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The World’s Best Employers 2019: Alphabet Takes Top Spot, Followed By Microsoft And Red Hat

For the third year in a row, Alphabet is ranked first on Forbes’ Global 2000 list of the World’s Best Employers. The tech juggernaut and Google parent company is followed by Microsoft, which is ranked second, and open-source software producer Red Hat, ranked third. Apple and SAP round out the top five.

To create the 500-company ranking, Statista analyzed 1.4 million recommendations sourced from a global poll and several regional surveys. Among other questions, respondents around the world were asked to rate their own employer and the likelihood that they would recommend this employer to a friend or family member. They also rated other employers they admired.

Though this methodology put Alphabet at the top of the list, it doesn’t account for what in many ways was a tumultuous year for the company. Google employees made headlines last November after they organized a series of high-profile walkouts in response to the company’s handing of sexual harassment claims. Thousands of employees participated. In a letter published by New York magazine, the organizers of the walkouts said they demanded “an end to the sexual harassment, discrimination, and the systemic racism that fuel [Google’s] destructive culture.” Google vowed to improve its policies in the wake of the massive protests.

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Google’s treatment of its temporary and contract workers has also drawn scrutiny this year. In April, the company announced that it will require that these types of workers receive a $15 minimum hourly wage and comprehensive healthcare benefits.

As of October 18, 2019, Alphabet had a market cap of roughly $870 billion. More than 100,000 employees work under Alphabet’s umbrella, and according to a recent SEC filing, the majority of the company’s new hires last quarter were engineers and product managers. The company reported revenues of $38.9 billion last quarter—an increase of 19% versus the same period last year.

Open-source and cloud software provider Red Hat, a newcomer to the list, was acquired by IBM this summer for a whopping $34 billion. After the deal closed, IBM chief vinancial officer James Kavanaugh said that the company had hired 1,000 new employees to cope with growing demand.

While the top spots on this year’s Best Employers list are dominated by tech companies (including Cisco at No. 8, Amazon at No. 10 and IBM at No. 11), the finance and banking industry was the best-represented on the list as a whole. Fifty-two regional banks made the top 500, including Switzerland’s Banque Cantonale Vaudoise at No. 30 and India’s HDFC Bank at No. 119. Thirty-two investment services companies also made the cut, including Berkshire Hathaway at No. 26 and the Japan Exchange Group at No. 38.

Just like last year, companies from the United States accounted for nearly two fifths of the list, including seven of the top ten. Seventy-one companies from China and Hong Kong were featured on the list, though just one company from that category broke the top ten (China’s Contemporary Amperex Technology, at No. 7). Employers from India accounted for the third-largest category, with 33 companies represented, including construction services firm Larsen & Toubro (No. 29).

This list is based on the 2019 Forbes Global 2000 list, which tracks the world’s largest public companies. Last year, companies on the list accounted for more than $40 trillion in annual revenue and upwards of $186 trillion in global assets.

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I’m an assistant editor on Forbes’ Money team, covering markets, fintech, and blockchain. I recently completed my master’s degree in business and economic reporting at New York University. Before becoming a journalist, I worked as a paralegal specializing in corporate compliance and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Source: The World’s Best Employers 2019: Alphabet Takes Top Spot, Followed By Microsoft And Red Hat

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This video ranks the top 10 most valuable publicly traded companies in the world from 1997 to 2019 based off of market capitalization. Market capitalization is calculated from the share price of a stock multiplied by the number of outstanding shares. Figures are converted into USD (using rate from selected day) to allow for comparison. If you have any feedback on the video or have any ideas of what you would like to see ranked in future videos then let me know in the comments! Also, you can subscribe here:) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFRo… Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Rankingthewo… Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rankingthew… Twitter: https://twitter.com/RankingTheWorld Datasource: Financial Times Music: Curse of the Scarab Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…

 

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4 Steps to Enhance Workplace Diversity

Ryan Buchanan, an Entrepreneurs’ Organization (EO) member and former president of the Portland chapter, is the founder and CEO of Thesis, a digital marketing agency, and co-founder of Emerging Leaders, a non-profit dedicated to improving racial and cultural diversity at the leadership level in Portland-area companies. He also hosts the podcast Faces of Marketing. We asked Ryan about best practices for building a diverse, inclusive workforce. Here’s what he shared:

Dozens of CEOs and human resources executives who I’ve talked to this year are sincerely focused on diversifying their company’s workforce–but in most cases, their strategies aren’t working. They are exasperated, bewildered and ready to throw in the towel. Several have shared that, “We put our job postings everywhere we can find, yet all the applicants are white or male or both.”

I listen to each reason why recruiting diverse employees seems unattainable, and then I pose the question that was asked of me four years ago when I began my equity journey: “When professionals of color or women go online to look at your company’s senior leadership team, what do they see?”

It seems counterintuitive and time-consuming to start from within–to actively build inclusivity into the company culture before turning our focus to external recruiting. But it’s a more effective strategy for the long-term success of a high-functioning, equitable, diverse workforce.

The business case for diversity

Regardless, let’s examine the situation around race and equity. The business case has been proven repeatedly: Diverse teams perform up to 35% better than homogeneous ones. Diverse teams are more profitable, more adaptable to change, and the best brands in the world are demanding that their agencies represent the diverse consumers they serve.

Before reading any further, you should know that I’m a privileged, straight, white, male CEO writing an article about equity in the workplace. You can decide whether I’m a hypocrite who lacks awareness–or an ally and advocate for equity.

At our digital agency, we have plenty of work ahead of us to create a more inclusive workplace, but we’re making progress. We’ve grown from 12 percent people of color to 33 percent in just four years since becoming intentional about diversification.

What changes have we made? Well, there isn’t a quick fix when it comes to improving workplace diversity. It begins with changing the corporate culture.

Here are four steps for building a more diverse workforce:

1. Commitment from the top

If I had to single out the most crucial step along the journey to diversification, it’s that the entire leadership team must be deeply committed to racial equity, and willing to uphold these values with sometimes unpopular decisions. Change starts by talking about it. The transformation requires difficult conversations and embracing being uncomfortable–but the upside is a company culture that’s strong, deep and inclusive, and a business that thrives because its clients are getting the diverse talent they seek.

2. Make a point to talk about it, regularly

I grew up in a white society that taught us not to see the color of someone’s skin. But silence about race in dominant culture denies employees of color a safe space to share daily experiences where race is an ongoing factor.

When we openly–and privately–participate in conversations around race, it can lead to significant personal and professional growth, as well as business benefits. Ensure these conversations are happening by hosting company-wide Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) training or by bringing in a trained DEI consultant to facilitate recurring group conversations. Extending an invitation to the greater professional community could attract outside talent who share similar values around the importance of equity.

3. Build relationships with communities of color

You can’t identify new channels without building relationships with underrepresented groups. Be more intentional about your outreach to communities of color by attending networking events, partnering with culturally specific community organizations, or getting coffee with leaders of color. Many cities have organizations and initiatives dedicated to helping companies connect with resources and like-minded businesses that have made diversity and inclusion a priority, such as Partners in Diversity and TechTown Diversity Pledge in Portland.

Involvement with local leaders and organizations like these is a stepping-stone to building fruitful relationships and connections.

4. Institute workplace programs

A study by the Kapor Center examined why tech workers leave high-paying jobs. It found unfairness was the primary driver of turnover, with underrepresented men being the most likely to leave due to unfair treatment. Still, many companies think their job is done once employees are in the door.

But retention is an ongoing challenge that reinforces the need to make complete corporate culture shifts. When I asked one of our employees why he chose to work here and, more importantly, why he stays, he said: “Seeing other employees of color who are excellent at what they do professionally, while being fully themselves, without having to code-switch–I’ve never felt that at any other company.”

Mentoring programs can also be critical to leadership development, helping to identify rising leaders of color while providing them with valuable support and feedback.

These are just a few of the actions we’ve taken so far, but there’s still much to do. Making sure these changes stick will require an ongoing commitment from the top-down, but it’s an investment that’s well worth it for both our business and employees, now and in the long run.

By:  Entrepreneurs’ Organization

Source: 4 Steps to Enhance Workplace Diversity

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Arwa Mahdawi on “The Surprising Solution to Workplace Diversity” at TEDxHamburg (http://www.tedxhamburg.de) Arwa Mahdawi is the founder and Chief Minority Officer of rentaminority.com, a revolutionary new service offering diversity on demand. The site has gained worldwide attention and been covered by the likes of the BBC, Le Monde, the Huffington Post, NPR, and the Atlantic. Arwa is also a partner at cummins&partners, an independent creative agency with offices in Australia and New York. She is a regular speaker at advertising/tech/media conferences, so if you need a minority last minute, give her a call. Arwa is also a freelance writer and writes regularly for the Guardian on issues including marketing, technology, cryptocurrency, and lesbians. Frequent comments on her articles include “Was someone really paid to write this?” and “This comment was removed by a moderator.” This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

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