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Jeff Bezos Is No Longer The Richest Person In The World After Amazon Stock Plunges

Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos lost his title as the richest man in the world during after-hours trading on Thursday, following a lackluster third-quarter earnings call from his ecommerce behemoth.

Amazon shares fell 7% in after-hours trading, knocking Bezos’ fortune down to $103.9 billion. That puts him at number two among the world’s richest. The new number one: Microsoft cofounder and fellow Washington state resident Bill Gates, who is worth $105.7 billion.

Bezos became the richest man in the world in 2018 and the first centibillionaire to ever appear on the The Forbes 400 that year with a net worth of $160 billion, ending Gates’ 24-year run as number one.

Today In: Billionaires

But the Amazon chief executive’s net worth drop isn’t entirely due to the decline in Amazon shares. Bezos transferred a quarter of his Amazon stake to his ex-wife MacKenzie Bezos as part of their divorce settlement, which was finalized earlier this year. MacKenzie Bezos is worth $32.7 billion, and among the top twenty wealthiest people in the world.

On Thursday afternoon, Amazon reported a 26% drop in net income in its third quarter, its first profit decline since 2017.  In after-hours trading, Amazon dropped nearly 9% to $1,624 per share in the 20 minutes after the market closed. It has since rebounded slightly, hovering at $1,657 per share at 7:30 p.m. ET.

The company said it is investing heavily in logistics and delivery infrastructure, with the goal of making one-day shipping the norm for Amazon Prime members. The company disclosed during its second quarter earnings call in July that it had spent “a little bit” more than the estimated $800 million that it has previously said it would invest in one-day shipping infrastructure. The company declined to disclose how much it had spent on one-day shipping in the third quarter. But chief financial officer Brian Olsavsky did disclose Thursday that the company plans to spend $1.5 billion in the fourth quarter, presumably to finance the one-day shipping initiative.

Gates, meanwhile, has been out of Microsoft since 2014 when he stepped down as chairman of the storied company, though he remains a board member. He has sold or given away the majority of his Microsoft stake and diversified his wealth over time. He is now the co-chairman of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the largest private charitable foundation in the world.

Bill Gates debuted on Forbes’ first ever billionaire list in 1987 with a net worth of $1.25 billion. Bezos first joined The Forbes 400 list of richest Americans in 1998, one year after Amazon went public, with a net worth of $1.6 billion.

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Angel Au-Yeung has been a reporter on staff at Forbes Magazine since 2017. She covers the world’s wealthiest entrepreneurs and tracks how they use their money and power.

 

Source: Jeff Bezos Is No Longer The Richest Person In The World After Amazon Stock Plunges

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A detailed look at the most expensive divorce in history where Jeff Bezos, the richest person in the world is set to lose almost half of his net worth. Follow us! Twitter: https://twitter.com/MrLuxuryBrand Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/MrLuxuryBrand Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MrLuxuryBrand Support the Channel! https://www.patreon.com/MrLuxury Why Jeff Bezos Will No Longer Be The Richest Person

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FAANG (Facebook, Amazon, Etc.) Stocks Have Lagged This Year. Here’s Why

Topline: The once high-flying FAANG stocks—Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google parent Alphabet—have mostly lagged the broader S&P 500 index over the past year, signaling that the market may turn to new leadership for the next leg of its advance.

  • With the recent exception of Apple—which reached a new record high last week, the FAANGs have been in somewhat of a slump, as high price volatility takes a toll on their long-time status as momentum stocks.
  • Amazon and Facebook are both 13% off their record highs, while Netflix is down 31% from its peak last year; Google, on the other hand, is just 4% from its record high.
  • These popular, high-profile names have driven the bull market to new heights in recent years, and as a result were increasingly treated as parts of a whole when it came to trading patterns.
  • But over the last 6 to 12 months, the FAANGs have not been leading the market as they once did, with Wall Street now pricing in slower growth rates, rising costs and the potential for more government oversight.
  • “These stocks have made people a lot of money, but they won’t trade as a group the way they did for several years,” says Charles Lemonides, chief investment officer of ValueWorks LLC.
  • Lemonides predicts that Wall Street will increasingly stop talking about the FAANGs as a group, as they go from being growth stocks absolutely adored by the investing public to companies that are perceived to have their own different business challenges.
Today In: Money

Key background: Analyst recommendations are increasingly varied on each of the FAANGs, which adds to the notion that they aren’t viewed as a group anymore. Most Wall Street analysts still assign “buy” ratings, though: 52% for Apple, 87.5% for Alphabet, 69% for Netflix, 96% for Amazon and 87% for Facebook, according to Bloomberg data.

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I am a New York—based reporter for Forbes, covering breaking news—with a focus on financial topics. Previously, I’ve reported at Money Magazine, The Villager NYC, and The East Hampton Star. I graduated from the University of St Andrews in 2018, majoring in International Relations and Modern History. Follow me on Twitter @skleb1234 or email me at sklebnikov@forbes.com

 

Source: FAANG (Facebook, Amazon, Etc.) Stocks Have Lagged This Year. Here’s Why

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Jim Cramer explains his latest take on the FAANG stocks, plus Microsoft.

Jeff Bezos Sells About $1.8 Billion Worth Of Amazon Shares In Three Days

Amazon founder and CEO, Jeff Bezos.

On Wednesday evening, hours after the stock markets had closed, Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos filed paperwork with the Securities Exchange Commission which showed he had sold $1.8 billion worth of Amazon shares over the final three days of July. After taxes, he will net about $1.4 billion.

Bezos sold slightly more than 900,000 shares of Amazon between July 29 and July 31, when the e-commerce behometh’s stock price was around $1,900 a share. His net worth is now $115 billion, using Wednesday’s closing share price.

The last time that Bezos sold Amazon shares was in October 2018.

The new filings appear to show that Bezos has given his ex-wife MacKenzie 25% of his Amazon stake, or 19.7 million shares. In April, as the couple announced they were getting divorced, Mackenzie tweeted that Jeff would keep 75% of his Amazon stake. Jeff Bezos will continue to exercise voting control over the 19.7 million shares of Amazon he transferred to his wife, according to an SEC filing in April. Her Amazon shares are worth nearly $36.8 billion, making her the third richest woman in the world.

A spokesman for Amazon has not responded to requests for comment.

Jeff Bezos has sold large chunks of Amazon stock before, but this appears to be the largest sale, measured in dollars. Bezos sold Amazon stock worth $1.7 billion in 2017 in two separate transactions in May and November of that year. It was reported that Bezos planned to sell $1 billion worth of stock every year to fund Blue Origin, his space exploration company.

Bezos has done little in terms of philanthropy so far. In September 2018, he announced the Bezos Day One Fund, a $2 billion pledge for two causes: helping homeless families find shelter and creating Montessori-inspired preschools in the U.S.

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Angel Au-Yeung has been a reporter on staff at Forbes Magazine since 2017. She covers the world’s wealthiest entrepreneurs and tracks how they use their money and power.

 

Source: Jeff Bezos Sells About $1.8 Billion Worth Of Amazon Shares In Three Days

Amazon’s Rising Shipping Costs Eat Into Profits

It turns out that one-day shipping is an expensive endeavor. Amazon reported worse-than-expected profits in its latest quarter, thanks in part to an aggressive effort to slash delivery times down to one day for items ordered on its site.

The e-commerce giant said on Thursday that profits during its second quarter rose 3.6% to $2.6 billion from the same period a year ago. That equates to $5.22 per share, which fell far short of the $5.57 per share that Wall Street analysts had anticipated.

Amazon’s shipping costs surged by 36% to over $8 billion in the last quarter. That is a sharp uptick when compared with the previous three quarters, when shipping costs had risen by around 20%. Amazon has stepped up its investment in its shipping capabilities after promising in April that it would make one-day shipping the new normal for members of Amazon Prime, rather than the two-day shipping that it has long offered.

The company said that it is making progress on the initiative and that free one-day shipping is now available to Prime members on more than 10 million items. “Customers are responding to Prime’s move to one-day delivery—we’ve received a lot of positive feedback and seen accelerating sales growth,” said Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos in a statement.

Bezos has made an Amazon Prime membership, which carries a price tag of $119 a year, a staple in over 100 million households across the country. A big part of the draw is free shipping on millions of items. Amazon has sought to stay ahead of the curve here as retailers like Walmart and Target pile on with free shipping offers of their own, which typically require a minimum order size but don’t charge an annual fee.

It’s also a play to satisfy its most impatient customers. Amazon noted on a call with analysts and investors on Thursday that it hopes one-day shipping will cut down on the number of customers who end up leaving Amazon and buying an item elsewhere because it isn’t available for delivery fast enough.

Amazon also saw a rise in marketing costs during the quarter, as well as an uptick in compensation costs as it continues to grow its workforce. Overall costs rose 21% in the quarter.

Sales increased 20% to $63.4 billion, topping analyst estimates of $62.5 billion. However, investors seemed to focus on the disappointing bottom line. Shares of Amazon slid 2% in after-hours trading on Thursday.

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I am a staff writer at Forbes covering retail. I’m particularly interested in entrepreneurs who are finding success in a tough and changing landscape. I have been at Forbes since 2013, first on the markets and investing team and most recently on the billionaires team. In the course of my reporting, I have interviewed the father of Indian gambling, the first female billionaire to enter the space race and the immigrant founder of one of the nation’s most secretive financial upstarts. My work has also appeared in Money Magazine and CNNMoney.com. Tips or story ideas? Email me at ldebter@forbes.com.

 

Source: Amazon’s Rising Shipping Costs Eat Into Profits

The Yield Curve Just Inverted, Putting The Chance Of A Recession At 30%

The interest rate on the U.S. Treasury 10-year bond just fell below the rate on the 3-month bill in response to the Fed’s March announcement. This is called yield curve inversion as defined by Arturo Estrella and Frederic Mishkin. It implies a 25%-30% probability of a recession on a 12-month view. Their research can be found here.

As economic relationships go, the yield curve has a good track record. You can see the data below going back to 1982. Per the chart, using this series over recent history, the yield curve inverts before a recession reliably with no false positives. An impressive record. The blue line shows the spread between 10-year and 3-month interest rates. The black line is the zero bound. The shaded grey periods are historical recessions. Note that there is a lagged relationship here, recession historically occurs 6-18 months after inversion. So today’s yield curve suggests a fair chance of a 2019-2020 recession.

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Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, 10-Year Treasury Constant Maturity Minus 3-Month Treasury Constant Maturity

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

Risks Of Interpretation

Nonetheless, there are some risks with this approach. The first is we’re looking at a limited run of data. There are only a few decades in the sample and a handful of recessions. We’re making a forecast here based on less than ten recessionary events, per the initial research and subsequent out-of-sample data. Plus there are countless pieces of economic data out there. Combining two of them and creating a good recession forecast is possibly due to data mining. For example Tyler Vigen’s site illustrates the problem, showing how correlations can be found between many things that have little basis in reality, such as an apparently strong relationship between mozzarella cheese consumption and sociology degrees. So even though the yield curve relationship looks robust, it has been plucked from hundreds of other relationships that could exist, but don’t look as meaningful. The human brain is adept at creating patterns where none exist.

Also, a 25-30% chance of recession is not that high. Going back from 1960 to 2018 we have 59 years of data. We’ve had U.S. recessions during 16 of those years. So even before any more sophisticated forecasting methods, your chance of being in a recession in any given year are 27%. There’s some auto-correlation there too, as recession years come in clusters, but still, saying the chance of recession coming within a year or so is around one in four isn’t that different from what history tells us regardless of what the economy is doing. Of course, even at a 30% probability the chances are roughly twice as high that a recession does not occur.

Also, the Federal Reserve (Fed) has a key target of avoiding a recession in order to maintain full employment. This one of their key policy targets. The Fed are quite capable of learning. The increasing emphasis on the yield curve has not gone unnoticed by the Fed. In fact, the initial research here was published by the New York Fed itself. So unlike in the past, the Fed may be able to take corrective action, which was exactly what Chairman Powell was looking to stress in the Fed’s March meeting release. The Fed’s challenge is obvious but not simple, a few quarters ago the markets were spooked by a potential stack of rate hikes in 2019 that could risk recession, so the Fed changed course. Yet, in doing so they have helped create an inverted yield curve, introducing another set of recessionary fears.

However, the risk here is the markets are capable of learning too, and there is some evidence that recessions are self-fulfilling, meaning that if enough decision makers expect a recession they may then take the very actions actions, such as temporarily cutting back on spending, that cause a recession to happen. In that light, yield curve inversion gaining more attention is bad news if it causes people to anticipate a recession, which then makes one more likely.

So yield curve inversion is not a positive sign for markets, but we may be overstating its importance. Also if the indicator is to be believed, we should watch out not just for inversion, but when the 3-month yield falls 1% or more below then 10-year yield, then our confidence in a recession around the corner should be quite a bit higher.

Articles educational only, not intended as investment advice.

Follow @simonwmoore on Twitter. Simon is Chief Investment Officer at Moola, and author of Digital Wealth (2015) and Strategic Project Portfolio Management (2009).

Source: The Yield Curve Just Inverted, Putting The Chance Of A Recession At 30%

Amazon Shares Drop After Q3 Sales Fall Short And Holiday Outlook Disappoints – Andria Cheng

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Amazon.com AMZN +7.24%, facing growing competition on all fronts led by Walmart, reported disappointing third-quarter sales, sending its shares lower in after-hours trading. Sales in the quarter ended Sept. 30 rose 29% to $56.6 billion, compared with the consensus Wall Street estimate of sales rising above $57 billion. Sales would have risen 30% without the negative impact of a stronger dollar that hurt translated overseas sales by $260 million……

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/andriacheng/2018/10/25/amazon-shares-drop-after-q3-sales-fall-short-and-holiday-outlook-may-disappoint/#202775e83048

 

 

 

 

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