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Apple Issues Expensive Shock For Millions Of iPhone Users [Updated]

Apple iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max - Apple

 

Apple’s 2020 ambitions know no boundaries. The company plans to release up to seven new iPhone models and, internally, they will make the biggest generational leap in years. The problem for Apple is the designs keep leaking and, having already been disappointed once, a major new iPhone design leak means we are likely to be disappointed all over again.

Digging through Apple’s small print, the eagle-eyed MacRumors discovered Apple has quietly slashed trade-in values across its entire iPhone range for anyone looking to upgrade to a new iPhone. And the newer your trade-in model, the more money you will lose:

  • ‌iPhone XS‌ Max – up to $500 (was $600)
  • ‌iPhone XS‌ – up to $420 (was $500)
  • iPhone XR – up to $300 (was $370)
  • ‌iPhone‌ X – up to $320 (was $400)
  • iPhone 8 Plus – up to $250 (was $300)
  • ‌iPhone 8‌ – up to $170 (was $220)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 7 Plus – up to $150 (was $200)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 7 – up to $120 (was $150)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 6s Plus – up to $100 (was $120)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 6s – up to $80 (was $100)

Yes, if you plan to trade-in your current iPhone, you will now receive up to $100 less even if it is in perfect condition (remember: these are “up to” prices). As it stands, despite the convenience of trading your old iPhone in with Apple, these prices make it a poor financial decision to do so. You’ll receive considerably more elsewhere, particularly if you sell it online.

As far as I understand, this is also an usual step to reduce prices mid-cycle with Apple typically dropping values only with the release of each new iPhone generation. Consequently, it will be a nasty shock to many upgraders.

01/13 Update: Apple has confirmed to me that it has dropped trade-in prices mid-generation, but it has not yet provided a reason why the decreases are so sizable on this occasion.


Gordon’s Top Apple Daily Deals:

  • AirPods with Charging Case – (typically $159.99) – Amazon: $129 / Best Buy: $139.99 / Staples: $129 / Walmart: $139
  • 10.2-inch 2019 32GB iPad – (typically $329.99) – Amazon: $279.99 (currently unavailable)/ Best Buy: $279.99
  • iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro Max – save up to $700 with second purchase and free year of Apple TV+ – shop deal now
Apple Sale Alert: AirPods Pro, iPad Pro, iPhone 11, MacBook Pro Best Deals [Updated]

Forbes Gordon Kelly


Interestingly, Apple has also slashed prices on iPads at the same time but Mac and Apple Watch trade-ins are barely changed.  For example, there’s only a $10 cut to one Apple Watch model (Series 4), and the most you will lose on any Mac is $90 and that’s on an iMac Pro worth over $4,000. Apple has not given a reason for its timing with these new iPhone and iPad cuts, but I have asked the company and will update when/if I receive a response.

In the meantime, anyone still on the fence about upgrading to the iPhone 11 may have just found a good reason to wait. And (despite my love of the current generation), this may prove to be the smart move. After all, we already know the iPhone 12 range is a major upgrade delivering, among many other things, a new long-range 3D camera, 120Hz ProMotion displays, the introduction of in-display Touch ID and 5G for all new models without a significant price penalty.

Now that’s a pricing decision I can get behind.

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Apple AirPods Pro Vs AirPods: What’s The Difference?

Samsung Galaxy S11: Everything We Know So Far [Updated]

I am an experienced freelance technology journalist. I have written for Wired, The Next Web, TrustedReviews, The Guardian and the BBC in addition to Forbes. I began in b2b print journalism covering tech companies at the height of the dot com boom and switched to covering consumer technology as the iPod began to take off. A career highlight for me was being a founding member of TrustedReviews. It started in 2003 and we were repeatedly told websites could not compete with print! Within four years we were purchased by IPC Media (Time Warner’s publishing division) to become its flagship tech title. What fascinates me are the machinations of technology’s biggest companies. Got a pitch, tip or leak? Contact me on my professional Facebook page. I don’t bite.

Source: Apple Issues Expensive Shock For Millions Of iPhone Users [Updated]

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Apple Issues New Blow To Google With This Bold Security Move

Apple has already been very vocal about the security and privacy built into its iOS 13 operating system update, which hits out at firms such as Google and Facebook by limiting the data they can collect. After making a bold privacy move a month ago, Apple is now doubling down on security, by launching a new Platform Security Guide detailing how its iPhones, iPads and Macs are more secure than Google’s Android devices, because the firm owns the whole ecosystem.

Apple’s devices have always been regarded as more secure, because Apple owns the hardware, software and apps. In contrast, although its biggest smartphone rival Google does make some of its own Android phones and has a level of control over its app store, the often separated hardware, software and platforms can make things very fragmented and pose security risks.

Apple’s security guide for Fall 2019 doubles down on how Apple keeps your devices and data secure across iOS and MacOS. It covers hardware security and biometrics such as Face ID and Touch ID–which is thought to be returning with the iPhone 12 next year–among other areas.

The Platform Security Guide reads: “Every Apple device combines hardware, software, and services designed to work together for maximum security and a transparent user experience in service of the ultimate goal of keeping personal information safe.

“Custom security hardware powers critical security features. Software protections work to keep the operating system and third-party apps safe. Services provide a mechanism for secure and timely software updates, power a safer app ecosystem, secure communications and payments, and provide a safer experience on the Internet.

Apple’s iPhone, iPad and Mac security guide: A “commitment” to security? 

As part of the guide, Apple emphasises its “commitment” to security–which could be seen as a direct swipe at Google and Facebook as companies that have seen their own share of data and security scandals. Apple points to its bug bounty program, which is now open to all ethical hackers, and dedicated security team as reasons it is more secure.

But at the same time, it’s important to note that Apple isn’t perfect: it came under fire from lawmakers recently after it emerged that the firm wasn’t applying the same controls to its own apps that it applies to others. With this in mind I created a useful guide to securing your apps in iOS 13, including Apple’s.

Another cool new feature in iOS 13.3 is the ability to use security keys with your iPhone in Apple’s Safari browser. I wrote an article including more information and a video demo on how to use it.

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I’m a freelance cybersecurity journalist with over a decade’s experience reporting on the issues impacting users, businesses and the public sector. My interests within cybersecurity include critical national infrastructure, cyber warfare, application security and data misuse. I’m a keen advocate for women in security and strive to raise awareness of the gender imbalance through my writing.

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In an interview with Charlie Rose, Apple CEO Tim Cook has hit out against accusations that his company is a liability to users, saying that unlike other companies, Apple has no interest in collecting customers’ data. Watch the interview in the video. Comment below and share your thoughts on this story! Subscribe to The Rubin Report: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c… Follow Dave on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RubinReport Like Dave on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/daverubin More Dave Rubin: http://daverubin.tv/ Host: Dave Rubin @RubinReport Guests: Dylan Brody @dylanbrody Rick Overton @rickoverton The Rubin Report is a comedy and current events panel show on The Young Turks Network hosted by Dave Rubin. Comedians, celebrities and media personalities join Dave each week to discuss hot topics in the worlds of news, politics, pop culture and more.

Exclusive: A ‘Magic’ iPhone Hacking Startup Bites Back At Apple Lawyers — And Demands $300,000

In mid-August, Amanda Gorton and Chris Wade sat dumbfounded in their Boynton Beach, Florida, offices. They had just been sent a lawsuit that might yet kill their startup.

Within Gorton’s inbox was an email sent by a reporter containing a complaint filed by tech titan Apple against the married couple’s company, Corellium. The suit’s unceremonious appearance belied the gravity of the allegations they were facing: that they’d illegally copied the world’s most famous tech device, the iPhone.

Dubbed “magic” by some users, Corellium “virtualizes” iPhones, turning Apple phones into something you can play with on a PC. For Corellium customers, it lets them tinker with the iOS operating system to find functional problems or security vulnerabilities, all without risking breaking the iPhone, a famously locked-down device that doesn’t welcome anything not approved Apple. Unlike testing with the real thing, if the phone suddenly dies, you can just load up another one, making it useful for security researchers, developers and hobbyists, known as jailbreakers, who want to wrest back control of their iPhone. For Apple, though, this amounted to a copyright infringement of its product by “replicating” it without permission.

Today In: Innovation

To Wade, a curly-haired, bespectacled Australian with the wide, intense eyes of a wired tech guy, and the more composed Yale-educated partner Gorton, the news that Apple was suing landed like a “gut punch.” Via exclusive interviews with the founders and documents they provided ahead of their legal response to Apple filed late Monday night, Forbes has learned the iPhone maker was considering buying Gorton and Wade’s first startup, a Corellium predecessor called Virtual. And it appears subsequent years-long relations between the parties were ostensibly amicable before the big bust up in August.

When Wade first heard about the suit he thought it was a joke. It’s no joke. Onlookers who spy a Goliath flexing its muscles against a plucky David are hoping, for the sake of iPhone security, an agreement is found. “As I understand it, many security researchers have used Corellium and submitted bugs to Apple,” said Kurt Opsahl, deputy executive director and general counsel of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Apple declined to comment on the claims made in this article. It pointed Forbes to the original complaint against Corellium, in which it said the suit was not trying to “encumber good-faith security research, but to bring an end to Corellium’s unlawful commercialization of Apple’s valuable copyrighted works.” Summing up Apple’s withering opinion of Corellium, the Cupertino company wrote: “Corellium’s true goal is profiting off its blatant infringement. Far from assisting in fixing vulnerabilities, Corellium encourages its users to sell any discovered information on the open market to the highest bidder.”

Cutting to the Apple core

Gorton and Wade’s long relationship with Apple can be dated back to at least the early 2010s. At the time the couple were working at OpenPeak, an enterprise mobile management company that had caught the attention of Mark Templeton, then Citrix CEO, who was considering an acquisition. Not long after Templeton met Wade, saying he was impressed by the Australian’s ability to do things considered “impossible,” Citrix bought Virtual, a startup founded by the married couple in 2014.

But in selling to Templeton, Virtual had to snub another suitor: Apple. A document outlining an agreement between Apple and Virtual, seen by Forbes, prevented the latter from talking to any other company about an acquisition for 45 days as the Cupertino company considered whether it wanted to splurge.

Did that upset the Apple cart? Is this a revenge story? Wade and Gorton aren’t sure. Gorton says she and her husband were excited such a formidable company was interested in their embryonic business.

The pair paints a picture of friendly Apple relations. Wade says he’s consistently handed details of security weaknesses to Apple. In 2016, after Apple announced it was launching a so-called Bug Bounty, where researchers are given monetary reward for disclosing vulnerabilities in iOS (now up to $1.5 million), Wade planned on partly funding Corellium with those bounties. He wanted to do it transparently, he says, and in one email dated September 27 2017, Wade explicitly told Apple’s manager for security and privacy programs, Jason Shirk, that he would start submitting bugs to fund his iPhone virtualizing startup.

The filing also suggests Apple encouraged Corellium’s early business. Emails provided to Forbes indicate Apple was at least impressed. Just as Corellium was getting started, in August 2017, Apple hosted a dinner in China for the Tencent Security Conference. Wade and Shirk dined together on Apple’s dime and later exchanged messages, according to the email threads. In one Wade boasted that he could virtualize the latest iPhone. Shirk’s response? “Wow! You got iOS 10.3 running virtually?” Wade cheekily messaged back: “Actually, we’re running iOS 11 :).”

At some point in the last year, something soured. In its filing on Monday, Corellium said that it hasn’t been paid for any of the vulnerabilities it submitted. In a counterclaim, the startup said that rather than it owing Apple anything, the Cupertino company owed it more than $300,000. And Corellium claimed Apple had launched a rival product in handing out custom iPhones for security researchers, letting them dive deeper into iOS.

Right now, Gorton says the bootstrapped Corellium is profitable, with a handful of customers across government and private industry paying thousands for its products: up to $62,500 for an on-site appliance and $575 a month for a cloud-based, single-user license for a month. But with legal fees mounting and the threat of being forced to kill the killer feature of its product, that profit could dwindle and leave Corellium facing collapse.

Apple, meanwhile, might be facing a backlash from the cybersecurity community. It’s already faced criticism this year. When Google released research in September regarding attacks on iPhone users from the persecuted Uighur community in China, Apple’s response was controversial. In a rare public post, it sought to downplay what happened. To some onlookers, including former Facebook chief security officer Alex Stamos, Apple was suggesting that attacks on Uighurs weren’t “as big a deal as Google makes it out to be.” “Apple’s response to the worst known iOS attack in history should be graded somewhere between ‘disappointing’ and disgusting,’” Stamos tweeted.

There’s the sense that after having opened up in the post-Steve Jobs years—with its industry-leading bug bounty and Tim Cook’s ostensibly aggressive stance on protecting user privacy—Apple is taking a few steps back. And one of those steps might squish one of the more intriguing startups to enter the often mundane cybersecurity market.

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I’m associate editor for Forbes, covering security, surveillance and privacy. I’ve been breaking news and writing features on these topics for major publications since 2010. As a freelancer, I worked for The Guardian, Vice Motherboard, Wired and BBC.com, amongst many others. I was named BT Security Journalist of the year in 2012 and 2013 for a range of exclusive articles, and in 2014 was handed Best News Story for a feature on US government harassment of security professionals. I like to hear from hackers who are breaking things for either fun or profit and researchers who’ve uncovered nasty things on the web. Tip me on Signal at 447837496820. I use WhatsApp and Treema too. Or you can email me at TBrewster@forbes.com, or tbthomasbrewster@gmail.com

Source: Exclusive: A ‘Magic’ iPhone Hacking Startup Bites Back At Apple Lawyers — And Demands $300,000

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Missing MacBook Pro Confirms Laptop’s Lost Reputation

At the start of October, Apple was riding high following the launch of the iPhone, new online services were opening for business, and a number of new products were hiding in plain sight ready for a launch before Christmas. There was also every expectation that these products would be boosted by a second event in October. Well, it’s the end of October, and there hasn’t been an event.

It looks like Apple has decided that October’s second-line product launches are not going to get the exposure and the oxygen of a staged event. AirTags are still waiting to be activated, the AirPods Pro were launched by press release yesterday, and the iPad Pro has been deemed ‘good enough’ to get through the holiday season before a potential update in March 2020.

And a triumphant return of a large-screened MacBook Pro in front of the gathered excitement of the geekerati has been denied. Once it was a powerful statement of computing power and prestige, now it’s a tool to help sell more iPhones and subscriptions.

The update to the 16-inch MacBook Pro has been trailed throughout the year. Expectations have been rising from reports at the start of the year on Apple’s portfolio, through movement in the supply chain,  to the leaks that suggested production had started on the units earlier this month.

There is even evidence of the new laptop tucked away in a beta of MacOS Catalina with a nod towards the 16-inch form factor in the system icons. And let’s not forget the AirPods Pro. They require MacOS 10.15.1, and the eagle eyed will note that, as the digital presses roll on this editorial, MacOS 10.15.1 is to yet available to the public.

The new laptop would fill the void left behind by the loss of the 17-inch MacBook Pro in 2012, would reinvigorate Apple’s laptop range, bring back a physical escape key, and fix the embarrassment of the butterfly keyboard once and for all.

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., speaks during an event at the Steve Jobs Theater in... [+] Cupertino, California (Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg)

© 2019 Bloomberg Finance LP

Everything was there for a launch, everything was there for an event that would allow Apple to explain its new strategy of a Mac ecosystem tightly tied to the iPhone, iPad, and online services. Everything was there for Apple to return to the ‘large screened laptop’ with the 16-inch MacBook Pro that was effectively the same size as the 15-inch model.

Everything was there except the drive and determination to push the Mac as a platform in general and the MacBook Pro specifically.

So yes, dear faithful geekerati. Go and buy the new MacBook Pro when it arrives. Go and develop your apps for iOS and iPadOS on it. Go and edit the films and TV series for Apple TV+, the games for Apple Arcade , the podcasts for (er) Podcasts… but don’t expect the genre-defining MacBook Pro to get any public recognition from Tim Cook.

Now read more about the first release of MacOS Catalina, and if you should upgrade…

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website.

I am known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on the public conscious and existing businesses. I’ve been following this space for over fifteen years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and received a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe. You’ll find me on Twitter (@Ewan), Facebook, and at my own site.

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After many years using MacBook variants I’ve made the switch to Windows. I’ve used every version of MacBook Pro and MacBook Air that have been released. My current laptop of choice is the Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Carbon / Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Extreme.Turns out switching from Mac to Windows isn’t as painful as I expected. FOLLOW ME IN THESE PLACES FOR UPDATES Twitter – http://twitter.com/unboxtherapy Facebook – http://facebook.com/lewis.hilsenteger Instagram – http://instagram.com/unboxtherapy

Why Apple Killed The MacBook Pro

Apple’s MacBook Pro remains an iconic product, but over the last few years Cupertino has pushed it back into the shadows; handing all the spotlight, attention, and shiny launch events to the iPhone. But it did more than that. It neutered a powerful laptop and turned it into a supporting player. Today’s MacBook Pro is a pale imitation of the original masterpiece.

Once upon a time Steve Jobs took to the stage, standing on the shoulders of Apple’s previous laptops, and announced the MacBook Pro. It was 2006, and the MacBook Pro pretty much defined Apple’s approach to for the next five years. It launched with Intel’s Core Duo chipset, an aluminium design, backlit keyboard, and a magnetic power connector so any trips would leave your laptop on a desk (whatever happened to that innovative idea?).

Four times faster than the G4 PowerBook, this was a laptop for the ages. Job’s Apple iterated on the design, ramping up the power, adding new apps, and increasing the portfolio to accommodate 17-inch and 13-inch versions.

When the time came to take on the lighter laptops from Microsoft (and arguably the Mayfly like rise of the netbook), the MacBook Pro was not compromised – instead the MacBook Air picked up that challenge and the Pro continued to push the envelope with Retina Displays, more powerful apps, and remained the gold standard for a workhorse laptop that could do anything, anywhere, with no compromises.

Today In: Innovation

The MacBook Pro was what you measured other laptops against, and frankly very little came close.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs discusses a new version of the Mac Book during a "town hall" style event at Apple Headquarters October 14, 2008 (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Getty

Then Tim Cook came along, taking over as Apple’s CEO in 2011. Given the lead time of products, Cook’s vision of Apple would arguably take a few years to become fully apparent, but when it did it was clear where his priorities lay.

The iPhone.

I’m not saying Apple should not have focused on the iPhone, after all this was a chance to dominate a new landscape (we’ll leave the discussion about how dominant Apple’s roughly twenty percent share actually is for another time. But Cook’s Apple decided that the company’s other products would be subservient to the needs of the iPhone.

That meant the Mac family, and especially the MacBook Pro, had to walk in the shadow and to reinforce the message  of the iPhone. New technology came to the iPhone and iOS first, with the Macs and macOS picking up similar apps later in the product cycle (and invariably sold as ‘now you can sync your iPhone docs to your Mac, doesn’t that make your Mac useful?’).

You even saw the physical design trends of the smartphone world affect the reliability and trustworthiness of the MacBook Pro. Everything was about making the machine thinner, lighter, more fragile, and reducing it to a single sealed unit that turned your personal computer from something you could tinker and upgrade to a ‘Tim says this is the way forward’ monolith.

Add in the move towards cloud based services, applications syncing data through to the internet to mobile devices, and the subtle indicators that your Mac was no longer a standalone machine but one that was a second-class interface to Cook’s world of monthly subscriptions, and is it any wonder that many consider Apple’s deskbound computers to be an afterthought?

Apple CEO Tim Cook previews a MacBook Pro during a product launch event at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, California on October 27, 2016 (Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)

Getty

The MacBook Pro is no longer the MacBook Pro.

The powerful standalone computer that did things differently was sacrificed. There never seemed to be a thought to keep the Mac family as something separate to the iOS product line. No, everything had to fall in line to support the annual retail temptation of the iPhone, every feature added to macOS was one that the iOS team had already provided to the smartphone, and the Mac lost its place as a premier product.

The MacBook Pro is dead. Long live the MacBook Pro. Excuse me for not putting out the bunting.

Now read more about the problems with the latest macOS update…

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

I am known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on the public conscious and existing businesses. I’ve been following this space for over ten years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies, some for long periods of time, others for commissions, one-off pieces or a series of articles or shows. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and picked up a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, alongside contributions to Radio 5 Live, the BBC World Service, presenting Edinburgh local radio’s coverage of the General Election. You’ll find me on Twitter (@Ewan), Facebook, and Google Plus.

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Say goodbye to the petite laptop. Read more: https://www.engadget.com/2019/07/09/a… Subscribe to Engadget on YouTube: http://engt.co/subscribe Engadget’s Buyer’s Guide: https://www.engadget.com/buyers-guide/ Get More Engadget: • Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/engadget • Follow us on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/engadget • Follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/engadget • Read more: http://www.engadget.com Engadget is the original home for technology news and reviews.

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Apple’s Unpleasant Behaviour Is Hurting The Macbook Pro

Tim Cook, chief executive officer of Apple Inc., speaks about Apple Arcade during an event at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

Apple is expected to launch a new MacBook Pro later this month and hand a very small cup of lukewarm water to the parched throats of the macOS-powered geekerati. Tim Cook and his team are going to make sure the new laptop will go unnoticed by the general public when it is announced.

In Apple’s push to emphasis software and services, it’s tough to look at macOS and wonder what the deskbound platform would look like if Apple had decided to make it successful in its own right. As well as its role in being the developer platform for iOS and iPadOS apps, macOS has been slowly turned into a subsidiary OS which supports the features of iOS. New apps are rarely for new desktop purposes, but to support existing mobile purposes.

While the world is moving towards mobile, there is still a strong place for desktop apps. But Apple’s focus is on iOS, on subscription services delivered to mobile, and how to support the cloud based services. It’s tough for any Mac to stand out when your seen only as a secondary supporting character.

Today In: Innovation

Most Apple watchers are expecting Tim Cook and his team to organise a second consumer event at some point in October (my money is on October 29th) and this will be the last opportunity in 2019 for Apple to publicly introduce the 16-inch MacBook Pro…  which is already in production ahead of the launch.

But the event is unlikely to be just about the new MacBook Pro… or the full MacBook or Mac range… Apple’s slate has a number of products that are going to be loved by Cook much more than the macOS machines. There’s the traditional ‘don’t you think the iPhone has been doing well’ reinforcement to the hand-picked audience which will take up some of the digital column inches.

Apple has been working on geo-location tags, and the expectation is that the Apple Tags system will launch at this event with the ‘new power’ of the iPhone 11 switched on by a software update to interact with these tags (and other Apple devices).

And then there’s the ‘direct’ competition in the form of the iPad Pro, which is also expected to pick up an update for the holiday season.

Given the choice between eulogising the new iPhone, increasing its functionality, and promoting the walled-garden of the iPad Pro… or giving the MacBook Pro family room to breath and luxuriate in the limelight, I suspect Cook will choose the former. I would love to be proved wrong but nothing in the last year or two suggests that is going to happen.

Finally, there’s another truth about the MacBook range as a whole, and the MacBook Pro individually, that has to be noted. No matter what Apple says on the stage, the MacBook Pro is going to struggle in comparison to its Windows 10 counterparts. There are laptops with far better designs and styling (such as Microsoft’s Surface Book series), there are laptops far better suited to gaming and multimedia creation (such as the Razer Blade Pro), and there are far more portable and practical business laptops (HP’s Elitebook range).

Even restricting a comparison to the headline feature (increasing the screen size to 16 inches), the new MacBook Pro is falling short not just of Apple’s previous large screened MacBooks, but also of the top line large screened laptops where the going rate on the diagonal is seventeen inches. It might be ‘the biggest and best MacBook Pro from Apple’ but it’s nowhere close to being the biggest or the best laptop in the market.

An employee is illuminated by the screen of an Apple Inc. laptop computer as he works at Flock's office in Mumbai, India. Photographer: Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg

© 2017 Bloomberg Finance LP

I want Apple to prove me wrong. I want Apple to do more than a minimum viable upgrade to the MacBook Pro. I want a machine that is seen as more than a ‘use this to support your iPhone’, ‘code for your mobile devices’ or ‘edit your miniseries so it can feature on Apple TV’.

But I don’t think Apple wants any of that.

Now read more about how Apple’s decisions have doomed the Mac family of devices…

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

I am known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on the public conscious and existing businesses. I’ve been following this space for over ten years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies, some for long periods of time, others for commissions, one-off pieces or a series of articles or shows. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and picked up a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, alongside contributions to Radio 5 Live, the BBC World Service, presenting Edinburgh local radio’s coverage of the General Election. You’ll find me on Twitter (@Ewan), Facebook, and Google Plus.

Source: Apple’s Unpleasant Behaviour Is Hurting The Macbook Pro

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Download PDFelement for Mac Free: https://www.macpdfeditor.com/?utm_sou… Save 50% on Back-to-school sale: http://bit.ly/2N7ITg5 Review It to get $5 Amazon gift card free: http://bit.ly/2Nd764H Rules: Download PDFelement 7 from Mac App Store and give it a try! Rate and write a review for it on the Mac App Store Capture your review and send it at jessie@wondershare.com Within 2-5 business days to wait your gift card to come. -Sponsored by PDF element The entry level MacBook Pro 2019 has been out for over a month. With previous problems like the reliability of the butterfly keyboard, thermal throttling issues on the 2018 model, just how well does Apple’s latest entry level MacBook Pro hold up after one month of use? #MacBookPro #MacBookPro2019 #MacBookPro13 Buy MacBook Pro 13″: https://amzn.to/2XKboqm Join the Greg’s Gadgets Discord: https://discord.gg/s8jp9Kt Follow Me on Twitter: http://bit.ly/2G9H3HM Audible: http://www.audibletrial.com/GregsGadgets Buy Greg’s Gadgets Merch: http://bit.ly/2RWZUNs NEW Six Colors Logo: http://bit.ly/2SIIpQy NEW Six Colors Logo 2: http://bit.ly/2Gr98vt PROMOCODE: SIXCOLORS for 25% off!

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Apple’s Obsessive Behaviour Is Killing The Macbook Pro

With the iPhone 11 launch out of the way, Apple’s attention will turn from the iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro phones to the iPad Pro and a new wave of tablets to accompany the newly forked iPadOS. But what of the upcoming MacBook Pro updates and the larger 16-inch laptop?

Looking closely at the attitude of Tim Cook’s Apple to the macOS powered laptops, you’d be forgiven in thinking that the MacBook Pro has already been moved to legacy status. The intense and almost obsessive focus on thin and minimalist design, coupled with restricting choice and denying Mac owners long-term flexibility, has pushed the still-useful and beloved laptop family out of the public’s gaze.

First up is the obsessive drive to make its laptops thinner and lighter. Yes, the resulting devices look lighter and I’m sure that focus groups presented with alternate designs will choose the prettier one, but a laptop is not phone, nor is it a tablet. You need a certain amount of size to enjoy the experience, to have space for powerful chips, to handle the cooling requirements, to allow for new technology, and to guarantee reliability.

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By all means use the MacBook Air for the ‘thin’ brigade, but for the workhorse laptop, the MacBook Pro, Apple’s decision to prioritise a thin design – notably the fragile butterfly keyboard – has allowed the competition to catch up with and overtake the MacBook Pro in terms of hardware options and software flexibility.

One obvious lucrative area where macOS has fallen behind is in gaming. MacOS

may have a significant share of the market, but where are the gaming options? They’re all using Windows 10, with access to a wide range of graphics cards, super processors, and fast refreshing densely packed 4K screens.

This speaks to another area where Apple’s obsessive nature has hindered the MacBook Pro. The inability to open up the system to graphics cards vendors is a poor choice at best, yet one where you could – if you look hard enough – understand why Apple is restricting the options inside the hardware. But is that any excuse to lock out some of the biggest names when using external graphics card caddies?

Apple has decided on the one true way to use your laptop, and has forced that through. If you want to do something outside of that definition, then the closed nature means you are out of luck.

Take the removal of the SD Card reader. Photographers are a notable demographic in MacBook Pro ownership and regularly tote a ridiculous number of cards around. It was an easy matter to pop these into their primary machine as required. Nope, that’s not the way forward that Apple sees it, so the SD card reader is removed.

And frankly, for a professional machine, the answer of using an external card reader in the USB ports or connecting through the camera is an embarrassment. And that’s before it leads to counting the number of available USB ports.

Apple CEO Tim Cook presents new products, including new Macbook laptops, during a special event at... [+] the Brooklyn Academy of Music (Photo by Timothy A Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

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Finally, there’s Apple’s attitude towards the Mac machines in general, and the flagship MacBook Pro laptops specifically. While Tim Cook and his team are happy to sell them, and happy to remind developers about the machines, when it comes to the consumer events, the MacBook Pro is simply left in the wings.

WWDC saw the launch of the Mac Pro, and a focus on high specs and how it works for the multimedia creative (presumably focusing on the companies that are going to be supplying content for Apple’s subscription TV business). The real line items from WWDC were iOS and the reveal of iPadOS. The Mac was well down the running order and the MacBooks were nowhere to be seen.

Apple’s September event is the key consumer event for the year. It sets the tone for the year to come, it focuses the attention of the public on Apple’s core devices, and that was the iPhone and the Apple Watch. The side order of iPad was a kick in the teeth for those waiting for the 16-inch MacBook Pro.

The obsession of preserving September for just the iPhone and any supporting peripherals weakens the MacBook Pro. And yes, Apple has the option of an event in October where the MacBook Pro can be revealed, but I suspect that even if the 16-inch MacBook Pro is given a public reveal (rather than a humbling ‘launch by press release’) the priority at the october event will be the iPad Pro.

Apple CEO Tim Cook presents new products, including new Macbook laptops, during a special event at... [+] the Brooklyn Academy of Music (Photo by Timothy A Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

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Tim Cook’s Apple is in the middle of a move towards software and services. At some point that means the focus on the iPhone and the iPad as standalone hardware will fade away and they will become little more than conduits for content. It means that there will come a point where Apple does not have to keep up with other platforms and manufacturers that are pushing the limits of technology – there are some would say that Apple is already following this model given the lack of change in the iPhone over the last few years.

What does that future look like? It looks a lot like the present day MacBook Pro. Unloved by management but continuing to perform vital tasks in the ecosystem; unnoticed by consumers who are lured into more profitable machines with software lock-ins and walled gardens that offer Apple’s accountants a thirty percent rake on everything; and unable to respond to competitors who are developing laptops and desk-bound machines for a new generation.

Now read why Apple is not just ignoring, but is afraid of your new MacBook…

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I am known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on the public conscious and existing businesses. I’ve been following this space for over ten years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies, some for long periods of time, others for commissions, one-off pieces or a series of articles or shows. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and picked up a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, alongside contributions to Radio 5 Live, the BBC World Service, presenting Edinburgh local radio’s coverage of the General Election. You’ll find me on Twitter (@Ewan), Facebook, and Google Plus.

Source: Apple’s Obsessive Behaviour Is Killing The Macbook Pro

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Apple Just Did Something Remarkable And It’s Very Good News For Its Customers

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No one likes to admit when they’re wrong. That’s true for you and me, and it’s especially true for big companies like Apple. The thing is, when you’re willing to admit when you made a mistake, it goes a long way towards building trust. And trust is, by far, your brand’s most valuable asset.

Today, Apple apologized for how it had handled recorded snippets of users’ voice interactions with Siri, the company’s digital assistant. In a statement, the company said that  “we realize we haven’t been fully living up to our high ideals, and for that we apologize.”

You might remember that Apple, like pretty much every other tech company, recently admitted that it used contractors to listen to, and transcribe these recordings in an effort to improve the artificial intellience-powered service. Making matters worse is that fact that the company hadn’t disclosed this practice, and contractors often heard false-activations that revealed personal information and other private conversations.

Earlier this month, Apple paused its review program and ended its relationship with the contractors involved. Now, it appears to be taking the next step, which started with an apology.

That’s actually pretty remarkable. It’s not often that companies say, “I’m sorry. We messed up.” Sure, they sometimes say a lot of words that vaguely sound like “I’m sorry,” but rarely are they this direct. Apple basically called itself out, saying that it wasn’t living up to its own standards, and that it owed customers an apology for a problem it caused.

Along with the apology, maybe the even bigger news here is that Apple announced a series of steps it plans to take moving forward, including:

  • The company will no longer retain recorded Siri interactions, but will use computer-generated transcripts instead.
  • Apple will allow users to opt in to having their audio samples included in the company’s efforts to improve the product. Users will also be able to opt out at any time after that.
  • Apple will only allow its employees (not contractors) to listen to audio samples, and will delete any “inadvertent trigger,” of Siri.

This is a big deal for a lot of reasons, but mostly because Apple will now allow users to ‘opt in.’ This is exactly how it should work.

There are perfectly legitimate reasons why Apple would want to listen to recorded snippets of Siri interactions. That’s one of the only ways it can really know how accurate the AI is at understanding user requests and providing the right information for a human to review and correction. I don’t know of anyone who doesn’t agree that that’s reasonable.

But Apple is changing the default assumption of an unspoken ‘opt in’ to one where people are given the choice to participate, instead of simply offering some opaque way of opting out. Companies offer opt out because they know most people won’t go through the trouble of changing whatever the default setting is, meaning people stay in whether they really want to or not.

Every tech company handling sensitive data should do exactly this. Don’t just let people opt out, or delete their history, or make a request to no longer be recorded. Make the default position the thing that’s best for the user, even if it makes your job a little harder.

Then, make your case for why your practice is worth it to the customer, and let them decide to participate or not.

By: Jason Aten

 

Source: https://www.inc.com/

At its 2019 Worldwide Developers Conference, Apple showed off iOS 13, which will be coming to iPhones this fall. Some of the new features include a dark mode, an overhaul for Maps, and the ability to swipe to type. Here are the best features Apple showed off. The event took place at the San Jose Convention Center, not Cupertino as mentioned in the video. Tech Insider regrets the error. MORE IPHONE CONTENT: 23 iPhone Tricks To Make Your Life Easier https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U52mI… $479 Pixel 3a XL VS. $1,099 iPhone XS Max https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ddAY… Lifelong iPhone User Switches To The Galaxy S10 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1r3wb… —————————————————— #Apple #iPhone #TechInsider Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to’s, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Visit us at: https://www.businessinsider.com TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider TI on Amazon Prime: http://read.bi/PrimeVideo INSIDER on Snapchat: https://insder.co/2KJLtVo The Best Features Apple Just Announced Coming To The iPhone

Apple Is Spending Billions on Its Upcoming TV Service. It Could Be a Costly Mistake

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We already knew Apple is joining the crowded TV streaming business, but thanks to a report from Bloomberg we now know the company is preparing to launch it’s Apple TV+ service in November. That coincides with Disney’s upcoming streaming service
launch announced to appear on November 12.

Certainly, Apple can afford to spend the money. With more than $100 billion in cash on hand, the company has plenty of resources to pour into building out a content library. The bigger question is, however, is it worth it?

The Financial Times reported on Monday that Apple is spending $6 billion on original content, including The Morning Show, a drama produced by Jennifer Aniston and Reese Whitherspoon, which reportedly costs more to produce per episode than Game of Thrones.

 

Apple is entering tricky waters. Netflix became the dominant leader in video streaming mostly because it had a robust library of familiar shows and films that viewers cared enough about to pay $10 a month for. That lead has eroded as content creators like HBO, Disney, and NBC Universal enter the game with their own services in order to monetize their content by cutting out the proverbial middle man.

 

For example, Netflix is losing its top two shows — The Office and Friends — in the next year, which has forced it to double-down on creating original content. Despite those efforts, and the fact that it still has a huge collection of popular shows and movies, the company saw it’s U.S. subscribers decrease for the first time last quarter.

Which brings us back to Apple. The company has remained tight-lipped about what specific content users can expect but has indicated that The Morning Show will be a launch feature.

Of course, if the primary library will be original content, that could be a hard sell for users, especially as they become tapped out by the number of subscriptions available to different video services.

Apple has bet big on its services division to drive a large part of its future growth. In addition to Apple TV+, the company is counting on its paid News+, App Store, Music, and Arcade game subscription services. Those drive recurring revenue each month, and it’s conceivable that it won’t be long before the company offers a subscription bundle that includes all of these services.

 

Still, in order for any of them to succeed, users have to care enough about the content to plunk down money every month. Apple Music benefits from the largest library of music, as well as many exclusive releases. iOS is one of the largest gaming platforms in the world, so it’s not hard to see why it will attract subscribers.

But, with the TV+ service, the bottom-line question is this: will customers pay $9.99 a month for largely unknown shows? If so, Apple could easily become a leader in both content creation and delivery. If not, the company could be looking at a very expensive lesson in the economics of media production.

 

I suspect that because it’s Apple, the content will be top-notch enough for people to sign up. I also suspect that because it’s Apple, people will sign up. But the challenge Apple faces isn’t that different from those you do — though it’s probably on a slightly larger scale.

 

That challenge is that every time you leverage your brand to launch something new, there’s not only a risk, but a cost. For Apple that cost is $6 billion. The company can’t afford to get this wrong at that — or any price.

Neither can you.

 

By : Jason Aten

 

Source: https://www.inc.com/

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Apple Accidentally Reveals Stunning Apple Watch Series 5 Upgrade

Apple Watch Series 5 is almost certainly going to be unveiled next month alongside the new range of iPhones. It looks highly likely that Tuesday, September 10 will be the big day.

An Apple Watch in titanium or ceramic finish? Oh, yes please.

An Apple Watch in titanium or ceramic finish? Oh, yes please. And a new leak has just confirmed that the smartwatch will be available in different finishes from the current range.

I say confirmed because the leak comes from an unimpeachably good source: Apple.

In an exclusive report by iHelp BR, Filipe Esposito has spotted something very interesting in the watchOS 6 operating system developers’ beta.

It was Esposito, by the way, who spotted the date of September 10 in Apple beta software, too, effectively confirming when the keynote will be.

Here, though, the information comes from an animation which appears when you set up an Apple Watch. If you’ve ever done this, you’ll know that it’s a pretty cool procedure. As you start the pairing, a circular pattern starts fizzing on the Watch screen, like a planet coming into existence or something like that, or am I being too poetic?

When your iPhone recognizes it’s looking at a Watch, the screen resolves into an elegant fret worked pattern with an Apple logo and descriptive writing specifying the size of the Watch and the metal in the case.

Now, it seems that hidden in the watch OS 6 software are animations which resolve themselves with details never seen before.

First of all, there’s a return of a ceramic case for the Apple Watch. How do we know this isn’t just left over from an earlier version of the Watch, you may ask?

After all, although there was no Series 4 ceramic watch, there was an Apple Watch Series 2 model in white ceramic, and Series 3 had white and grey ceramic options, all of which looked spectacular, by the way.

Well, we know this is all-new because it gives the size of the case as 44mm and 40mm, neither of which were the sizes of the previous ceramic models (which were 42mm and 38mm).

This is pretty intriguing news, and there’s more.

As well as an animation announcing the return of ceramic is another which presages a whole new metal finish: titanium.

Well, the new Apple Card is made of titanium so maybe Apple feels it should make a Watch to match.

What’s not clear is whether titanium will replace the stainless steel Watch or sit alongside it in the range.

Esposito advises caution, however, in assuming that these new Watches will be for Apple Watch Series 5. After all, the assets are found in the operating system which will run on Series 4 Apple Watch, so could these new versions be for a new look that will appear on current Series 4 timepieces?

I see the logic of this, but it just doesn’t feel quite right to me. Apple has never refreshed an existing Apple Watch in a new metallic livery, but has always saved its new designs exclusively for its latest models.

And I find it unlikely that Apple would want to create a Watch with a new outside and not refresh the insides as well. It’s true that the company has in the past added an extra color to the iPhone, specifically PRODUCT(RED), but never this late in the annual cycle, so I find it doubtful that that’s what’s happening here.

My guess is that we’ve just had a glimpse of what the next Apple Watch is going to be made of. Of course, exactly what it will look like is still to be revealed, but this is a juicy piece of information which promises something exciting is about to be unveiled.

Not long now…

Follow me on Instagram by clicking here: davidphelantech and Twitter: @davidphelan2009

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I’ve been writing about technology for two decades and am always struck by how the sector swings from startling innovation to regular repetitiveness. My areas of specialty are wearable tech, cameras, home entertainment and mobile technology. Over the years I’ve written about gadgets for the Daily Telegraph, the Sunday Times, the Daily Mail, the Sun, Metro, Stuff, T3, Pocket-lint, Wareable.com and Wired. Right now most of my work away from Forbes appears in the Independent, the Evening Standard and Monocle Magazine. Parenthetically, I also work as an actor, enjoying equally the first Mission Impossible movie, a season at Shakespeare’s Globe and a stint on Hollyoaks. Follow me on Instagram: davidphelantech, or Twitter: @davidphelan2009.

Source: Apple Accidentally Reveals Stunning Apple Watch Series 5 Upgrade

 

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