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JPMorgan Chase Hired 2,100 People With Criminal Records In 2018 (And Will Hire More)

Topline: JPMorgan Chase announced an expansion of its efforts to hire people with criminal backgrounds Monday, continuing the trend of big companies “banning the box” and giving people second chances.

  • JPMorgan Chase hired 2,100 people with criminal records in 2018, which equals about 10% of their total hires last year.
  • The bank knows those people have records, because they conduct background checks on applicants after a job offer has been made.
  • Applicants with criminal records are being considered for entry-level jobs like account servicing and transaction processing, according to the bank’s press release.
  • The unemployment rate for formerly incarcerated people is 27%, while the nationwide unemployment rate is 3.5%, according to the bank.
  • But the tight labor market could be more beneficial to people with criminal records⁠—a July survey from staffing firm Adecco showed that 35% of respondents would consider those applicants, and 21% of respondents are no longer drug-testing them.
  • Koch Industries, Starbucks, McDonald’s, Target and Home Depot are among other corporations that have increased hiring efforts of the formerly incarcerated since at least 2013.

Surprising fact: The U.S. loses up to $87 billion annually in GDP by excluding people with criminal backgrounds from the workforce, said the bank.

Key background: “Banning the box” refers to removing questions about criminal backgrounds from job applications, a movement that’s been growing over the past two decades. According to the Pew Research Center, as of April black and Hispanic people make up 56% of the jailed population, leading experts to believe the groups are unfairly discriminated against in hiring. But “ban the box” legislation began to pass in the early 2000s, with laws on the books in 35 states and over 150 cities and counties as of July, according to the National Employment Law Project. And the 2018 First Step Act means thousands of people could be eligible for early release from prison, on top of the 700,000 already released annually⁠—signaling a shifting political attitude towards these workers, according to FastCompany.

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I’m a New York-based journalist covering breaking news at Forbes. I hold a master’s degree from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Previous bylines: Gotham Gazette, Bklyner, Thrillist, Task & Purpose, and xoJane.

Source: JPMorgan Chase Hired 2,100 People With Criminal Records In 2018 (And Will Hire More)

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From the railroad and steel consolidations brokered by John Pierpont Morgan on Wall Street more than a century ago, to banking consolidation, the financial crisis and Jamie Dimon’s leadership, J.P. Morgan Chase has been at the center of finance for more than a century. Here’s the story of how the country’s largest bank got to where it is today. Biographer of J.P. Morgan Jean Strouse, longtime bank analyst Mike Mayo and CNBC banking reporter Hugh Son help tell the story. You’ll learn about how Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton are part of the bank’s history, along with the first ATM, and the company’s position moving forward into the future of digital banking. Watch the video above to see how the country’s largest bank got to where it is today. ***Clarification*** Since 2004, investors in JPM stock have outperformed the bank stock index by an average of 6% return every year. That’s more than 6x the return of the index yearly (13:52) In February, J.P. Morgan Chase announced it was in growth mode, expanding its branch network to cover 93 percent of the U.S. population by the end of 2022. The aggressive growth plans will allow it to reach 80 million more consumers, or about one-quarter of the U.S. population, versus its footprint in 2018, the New York-based bank says. The expansion of physical branches comes amid a consumer shift to mobile and online banking. The average number of teller transactions per customer has plunged 41 percent since 2014, according to J.P. Morgan’s presentation at its investor day meeting. But convenient branch locations are a key consideration for people thinking about switching banks, and most of the firm’s growth in deposits has been fueled by people who use branches frequently, the bank said. The company made it clear it had flexibility in its growth plans: More than 75 percent of its branches could be shuttered within five years or kept open for more than a decade. » Subscribe to CNBC: http://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC About CNBC: From ‘Wall Street’ to ‘Main Street’ to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: http://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: http://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Google+: http://cnb.cx/PlusCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: http://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC How JP Morgan Chase Became The Largest Bank In The US

The Future Of Banking: Fintech Or Techfin – Jim Marous

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The banking industry is experiencing disruption at an increasing pace. Over the past few years, traditional financial institutions and non-traditional fintech firms have begun to understand that collaboration may be the best path to long-term growth. At the same time, big tech firms are offering financial services, creating techfin solutions.

The rationale for collaboration is the ability to bring strengths of both banks and fintech firms together to create an stronger entity than either unit could bring on their own. For most fintech organizations, the primary advantages are an innovation mindset, agility (speed to adjust), consumer-centric perspective, and an infrastructure built for digital. These are advantages that most legacy financial institutions don’t possess.

Alternatively, most banking institutions have scale, a stronger brand recognition and established trust. They also have adequate capital, knowledge of regulatory compliance and an established distribution network.

According to the World Fintech Report 2018 from Capgemini and LinkedIn, in collaboration with Efma, “Most successful fintech firms have focused on narrow functions or segments with high friction levels or those underserved by traditional financial institutions, but have struggled to profitably scale on their own. Traditional financial institutions have a vast customer base and deep pockets, but with legacy systems holding them back.”

The challenge will be the ability to establish an environment where collaboration can flourish as opposed to stifling the beneficiary attributes of either partner.

Fintech vs. Techfin

The difference between fintech and techfin is based on the origin of the underlying organization. Fintech usually references an organization where financial services are delivered through a better experience using digital technologies to reduce costs, increase revenue and remove friction.

A basic example of a fintech offering is the mobile banking services that most traditional banks offer. More commonly, fintech refers to non-traditional financial offerings such as PayPal, Zelle and Venmo in the U.S. and digital-only Starling Bank, Monzo and Revolut in the U.K.

Alternatively, techfin usually references a technology firm that finds a better way to deliver financial products as part of a broader offering of services. Examples of techfin companies include Google, Amazon, Facebook and Apple (GAFA) in the U.S. and Baidu, Alibaba & Tencent (BAT) in China.

A couple years ago, Jack Ma, technology visionary and co-founder and executive chairman of Alibaba Group, described the difference between Fintech and Techfin.

There are two big opportunities in the future financial industry. One is online banking, where all the financial institutions go online; the other is internet finance, which is purely led by outsiders.Jack Ma

In both instances, success of these organizations in finance will be based on the ability for the institution to collect and analyze massive data sets, learn from the insights to improve personalization and digital engagement in real-time, and expand offerings in response to consumer needs.

A New Competitive Landscape

Even with the best collaboration, the ability for legacy financial institutions to compete in the future banking ecosystem will be challenged by the techfin powerhouses. Built on digital platforms, these huge technology organizations are efficient and have already found ways to reduce operational costs and monetize their business models.

According to Bain, “Many of the tech giants possess the ingredients of success: digital prowess, large customer bases, organizations well versed in improving the customer experience, and ample leeway to extend their corporate brands into banking.” More concerning may be that some of these firms are generating a level of trust previously reserved only for traditional banks and credit unions.

As a result, an increasing percentage of consumers are willing to use financial products offered from these non-traditional firms – especially where the experience is superior to that offered by legacy organizations. A potential to shift revenues from other businesses (such as retail) to enhance banking offerings can completely change the competitive equilibrium.

It is expected that demand for products and services from fintech firms and large tech companies will only increase as more consumers become familiar with new digital offerings. This is especially true for younger consumers, who have grown up with digital devices.

More and more, people will get annoyed when they’re forced by bank policies and processes to use non-digital channels for everyday banking business. Traditional banking organizations cannot rely on providing checking accounts and loans only. Competitors are already eating away at significant parts of the banking value chain with the potential of limiting banks to becoming nothing more than utilities.

The future of the banking industry will depend on its ability to leverage the power of customer insight, advanced analytics and digital technology to provide services that help today’s tech-savvy customers manage their finances and better manage their daily lives.

As financial and technology organizations embrace a broader view of banking, offering both banking and non-banking services, the ultimate winner will be the consumer regardless of which provider they select.

 

 

 

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