbes with a focus on Uber, the sharing economy, and startups. I previously worked for Business Insider, Gigaom, and Wired. I also spent a year as newspaper designer for Gannet. I’m a native of Atlanta, Georgia and a proud graduate from Indiana University’s journalism school. Email me story tips at bcarson [at] forbes.com or follow me on Twitter @bizcarson.

Source: Uber Claims It Won’t Need To Change Its Business Despite Landmark Gig-Worker Law

Uber and Lyft address growing concerns over harassment by riders with new safety features. NBC News’ Jacob Ward tests out the new functions. » Subscribe to NBC News: http://nbcnews.to/SubscribeToNBC » Watch more NBC video: http://bit.ly/MoreNBCNews NBC News Digital is a collection of innovative and powerful news brands that deliver compelling, diverse and engaging news stories. NBC News Digital features NBCNews.com, MSNBC.com, TODAY.com, Nightly News, Meet the Press, Dateline, and the existing apps and digital extensions of these respective properties. We deliver the best in breaking news, live video coverage, original journalism and segments from your favorite NBC News Shows. Connect with NBC News Online! NBC News App: https://smart.link/5d0cd9df61b80 Breaking News Alerts: https://link.nbcnews.com/join/5cj/bre… Visit NBCNews.Com: http://nbcnews.to/ReadNBC Find NBC News on Facebook: http://nbcnews.to/LikeNBC Follow NBC News on Twitter: http://nbcnews.to/FollowNBC Follow NBC News on Instagram: http://nbcnews.to/InstaNBC Uber And Lyft Launch New Safety Features After Multiple Lawsuits | NBC News Now

Advertisements

Uber’s Nightmare Has Just Begun

“Never get in cars with strangers…”

Did your parents tell you that when you were a kid?

These days, people get in cars with strangers all the time… only they use a smartphone “app” to match them with a specific stranger to drive them around.

As you may have guessed, I’m referring to Uber, the world’s biggest ride-sharing company.

It’s like a taxi company except it doesn’t own any cars. It doesn’t employ any drivers either. Instead, it runs an app that connects drivers with people who need a ride.

Since 2009, Uber has grown into a hundred-billion-dollar company. It’s become so big and popular that it’s hard to imagine the world without it.

Hardly anyone “takes a taxi” anymore. Everyone “Ubers”…

The most-hyped IPO since Facebook…

Today In: Money

After years of extraordinary growth, Uber launched an IPO on May 10.

An IPO, as you may know, is when a company first sells shares in the public markets. It marks the first time individual investors can buy the stock.

Uber’s debut on the stock market was one of the most hyped financial events since Facebook went public in 2012.

It was on every financial TV. The headlines screamed “this is the next Facebook.”

Everyone was talking about it… I even heard stories of people putting half of their savings in this single stock.

I understand, Uber is a colossal technology company that has become part of everyone’s lives.

It has changed the way we commute. It even disrupted culture.

Who would have thought we would take rides from strangers in their personal cars on a regular basis?

But while Uber is a disruptive company, it’s a terrible business… and its stock is a horrendous investment.

You don’t need a master’s degree in business to understand this…

Every business has to eventually make more money than it spends. Period.

Yes, you can sacrifice profit to win customers at the beginning… but eventually you have to make money to cover your expenses and reward investors.

The thing is, after 10 years, Uber is still highly unprofitable. Worse, its losses are growing at astronomical levels.

Last year, it lost $1.8 billion… while last quarter, it lost a whopping $5 billion.

To put this in perspective…

In its IPO, Uber raised $9 billion…

… five of which it has already burned. IN A SINGLE QUARTER.

As I wrote in May, Uber loses 25 cents on every dollar it brings in and an average of $1.20 on every ride.

It’s burning money so fast that it lost more in the nine months leading up to the IPO than Amazon did in its first seven years!

Now, here’s simple math.

If you are losing money as a business, you have two options: cut your expenses or raise prices.

Uber’s biggest expense is driver pay. It pays back to drivers about 80% of all the money it generates.

That means to turn profit, Uber has to cut driver pay… or raise its fares.

And as I’ll explain, neither is possible.

Days before Uber’s IPO, Uber drivers boycotted the company and turned off the app…

They marched the streets in protests demanding higher pay and better working conditions.

Uber drivers now earn an average of $10 to $12 an hour in the US after expenses, according to researchers.

No surprise they are unhappy. The current pay is almost on par with the federal minimum wage.

Uber has no room to cut driver pay. Its drivers would just quit or migrate to Uber’s competitors.

Now, if you are losing money and can’t cut your expenses, your only option is to raise prices.

The problem is Uber is in a stalemate position where it can’t hike its fares.

A never-ending price war with Lyft…

The US is Uber’s biggest and most profitable market. But here, it has one big challenge.

You’ve probably heard about Lyft, Uber’s biggest competitor in the US.

These two companies have battled each other in price wars for years to undercut taxi fares and steal customers from each other.

It’s estimated that they’ve lost a combined $13 billion… and both still have no roadmap to profitability.

In other words, Uber is locked in a price war with Lyft.

As I’ll explain later, the moment Uber raises fares, its customers will switch to Lyft or another competitor.

But Uber’s problems with the competition don’t end here…

Uber can’t keep up with cutthroat competition overseas…

Another way Uber could raise its profits would be to grow globally.

But here, Uber’s prospects look even grimmer.

Bolt, an Estonia-based ride-sharing company, is quickly taking over Europe. In a lot of European cities, it’s a #1 ride-hailing app already.

It’s a heavy blow to Uber’s growth potential in Europe.

For example, London has been one of the biggest, most profitable markets for Uber. For years, Uber enjoyed zero serious competition in this city. Now it has Bolt.

Elsewhere Uber has already lost the battle with local competitors:

It has exited Russia after losing the battle with Yandex.Taxi…

It has exited China after losing the battle with DiDi…

And it has exited Southeast Asia after losing the battle with Grab and Go-Jek.

Southeast Asia accounts for more than 70% of the global ride-sharing market.

And these competitors are not just a local problem. Just like Uber, they have set their sights on the global market.

Take Brazil, where Uber boasts an 80% market share. It could be a money-making machine for Uber. And yet, the company bleeds money in Brazil because it’s fighting a price-war with China’s ride-sharing giant DiDi.

It’s a race to the bottom, which forces Uber to keep prices low and marketing expenses high.

Uber customers don’t care about Uber…

Would you take a ride with Uber if it cost twice as much as Lyft? That’s how much Uber needs to raise its fares to start earning money.

Probably not…

That’s because Uber’s app is no different from its competitors. It has no customer loyalty whatsoever.

In fact, more than 34% of people in the US who use ride-hailing services use both apps, Lyft and Uber. That’s up 50%+ from two years ago, according to Vox.

uncaptioned

Many people switch back and forth between Uber and Lyft, choosing whichever one offers a better price at the moment.

And with its fierce competitors charging about the same or lower fares, this makes it impossible for Uber to raise prices.

Meanwhile, Uber is losing its market share not only globally but also in the US, as you can see in the above chart.

Let me say this one more time: It’s a race to the bottom.

Uber is worth no more than $20/share

Uber is currently trading for 4X sales. In short, this means Uber’s value is 4X greater than its annual sales.

For perspective, that’s more expensive than Amazon or Apple.

My research shows 3X sales is a fair price, if we are really generous.

The problem is, at 3X sales, Uber is worth no more than $20 to $22/share. And that’s currently 30% below its price.

That’s where I see the stock going in the coming years.

Get my report “The Great Disruptors: 3 Breakthrough Stocks Set to Double Your Money”. These stocks will hand you 100% gains as they disrupt whole industries. Get your free copy here.

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

I’m a professional investor and the chief analyst at RiskHedge, a disruption research firm. My team and I hunt for under-the-radar “disruptive” companies that are changing the world and making investors rich in the process. Get my latest analysis at RiskHedge.com.

Source: Uber’s Nightmare Has Just Begun

⭐️Here’s a helpful app(GetUpSide) for everyone to save on gas with prices on the rise. Here’s a video showing how it works https://youtu.be/LSWTzCFyoOI Save up to .20 a gal plus you get .20 per referral. It’s free and easy to use. https://upside.app.link/3Qr0YazIgN. ⭐️New Uber Drivers⭐️ Sign up with your maximum bonus/guarantee applied up to $1000! Use code 6H5BG897UE or link https://partners.uber.com/i/ncw11cw3k ⭐️DONATIONS ALWAYS APPRECIATED https://paypal.me/uberdriver101 ⭐️NEW MERCH STORE-http://shop.spreadshirt.com/mrsmackovich ⭐️Use this # ONLY to call in on LIVE STREAMS 646-750-0985 Need A Phone? www.gigmobile.com $1 Down $12.50 A week http://www.gigmobile.com ⭐️⭐️BONUS FOR ALL UBER/UBEREATS DRIVERS⭐️⭐️ Already a Uber Driver but forgot to use a referral code for your 1 time sign on bonus/guarantee?? This is the legitimate way to retroactively applied one today. It’s always worth a try And Uber will email/message you within 24hrs telling you if it was approved or not and what to expect. 1 Open Uber driver app 2 Click On your picture in top right 3 click help in the top right. 4 click account and payment 5 click referrals 6 click invited driver – report my missing or incorrect driver referral 7 click message us and use the information below Invite code: 6H5BG897UE Friend name: Dustin Nicol Phone number: 757-672-8313 Email: Dustin_nicol@yahoo.com Detail: my friend Dustin referred me to drive for uber Check out Traxx Media Productions for awesome videos on Rideshare here http://Www.youtube.com/c/traxxmediapr… ⭐️The Best Dash Cam Recommendation https://amzn.to/2UFD5ea 🥊🏋️‍♀️Here’s my workout channel I started to try and get fit and inspire others to do the same. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGT4… ⭐️BECOME A PATREON & SUPPORT THE CHANNEL for 1 on 1 message support and/or become a moderator for the channel https://patreon.com/UberDriver101 ⭐️Here’s the video on how to retroactively apply a uber referral if you forgot to when ya first started driving. https://youtu.be/5Yfmw-VFi6E ⭐️For anyone that wants to sign up with “Get Cargo”and make up to $500 a month selling snacks for FREE!! https://app.getcargo.today/referred_b… ⭐️Use code 6H5BG897UE for $15 off your first uber ride.. so if it’s less then $15 it’s free https://www.uber.com/invite/6h5bg897ue ⭐️Use this code for money off your food when ya use Ubereats Eats-6H5BG897UE ⭐️Check out the Website for this channel for helpful information and tips plus get the recommended DASHCAMS for rideshare drivers https://ridesharedriverstips.com/ ⭐️Here’s the Facebook Drivers page I created to help everyone stay informed with updates and tips for Uber https://m.facebook.com/RideshareDrive… ⭐️Here’s the Uber/Lyft Driver 101 Facebook group to interact with other drivers https://m.facebook.com/groups/1874957… OTHER GREAT RIDESHARE YOUTUBERS: @ The Rideshare Guy @ The Rideshare Hub @ Real Rideshare Stories @ Your Driver Mike @ The Simple Driver @ Rideshare Revolution @ Rideshare Professor @ Hassan Is Driving @ Rideshare Tips @ Rideshare Genius @ Drive Girl Drive @ Ryan is Driving @ RyMac @ The Apptrapanuer @DriverLady Pro @No Limitation Rideshare @Real Rideshare Stories @Traxx Media Production @See Chelle1 @Paid To Drive! @UDM Learn more to earn more #Funnyuberparody #Uber #uberscams

Regulations Define Uber Drivers As Contractors-Not Employees – Oofy

Image result for Regulations Define Uber Drivers As Contractors-Not Employees

Ever since Driving for Uber was introduced, the debate about what kind of job ‘Uber’ was, has been debated. In the beginning, Uber claimed those working as drivers were simple employees, but regulations passed recently say otherwise.

Table of Contents

Ruling by the National Labor Relations Board

The National Labor Relations Board determines what jobs fit under rulings. In this case, if driving for Uber is being an ’employee’ or a contractor. Just a few years ago the National Labor Relations Board rules Uber Drivers as employees, but as the criteria changed in order to use a 1099 form when working, the definition of being an uber driver shifted as well.

Criteria In Order to be a Contractor

Contractors typically work for themselves, which describes driving for Uber. They also use their own materials and can work for multiple competitors without the company they are working for getting involved.

Listed Below are reasons why Uber Drivers are not contractors as stated by Suzanne Lucas, writer for Inc.

  • Use their own equipment
  • Set their own schedules
  • Are free to work for competitors
  • Are responsible for their own profit/loss

What does this mean in the long-run?

In the long-run Uber, Drivers may have to file taxes differently than before. Although this change in label or work, there won’t be too many changes. The debate on whether you are a contractor versus a Uber employee has been going on for years. It is no surprise that the criteria have changed.

However, just as the title changed to the contractor, it may bounce back later on depending on the wording that is updated.

Currently, since Uber Drivers are now considered ‘Independent Contractors’ through the eyes of the United States, Uber will not be paying for overtime and benefits. Uber drivers around the country have mixed feelings about this declaration.

Disclaimer: The information on this site is provided for discussion purposes only, and should not be misconstrued as investment advice. Under no circumstances does this information represent a recommendation to buy or sell securities.

Source: Regulations Define Uber Drivers As Contractors-Not Employees – Oofy

Uber & the Blockchain Problem – Aubrey Hansen

1.jpg

It doesn’t seem that long ago that startups such as Uber looked to have it all figured out.

Following a successful beta launch back in May of 2010, Uber officially launched its app and service in San Francisco in 2011, followed by the launch of UberX in July 2012, allowing people to drive for the company subject to certain background checks and other requirements.

Less than ten years later and we’re already seeing that business model, which looked so convincing, being called into question.

Essentially, Uber and other similar companies provide a service as an aggregator, connecting drivers with individuals who require their services.

Much like Airbnb, an Uber user could be forgiven for believing they are connecting directly with the providers of the service, but in reality, they are carrying out these transactions by way of a centralized infrastructure that is owned and operated by the aggregator.

Every step of the process, from the initial request to the pairing of driver and rider, to the payment process, is carried out through Uber.

Using a centralized system allows Uber to maintain control over the service agreements and all conditions of use.

Enter blockchain.

Briefly, blockchain technology offers users a decentralized ledger that boasts high levels of security. With no centralized authority required, both service providers and customers can connect directly without the need for an aggregator.

All of the information that is usually provided by way of the middleman company, which is Uber in this instance, can easily and safely be added to the blockchain instead.

Location and driver-specific information such as police record checks and customer reviews could be made available to those who require them before they request a ride, and the transaction carried out between both driver and rider will be processed entirely on the peer-to-peer network.

Arcade City, one of the first to enter the blockchain ride-hailing space, most prominently in Austin, Texas, got the ball rolling.

Since then we’ve seen other startups emerge with different takes on how blockchain technology can affect the ride-hailing business.

A terrific example of the worldwide reach of the blockchain revolution is Egypt-based RedCab, who are looking to make waves in Cairo, as well as expanding into the likes of Bahrain and the KSA.

The real kicker with RedCab is that their central monetization pillar is geo-ads, which will allow local businesses to advertise to local customers using a relevancy algorithm ensuring target markets are reached.

Uber broke through the wall of the traditional ride-hailing industry, but it now looks as though the system they introduced not so long ago is already under threat of being surpassed.

For the ride-hailing industry, the future looks as though it’ll be run on the blockchain.

Donate us if you like

Can A Toyota Deal Save Uber’s Robotaxi Dreams – And CEO’s IPO Hopes – Alan Ohnsman

1.jpg

Uber’s self-driving vehicle program has been rocked by a fatal collision, a costly legal fight with Alphabet Inc.’s Waymo and the sudden dissolution of its robotic-trucking project. But a new partnership and investment from Toyota Motor Corp. could help change that and aid Uber’s plans for an IPO by 2019.

The Japanese automotive giant will invest $500 million in the U.S. ride-hailing company and also supply a purpose-built vehicle based on the Toyota Sienna minivan for the project, the companies said in a joint statement. The minivan go into an on-demand pilot ride service in 2021 and use both Uber’s autonomous driving system and Toyota’s suite of automated safety tech features it calls Guardian.

Toyota’s investment and collaboration were reported earlier by the Wall Street Journal.

“The deal is the first of its kind for Uber, and signals our commitment to bringing world-class technologies to the Uber network,” Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi said in a statement. “Our goal is to deploy the world’s safest self-driving cars on the Uber network, and this agreement is another significant step towards making that a reality.”

It may be a coup for Khosrowshahi as he works to rehabilitate the San Francisco company’s image, cut costs and improve the balance sheet ahead of his target to take Uber public by next year. The Toyota project also comes days after Uber filled a CFO position that had been empty since 2015.

The partnership also benefits Toyota, which has previously invested in Uber. Though it’s among the world’s most advanced automakers, Toyota has moved more conservatively in the autonomous vehicle space than competitors such as General Motors and Waymo. In January, Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda showed off the e-Palette, a vanlike vehicle for use in ride-share and delivery services, and said Uber might be among the companies that use it.

The Toyota e-Palette, an autonomous vehicle designed for multiple business purposes such as driverless stores, is displayed at CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 12, 2018.

The Toyota e-Palette, an autonomous vehicle designed for multiple business purposes such as driverless stores, is displayed at CES in Las Vegas, Nevada, January 12, 2018.Getty

“This agreement and investment marks an important milestone in our transformation to a mobility company as we help provide a path for safe and secure expansion of mobility services like ride-sharing that includes Toyota vehicles and technologies,” Shigeki Tomoyama, Toyota’s executive vice president and head of Toyota Connected, said in the statement.

Uber’s program, which under former CEO Travis Kalanick attempted to catch up to Waymo, formerly the Google Self-Driving Car Project, spent lavishly to do so, including the $680 million August 2016 purchase of Ottomotto LLC, a startup created by former Google driverless car engineer Anthony Levandowski. Kalanick made no secret of his plan to one day replace human drivers on the Uber platform with fully automated vehicles that would be much cheaper to operate.

The company also beat tech rivals by launching a public ride program in Pittsburgh in September 2016, touting it as one of the first large demonstrations of robotic vehicles.

Soon after, Levandowski, who’d co-founded Otto as a provider of autonomous trucking technology, was accused in a federal lawsuit of taking trade secrets stolen from Waymo with him to Uber. Uber eventually fired Levandowski and was ordered to give Waymo an equity stake valued at $245 million in February to settle that lawsuit.

Then, on March 18, one of Uber’s self-driving Volvo XC90 SUVs being tested in Tempe, Arizona, struck and killed Elaine Herzberg, 49, as she was crossing a dark city street. The safety driver doesn’t appear to have been paying attention and a preliminary report by federal safety investigators found that although the vehicle’s sensors detected Herzberg, there was a delay in how rapidly it determined “emergency braking was needed to mitigate a collision.”

Although the National Transportation Safety Board hasn’t yet posted its final findings, the accident was the first fatality for a self-driving vehicle and an enormous blow to Uber’s program.

Then, in July, Uber announced it was discontinuing its robot truck program and would “move forward exclusively with cars,” Eric Meyhofer, head of Uber Advanced Technologies Group, said in a July 30 statement. “We recently took the important step of returning to public roads in Pittsburgh, and as we look to continue that momentum, we believe having our entire team’s energy and expertise focused on this effort is the best path forward.”

While the deal is certainly much-needed good news for Uber, it could also be a win-win partnership for Toyota as it looks to get self-driving vehicles on road the from the early 2020s, a bit after Waymo and GM Cruise robotaxi fleets start rolling out this year and next.

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you
https://www.paypal.me/ahamidian

How to Pay for Airbnb and Uber with Rewards Points – Johnny Jet

1.jpg

Airbnb and Uber are two of the most popular and semi-unconventional travel services for those that don’t want to spend the extra money on a regular hotel room or taxi fare. The one problem is that while you can earn points by paying for your reservations with a credit card, it can be difficult to redeem your rewards points. This guide will help show you how to pay for Airbnb and Uber with rewards points.

Airbnb

There are a couple different ways to help pay for your Airbnb purchases.

EDIT: You can longer directly link your Airbnb account with Amex Membership Rewards

American Express

If you have an American Express credit card that earns Membership Rewards, you can redeem those points directly through Airbnb at 0.7 points per dollar. This means a $100 stay would cost approximately 14,285 Amex points. While it’s nice to have the option of directly redeeming your points for a full or partial payment, the better deal with Amex is to redeem your points for an Airbnb gift card.

You may also be able to redeem your points for 1 cent each (1,000 points=$1) for an Airbnb gift card of $100 or $250. For a $100 gift card, you will only need 10,000 points to redeem a gift card instead of $14,285 point by redeeming directly from Airbnb. As a forewarning, Amex doesn’t always offer these gift cards.

Statement Credit

Another option is to pay for your Airbnb stay with a rewards credit card that gives you a statement credit for travel purchases. Two examples are the (currently unavailable) Barclaycard Arrival Plus or Capital One Venture cards. You will have pay for the Airbnb statement with your qualifying credit card, because the credit cards count Airbnb stays as a travel purchase, you can redeem your points for your stay. With this method, redeeming 10,000 points will give you a $100 travel reimbursement credit. The Arrival Plus also gives you a 5% rebate on all miles redeemed, and you 120 days from your purchase to make the redemption.

Uber

Uber is a little more flexible when it comes to redeeming points than Airbnb.

American Express

Once again, American Express has a direct relationship with Uber. By opting into their special offer, you can earn 2 points for every $1 spent on Uber fares and you can also redeem your Membership Rewards points at 1-cent-apiece. This means a $50 Uber ride would cost 5,000 Amex Membership Rewards points.

Capital One Quicksilver

If you own the Capital One Quicksilver card, you also have the opportunity to earn a $15 Uber credit after paying for your first 9 rides with your Quicksilver card. You will need to link your card on the Capital One website to take advantage of this offer. Plus, you earn 1.5% on every purchase.

Statement Credits

Once again, another flexible way to pay for your Uber rides is with a statement credit from a travel rewards credit card. Most Uber rides won’t cost $100, but a possible way around this limit is to buy Uber gift cards through the United MileagePlus (over $100) X App. 

Starwood Starpoints

You can’t redeem Starwood Starpoints for Uber rides, but, you can earn bonus SPG points and that might be more valuable as a free hotel night could be more valuable than a free taxi ride.

By linking your SPG & Uber accounts, you earn 2 Starpoint for every $1 spent on Uber rides during a Starwood stay & 1 Starpoint for non-stay rides. This can also be in addition to earning the 2 points on an American Express card that earns Membership Rewards points like the American Express Premier Gold Rewards card.

Is it possible to pay for Airbnb and Uber with rewards points?

After reading this article, you have realized that the easiest way to pay for Airbnb and Uber with rewards points is by having an American Express Membership Rewards credit card, or through a statement credit from a qualifying travel rewards credit card.

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you
https://www.paypal.me/ahamidian

 

Uber To Give Drivers & Couriers Sickness & Maternity Cover

Image result for uber

Uber is to provide additional protection for its drivers and couriers across Europe, including 70,000 in the UK, with limited insurance against sickness and injury as well as small maternity and paternity payments.The ride-hailing service said a new insurance policy, to be provided free to its drivers, would give them “peace of mind while preserving the flexibility they value”.

The cover starts in June for drivers who have completed 150 trips in the past two months, or Uber Eats couriers who have completed at least 30 deliveries. Payouts for a baby are £1,000; sick pay for injured drivers after a week is capped at £1,125.

But James Farrar, the chair of the united private hire drivers branch of the gig economy union IWGB, said the deal was just “tinkering around the edges” instead of guaranteeing drivers’ employment rights.“It’s good to see Uber is reacting to the pressure piled on by the IWGB’s campaigns and legal action,” he said.

“Sadly, this is once again a case of tinkering around the edges for a quick PR win, rather than dealing with the issue at hand. If Uber really cares about the workers on which the business relies, it should stop fighting us in court and give the drivers the rights they are entitled to under the law.” The GMB union said Uber was starting to listen to its members’ complaints about employment rights.

Mick Rix, the national officer, said: “This is a major step in the right direction, but our successful court victories, winning workers’ rights for Uber drivers, could have all been avoided if they had sat down and talked with GMB from the start.Uber has fought claims from drivers who argue that the technology firm is their employer and should provide benefits such as paid time off, and is continuing its legal appeal after British tribunals ruled against them.

While Uber insists that most drivers prefer to be self-employed, the latest move is another step in its efforts to show itself as a “better partner”, after a string of controversies and the decision by local authorities in London and other UK cities to refuse its application for a renewed licence.Announcing the move in Paris at President Emmanuel Macron’s Tech for Good summit, Uber’s chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, said drivers were “at the heart of the Uber experience”.

He said: “We’re committed to being better a partner, and that starts by being a better listener. That’s why I’m thrilled to provide this groundbreaking protection alongside a trusted insurer like AXA, giving our drivers and couriers the peace of mind they tell us they want while preserving the flexibility they value.”In a blogpost confirming the details, Uber said: “We called drivers ‘partners’ but didn’t always act like it.”

The insurance will give some protection against major costs or lost income resulting from accidents or injuries while working, as well as an element of sick or parental leave through one-off payments.A similar scheme was announced this month by Deliveroo, who gave its riders accident insurance towards medical expenses and loss of earnings.

If everyone who reads our articles and like it , help to fund it. Our future would be much more secure if you donate us as little as $1 – an it only takes a minute…THANK YOU

 

Uber Exodus Continues With Chief Product Officer Jeff Holden’s Departure

(Reuters) — Uber Chief Product Officer Jeff Holden is leaving the ride-hailing company, an Uber spokesman told Reuters on Thursday, the latest of more than a dozen senior executives to depart since last year.

Holden oversaw Uber Elevate, the company’s flying car operation, which is now headed by Eric Allison, the spokesman said, but declined to elaborate on the reason for his departure.

New Chief Executive Officer Dara Khosrowshahi has been shaking up the company since taking over last August aiming to improve Uber’s reputation after a string of scandals.

Uber, along with Lyft Inc, scrapped mandatory arbitration to settle sexual harassment or assault claims earlier this week, giving victims several options to pursue their claims including public lawsuits.

Uber also launched a new app for its drivers last month, in an effort to improve an often contentious relationship.

Uber’s chief legal officer, Salle Yoo, and head of external affairs Dave Clark left the company in September.

Uber is also searching for a chief financial officer who can help take the company public in 2019. The CFO position has been vacant since 2015.

The Wall Street Journal earlier reported that Holden, who was hired by former Uber Chief Executive Officer Travis Kalanick from Groupon Inc (GRPN.O), told colleagues that Thursday was his last day with the company.

(Reporting by Kanishka Singh and Abinaya Vijayaraghavan in Bengaluru; Editing by Peter Cooney and Gopakumar Warrier)

By:

Uber’s new head of Asia is a former Goldman exec who once climbed Mount Everest

Regular run-ins with government regulators and battles with well-funded local rivals have made Asia challenging terrain for Uber. The challenge is such that it’s fitting that the U.S. ride-sharing giant has hired a man who once scaled the summit of Mount Everest to lead its business in the region. Brooks Entwistle, a former Chairman of…

via Uber’s new head of Asia is a former Goldman exec who once climbed Mount Everest — TechCrunch

Uber debuts Trip Tracker so you can view a family member’s ride in real-time — TechCrunch

Uber today announced a new tool that will allow family members and other loved ones the ability to track each others’ trips using its service. Called simply “Trip Tracker,” the addition is a feature connected to Uber’s Family Profiles, a program Uber announced in March which allows customers to pay for rides for their family and…

via Uber debuts Trip Tracker so you can view a family member’s ride in real-time — TechCrunch

%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar