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Apple Issues Expensive Shock For Millions Of iPhone Users [Updated]

Apple iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, iPhone 11 Pro Max - Apple

 

Apple’s 2020 ambitions know no boundaries. The company plans to release up to seven new iPhone models and, internally, they will make the biggest generational leap in years. The problem for Apple is the designs keep leaking and, having already been disappointed once, a major new iPhone design leak means we are likely to be disappointed all over again.

Digging through Apple’s small print, the eagle-eyed MacRumors discovered Apple has quietly slashed trade-in values across its entire iPhone range for anyone looking to upgrade to a new iPhone. And the newer your trade-in model, the more money you will lose:

  • ‌iPhone XS‌ Max – up to $500 (was $600)
  • ‌iPhone XS‌ – up to $420 (was $500)
  • iPhone XR – up to $300 (was $370)
  • ‌iPhone‌ X – up to $320 (was $400)
  • iPhone 8 Plus – up to $250 (was $300)
  • ‌iPhone 8‌ – up to $170 (was $220)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 7 Plus – up to $150 (was $200)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 7 – up to $120 (was $150)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 6s Plus – up to $100 (was $120)
  • ‌iPhone‌ 6s – up to $80 (was $100)

Yes, if you plan to trade-in your current iPhone, you will now receive up to $100 less even if it is in perfect condition (remember: these are “up to” prices). As it stands, despite the convenience of trading your old iPhone in with Apple, these prices make it a poor financial decision to do so. You’ll receive considerably more elsewhere, particularly if you sell it online.

As far as I understand, this is also an usual step to reduce prices mid-cycle with Apple typically dropping values only with the release of each new iPhone generation. Consequently, it will be a nasty shock to many upgraders.

01/13 Update: Apple has confirmed to me that it has dropped trade-in prices mid-generation, but it has not yet provided a reason why the decreases are so sizable on this occasion.


Gordon’s Top Apple Daily Deals:

  • AirPods with Charging Case – (typically $159.99) – Amazon: $129 / Best Buy: $139.99 / Staples: $129 / Walmart: $139
  • 10.2-inch 2019 32GB iPad – (typically $329.99) – Amazon: $279.99 (currently unavailable)/ Best Buy: $279.99
  • iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro Max – save up to $700 with second purchase and free year of Apple TV+ – shop deal now
Apple Sale Alert: AirPods Pro, iPad Pro, iPhone 11, MacBook Pro Best Deals [Updated]

Forbes Gordon Kelly


Interestingly, Apple has also slashed prices on iPads at the same time but Mac and Apple Watch trade-ins are barely changed.  For example, there’s only a $10 cut to one Apple Watch model (Series 4), and the most you will lose on any Mac is $90 and that’s on an iMac Pro worth over $4,000. Apple has not given a reason for its timing with these new iPhone and iPad cuts, but I have asked the company and will update when/if I receive a response.

In the meantime, anyone still on the fence about upgrading to the iPhone 11 may have just found a good reason to wait. And (despite my love of the current generation), this may prove to be the smart move. After all, we already know the iPhone 12 range is a major upgrade delivering, among many other things, a new long-range 3D camera, 120Hz ProMotion displays, the introduction of in-display Touch ID and 5G for all new models without a significant price penalty.

Now that’s a pricing decision I can get behind.

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More On Forbes

Apple iPhone 12: Everything We Know So Far

Apple iOS 13.3 Release: Should You Upgrade?

Apple AirPods Pro Vs AirPods: What’s The Difference?

Samsung Galaxy S11: Everything We Know So Far [Updated]

I am an experienced freelance technology journalist. I have written for Wired, The Next Web, TrustedReviews, The Guardian and the BBC in addition to Forbes. I began in b2b print journalism covering tech companies at the height of the dot com boom and switched to covering consumer technology as the iPod began to take off. A career highlight for me was being a founding member of TrustedReviews. It started in 2003 and we were repeatedly told websites could not compete with print! Within four years we were purchased by IPC Media (Time Warner’s publishing division) to become its flagship tech title. What fascinates me are the machinations of technology’s biggest companies. Got a pitch, tip or leak? Contact me on my professional Facebook page. I don’t bite.

Source: Apple Issues Expensive Shock For Millions Of iPhone Users [Updated]

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Why Apple Killed The MacBook Pro

Apple’s MacBook Pro remains an iconic product, but over the last few years Cupertino has pushed it back into the shadows; handing all the spotlight, attention, and shiny launch events to the iPhone. But it did more than that. It neutered a powerful laptop and turned it into a supporting player. Today’s MacBook Pro is a pale imitation of the original masterpiece.

Once upon a time Steve Jobs took to the stage, standing on the shoulders of Apple’s previous laptops, and announced the MacBook Pro. It was 2006, and the MacBook Pro pretty much defined Apple’s approach to for the next five years. It launched with Intel’s Core Duo chipset, an aluminium design, backlit keyboard, and a magnetic power connector so any trips would leave your laptop on a desk (whatever happened to that innovative idea?).

Four times faster than the G4 PowerBook, this was a laptop for the ages. Job’s Apple iterated on the design, ramping up the power, adding new apps, and increasing the portfolio to accommodate 17-inch and 13-inch versions.

When the time came to take on the lighter laptops from Microsoft (and arguably the Mayfly like rise of the netbook), the MacBook Pro was not compromised – instead the MacBook Air picked up that challenge and the Pro continued to push the envelope with Retina Displays, more powerful apps, and remained the gold standard for a workhorse laptop that could do anything, anywhere, with no compromises.

Today In: Innovation

The MacBook Pro was what you measured other laptops against, and frankly very little came close.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs discusses a new version of the Mac Book during a "town hall" style event at Apple Headquarters October 14, 2008 (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Getty

Then Tim Cook came along, taking over as Apple’s CEO in 2011. Given the lead time of products, Cook’s vision of Apple would arguably take a few years to become fully apparent, but when it did it was clear where his priorities lay.

The iPhone.

I’m not saying Apple should not have focused on the iPhone, after all this was a chance to dominate a new landscape (we’ll leave the discussion about how dominant Apple’s roughly twenty percent share actually is for another time. But Cook’s Apple decided that the company’s other products would be subservient to the needs of the iPhone.

That meant the Mac family, and especially the MacBook Pro, had to walk in the shadow and to reinforce the message  of the iPhone. New technology came to the iPhone and iOS first, with the Macs and macOS picking up similar apps later in the product cycle (and invariably sold as ‘now you can sync your iPhone docs to your Mac, doesn’t that make your Mac useful?’).

You even saw the physical design trends of the smartphone world affect the reliability and trustworthiness of the MacBook Pro. Everything was about making the machine thinner, lighter, more fragile, and reducing it to a single sealed unit that turned your personal computer from something you could tinker and upgrade to a ‘Tim says this is the way forward’ monolith.

Add in the move towards cloud based services, applications syncing data through to the internet to mobile devices, and the subtle indicators that your Mac was no longer a standalone machine but one that was a second-class interface to Cook’s world of monthly subscriptions, and is it any wonder that many consider Apple’s deskbound computers to be an afterthought?

Apple CEO Tim Cook previews a MacBook Pro during a product launch event at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, California on October 27, 2016 (Photo: Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images)

Getty

The MacBook Pro is no longer the MacBook Pro.

The powerful standalone computer that did things differently was sacrificed. There never seemed to be a thought to keep the Mac family as something separate to the iOS product line. No, everything had to fall in line to support the annual retail temptation of the iPhone, every feature added to macOS was one that the iOS team had already provided to the smartphone, and the Mac lost its place as a premier product.

The MacBook Pro is dead. Long live the MacBook Pro. Excuse me for not putting out the bunting.

Now read more about the problems with the latest macOS update…

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

I am known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on the public conscious and existing businesses. I’ve been following this space for over ten years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies, some for long periods of time, others for commissions, one-off pieces or a series of articles or shows. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and picked up a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, alongside contributions to Radio 5 Live, the BBC World Service, presenting Edinburgh local radio’s coverage of the General Election. You’ll find me on Twitter (@Ewan), Facebook, and Google Plus.

Source: Why Apple Killed The MacBook Pro

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