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The 2019 List Of The Most Dangerous Airlines In The World

LONDON – JANUARY 19: Investigators inspect wreckage and debris from grounded British Airways flight 038 from China at Heathrow Airport on January 19, 2008 in London, England. Investigators continue to examine the wreckage of the Boeing 777

The last 40 years have seen continual engineering advancement that solidifies aviation as the safest form of transportation. However, with the actual numbers of air passengers and flights increasing at an exponential rate, you could be forgiven for questioning the statistical evidence.

Recent years have seen multiple aircraft hull losses in the news headlines. British Airways are considered a very safe airline but a relatively short memory will remember images of flight BA38 from Beijing that crash landed at Heathrow in 2008, or the stark images of a British Airways 777 on fire at Las Vegas in 2015. Emirates are another airline who have quietly moved on from the negative PR they received after a Boeing 777 crash landing at Dubai In 2016.

Despite these incidents, major airlines remain relatively very safe. However, there are some airlines that have a safety record that scales from average to absolutely terrible. If you find yourself on the airlines below, ignore everything written above, and assume you’re either flying to a very remote location where you had no other choice, or that you just wanted to book the cheapest fare. Many of the world’s most dangerous airlines are banned from flying into both the USA and the EU, and if the aviation authorities are telling you this, it’s probably with justified reasoning.

AirlineRatings.com have published their list of the most dangerous airlines in the world based on a rating system of seven stars. Factors such as fatalities over the last decade, country blacklists and International Air Transport Association Operational Safety Audit certificates (IOSA) all play a factor in how the airlines are rated. None of the airlines below attained any more than two out of seven stars.

Tara Air

Tara Air managed to accumulate just one out of seven stars. Multiple fatal accidents in 2010 and 2011 have not assisted this Nepalese based carrier’s rating which operates a fleet of eight aircraft in and out of the dangerous mountainous approaches in Nepal.

Nepal Airlines

Nepal has seen nine fatal accidents over the last eight years. Statistically, flying in the mountainous kingdom is relatively dangerous. Nepal Airlines has been flying since 1958 under the name Royal Nepal Airlines, and its safety record leaves a lot to be desired. Accumulating just one star, Nepal Airlines is banned from flying to the EU. Although the last 20 years has seen a vast improvement in the airline’s safety record, a fatal accident in 2014 resulted in 18 fatalities.

Ariana Afghan Airlines

Serving as Afghanistan’s national carrier, Ariana has just five aircraft in their current fleet and a disproportionately stagering record of 19 aircraft being written off during its history, including seven fatal incidents.

Bluewing Airlines

Bluewing are based in the small South American nation of Suriname. The loss of three different Antonov An-28 aircraft over a three year period has found the airline banned over European airspace, which includes neighbouring French territory French Guiana.

Kam Air

Kam Air finds itself in exclusive company at the bottom of this safety list, with just 3 other one star airlines for company. This Afghanistan based airline finds itself banned from US airspace, and when Kam attempted to fly to the EU in 2010 they found themselves banned from there too after incidents that included a fatal accident and a seperate bomb threat.

Trigana Air Service

With 10 hull losses and 14 accidents involving Trigana operated aircraft, it is no wonder that the Indonesian airline was only awarded a one star rating. Like it’s peers on this list, Trigana is also banned from EU and US airspace.

SCAT Airlines

This Kazakhstan based airline has an unimpressive safety record, however it has not seen a fatal accident since 2013. Although SCAT doesn’t operate with an internationally recognized safety audit certificate, the airline is making huge improvements to be internationally recognized and operate safely.

Source: The 2019 List Of The Most Dangerous Airlines In The World

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Get more Tips here! http://www.destinationtips.com Sometimes we also want to know which are the most dangerous airlines in order to avoid them when we are organizing our trip, so here are The 10 Most Dangerous Airlines in the World rated by AirlineRatings.com, non certified by the IOSA 10) Southwest Airlines This is a major United States airline established in 1967. Ironically, this was considered among the ten safest in the world in 2012, what happened then? apart from the lack of minimum standards and certification, of course… 9) AirAsia Thailand This is a joint venture of Malaysian low-fare airline AirAsia and Thailand’s Asia Aviation. This was the only low-cost airline operating both domestic and international flights from Suvarnabhumi Airport. It’s not certified by the IOSA, but, at least it’s allowed to enter in the EU. 8) Iraqi Airways This is the national carrier of Iraq, being the second oldest airline in the Middle East, and a member of the Arab Air Carriers Organization. It has had several incidents, accidents and hijackings since it began operations in 1945. And it’s not certified by the IOSA nor allowed to enter the EU. 7) Kam Air This one is headquartered in Kabul and it was founded in 2003. It operates 90 percent of domestic flights in Afghanistan. But it’s not certified by the IOSA, not allowed in the EU and not even follows the ICAO, so… 6) Ariana Afghan Airlines Also known simply as Ariana, it is the largest airline of Afghanistan and serves as the country’s national carrier. Founded in 1955, it has been on the list of air carriers banned in the European Union since October 2006. And it has had 13 incidents and accidents, so not the best option. 5) Blue Wing This airline from Suriname, started in 2002, but after three accidents and legal problems, now it performs cargo as well as commercial flights to the interior of Suriname and the surrounding region. At least, it follows the ICAO, not the other certifications but this one yes. 4) Airlines PNG PNG Air is an airline from Port Moresby, that operates scheduled domestic and international flights, as well as contract corporate charter work. It started in 1987, but it has had seven accidents since then. It’s allowed to enter the EU, but… there’s no need, really… 3) NOK Air This is a low-cost airline in Thailand operating mostly domestic services, the second largest in the country. It’s free of fatalities, but it’s not certified by the IOSA, ICAO or endorsed by FAA. So, maybe, it’s not the best option. 2) Yeti Airlines This airline is based in Kathmandu since 1998. This airline is only endorsed by the FAA. Togetherwith Tara Air, form the largest domestic flight operator in Nepal, and during its short history has had 4 accidents that bring it to the second place in safety. 1) Nepal Airlines Formerly known as Royal Nepal Airlines, the airline operates domestic services. Founded in 1958, the airline has been banned in the European Union since 2013. It has had 15 incidents and accidents. And it’s only certified by FAA. So it really is the most dangerous airline rated in 2018. Do you think any other airline should be on this list? Comment below!

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This Airline Has Just Put Its Flight Attendants On A Low-Fat Diet

The aviation sector in India has a history of being challenging and controversial. Earlier this year India’s second largest airline, Jet Airways, ceased trading which left Air India as the sole major international carrier in India. With debts mounting to over $8 billion, Air India has a tough uphill challenge to turn its fortunes around.

Now the airline is putting its flight attendants on low-fat diet meals inflight. You would be mistaken for thinking that this could be another controversial move aimed at maintaining specific weight limits for crew. In 2009 Air India dismissed 10 female cabin crew for being “overweight” after moving them to ground crew roles.

However, the latest move may be more about saving money rather than keeping crew “in shape.” Air India declined to comment on reports that the new meals, which are mostly vegetarian, will reduce each meal cost by up to 65%.

Today In: Lifestyle

Despite this, there will still be a debate about whether or not the move by Air India is in fact to prevent staff putting on weight. After firing 10 employees in 2009 the Indian carrier again came into the spotlight in 2015 when the airline insisted that 125 flight attendants should lose weight or face the prospect of ground roles.

The airline maintains that the rationale in the past has been “safety issues”, but with the new low-fat meals completely replacing the current options for flight attendants, this latest shift doesn’t seem like an additional option for crew wellbeing but perhaps a split between saving cash and shedding weight, literally and metaphorically.

I spend 360 days a year on the road traveling for work discovering new experiences at every turn, trying out the best and the worst airlines around the world. I set the Guinness World record for being the youngest person to travel to all 196 countries in the world by the age of 25, and you could perhaps say I caught the travel bug over that 6-year journey. I now take over 100 flights every year and I am still discovering many new places, both good and bad, whilst writing about my experiences along the way. In addition to rediscovering known destinations, I visit some of the World’s least frequented regions such as Yemen to highlight untold stories. Join me on an adventure from economy to first-class flights, the best and worst airports, and from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Source: This Airline Has Just Put Its Flight Attendants On A Low-Fat Diet

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NEAR BIRD STRIKE shown on this video!! See below:- Take a ride with me on this short 45 minute hop from Mumbai to the beachside city of Goa, India. This flight is filmed in seat 1A on the Jet Airways Boeing 737-800 and includes the airport scenes, lounge, boarding, cabin, inflight service, descent and landing including a NEAR BIRD STRIKE! For the bird strike view from 6:10 . Please visit my blog at www.aussieflyer.net and subscribe to my channel!

Won’t You Please Buy A Used Airbus A380?

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Are you looking for a great new entrepreneurial opportunity? Why not buy some used Airbus A380s and start your own airline? Second-hand aircraft have been a launching pad for billionaires from Sir Richard Branson, who started Virgin Atlantic with a used 747, to the late Kirk Kerkorian, who turned a used DC-3 into an airline asset he later parlayed into ownership of MGM.

Such an opportunity may be here again for the right (and well-financed) entrepreneur. Since Airbus announced the coming end of A380 manufacture, airlines like Singapore, Lufthansa and most recently Air France have been rushing towards the exits of A380 ownership. Recent reports about possible wing cracks in early models (again) may provide added impetus. Reports are that seven Airbus A380 aircraft are in storage in France, almost 3% of the total of 238 manufactured. A pair have reportedly been scrapped.

Still, all the potential airline mogul needs to do is create a start-up airline (or charter, or, possibly, a freight carrier) with routes that can keep a 500-seat A380 or two packed full. With seven planes parked and more coming, (Lufthansa is returning its aircraft to the manufacturer as part of a deal for new aircraft) Airbus will no doubt cut you a sweet deal on a used A380, original list price $446 million.

There’s just one problem. The budding airline entrepreneur will need to figure out how to make money with the airplane, apparently something that neither most airlines or Airbus have figured out. (An exception may be Emirates, which owns 111 of the world’s 238 A380 aircraft and has aggressively used them to build traffic through Dubai Airport, which leads the world in annual international travelers with 88 million.)

Ironically, Virgin Atlantic, the creation of entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson, was a launch customer for the A380, ordering six in 2001. It finally canceled the order in 2018 without ever taking delivery.

While entrepreneurs willing to take a chance on the A380 can no doubt get a substantial discount off the $446 million list price, the plane’s costs of operation and maintenance remain substantial. You’ll still need a large crew (Qantas operates the plane with three in the cockpit, 21 in the cabin), and pay a cost of operation estimated at $26,000 to $29,000 an hour, one of the highest in the airline industry. Those four engines are thirsty; that cost included roughly $17, 467 worth of fuel.

Simple Flying quoted the Australian Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics , “To achieve break-even at 80% seat factor (440 seats occupied including first class and business class), average ticket price should be about $700 one way and $1400 return.”

Compounding the usability problem, only a relative handful of world airports are specifically designed to accommodate the A380. The Top 20 airport list is led, of course, by Dubai. Most of the world’s busiest airports are on it, including Los Angeles, Tokyo, London Heathrow, Paris, New York JFK, Beijing, Shanghai, and Frankfurt. Not on the list is the world’s busiest, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson, reflecting the fact that no US carrier has ever operated the A380.

Other airports can accommodate the A380, but at many, operations will create complications. Not only does the aircraft weigh more than a million pounds when fully loaded with passengers, luggage, cargo and fuel, it needs a special jet bridge to efficiently handle loading of its double-decker configuration.

The A380 was designed to fly huge numbers of passengers to various “hub” cities. The idea was that once they arrived, passengers going elsewhere would board another plane and fly to their destination. However, most passengers prefer flying point-to-point, which is now possible in much smaller, more efficient aircraft. Travelers heading from New York to Singapore, for example, no longer must fly to Los Angeles or San Francisco and switch to a different aircraft. Singapore Airlines now offers a 19-hour direct flight, using Airbus’ own twin-engine A350 900ULR.

While there is an almost non-existent used market for A380 aircraft, there is still demand for an even older jumbo, the Boeing 747. However, that market is driven by demand for dedicated air freighters. While a cargo version of the A380 was designed, production delays frustrated launch cargo customers FedEx and UPS to the point where they cancelled their orders.

Without freighter orders, Airbus decided to concentrate on the passenger craft, so no freighter was ever built. It is unclear whether conversion of existing passenger aircraft to freighter configuration would even be possible, let alone economic.

Just as no airline at this point seems to buy a new A380, few to want to buy, lease or rent a used one. But entrepreneurs won’t be stopped, so there is at least one exception, the Portuguese-based charter operator Hi Fly. Hi Fly became the first charter airline with an A380 in 2018.

The operator was busy last summer bailing out customers like Norwegian and Air Austral. Both airlines had similar problems; Boeing 787 Dreamliners grounded for engine checks during the height of the tourist season. Each contracted with Hi Fly to supply a “wet lease” A380, complete with crew and maintenance . But this summer, One Mile At A Time says the Hi Fly A380 is “Still Doing A Whole Lot Of Nothing.”

Nonetheless, the CEO of Hi Fly, Paulo Mirpuri, is sanguine about the future of the A380. He told Forbes.com, “The aircraft is performing well, flying all over the world, the main markets out of Europe so far being in Africa, USA, and South America. Other than for planned maintenance over the last winter, the aircraft has been operationally available with a high degree of dispatch reliability.”

Like a true entrepreneur, Mirpuri clearly believes in his product. “Hi Fly plans to expand further its fleet of A380s. It is a technically very advanced aircraft, loved by the passengers and it fits well in a number of missions and routes.”

Austrian Airlines The Quality Reliability of All Travel Experience

General

Austrian Airlines is Austria’s largest carrier and operates a global route network of approximately 130 destinations, being particularly dense in Central and Eastern Europe with 35 destinations.

Thanks to its favourable geographical location at the heart of Europe, the company’s hub at Vienna International Airport is the ideal gateway between East and West. Austrian Airlines is part of the Lufthansa Group, Europe’s largest airline group, and a member of the Star Alliance, the first global alliance of international airlines.

Austria established the world’s first regular international air connection on 1 April 1918, when it opened its route between Vienna and Kiev. Initially, this served only to transport post. In July 1918, the line from Vienna to Budapest was also opened.

On 14 May 1923, the first aircraft to be operated by ÖLAG (Österreichische Luftverkehrs AG) flew from Vienna to Munich. ÖLAG soon expanded to become the fourth-largest airline in Europe. Following the occupation of Austria in 1938, ÖLAG was forced to cease operations.

When Austria regained sovereignty over its airspace in 1955 with the signature of the State Treaty, two separate carriers were founded, Air Austria and Austrian Airways. Neither of the two began operating flights at this stage. On 4 April 1957, the two companies finally merged to form a single airline, Austrian Airlines.

On 30 September 1957, Austrian Airlines AG was founded, and the new company began to operate scheduled services on 31 March 1958.

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The fleet development announced in January 2019 is taking shape now: Austrian Airlines has now secured six additional A320 aircraft. The first of these jets is scheduled for delivery in August. Within the next few days, it will already receive the red-white-red Austrian color scheme in Jacksonville/USA. A total of ten additional jets are to replace the 18 Dash 8-400 turboprop aircraft by 2021. Austrian will thus increase its Airbus fleet from 36 to 46 aircraft. As of June 30, 2019, the entire Austrian Airlines fleet consisted of 82 aircraft.

“These six additional A320s should also be understood as a strong signal towards low cost competition. We are defending our market position and are determined to fight for our customers”, Austrian Airlines CCO Andreas Otto explains the strategic fleet development.

Four A320 aircraft from Avianca Brasil, two from Juneyao

Four of the six additional A320 jets are leased from Aviation Capital and previously flew at Avianca Brasil. In part, these aircraft are already being subject to the necessary delivery check. The first A320 plane is expected to be transferred to Austrian Airlines in the middle of August. Additional planes will be supplied at the end of August as well as in September and October. Following the necessary modifications and adaptations, the first aircraft should be put into operation on Austrian Airline’s behalf in December of this year. Austrian Airlines will take possession of two other Airbus jets purchased from CDB Aviation, which are currently operated by Star Alliance Connecting Partner Juneyao.

Quality, reliability and creation of a positive travel experience for our customers are the core competencies of the Austrian Airlines Group. Thus we aim at inspiring our passengers. In this regard Central Procurement plays an essential role: We are searching for suppliers and partners, who support us in satisfying our customers’ needs. However, this gets surpassed by a continuous cost optimization process, quality improvement and especially by innovation through which we enthuse and amaze our customers.

Source: https://www.austrianairlines.ag

How Does Emirates Airline Buy So Many Planes – Navgeek Aviation

Hello Captains! In this video we’ll discuss how Emirates Airline is able to purchase large fleets of aircraft and how exactly they’re financed. Currently, Emirates has 105 Airbus A380’s in their fleet, and 57 more on on order. Their total A380 fleet equates over £100 billion – do they have that kind of money to pay for their planes? Join our Discord server @ https://discord.gg/qDYXWDC Subscribe & hit the notification bell for more content on the aviation world! 🙂

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Email: yaboinav@gmail.com CREDITS: Many thanks to my friend, Andy, for sharing his knowledge for this video Emirates YouTube Channel Airbus YouTube Channel Cool Vibes – Film Noire by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/…)

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China’s Big Three Airlines Are On A Fast Track To Overtake U.S. Big Three Within A Few Years – Dan Reed

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The Big Three U.S. airlines – American, Delta and United – might as well start planning their complete withdrawal from the Chinese air market in the 2020s  if – and it’s decent-sized “if” – Chinese airlines continue expanding their fleets at the breakneck pace they’ve been on over the last decade. Earlier this week China Southern Airlines president Tan Wangeng, speaking at an industry conference in Guangzhou, said his carrier, Asia’s largest and the world’s sixth-largest, plans to have 1,000 jetliners………

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/danielreed/2018/09/20/chinas-big-three-airlines-are-on-a-fast-track-to-overtake-u-s-s-big-three-within-a-few-years/#51750c821234

 

 

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