British Airways Owner IAG To Operate Just 30% Of Flights For The Rest Of 2020

International Airlines Group (IAG), which owns British airways, the U.K.’s second largest airline by passenger numbers, fell far short of analysts’ expectations on Thursday as it recorded a loss of $1.5 billion (1.3 billion euros) in the third quarter and announced further cuts to its schedule amid a severe drop in demand for air travel.

Key Facts

Losses at IAG flew below forecasts of $1.1 billion (920 million euros) to report a 1.3 billion loss.

Revenue was down 83%, from $8.6 billion (7.3 billion euros) this time last year, to $1.4 billion (1.2 billion euros) in the three months to the end of September.

IAG blamed a rise in local lockdowns for impacting bookings as several of its key markets face a surge in new infections, while it added that governments had not adopted air travel corridors or new measures to replace quarantine periods as quickly as it had hoped. 

The group, which earlier this year was forced to cut 94% of its flights at the height of the first wave of the pandemic, now says it will operate up to 30% of its 2019 capacity in the fourth quarter, lower than the 40% that they had hoped.

But the group said liquidity remains strong, adding it had raised 2.74 billion euros in early October, helping it to maintain a strong pot of cash likely totalling 9.3 billion euros ($11 billion).

PROMOTED Civic Nation BrandVoice | Paid Program Tips From A College Counselor Before Hitting The Runway To College Grads of Life BrandVoice | Paid Program There Are 6 Million Black Workers Missing From Your Talent Pool UNICEF USA BrandVoice | Paid Program Protecting Child Migrants During A Pandemic

IAG shares were down almost 2% on Thursday morning.

Key Background

IAG previously said it does not expect passenger demand to return to pre-pandemic levels until 2023. Like many global air travel firms, the group was severely hit by coronavirus restrictions introduced earlier this year and forced to dramatically slash the number of flights it operated during the first wave of the virus.

As of May, the firm, which also owns Iberia, Spain’s flagship airline, budget airline Vueling and Ireland’s flagship airline Aer Lingus, had received some $1.45 billion in government support from the U.K. and Spain. Industry veteran Willie Walsh, who stepped down as IAG CEO in September with ex-Iberia CEO Luis Gallego taking over, recently warned that the coming months would be “very tough” for the industry and that it would “never go back to the way it was”, but added that he foresees airlines becoming more efficient

Tangent

British Airways announced over the summer that it would press ahead to cut almost a third of its workforce—or 12,000 jobs—to offset the pandemic-induced downturn. 

Further Reading

IAG preliminary third quarter results and update (IAG)

Full coverage and live updates on the CoronavirusFollow me on Twitter. Send me a secure tip

Isabel Togoh

Isabel Togoh

I am a breaking news reporter for Forbes in London, covering Europe and the U.S. Previously I was a news reporter for HuffPost UK, the Press Association and a night reporter at the Guardian. I studied Social Anthropology at the London School of Economics, where I was a writer and editor for one of the university’s global affairs magazines, the London Globalist. That led me to Goldsmiths, University of London, where I completed my M.A. in Journalism. Got a story? Get in touch at isabel.togoh@forbes.com, or follow me on Twitter @bissieness. I look forward to hearing from you.

.

.

British Airways owner IAG cuts flight numbers again IAG, the owner of British Airways, has said it will operate fewer planes than planned for the rest of the year as the pandemic continues to hit demand. The airline group said it would fly no more than 30% of its usual flights compared to last year. The news came as the firm – which also owns the Iberia and Aer Lingus airlines – reported a €1.3bn (£1.17bn) loss for the period from July to September.

In the same period last year, the group reported a €1.4bn profit. IAG said revenue in the quarter plunged 83% to €1.2bn, compared to €7.3bn last year. “Recent overall bookings have not developed as previously expected due to additional measures implemented by many European governments in response to a second wave of Covid-19 infections,” IAG said. ►► Like and share more news! ►► Subscribe to 00Fast News! ►► See you in the next news! Goodbye! https://00fastnews.blogspot.comhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UClk2… Created By 00Fast News #news#00fastnews#breakingnews#latestnews#newsupdate

Advertisement

SFO Plans To Surround Airport With 10-Mile Wall To Protect Against Rising Bay Waters

MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: An egret hunts in the reeds of San Francisco Bay, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, near San Francisco International Airport in a view from Bayfront Park. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group)

Concerned that rising waves will flood runways and buildings in the coming years, officials at San Francisco International Airport are moving ahead with a $587 million plan to build a major new sea wall around the entire airport.

The plan, the latest example of the growing cost of climate change in California, involves driving steel pilings — sheets with interlocking edges — into the mud and also constructing concrete walls in some places around all of the airport’s 10-mile perimeter.

“This is something we’ve been looking at for many years,” said Doug Yakel, a spokesman for the airport. “What’s changed is the level of protection that is needed.”

The airport, built in 1927 in a cow pasture at the edge of San Francisco Bay, serves 55 million passengers a year, making it the nation’s seventh busiest. But its runways sit only about 10 feet above sea level.

Under the new project, whose fiscal plan was approved by the San Francisco County Board of Supervisors on Sept. 17, the airport will build five more feet of protection.

That should guard against 3 feet of sea level rise, plus another two feet for big waves during storms, airport planners said. And it should protect the airport through 2085, based on the most recent scientific estimates of sea level rise. Researchers project San Francisco Bay’s waters could rise 1 foot in the next 30 years and another 3 feet or more by 2100. Environmental studies are set to begin next fall, Yakel said, with construction starting in 2025.

MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: A jet lands at San Francisco International Airport, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in a view from Burlingame, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) 

The project will be funded with bonds and paid off through higher fees on airlines that fly in and out of SFO, according to airport officials. With interest on the bonds, the final price tag is estimated at $1.7 billion over 30 years.

Environmental groups, who successfully blocked SFO’s plans 20 years ago to build new runways into the bay, say they don’t have a problem with this project.

“We have no objection to this. The airport can’t be easily moved,” said David Lewis executive director of Save the Bay, in Oakland. “But adapting to climate change is going to be expensive. We can save ourselves a lot of money if we reduce the amount that we warm the planet, melt the ice caps, and raise the sea level.”

What’s happening at SFO is also an issue in other places.

Dozens of major airports around the world are located at the water’s edge. In some cases, parts of bays or harbors were filled in generations ago to construct new land for runways. In other places, the shoreline was chosen because it reduced noise problems from airplanes flying over neighborhoods.

“Nobody thought about sea level rise back then,” said Gary Griggs, a professor of earth sciences at UC Santa Cruz who has studied oceanography for more than 50 years. “They put in fill, got it a few feet above sea level and thought they were good. Now they don’t have a lot of options.”

At Oakland International Airport, construction is set to begin next year on a $46 million project to raise a 4-mile earthen dike by two feet to guard runways against rising bay waters.

“Sea level rise is a very big focus of airports both in the U.S. and globally,” said  Kristi McKenney, assistant director of aviation for the Port of Oakland, which owns the airport. “The recent hurricanes in the Caribbean shined a bright light on it. The airport industry takes this very seriously.”

San Jose’s airport is not facing the same threat. It sits nearly four miles inland from the bay.

The Earth’s temperature continues to rise as fossil fuels are burned and heat is trapped in the atmosphere. The 10 hottest years since 1880, when modern temperature records began, all have occurred since 1998, according to NASA and NOAA. The planet has warmed 1.8 degrees Fahrenheit in the last century, and is expected to warm another 2 to 4 degrees this century at the current rate.

“As you heat water, it expands, just like in your water heater,” Griggs said. “And the warmer it gets, the more ice melts. Ice melts at 32 degrees Fahrenheit. It doesn’t matter if you are a Democrat or Republican.”

According to tide gauges, San Francisco Bay has risen 8 inches since 1900. Scientists project it will rise another 1 foot by 2050 and another 3 feet or more by 2100. Heavy winter storms, especially during high tides, already cause flooding in some parts of the Bay Area. Waves have over-topped the berms and existing sea walls on occasion at SFO, causing minor flooding issues.

The trouble, scientists say, is that the rate of sea level rise has doubled in recent decades, and is expected to further accelerate. There is some uncertainty about just how high the oceans will go. It depends on how much more fossil fuel is burned in the coming decades and at what rate the ice sheets of Antarctica, Greenland and other ice-bound regions continue to melt, Griggs said.

Bay Area cities and counties have three choices, experts say. First, they can build and restore wetlands in some areas, like the former Cargill salt evaporation ponds in the South Bay. Wetlands buffer waves and storms, reducing flood impacts on the shorelines.

Bay Area voters in 2016 approved $500 million in new funding over the next 20 years for bay wetlands restoration and flood control projects when they passed Measure AA, a $12-per-year parcel tax in all nine Bay Area counties. The first grants went out last year.

Second, cities can build concrete seawalls and levees. That will be the option for important features that cannot be moved, such as airports, or the Embarcadero along the San Francisco waterfront. But it’s expensive.

San Francisco voters last year approved Proposition A, a $425 million bond measure to begin work on an enormous, 30-year, $5 billion project to rebuild the 3-mile long seawall along the city’s Embarcadero — which was built in the 1800s and is cracking and crumbling — all the way from Fisherman’s Wharf to the San Francisco Giants ballpark.

Finally, some areas are likely to be allowed to flood if the costs are too high to preserve them, like hay fields in the North Bay.

“From a global standpoint, there are parts of our world where we are going to adapt and parts where we are going to retreat,” said San Francisco Supervisor Aaron Peskin. “And there are certain places our society is going to need to armor. SFO falls in that category. The airport is one of the most vital transportation links in the state, the country and the planet. There’s nowhere else for it to go.”

MILLBRAE, CA – Oct. 8: A flock of birds flies near a jet on a taxi way at San Francisco International Airport, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in a view from Bayfront Park in Millbrae, Calif. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area News Group) 

Source: SFO plans to surround airport with 10-mile wall to protect against rising bay waters

8.02K subscribers
The next time your flight is delayed at San Francisco International Airport, you might have something besides the weather or maintenance problems to blame. It could be what scientists call “subsidence.” In simple terms, #SFO is sinking. Senior investigative reporter Stephen Stock has the story. #WeInvestigate #airports Stay connected: Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/nbcbayarea Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nbcbayarea Follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/nbcbayarea Add us on Snapchat @NBCBayArea Catch up on all the day’s news: http://www.nbcbayarea.com Download our app: On iOS: http://nbcbay.com/R1BhqYM On Android: http://nbcbay.com/rUcA97h

Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

Caviar in First class, seemingly endless seat-back touchscreen entertainment and route networks that can fly passengers to almost any destination around the world on just a single ticket, all for a cost that makes air travel cheaper than it has ever been.

Today could be seen as the true golden age of travel. The Compass Lexicon study shows that domestic air travel in the U.S. costs 40% less today than in 1990, despite rising fuel costs.

Many airline reviews point to the quality of airline seats, food and beverages and even onboard bars. However, I think that flight attendants remain the most important part of a flight experience, where cabin crew can either make or break a passengers experience.

Today In: Lifestyle

Skytrax published their list of the world’s best airline cabin crew which measure everything from friendliness and enthusiasm to efficiency and attention.

Granted, being a flight attendant is not an easy job. Dealing with hundreds of passengers inside a confined space, where many human norms seem to dissipate along with the ground below can be challenging to say the least.

There are individual situations where the below ratings can vary widely and on any given day. It’s a part of life that people, including flight attendants, have good and bad days, however, the consistent brilliance of crew at the top of the list is tough to argue with.

The first thing many people will notice about the top-10 on the list is that every single airline, except for Qatar Airways, is Asian carriers. The flight attendants on many Asian carriers are certainly outstanding, however, it is a surprise to see Qatar further down the list, after also being rated the Number 1 Airline by Skytrax this year.

No U.S. carriers feature in the top 20, and although I strongly feel service has improved on American carriers over the last few years, there is still a way to go to compete with many of the Asian airlines.

Singapore Airlines at Number 1 is very difficult to argue with, as the Singapore flag carrier does offer consistently outstanding. Consistency is where many other airlines may squander their hopes. Lots of other carriers have split fleets, that passengers may seldom notice when flying, but with variations in training and crew schedules between internal fleets, such as that of British Airways, this can be reflected on different routes for the same airline.

Garuda Indonesia makes it to second on the list of the world’s best cabin crew but has recently faced controversy after banning inflight photos of the cabin. This was the airline’s response to receiving a poor review from an airline vlogger where business class menus were scribbled down in handwriting after the airline also ran out of wine in business class. After threatening to take legal action against the vlogger, Garuda has since backed down, but the situation could well make it difficult for the airline to retain a top spot next year, after management’s strategy, despite the actual cabin crew doing their best in a difficult situation.

The highest-rated European airline on the list is Austrian Airlines, shortly followed by British Airways and Lufthansa. Another lesser-known airline to make the list is Bangkok Airways who operate a relatively small fleet of just 40 aircraft across Thailand, but do deserve a spot in the top 20.

The Skytrax list features just one low-cost airline, Air Asia, who despite offering budget prices for travelers, has not cut the quality of high service offered. For such a well-known brand, Emirates only comes in at number 19 on the list, and similar to other airlines such as British Airways and Lufthansa, has a reputation amongst passenger reviews of offering a varied service and quality, depending on the route and given day, which is why the airline is likely not coming inside the top-10, for now.

Below is the full list of the top 20 airlines based on cabin crew:

  1. Singapore Airlines
  2. Garuda Indonesia
  3. ANA All Nippon Airlines
  4. Thai Airways
  5. EVA Airways
  6. Cathay Pacific
  7. Hainan Airlines
  8. Japan Airlines
  9. Qatar Airways
  10. China Airlines
  11. Philippine Airlines
  12. Austrian Airlines
  13. British Airways
  14. Asiana Airlines
  15. Bangkok Airways
  16. Lufthansa
  17. Flynas
  18. AirAsia
  19. Emirates
  20. Fiji Airways

I spend 360 days a year on the road traveling for work discovering new experiences at every turn, trying out the best and the worst airlines around the world. I set the Guinness World record for being the youngest person to travel to all 196 countries in the world by the age of 25, and you could perhaps say I caught the travel bug over that 6-year journey. I now take over 100 flights every year and I am still discovering many new places, both good and bad, whilst writing about my experiences along the way. In addition to rediscovering known destinations, I visit some of the World’s least frequented regions such as Yemen to highlight untold stories. Join me on an adventure from economy to first-class flights, the best and worst airports, and from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe.

Source: Which Airline Has The Best Cabin Crew In The World?

1.63M subscribers
Try Dashlane here: https://www.dashlane.com/sam Get 10% off now with promotion code “sam” on Dashlane premium! Watch this video for the World’s Top 10 Airline Cabin Crew by Sam Chui. Enjoy the flight attendant interaction with Sam and other passengers. You will see flight attendant working in galley and their crew rest area. Count down from Number 10 to 1 for the best airline flight attendants, watch out for many surprises! Note: The ranking is strictly based on personal experience and preference. Cover Image by A Fly Guy https://internationalflyguy.com/ 12:07 Follow Cherag https://www.instagram.com/cheragdubash/ 13:47 Follow Mayur https://www.instagram.com/mayurkashya… 16:15 Follow Skywardfreak https://www.instagram.com/skywardsfreak/ This video is sponsored by Dashlane — Enjoy an informative, nostalgic and personal insight in to my top 10 favourite airlines in this video based on the superb on-board customer experience that they provide. Meet the airline stewards and stewardesses who make it all happen and see the hectic activity that goes on backstage in the aeroplane’s galley to make sure that your pillows are plumped, your privacy is protected, your food is tasty and hot and that cocktail is sublime! In this video, we meet the kind and friendly staff of South African Airways, the vibrant staff of Philippine Airlines and the fun, loving and outgoing staff of Air Asia, as well as the more reserved staff, but certainly no less professional and courteous, of Qantas, Qatar Airways and Emirates. We also meet the staff of Cathay Pacific, Singapore Airlines and Eva Air and recall special, unforgettable moments spent in the air with this group of airlines at times such as Christmas, as well as seeing the little personal touches that all the airlines in this video provide that make them worthy of inclusion in this top 10. You’ll be astonished at the lengths that the airline staff in this video go to in order to ensure a hospitable and comfortable flight, both in business class and economy class, and their ability to adapt to the specific challenges presented by the different models of aeroplane they fly in such as the A350 1000 of Qatar Airways, the Boeing 777 of Emirates and the SQ21 of Singapore Airlines. Which airline has your loyalty and is your number 1? Let me know your opinions in the comments and thanks as always for watching.

 

United Airlines Kicks Retired Professors Off Late-Night Flight

A married couple, Jessie Au, 68, and her husband M.G. (“Guill”) Wientjes, 66, both PhDs, were kicked off a late-night United flight from Washington, DC to Los Angeles earlier this summer.

To add insult to injury, Au, a 5’3” grandmother, says an internal United committee called her “belligerent” and “threatening” after she stood up for her rights as a passenger. Although not physically beaten or dragged, Dr. Au says the intimidating experience reminded her of the treatment Dr. David Dao received in a notorious United incident in 2017.

(Full disclosure: I own stock in American, JetBlue and Southwest Airlines.)

The incident apparently began when Dr. M. G. Wientjes and another passenger were issued boarding passes with duplicate seat assignments. While trying to sort out the mess, the couple says a flight attendant dropped Wientjes’ boarding pass several rows back, then denied they had ever given it to her. Although the pass was ultimately returned to the Wientjes, they say by that time the situation had become confrontational, with the flight attendant screaming “You’re coming out.”

I contacted United Airlines multiple times to hear their side of the story, but did not receive an on-the-record response before publication. On September 13, we received the following statement from a United spokesperson. “At United, we hold ourselves to the highest standards of professionalism. Following this issue, we reached out to our customers and our team to find out what happened.” Sources within the airline also note that they spoke to the Wientjes in July to talk through the incident.

Today In: Lifestyle

Jessie Au and Guil Wientjes retired as professors of pharmaceutics from The Ohio State University. The couple met in San Francisco as young researchers and have been married nearly forty years. But rather than stay home and dote on their three grandchildren, the pair remain active in scientific research with their Carlsbad-based company Optimum Therapeutics, currently working on a time-release medication that attaches itself to tumors.

On June 24, they were at Washington Dulles (IAD), having completed visits to the National Institute of Health and the Food and Drug Administration in search of a research grant. They checked in on UA1448 at 7PM, three hours ahead of their scheduled 10:15PM departure to LAX. The couple planned to drive to San Diego after their early-morning arrival the next day.

They got boarding passes with assigned seats 21A (Wientjes) and 21C (Au) in the exit row. The couple boarded in the first two boarding groups, stowed carry-ons and relaxed in their seats. About 20 minutes later, another passenger in the 5th boarding group appeared with a boarding pass for 21A. A flight attendant took both boarding passes and headed to the back of the plane, apparently to try to resolve the situation. But then, according to Au, she dropped the pass and denied that Au and Wientjes had given it to her.

By this time a gate agent had arrived to assist the flight attendant, and the other person assigned the same seat had been seated elsewhere. When another passenger handed them the dropped boarding pass, the Wientjes say, they tried to get the attention of the flight attendant. They were ignored.

“They had their back to me. I said,“We have the pass here it is,” says Dr. Au. They ignored her “until I tapped her elbow from her seat. “’I just want to show you.’”

Au says, “The flight attendant and gate agent both yelled at us. We were traumatized. You could hear them screaming throughout the plane. “Don’t touch me! You are coming out! I’m going to kick you off the plane.”

The elbow tap may be what led a United internal review committee to call Au “physically threatening.” Ultimately United sent another flight attendant and three ground personnel to deal with the Wientjes. “They didn’t resolve the issue,” said Dr. Au. “They abuse us for no good reason.” What is unclear is if the elderly couple were considered a threat, why air marshals, TSA, local police or other security personnel were not contacted.

“Jessie didn’t curse or yell. We think the flight attendant overreacted,” says Dr. M.G. Wientjes. He says “United made all these promises” about how passengers would be treated after the Dr. Dao beating. Yet Wientjes says the flight attendant, the ground personnel and even the pilot were “menacing and unpleasant.”

The Wientjes, who say they were sitting in their assigned seats and felt “abused” by United, refused to leave. A 40-minute impasse resulted, in which three ground personnel boarded the plane to “discuss” the situation with the Wientjes, which they found intimidating. Ultimately, the pilot went on the intercom. He said there was a “situation” on the aircraft and all the passengers would have to deplane.

At this point, the Wientjes reluctantly left the plane so the other passengers could fly. Although United put them up for the night and put them on a plane the following day, the United Mileage Plus members were warned that they were on an internal watch list. Au says she has been repeatedly questioned on subsequent flights.

Hong Kong-born Au, who is 5’ 3 and a non-drinker, was subsequently accused of being “belligerent” and “physically threatening” by an internal United panel. The United Airlines Passenger Incident Review Committee, (PIRC) had previously demanded she produce a substantial written response within 96 hours or face a lifetime ban from United.

“This event was caused by mistakes of two UA employees, the gate agent who double-assigned the same seat to two passengers and the flight attendant who misplaced our boarding pass,” claims Dr. Au. “But no one apologized for the UA mistakes nor acknowledged that UA violated their Contract of Carriage that a seated passenger cannot be removed unless the passenger presents a security or safety risk.”

The former professor believes that United employees and the PIRC “greatly exaggerated a light tap on their employee’s elbow as being physically threatening.” To the Wientjes, the internal review “was nothing more than an exercise in putting more blame on the passengers.”

“Being removed from our flight, in addition to being delayed, was humiliating and hurtful,” say the Wientjes. They feel that since the “infamous incident of Dr. Dao” being forcefully dragged off a United Airlines flight two years ago, “the CEO and President of UA have repeatedly vowed to improve their service and make passengers feel good. We would like them to live up to their words and revise their policy and procedures so that what happened to us cannot happen to other passengers.”

I’ve won several journalism awards, and my writing on travel has appeared in The Los Angeles Times, American Way, Southwest Airlines Spirit, Successful Meetings and United Hemispheres. At home in the middle seat, I’ve got a fistful of travel reward credit cards, have spent more than six months of my life in Las Vegas hotels and I’ve traveled extensively across the world. Yet one of my favorite travel destinations is Independence, KS, a great American small town, where my work as a playwright was performed at the William Inge Festival.

Source: United Airlines Kicks Retired Professors Off Late-Night Flight

A passenger was forcibly removed from a United Airlines flight by law enforcement on Sunday after refusing to give up his seat. According to a person who says they were on the flight, the airline needed room on the overbooked aircraft to reposition crew for another flight. But when it couldn’t find enough volunteers, even after offering $800, the airline selected the man, who is a doctor, and several other passengers to deplane. The video quickly made its way around the internet and social media. In a statement to Business Insider, United Airlines said: “Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville was overbooked. After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate. We apologize for the overbook situation. Further details on the removed customer should be directed to authorities.” ————————————————– Follow BI Video on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1oS68Zs Follow BI on Facebook: http://bit.ly/1W9Lk0n Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/ ————————————————– Business Insider is the fastest growing business news site in the US. Our mission: to tell you all you need to know about the big world around you. The BI Video team focuses on technology, strategy and science with an emphasis on unique storytelling and data that appeals to the next generation of leaders – the digital generation.

Austrian Airlines The Quality Reliability of All Travel Experience

General

Austrian Airlines is Austria’s largest carrier and operates a global route network of approximately 130 destinations, being particularly dense in Central and Eastern Europe with 35 destinations.

Thanks to its favourable geographical location at the heart of Europe, the company’s hub at Vienna International Airport is the ideal gateway between East and West. Austrian Airlines is part of the Lufthansa Group, Europe’s largest airline group, and a member of the Star Alliance, the first global alliance of international airlines.

Austria established the world’s first regular international air connection on 1 April 1918, when it opened its route between Vienna and Kiev. Initially, this served only to transport post. In July 1918, the line from Vienna to Budapest was also opened.

On 14 May 1923, the first aircraft to be operated by ÖLAG (Österreichische Luftverkehrs AG) flew from Vienna to Munich. ÖLAG soon expanded to become the fourth-largest airline in Europe. Following the occupation of Austria in 1938, ÖLAG was forced to cease operations.

When Austria regained sovereignty over its airspace in 1955 with the signature of the State Treaty, two separate carriers were founded, Air Austria and Austrian Airways. Neither of the two began operating flights at this stage. On 4 April 1957, the two companies finally merged to form a single airline, Austrian Airlines.

On 30 September 1957, Austrian Airlines AG was founded, and the new company began to operate scheduled services on 31 March 1958.

Uniform_1958-69

The fleet development announced in January 2019 is taking shape now: Austrian Airlines has now secured six additional A320 aircraft. The first of these jets is scheduled for delivery in August. Within the next few days, it will already receive the red-white-red Austrian color scheme in Jacksonville/USA. A total of ten additional jets are to replace the 18 Dash 8-400 turboprop aircraft by 2021. Austrian will thus increase its Airbus fleet from 36 to 46 aircraft. As of June 30, 2019, the entire Austrian Airlines fleet consisted of 82 aircraft.

“These six additional A320s should also be understood as a strong signal towards low cost competition. We are defending our market position and are determined to fight for our customers”, Austrian Airlines CCO Andreas Otto explains the strategic fleet development.

Four A320 aircraft from Avianca Brasil, two from Juneyao

Four of the six additional A320 jets are leased from Aviation Capital and previously flew at Avianca Brasil. In part, these aircraft are already being subject to the necessary delivery check. The first A320 plane is expected to be transferred to Austrian Airlines in the middle of August. Additional planes will be supplied at the end of August as well as in September and October. Following the necessary modifications and adaptations, the first aircraft should be put into operation on Austrian Airline’s behalf in December of this year. Austrian Airlines will take possession of two other Airbus jets purchased from CDB Aviation, which are currently operated by Star Alliance Connecting Partner Juneyao.

Quality, reliability and creation of a positive travel experience for our customers are the core competencies of the Austrian Airlines Group. Thus we aim at inspiring our passengers. In this regard Central Procurement plays an essential role: We are searching for suppliers and partners, who support us in satisfying our customers’ needs. However, this gets surpassed by a continuous cost optimization process, quality improvement and especially by innovation through which we enthuse and amaze our customers.

Source: https://www.austrianairlines.ag

%d bloggers like this: