How To Tell If You Have a Yeast Infection or UTI

Itching, burning or the constant urge to go — when it comes to problems down there, figuring out what’s wrong can be a tricky task. That’s because many issues that affect the vagina present with symptoms that may seem similar or even overlapping.

This is particularly true when it comes to urinary tract infections and yeast infections, two of the most common to afflict women — about 50% to 60% will experience a UTI at least once in her lifetime, and around 75% of women will experience a yeast infection at some point.

“These conditions can sometimes mirror one another because they both cause vaginal and bladder irritation,” says Jessica Shepherd, M.D., an ob-gyn, women’s health expert, and founder of Sanctum Wellness in Dallas, Texas.

lite9-4-1-1-1-1-3Here’s how to tell the difference between a UTI and a yeast infection so you can get the proper treatment.

Symptoms

UTI symptoms include:

  • A persistent urge to urinate, even if the bladder is empty and not much comes out
  • Incontinence
  • Burning, stinging or discomfort when urinating
  • Abdominal pain or cramping, especially when urinating
  • Cloudy or bloody urine
  • Pelvic pain
  • Pain in the lower back or flank
  • Fever, chills, nausea

Yeast infection symptoms include:

  • Constant itching, burning, or pain when urinating
  • Abnormal discharge (white and cottage cheese-like)
  • Itching or irritation in the vaginal area
  • Vaginal pain or soreness

Causes

UTIs occur when bacteria gets into the vaginal area, giving it the opportunity to travel up to the urethra or bladder where it becomes a full-blown infection and triggers uncomfy symptoms, explains Dr. Shepherd. Women are more likely than men to get one (although men can have a UTI, too) because our urethras (the pathway to the bladder) are shorter, making the bacterial journey easier.

Yeast infections happen when there’s an overgrowth of yeast that disrupts the vagina’s delicate microbiome. “Yeast naturally grows in our vaginas, along with other ‘good’ bacteria, but sometimes these levels can become imbalanced, leading to an infection,” says Staci Tanouye, M.D., a board-certified OB/GYN in Jacksonville, Florida and a Poise partner. “This can be caused by things like taking antibiotics, pregnancy, diabetes or a compromised immune system.”

Treatment

You need antibiotics to get rid of a UTI, so schedule an appointment with your doctor as soon as you notice symptoms. “If left untreated, a UTI could potentially spread to the kidneys, causing pain in the lower back or side, as well as fever, chills, or nausea,” Dr. Shepherd says.

Yeast infections can be treated with antifungal medications, but always talk to your doctor before trying any over-the-counter products, Dr. Tanouye says. Your doctor can help you determine which medication is right for you (there are oral options or suppositories that you insert into the vagina, as well as creams to help alleviate discomfort like itching).

Yeast infections require antifungal medications. These can be prescribed or purchased without a prescription and are available in a variety of treatments. You may take an oral medication, use a topical substance, or even insert a suppository. The duration of treatment varies and can range anywhere from one dose to multiple doses over a week’s time. Just like UTIs, you should take the yeast infection medication for the entire recommended duration to prevent the condition from coming back.

It’s possible that you have recurring UTIs and yeast infections that require a more aggressive treatment. Your doctor will outline these treatments if you experience multiple infections over a short course of time.

Preventing UTIs and yeast infections:

“Lifestyle factors can go a long way in helping you ward off UTIs and yeast infections,” says Dr. Shepherd. Here are some tactics to keep in mind:

  • Stay hydrated. “This can help prevent mild UTIs because fluids help flush bacteria from the urinary tract while decreasing inflammation,” Dr. Tanouye says.
  • Exercise. Being active supports a strong immune system, which is important for you to be able to fight off infections.
  • Ditch tight clothing. “Wear breathable clothing and keep skin dry,” Dr. Tanouye says, and try to change out of damp or sweaty clothing as soon as possible. Yeast thrives in warm, moist environments.
  • Avoid scented products. Feminine perfumes, deodorants, wipes or tampons that are scented may disrupt the makeup of vaginal bacteria, causing infection.
  • Wipe from front to back. This can help prevent you from spreading bacteria (which may cause a UTI) from the rectum to the vagina.
  • Don’t douche. This can disrupt your vagina’s natural bacterial makeup, which may lead to a yeast infection.

UTIs are common, with 10 in 25 women, and 3 in 25 men experiencing a UTI in their lifetime. Women experience UTIs more commonly than men because a woman’s urethra is shorter than a man’s, and closer to the vagina and anus, resulting in more exposure to bacteria.

You may also be more at risk for a UTI if you:

  • are sexually active
  • are pregnant
  • are currently using or have used antibiotics recently
  • are obese
  • have gone through menopause
  • have given birth to multiple children
  • have diabetes
  • have or have had a kidney stone or another blockage in your urinary tract
  • have a weakened immune system

Women experience yeast infections more frequently than men, and 75 percent of women will get a yeast infection in their lifetime. Yeast infections commonly occur in the vagina and vulva, but you can also get a yeast infection on your breast if you’re breast feeding and in other moist areas of the body, like the mouth. A vaginal yeast infection is not a sexually transmitted infection, but in rare occasions you can pass it to your partner during sex.

Your risk of contracting a vaginal yeast infection increases if:

  • you’re between puberty and menopause
  • you’re pregnant
  • you use hormonal birth control
  • you have diabetes and don’t manage high blood sugar effectively
  • you’re using or have recently used antibiotics or steroids
  • you use products in your vaginal area like douches
  • you have a compromised immune system

Source: How to tell if you have a yeast infection or UTI

More contents:

Vaginal yeast infections fact sheet”. womenshealth.gov. December 23, 2014. Archived from the original on 4 March 2015. Retrieved 5 March 2015.

Sexually transmitted diseases treatment guidelines, 2006″. MMWR Recomm Rep. 55 (RR-11): 1–94. PMID 16888612. Archived from the original on 2014-10-20.

Vaginal yeast infection”. MedlinePlus. National Institutes of Health. Archived from the original on 4 April 2015. Retrieved 14 May 2015.

Diagnosis of vaginitis”. Am Fam Physician. 62 (5): 1095–104. PMID 10997533. Archived from the original on 2011-06-06.

Thrush in men and women”. nhs.uk. 2018-01-09. Retrieved 2021-01-16.

Yeast infection (vaginal)”. Mayo Clinic. Archived from the original on 16 May 2015. Retrieved 14 May 2015.

Vaginal Candidiasis | Fungal Diseases | CDC

Treatment of vaginal candidiasis for the prevention of preterm birth: a systematic review and meta-analysis”.

“Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Candidiasis: 2016 Update by the Infectious Diseases Society of Amerika

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How Lemon Water Impacts Your Bladder, Per Urologists

That’s why so many people swear by drinking lemon water as part of their daily wellness routine, especially first thing in the morning upon waking up. Lemon water can help to make you feel more awake and alert by replenishing your body’s fluids—and you can’t deny that the sharp, acidic zing from the citrus helps clear some of the morning blearies, too.

“Many people report that they benefit from drinking lemon water first thing in the morning,” says Justin Houman, MD, a urologist available on Sesame. “They find it feels energizing and refreshing, alongside of course being thirst-quenching.”

However, there might be other impacts that drinking lemon water can have on your body, particularly your bladder. Here’s what two urologists have to say about how lemon water impacts your bladder health—including whether it’s beneficial or irritating—and provide recommendations for reaping the most bladder-boosting benefits from lemon water.‘I’m a Urologist, and These Are the Foods I Always Eat for…These Are the 10 Most Important Things We Learned From a Urologist…

How Lemon Water Impacts Your Bladder

First off, let’s quickly clear the air on one common misconception: Lemon water and lemonade are not the same. “Many people are told that lemon water and lemonade are natural treatments for common urological issues such as kidney stones, urinary tract infections (UTIs), and urinary incontinence, but in reality, lemonade is often full of bladder irritants like sugar and artificial coloring and flavoring, so those attempting to get the benefits of lemon water should not use lemonade as a substitute,” says Shenelle N. Wilson, MD, urologist and founder and CEO of Urology Unbound.

That being said, lemon water is certainly also no cure-all for bladder infections and doesn’t have miraculous powers that will make much of a difference in solving real-deal conditions like kidney stones or UTIs. “Lemon water will not dissolve existing stones, and it also won’t help stones pass any easier than if you were drinking plain water without lemon.

Lemon water also does not prevent or treat UTIs or urinary incontinence, and any benefits derived for these conditions are due to the increased water intake associated with drinking lemon water and water in general,” says Dr. Wilson. “If you have a UTI, for instance, drinking lemon water will not cause the infection to clear up on its own. You’ll likely need a round of antibiotics, as prescribed by a physician.”

According to Dr. Wilson, however, it can work in tandem with other lifestyle habits and dietary measures to support your bladder and its health. “Drinking lemon water can be a healthy habit that encourages optimal bladder health by providing much-needed hydration to the body—and that’s enough of a reason to drink it in the day,” she says.

What’s more, Dr. Wilson shares that drinking lemon water may help ward off the development or recurrence of kidney stones over time due to its ability to impact calcium oxalate formation, as shown in a recent study in the journal Europe PMC. “Lemon water can increase urinary citrate and urine pH, thereby potentially reducing one’s risk for formation of the most common type of kidney stone, calcium oxalate,” Dr. Wilson says.

Dr. Houman agrees, and adds this there may be slight immune- and digestion-boosting benefits to drinking lemon water as well. “Some patients who are prone to kidney stones are actually advised to drink freshly-squeezed lemon juice daily, as it may help reduce the chances of kidney stone formation, but more research is needed.

The acidity of lemons can also help supplement the acidity in your stomach, which tends to decline with age, so drinking lemon water may help with digestion as we age,” he says. It’s important to keep in mind that these benefits are likely minor—you’re only consuming a small portion of a lemon by squeezing it into a glass of water, after all.

Are There Drawbacks To Drinking Lemon Water?

Despite the benefits of drinking lemon water, some people may get adverse reactions or feel GI or bladder discomfort from the acid. So if that’s the case, it’s best to ditch the lemons and focus on drinking plain water in adequate amounts each day to best serve bladder health and function. “Lemon water can irritate the bladder in some patients, causing the sensation where you feel like you need to urinate more often than usual,” says Dr. Houman.

“Patients who are prone to irritative bladder symptoms in particular are advised to avoid citric foods, such as lemons, oranges, grapefruits, and tomatoes. Diluting your lemon water more heavily may decrease the irritative symptoms you are experiencing, but generally speaking, it’s probably not worth it.”

Plain water offers virtually as many bladder benefits, adds Dr. Wilson, so you won’t be missing too much if lemon water doesn’t agree with your urological or digestive system. “Simply drinking at least two and a half liters of water daily is among the most important ways to help prevent kidney stones from recurring, so I would advise patients sensitive to lemon water discontinue the consumption of it if it causes them discomfort,” says Dr. Wilson.

Additionally, if you struggle with nocturia—or the need to urinate frequently in the middle of the night—lemon water before bed may not be the best idea. “There is no ideal time to drink lemon water, but since lemon is a natural diuretic, I would recommend patients who struggle with frequent urination at night to stop drinking it, as well as all other fluids, at least two hours before bedtime,” says Dr. Wilson.

Beyond that, Dr. Wilson says that there isn’t any negative influence on the bladder to worry about regarding lemon water. “There’s no drawback to drinking lemon water from a urological standpoint,” she says. So if you enjoy it for its flavor and find that it’s helpful for keeping you hydrated, drink as much as you like.

How to Drink Lemon Water

It doesn’t need to be fancy. You can drink lemon water warm—try boiling water and infusing it with lemon juice and zest—or you can squeeze lemon juice into a glass of cold water or pitcher and store it in the fridge for ease and accessibility. You can also sprinkle in anti-inflammatory spices like cayenne or turmeric, or drop in additional pieces of fruit or herbs for even more flavor and health benefits.

Bottom line

“Many who make a habit of drinking lemon water first thing in the morning consider it to be a healthy way to start a happy, productive day,” says Dr. Houman. Are who are we to suggest there’s anything wrong with that? If you find that drinking lemon water in the morning improves your wellbeing and eases you into the day, then there’s zero reason to stop your daily practice.

“I’ve heard about the various ways people incorporate lemon water into their diet and drink it often myself,” agrees Dr. Wilson. “As a urologist, I don’t manage my patients’ mood or energy levels, but when I need to alkalinize a patient’s urine, I discuss lemon water in that capacity.

However, I also often prescribe medications for that purpose. So while I am a big believer and follower of naturopathic and dietary remedies, as a physician I don’t make general recommendations for treatments or therapies that have not been really proven in the medical literature,” says Dr. Wilson.

Source: How Lemon Water Impacts Your Bladder, Per Urologists | Well+Good

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Sweeteners May Be Linked To Increased Cancer Risk

1

Sweeteners have long been suggested to be bad for our health. Studies have linked consuming too many sweeteners with conditions such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. But links with cancer have been less certain.

An artificial sweetener, called cyclamate, that was sold in the US in the 1970s was shown to increase bladder cancer in rats. However, human physiology is very different from rats, and observational studies failed to find a link between the sweetener and cancer risk in humans. Despite this, the media continued to report a link between sweeteners and cancer.

But now, a study published in PLOS Medicine which looked at over 100,000 people, has shown that those who consume high levels of some sweeteners have a small increase in their risk of developing certain types of cancer.

To assess their intake of artificial sweeteners, the researchers asked the participants to keep a food diary. Around half of the participants were followed for more than eight years.

The study reported that aspartame and acesulfame K, in particular, were associated with increased cancer risk – especially breast and obesity-related cancers, such as colorectal, stomach and prostate cancers. This suggests that removing some types of sweeteners from your diet may reduce the risk of cancer.

Cancer risk

Many common foods contain sweeteners. These food additives mimic the effect of sugar on our taste receptors, providing intense sweetness with no or very few calories. Some sweeteners occur naturally (such as stevia or yacon syrup). Others, such as aspartame, are artificial.

Although they have few or no calories, sweeteners still have an effect on our health. For example, aspartame turns into formaldehyde (a known carcinogen) when the body digests it. This could potentially see it accumulate in cells and cause them to become cancerous.

Our cells are hard-wired to self-destruct when they become cancerous. But aspartame has been shown to “switch off” the genes that tell cancer cells to do this. Other sweeteners, including sucralose and saccharin, have also been shown to damage DNA, which can lead to cancer. But this has only been shown in cells in a dish rather than in a living organism.

Sweeteners can also have a profound effect on the bacteria that live in our gut. Changing the bacteria in the gut can impair the immune system, which could mean they no longer identify and remove cancerous cells.

But it’s still unclear from these animal and cell-based experiments precisely how sweeteners initiate or support cancerous changes to cells. Many of these experiments would also be difficult to apply to humans because the amount of sweetener was given at much higher doses than a human would ever consume.

The results from previous research studies are limited, largely because most studies on this subject have only observed the effect of consuming sweeteners without comparing against a group that hasn’t consumed any sweeteners. A recent systematic review of almost 600,000 participants even concluded there was limited evidence to suggest heavy consumption of artificial sweeteners may increase the risk of certain cancers. A review in the BMJ came to a similar conclusion.

Although the findings of this recent study certainly warrant further research, it’s important to acknowledge the study’s limitations. First, food diaries can be unreliable because people aren’t always honest about what they eat or they may forget what they have consumed. Although this study collected food diaries every six months, there’s still a risk people weren’t always accurately recording what they were eating and drinking.

Though the researchers partially mitigated this risk by having participants take photos of the food they ate, people still might not have included all the foods they ate. Based on current evidence, it’s generally agreed that using artificial sweeteners is associated with increased body weight – though researchers aren’t quite certain whether sweeteners directly cause this to happen.

Although this recent study took people’s body mass index into account, it’s possible that changes in body fat may have contributed to the development of many of these types of cancers – not necessarily the sweeteners themselves.

Finally, the risk of developing cancer in those who consumed the highest levels of artificial sweeteners compared with those who consumed the lowest amounts was modest – with only at 13% higher relative risk of developing cancer in the study period. So although people who consumed the highest amounts of sweetener had an increased risk of developing cancer, this was still only slightly higher than those with the lowest intake.

While the link between sweetener use and diseases, including cancer, is still controversial, it’s important to note that not all sweeteners are equal. While sweeteners such as aspartame and saccharin may be associated with ill health, not all sweeteners are.

Stevia, produced from the Stevia rebaudiana plant, has been reported to be useful in controlling diabetes and body weight, and may also lower blood pressure. The naturally occurring sugar alcohol, xylitol, may also support the immune system and digestion. Both stevia and xylitol have also been shown to protect from tooth decay, possibly because they kill bad oral bacteria.

So the important choice may be not the amount of sweetener you eat but the type you use.

By:

James is an Associate Professor in Biosciences in the School of Life and Health Sciences at Aston University, UK and a broadcaster with a number of television companies. James’s broadcasting includes work on BBC2’s Trust Me I’m a Doctor where he is the programmes most used contributor

Source: Sweeteners may be linked to increased cancer risk – new research

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Critics:

Artificial sweeteners (particularly aspartame and acesulfame-K) are associated with increased cancer risk, according to a study published online March 24 in PLOS Medicine. Charlotte Debras, from the Sorbonne Paris Nord University, and colleagues examined the associations between artificial sweetener intakes and cancer risk, overall and by site, among 102,865 adults from the French population-based cohort NutriNet-Santé (2009 to 2021), with a median follow up of 7.8 years.

The researchers found that higher consumers of total artificial sweeteners (above the median exposure) had increased risk of overall cancer compared with nonconsumers (hazard ratio, 1.13). Aspartame and acesulfame-K was associated with increased cancer risk (hazard ratios, 1.15 and 1.13, respectively). Risks were elevated for breast cancer (hazard ratio, 1.22 for aspartame) and obesity-related cancers (hazard ratios, 1.13 and 1.15 for total artificial sweeteners and aspartame, respectively).

“Our findings do not support the use of artificial sweeteners as safe alternatives for sugar in foods or beverages and provide important and novel information to address the controversies about their potential adverse health effects,” the authors write. “These results are particularly relevant in the context of the ongoing in-depth re-evaluation of artificial sweeteners by European Food Safety Authority and other agencies globally.”

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Related articles:

Eat These 7 Foods to Help Prevent Prostate Cancer – Natural Cures

Prostate cancer affects men more than any other kind of cancer. Almost 15% of men in the US suffer from it—a disproportionate number that could be significantly reduced. Some of the symptoms that accompany prostate cancer include: loss of bladder control, blood present in urine, and a burning sensation during urination. Studies show that a diet high in saturated fats, as well as being overweight increase the risk of prostate cancer.

In fact, more and more doctors are learning that a definite link exists between the foods we eat and the risk of cancer. These foods can be beneficial to anyone with a high risk of cancer:

1. Fresh Fish 2. Greens 3. Tomatoes 4. Coffee 5. Nuts 6. Pomegranates 7. Orange Vegetables Eating these foods can cut down on the risk of prostate cancer, but they can also have a positive effect on both a man’s waistline and his overall quality of life. It’s also important to note the presence of regular exercise reduces not only the risk, but also the degree of prostate cancer. Eat well and live well.

 

 

 

 

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