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Nutrition For Kids – Get All The Support And Guidance You Need To Get The Right Nutrition For Your Kids

Children today are more likely to consume foods that are delicious rather than nutritious, and most foods that come under the delicious category are usually either highly sweetened or salted, either way the delicious choice is not good for the child at all. It is up to the adult to ensure the meals a child consumes us as balanced as possible. With balanced meals, the child will be able to have all the necessary nutrition needed for optimum and normal growth patterns both mentally and physically……

Read more: https://nutritionforkids01.blogspot.com/

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What to Do When You Can’t Stop Worrying About Your New Baby – Kate Rope

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Almost all parents worry about the health and safety of their newborn children. In fact, we’re evolutionarily programmed to scan our environments for any potential threat to the little life we are now charged with preserving. You might worry that your child will stop breathing in the night. That a car might leap onto the sidewalk and mow down you and your stroller. Or, even, that you could do something to harm your new baby, like drown her during those awkward newborn sponge baths……

Read more: https://offspring.lifehacker.com/what-to-do-when-you-cant-stop-worrying-about-your-new-b-1826008586

 

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Anxious Children – 4 Ways to Help by Lynda Monk

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We should all be concerned and paying attention to the mental health of our children and youth within society. Evidence suggests that stress and anxiety are on the rise for today’s young people. Even young children between the ages of 2 and 5 are showing higher levels of emotional upset and anxiety (Statistics Canada). Many reasons are cited for this, including things like the impact of bullying, higher rates of divorce and the breakdown of the family, and poverty. Technology and high rates of screen time, less sleep and many other factors also have an effect……

Read more: https://ca.ctrinstitute.com/blog/anxious-children-4-ways-to-help/

 

 

 

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Eric Black: When the World Poses Challenging Questions, What Do We Tell the Kids? — BCNN1 WP

What do we tell the kids about sex? The neighbors are gay and invited us over. What do we tell the kids? The pastor’s been accused of sexual misconduct. What do we tell the kids? A child at school says she no longer identifies as a girl. What do we tell the kids? A teenager […]

via Eric Black: When the World Poses Challenging Questions, What Do We Tell the Kids? — BCNN1 WP

 

 

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Prevent Children From Exposure of Electronic Devices

Parents are being admonished to control their children’s use of electronic devices The Worldwide Head of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, says parents, who prevent their children from the uncontrolled exposure to electronic devices are worthy of praise. His Holiness Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, Khalifatul Masih V, said the proper upbringing of children in the society […]

via Prevent children from exposure of electronic devices

 

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My Tangled Relationship with My Daughter’s Hair – Leslie Kendall Dye

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I fell in love with a photo I snapped of my daughter at a Christmas day wedding just a month after she’d turned four. I printed the photo and it now sits on a shelf above my desk, framed in silver. It’s difficult to describe precisely what the image suggests to me, but a lot of it has to do with her hair. It’s shaped into a silky confection of a bob, some platonic ideal of how hair should look: neat but glamorous, the light sumptuously dancing in its waves, controlled, sporty, elegant. It is swept back on one side with a barrette, and her face looks up toward the light. She is wearing a frock of tulle and taffeta- she might be in a fairy tale, or a moonlit bay in Maine, or an A.R. Gurney play.

My daughter used to love having her hair cut. She developed an obsession with scissors and their potential relationship to hair when she was only two. She would place her dolls side by side on wooden chairs, drape them with dish towels, and manipulate her father’s long and very real scissors with preternatural dexterity. We told her the hair would not grow back. She was indifferent to this; she just wanted to cut hair, any hair, all hair.

After the bath she would ask me to trim her hair. She’d sit on a towel draped on my bed and I’d begin the haphazard process, cutting along the bottom of her curls. Her hair was wavy enough to be forgiving of my reckless, uneven intrusions. It would fall in satiny clumps around her and she’d squeal, then run through the apartment spinning her head to feel the lightness of her curls.

Then came the bob I captured in that wedding photo. A professional had cut it this time, and my daughter hated what she saw in the mirror, deeming it severe and somehow too deliberate. She didn’t use those words, but I knew what she meant when she complained.

With that, she never wanted to cut her hair again. For a long time, I didn’t worry. I assumed she’d forget the trauma of the salon cut and long for the thrill of scissors in her hair once more. But as that adorable bob grew out, her resolve only hardened. And I began to fret.

Why is her hair such a big deal to me? Why do I want my daughter to hew to the image in the silver frame? It’s been two and a half years and in that time a struggle has played out between my child and me. She will not submit to a trim. She now looks more Haight-Ashbury than A.R. Gurney.

I have imagined cutting it when she falls asleep. It’s a terrible thing to consider, much less admit to. But—her hair. The curls are gone, the weight of two years’ growth has pulled them out. It lies flat; it does not frame her face. So what? She looks different. She looks older. “Can I comb it into pigtails?” I beg. “What about braids? Or ribbons?” No. She likes it down, untended, wild.

“If you won’t trim it,” I say, “then you have to let me condition and comb it at night.” My daughter accepts this, as a way to ward off more demands that she visit the hairdresser. It takes a while to tease out the knots and the rapid motion of my comb slowly working its way down the hair shaft makes her nervous. “You aren’t cutting my hair back there, are you?” my daughter asks. I assure her I’m not, feigning shock that she would think I could commit such treachery; nonetheless, she knows my heart telepathically.

It isn’t just the hair. Something is shifting. Last weekend we received a box of hand-me-downs and before I’d had time to vet them she was gleefully sorting her favorites—”Look Mommy! It says “Star” in sparkles!”

No, no, no! I wanted to scream. That is not what my daughter wears! But it is now. This morning she went to school in a t-shirt studded with sequins and a dung-colored pair of slim-fit pants, her unruly mane cascading down her back. She knew I silently disapproved, and I considered this a personal failure, but slim-fit pants strike me as both confining and too mature. I see in my mind’s eye a Bonwit Teller dress from my youth, something A line and tailored, maybe it’s one I saw my mother wearing in a photo circa 1946. Maybe I’d like my daughter’s clothing, even the very impression she makes, to work as a time machine, forging a connection with a grandmother otherwise lost.

I don’t think she wants my approval; I think she wants me not to care. She doesn’t want me to have a vision of her that does not agree with her own, as if my fantasy could coopt her singular vision of herself. Perhaps it can. When she was a baby, I loved choosing the hats. I put her in sun bonnets, the jauntiest caps, knit beanies with ears. But I knew how important separation and differentiation was, and I prepared myself to let go.

Yet here I am, tangled up in her hair.

I wrote to a friend about it and she wrote back, “Mothers care a lot about hair.” I don’t think I see my daughter as an extension of me, but perhaps in presentation I am unable to fully separate from her. If she is messy, I look messy too. I know a mother who called her pediatrician about her daily battle over clothes with her six-year-old. The doctor asked, “Do you think you look less in control if she leaves the house in a tutu?” “Yes!” the mother replied. Is it simply about control though? I want my daughter to wear clothes that match her youth, her freshness, her recent arrival in the world. If she wears trends, she seems prematurely self-conscious, whereas timeless clothes suggest a freedom from worldly preoccupation.

Maybe that’s what it’s about—time. The longer her hair grows—the more I don’t recognize the clothes and the affect and the expressions she brings home, the more immediate is the sensation of time overcoming me like a riptide. I don’t want the photo under glass; I want the whole child imprisoned there.

They say you must remind yourself that your children do not belong to you.

The truth is more complex. She is more my little girl now than she was as a less formed four year old. Together, we peruse the shelves of the local bookshop, delighting in the first edition Narnia books. “It has to be Pauline Baynes, Mommy.” She knows who illustrated the original Narnia; she is very much my daughter. I recognize the inside of her more and more.

This weekend, I have a haircut appointment. I asked my daughter if she’d like to go, because she still loves watching haircuts.

“No thanks, Mama,” she said.

Then—”I wish you wouldn’t cut your hair.”

We are forever snarled in each other’s hair, my daughter and I, invested in the consistency of the people we know best and need most.

I wish you wouldn’t cut your hair. Oh kid. It cuts both ways.

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Calmer Children: 10 Mindfulness Ideas – Judith Aitken

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It’s all too apparent that practicing mindfulness is just as important for teachers, so to reduce any additional workload, all of these activities involve zero preparation time.

10 Mindfulness Tips

1. Breathe

As simple as it sounds, asking children to take the time to focus on nothing but their breathing will help to clear their mind. Try experimenting with breaths (breathe in for 2, exhale for 4) to allow children to find their own natural rhythm.

2. Muscle relaxation

When tensions are running high, ask your children to lie on the floor and starting from their toes, tense their muscles for 5 seconds – squeezing as tightly as they can – before releasing again. Continue all the way up the body, even scrunching their facial muscles to relieve any tension from the day.

3. Sensing the senses!

Encourage your children to tap into their senses by pausing for a moment and noticing exactly what they can see, hear and smell in that particular moment. Being in the present can help to alleviate worries that children may have had about previous lessons.

4. Noticing emotions

Mindfulness teaches children that it’s OK not to be OK. Recognizing the emotion that they are experiencing is the most important thing, as well as understanding that this emotion will fade over time.

5. Time on your hands

For those needing some breathing space, a simple yet effective exercise is asking children to hold out their hand in a high five pose, then as slowly as they can, trace round each finger with their other hand. Taking the attention away from what has made them feel frustrated or upset, even if only for a matter of seconds, might be all it takes for them to calm down.

6. Strike a pose

When thinking of mindfulness, yoga is the first exercise that springs to most peoples’ minds. Complicated downward dogs may be attempted, but a simple crossed legged position or standing tall with arms stretched out wide can help children to refocus.

7. Heartbeats

Have your pupils job on the spot for 30 seconds to release some much needed endorphins, then ask them to put their hands on their heart, noticing the speed of the beats. This simple exercise is effective in improving children’s focus.

 8. Practice gratitude

When a day or a lesson seems to have been a complete disaster for a pupil, take the time to have a quick circle time, asking the children to share one positive thing about their day. Hearing what others are grateful for will foster an environment of positivity.

 9. YouTube meditation

There are so many fantastic guided meditation channels on YouTube now, such as “Peace out”  which lead children through a relaxation sequence. Ideal for improving concentration before a long writing session.

10. The sound of music

Using a bell, tambourine or maracas, make sound for while the children close their eyes. Ask the children to open their eyes when they notice that the sound has completely gone and silence has been restored.

If everyone who reads our articles and likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure by your donations – Thank you.

 

How to Help Your Child Develop Empathy – Claire Lerner

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Empathy is the ability to imagine how someone else is feeling in a particular situation and respond with care. This is a very complex skill to develop. Being able to empathize with another person means that a child:

  • Understands that he is a separate individual, his own person;
  • Understands that others can have different thoughts and feelings than he has;
  • Recognizes the common feelings that most people experience—happiness, surprise, anger, disappointment, sadness, etc.;
  • Is able to look at a particular situation (such as watching a peer saying good-bye to a parent at child care) and imagine how he—and therefore his friend—might feel in this moment; and
  • Can imagine what response might be appropriate or comforting in that particular situation—such as offering his friend a favorite toy or teddy bear to comfort her.

Milestones in Empathy

Understanding and showing empathy is the result of many social-emotional skills that are developing in the first years of life. Some especially important milestones include:

  • Establishing a secure, strong, loving relationship with you. Feeling accepted and understood by you helps your child learn how to accept and understand others as he grows.
  • Beginning to use social referencing, at about 6 months old. This is when a baby will look to a parent or other loved one to gauge his or her reaction to a person or situation. For example, a 7-month-old looks carefully at her father as he greets a visitor to their home to see if this new person is good and safe. The parent’s response to the visitor influences how the baby responds. (This is why parents are encouraged to be upbeat and reassuring—not anxiously hover—when saying good-bye to children at child care. It sends the message that “this is a good place” and “you will be okay.”) Social referencing, or being sensitive to a parent’s reaction in new situations, helps the babies understand the world and the people around them.
  • Developing a theory of mind. This is when a toddler (between 18 and 24 months old) first realizes that, just as he has his own thoughts, feelings and goals, others have their own thoughts and ideas, which may be different from his.
  • Recognizing one’s self in a mirror. This occurs between 18 and 24 months and signals that a child has a firm understanding of himself as a separate person.

What You Can Do To Nurture Empathy in Your Toddler

Empathize with your child. Are you feeling scared of that dog? He is a nice dog but he is barking really loud. That can be scary. I will hold you until he walks by.

Talk about others’ feelings. Kayla is feeling sad because you took her toy car. Please give Kayla back her car and then you choose another one to play with.

Suggest how children can show empathy. Let’s get Jason some ice for his boo-boo.

Read stories about feelings.

Some suggestions include:

  • I Am Happy: A Touch and Feel Book of Feelings
  • My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss
  • How Are You Peeling by Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers
  • Feelings by Aliki
  • The Feelings Book by Todd Parr
  • Baby Happy Baby Sad by Leslie Patricelli
  • Baby Faces by DK Publishing
  • When I Am/Cuando Estoy by Gladys Rosa-Mendoza

Be a role model. When you have strong, respectful relationships and interact with others in a kind and caring way, your child learns from your example.

Use “I” messages. This type of communication models the importance of self-awareness: I don’t like it when you hit me. It hurts.

Validate your child’s difficult emotions. Sometimes when our child is sad, angry, or disappointed, we rush to try and fix it right away, to make the feelings go away because we want to protect him from any pain. However, these feelings are part of life and ones that children need to learn to cope with. In fact, labeling and validating difficult feelings actually helps children learn to handle them: You are really mad that I turned off the TV. I understand. You love watching your animal show. It’s okay to feel mad. When you are done being mad you can choose to help me make a yummy lunch or play in the kitchen while mommy makes our sandwiches. This type of approach also helps children learn to empathize with others who are experiencing difficult feelings.

Use pretend play. Talk with older toddlers about feelings and empathy as you play. For example, you might have your child’s stuffed hippo say that he does not want to take turns with his friend, the stuffed pony. Then ask your child: How do you think pony feels? What should we tell this silly hippo?

Think through the use of “I’m sorry.” We often insist that our toddlers say “I’m sorry” as a way for them to take responsibility for their actions. But many toddlers don’t fully understand what these words mean. While it may feel “right” for them to say “I’m sorry”, it doesn’t necessarily help toddlers learn empathy. A more meaningful approach can be to help children focus on the other person’s feelings: Chandra, look at Sierra—she’s very sad. She’s crying. She’s rubbing her arm where you pushed her. Let’s see if she is okay. This helps children make the connection between the action (shoving) and the reaction (a friend who is sad and crying).

Be patient. Developing empathy takes time. Your child probably won’t be a perfectly empathetic being by age three. (There are some teenagers and even adults who haven’t mastered this skill completely either!) In fact, a big and very normal part of being a toddler is focusing on me, mine, and I. Remember, empathy is a complex skill and will continue to develop across your child’s life.

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Childhood Emotional Neglect And Codependency

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What is Childhood Emotional Neglect?

Do you feel empty and disconnected? Do you sense that you’re different than everyone else, but you can’t put your finger on what’s wrong? Childhood Emotional Neglect is a powerful experience, but one that often goes unnoticed and untreated. In fact, many people who experienced Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN) describe their childhood as “good” and it’s only on closer examination that they recognize that something important was missing.

Your childhood experiences played a huge part in shaping you into the adult you are today. Children rely on their parents to meet their physical and emotional needs. And significant, but invisible, damage is done when parents fail to meet their children’s emotional needs.

Childhood Emotional Neglect is the result of your parent’s inability to validate and respond adequately to your emotional needs. Childhood emotional neglect can be hard to identify because it’s what didn’t happen in your childhood. It doesn’t leave any visible bruises or scars, but it’s hurtful and confusing for children.

Dr. Webb told me via email that “CEN happens when your parents fail to respond enough to your emotional needs while they are raising you. When you grow up this way, you learn the powerful lesson that your emotions do not matter, and you then continue to live your life this way. There are legions of people walking around with an empty space where their own lively feelings should be. Sadly, they all are lacking healthy access to a vital resource from within that could be connecting, motivating, guiding and enriching them: their own feelings.”

What does Childhood Emotional Neglect (CEN) look like?

In an emotionally neglectful family, you might have come home upset because you didn’t make the basketball team, but when you tried to talk to your Mom about it, she shooed you away saying she was busy working. And when your grandma died your father told you “boys don’t cry” and no one helped you process your grief. Or it might have been that you spent hours and hours isolated in your room as a teenager and no one asked how you were feeling or if something was wrong. When this happens consistently, you feel unloved and unseen.

CEN can co-occur with physical abuse and neglect and is rampant in families where a parent is addicted to drugs, alcohol, or any compulsive behavior, or mentally ill. But many people who experienced Childhood Emotional Neglect grew up in families without obvious dysfunction. They weren’t beaten or belittled. Their parents were well-meaning but lacked the emotional skills themselves to notice and tend to their children’s feelings. Such parents never learned to cope with their feelings or express them in healthy ways and don’t know how to deal with their children’s feelings either.

Many adults who experienced emotional neglect look like they’ve got it all together on the outside. They’re successful and have a happy family, but there’s a nagging sense of emptiness, not fitting in, and that they’re different, but there isn’t anything obviously wrong.

Symptoms of Childhood Emotional Neglect include:

  • Emptiness
  • Loneliness
  • Feeling something’s fundamentally wrong with you
  • Feeling unfulfilled even when you’re successful
  • Difficulty connecting with most of your feelings, not feeling anything
  • Burying, avoiding, or numbing your feelings
  • Feeling out of place or like you don’t fit in
  • Difficulty asking for help and not wanting to depend on others
  • Depression and anxiety
  • High levels of guilt, shame, and/or anger
  • Lack of deep, intimate connection with your friends and spouse
  • Feeling different, unimportant or inadequate
  • Difficult with self-control (this could be overeating or drinking)
  • People-pleasing and focusing on other people’s needs
  • Not having a good sense of who you are, your likes and dislikes, your strengths and weaknesses

What are the effects of childhood emotional neglect?

Your feelings are a core part of who you are, so when they aren’t noticed or validated you come to believe that you aren’t important because you aren’t “seen” and known. In emotionally neglectful families, the message is that feelings don’t matter, they’re an inconvenience, or they’re wrong. Naturally, you learn not to value your feelings; you push your feelings away or numb them with food, alcohol, drugs, or sex.

When your emotional needs aren’t met and your internal state isn’t acknowledged, you’ll be disconnected from yourself. You will constantly seek attention and try to prove your worth through clingy or needy behaviors, perfectionism, overworking, and achievements. But these external validations never fix the problem; they never leave you feeling good enough.

Feelings serve to let us know what we need. For example, if you don’t notice when you’re getting frustrated, you won’t be able to find a healthy resolution or outlet for your anger and you’re likely to let it fester until you explode.

Lack of emotional attunement also makes it hard for you to deeply connect with others and understand your spouse and children’s feelings.

Childhood Emotional Neglect and Codependency

I have been counseling Adult Children of Alcoholics (ACOAs) and people struggling with codependency for almost two decades. When I started learning about Childhood Emotional Neglect, I immediately noticed a big overlap between CEN and codependency or ACOA issues. It makes sense that if you grew up with an alcoholic or otherwise impaired caregiver, your emotional needs weren’t noticed and met.

Childhood Emotional Neglect and codependency have the same root cause. Both begin in childhood and tend to be passed unknowingly from one generation to the next. CEN and codependency aren’t the result of you being inadequate or doing something “wrong”, but they continue to make it difficult for you to have a healthy loving relationship with yourself and others in adulthood.

Individuals with CEN and codependency have in common a tendency toward:

  • Perfectionism
  • People-pleasing
  • Low self-worth, feeling inadequate
  • Fear of abandonment
  • Sensitivity to criticism
  • Lack of awareness of their feelings
  • Discomfort with strong emotions
  • Putting other people’s needs before their own
  • Difficulty trusting
  • Difficulty asserting their needs

“Clean eating” promotes unhealthy habits

Clean eating seems ideal for parents who want to establish their children’s healthy habits early on. It’s no surprise really: “clean eating” is the perfect buzz term for parents who are faced with supermarket shelves full of baby and toddler food which is high in sugar content and low in nutritional value. But while some…

via “Clean eating” promotes unhealthy habits—especially among kids — Quartz

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