Here’s a Useful Fund For Investing In Blockchain Without Buying Bitcoin

“Buy the rumour, sell the news” is an old market saying – and we got a classic of the genre yesterday.

It was a huge day in the evolution of bitcoin. From its origins on obscure chat boards, the open-source experiment of a few renegade computer programmers, to mainstream investment vehicle.

And then yesterday, for the first time, a nation – El Salvador – made bitcoin legal tender. The bitcoin price was steadily running up on the story – from $30,000 to $53,000. Then “Bitcoin Day” arrived and wallop: it sells off $7,000 to $46,000. The bitcoin price “should” have risen. It didn’t; it rose on the rumour and sold on the news.

How many times? It’s happened before and it will happen again.

How to bet on cryptocurrencies without having to own cryptocurrencies

Traditional investors have long been searching for a vehicle by which they can own bitcoin through their Sipp or Isa, via a regular broker account. The older generation in particular don’t want to get involved with wallets and keys and storing coins on hard drives in safes and all the rest of it. They just want to be able to buy and sell bitcoin through their regular broker, with which they are familiar.

In response to this demand there have been numerous attempts to establish bitcoin ETFs, but every attempt has run into some sort of regulatory issue. The most successful were probably the Greyscale Bitcoin Trust, listed in the US, or Coinshares Swedish listed XBT Bitcoin Tracker One. Neither is quite the same as owning bitcoin, but they do track the price.

But another vehicle has come to my attention and I thought I’d flag it up for you today, as I think it might be quite useful. That is the VanEck Vectors Digital Assets Equity UCITS ETF (LSE: DAGB).

It invests in companies that, to use its own lingo, “are driving the blockchain revolution”. That is to say in miners, exchanges, payment providers, service providers and companies that hold and trade crypto and crypto patents.

If I were to draw a parallel, I’d say that, rather than buying gold, it’s like holding a basket of gold mining companies or a gold mining ETF.

The ETF is listed in London, and it’s been going since the beginning of May. There’s a dollar denominated version whose ticker is DAPP – and a sterling version, which is probably most useful to us, with the ticker DAGB (there are also euro-denominated versions listed in Germany (DAVV) and Italy (DAPP), and a Swiss franc denominated version listed in Switzerland (also DAPP)).

It’s still small – very small – but as awareness grows it has the potential to grow too. It holds 25 companies in total, with 75%-plus weighting to the US and Canada and 12% to China, and it rebalances on a quarterly basis. I’ll post the holdings below, but in case you’re not familiar with them, I’ll outline what the major ones do. 

It’s biggest holding is Marathon Digital Holdings (Nasdaq: MARA) a Nasdaq-listed bitcoin miner. Then there’s Jack Dorsey of Twitter fame’s payment company Square (NYSE: SQ) and Coinbase (Nasdaq:COIN), the recently-listed wallet-provider and exchange

Other miners it owns include Riot (Nasdaq: RIOT), Hive (Vancouver: HIVE) and Argo (LSE: ARB), while other notable holdings include Silvergate (NYSE: SI), the bank for fintech and cryptocurrency businesses, and Michael Saylor’s Microstrategy (Nasdaq: MSTR). 

Saylor has in the past year totally got the bitcoin bug and become one of the most vocal and articulate cheerleaders for the space. His company, Microstrategy, has gone from being a software company to a bitcoin holding vehicle, owning more than $5bn in bitcoin. He’s raised debt to do it so it is a highly leveraged bitcoin play.

Anyway, here are the main holdings:

HoldingTickerSharesMarket value
(US$)
% of net
assets
Marathon Digital Holdings IncNasdaq: MARA37,8581,491,2279.15
Square IncNYSE: SQ5,3801,430,1658.77
Coinbase Global IncNasdaq: COIN5,0421,345,2568.25
Hut 8 Mining CorpToronto: HUT125,4231,261,6757.74
Silvergate Capital CorpNYSE: SI7,986947,2995.81
Microstrategy IncNasdaq: MSTR1,378892,9585.48
Hive Blockchain Technologies LtdVancouver: HIVE257,250857,1615.26
Voyager Digital LtdToronto: VOYG53,621799,9654.91
Riot Blockchain IncNasdaq: RIOT24,755794,8834.88
Bitfarms Ltd/CanadaVancouver: BITF128,704763,9734.69
Galaxy Digital Holdings LtdToronto: GLXY34,963732,1894.49
Taiwan Semiconductor ManufacturingNasdaq: TSM5,431677,2464.15
Canaan IncNasdaq: CAN64,785620,6403.81
Northern Data AgFrankfurt: NB26,290568,4983.49
Argo Blockchain PlcLSE: ARB288,705533,3123.27
Bit Digital IncNasdaq: BTBT45,480533,0263.27
Ebang International Holdings IncNasdaq: EBON157,795397,6432.44
BC Technology Group LtdHong Kong: 863179,501372,2122.28
Coinshares International LtdStockholm COIN26,030257,8651.58
Diginex LtdNasdaq: EQOS40,141222,3811.36
DMG Blockchain Solutions IncVancouver: DMGI201,595205,8231.26
Huobi Technology Holdings LtdHong Kong: 1611113,001204,9561.26
Bigg Digital Assets IncToronto BIGG183,875180,4551.11
Future Fintech Group IncNasdaq: FTFT58,088156,8380.96
Bitcoin Group SeFrankfurt: ADE1,22261,2300.38
Other/Cash-4,083-0.03

Bitcoin is supposed to be outside of the traditional financial system so it sounds funny saying that I own DAGB in my Sipp, but I do. I’m not, however, recommending that you go out and buy it straight away. I see it more as a useful vehicle to be aware of.

My overriding theory that we are in a period of “frustrating consolidation” for bitcoin remains in play, so I would try to wait for the sell off to get really harsh before you buy: buy the dips, as they say. But this should be a good vehicle to play the bitcoin game, should you see fit.

Regulating the unregulatable

In other news, I see that a bit of a crypto storm is now brewing in Brussels, where the European Parliament is about to try and regulate cryptocurrencies. Good luck with that! What could possibly go wrong when regulators are trying to regulate something they don’t understand, one of the purposes of which is to obviate bureaucracy?

The polling company Redfield and Wilton has run a poll and found that the overwhelming majority of Europeans want cryptocurrencies regulated by their own countries and not at the EU level, with many seeing EU regulation as a power grab. Greece, The Netherlands and Latvia are the most anti-EU regulation, while Spain and Portugal are the most pro. Make of that what you will.

Daylight Robbery – How Tax Shaped The Past And Will Change The Future is now out in paperback at Amazon and all good bookstores with the audiobook, read by Dominic, on Audible and elsewhere.

Dominic Frisby author headshot

By: Dominic Frisby

Source: https://moneyweek.com/

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Crypto Investors Get Ready for More Taxes But Clearer Rules

Sure, you might have to actually pay U.S. taxes on those crypto trades. But at least it will be easier to figure out how much you owe.

A new push by Congress to require crypto brokers to report transactions to the Internal Revenue Service could create some unwelcome tax bills but could clarify rules for traders and users of Bitcoin and other digital tokens, potentially strengthening the system in the long run, people in the industry say.

The new rules — a last-minute addition to the $550 billion bipartisan infrastructure package now being considered by the U.S. Senate — would also force businesses to disclose trades of digital assets of more than $10,000. The provisions are designed to raise $28 billion.

The measures add to increased scrutiny the IRS has recently applied to traders of Bitcoin, Ethereum and other digital assets. The agency has promised it will issue new rules that clarify how those virtual currencies should be taxed.

People who trade digital currencies must pay income taxes on any gains, even if some crypto investors have been ignoring their tax obligations. But even for those who want to follow the law, it can be difficult to keep track of what’s owed.

Filing taxes on crypto trades can create huge headaches, especially for those who conduct multiple transactions each year. While traditional stock brokerages are already required to send detailed tax forms to clients, crypto exchanges aren’t. Even if firms wanted to help their clients file taxes, it’s not always clear how to do that under the current regulations.

In addition, tax obligations can pop up in surprising places. People who use digital currencies to pay for things — like, say, a Tesla, or a pizza — are supposed to pay taxes on any increase in value of the crypto they spend. It’s a key difference between using digital “currencies” and actual, fiat currencies such as the U.S. dollar to conduct commerce.

Andrew Johnson, a project manager at a large national bank, has invested tens of thousands in crypto and uses a dedicated service to figure out what he owes in taxes. He’s been using CoinTracker, which he learned about though a YouTube channel that he trusts.

“Most would benefit from a tracking service to help with taxes,” he said. “For me, I decided it was worth the cost to not have to manually track all the trades I did — which could take hours or days.”

Read more from Bloomberg Opinion: How Can I Lower My Taxes on Bitcoin?

Cryptocurrency exchanges and others in the industry have raised concerns that the U.S. Senate is rushing the rules into effect without consulting them first.

Some wondered whether the new rules and regulatory attention would encourage mainstream investors to join the space — or hurt the appeal of cryptocurrencies by killing its anything-goes ethos.

“Some portion of crypto investors may start to have second thoughts about the tax consequences,” said Michael Bailey, director of research at FBB Capital Partners. “It’s almost like crypto is a really fun party, but it’s getting late and a few people are starting to look at their watches as they think about the next morning.”

For years, the IRS has been warning taxpayers to report cryptocurrency transactions on their tax returns. More recently, the agency has made clear that fighting tax evasion through digital currencies is a top priority.

The IRS has started collecting vast amounts of data on blockchain transactions, has subpoenaed crypto exchanges and worked on coordinating enforcement with foreign governments. Last year, the IRS added a yes-or-no question to the front page of the 1040 income tax form asking whether filers had sold or exchanged virtual currencies.

The jurisdiction of U.S. law enforcement only reaches so far, and crypto traders who prize secrecy could flee to offshore exchanges, or take other measures to avoid being spotted by the IRS. However, the U.S. has already shown it can crack down on foreign tax evasion by, for example, forcing banks in Switzerland and elsewhere to divulge details on American clients.

Even if parts of the crypto universe remain hidden, it may be difficult to move those assets onshore and turn them into legitimate wealth.

“If a U.S. taxpayer is into crypto for the ability to underreport income from sales or transfers, chances are someone in a chain somewhere may have to disclose it,” said Julio Jimenez, an attorney who is principal in the tax services group at Marks Paneth LLP.

All this isn’t necessarily a bad thing for law-abiding investors in digital assets if they end up with clearer rules and easier-to-understand annual statements from crypto firms.

“I think it will have a positive effect on the industry,” said Brett Cotler, an attorney at Seward and Kissel LLP in New York who specializes in blockchain and cryptocurrency. While exchanges and fintech firms that deal in digital currencies may have to spend money upgrading reporting and compliance systems, it will improve customer service, he said.

Johnson, the crypto trader, said he thinks the new rules will help legitimize the crypto ecosystem and foster international growth.

“While at its heart, crypto assets have been a means of moving value outside of government-controlled rails, I still understand the need for regulation in the crypto space in order for wider adoption to take place,” he said.

— With assistance by Natasha Abellard, and Laura Davison

By ,  , and

Source: Bitcoin (BTC): What Is Impact of Government Plan to Tax Crypto Trades? – Bloomberg

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