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The Mystery Of Apple’s Missing MacBook

With the release of the Mac Pro this week, and the 16-inch MacBook Pro last month, Apple’s deskbound MacOS machines have been pushing the price point higher and higher, with increased specs for professional users.

What about those at the lower end of the portfolio, looking for an alternative to a Windows 10 laptop, those who want to keep their mobile devices in the same ecosystem, those who have a long relationship with Apple’s MacOS computers but find the rising price is too high for them to upgrade? And how can Apple bring new users to the platform

In short, where is the entry level MacBook, the point where everyone can start their journey? Right now, there isn’t one.

The lowest priced MacBook in the current portfolio is the MacBook Air, with a starting price of $1099 for 8 GB of RAM and 128GB of SSD based storage. I’m pretty sure that a laptop with prices starting at over a grand would not be considered an entry-level laptop by many customers.

Why should Apple be looking at a lower price point for a MacBook? It’s worth taking into account the amount of effort that Apple is putting into cloud-based services and applications. Perhaps the answer to an entry-level MacBook would be to follow Google’s path with the Chromebook options, push everything into a new branch Apple’s walled garden with improved services to match the offering from Google, while keeping the option of local applications and processing power for intensive tasks.

Arguably Apple has already something similar on the books. Take an iPad, add the Smart Keyboard Cover, and you have your equivalent of the Chromebook. The advantage of this solution is that Apple brings the consumers closer into Apple’s garden, with almost every transactions pushed through the App Store and the thirty percent rake, more opportunities to upsell users into Apple’s subscription-based services, and a good chance of locking them into Apple’s hardware eco system for the medium- to long-term.

Whether you consider a tablet and keyboard combo running the closed iPad OS a suitable replacement for a entry-level MacOS powered laptop is the big question.

I suspect Apple believes the answer is yes. Personally I’m in the no camp. While the iPad can hit some of the same functions as a laptop, the MacBook range is about delivering more power, more flexibility, and more customisation than the restricted options present in the iPad.

The MacBook family addresses and solves different problems than the iPad family. Not all of these problems are $1099 problems, but they are problems that countless consumers need addressed. By keeping the entry point to MacOS at such a high level, Apple is ignoring a significant market.

A software and services approach requires the widest possible user base. The wider the base you have, the more you can upsell. Apple needs a diverse product range that meets the needs of as many potential customers as possible. It doesn’t need to fight in the $199 Chromebook market, but Tim Cook and his team should consider the need for a competent laptop in the $799 to $999 range.

Now read how Apple turned the iconic MacBook brand into a supporting player…

Check out my website.

I am known for my strong views on mobile technology, online media, and the effect this has on the public conscious and existing businesses. I’ve been following this space for over ten years, working with a number of publishers, publications and media companies, some for long periods of time, others for commissions, one-off pieces or a series of articles or shows. As Scotland’s first podcaster, I continue to be a prominent voice in the rise of podcasting and new media online, and picked up a British Academy (BAFTA) nomination for my annual coverage of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe, alongside contributions to Radio 5 Live, the BBC World Service, presenting Edinburgh local radio’s coverage of the General Election. You’ll find me on Twitter (@Ewan), Facebook, and Google Plus.

Source: The Mystery Of Apple’s Missing MacBook

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Watch more Top 5: http://bit.ly/1N5SGJ6 Sure there’s a touch strip above the keyboard, but Apple’s new MacBook Pros are lacking in a number of ways. Apple’s new mainstream MacBook Pro: http://bit.ly/2eW6gWX Does the new Macbook Pro revolutionize laptops?: http://bit.ly/2eQbdmr Watch more Apple News: http://bit.ly/1X0DYcp Read the CNET review: http://cnet.co/2efTYra Subscribe to CNET: http://bit.ly/17qqqCs Watch more CNET videos: http://bit.ly/1BQxrGw Follow CNET on Twitter: http://twitter.com/CNET Follow CNET on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/cnet Follow CNET on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/cnet/ Follow CNET on Snapchat: CNETsnap

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The Top Coding Schools of 2019

Coding as a vocation is seen as a very recent phenomenon, but its roots lie back in the middle of the 19th century, when, in 1842, Ada Lovelace, the only child of the poet Lord Byron, is widely viewed to have written the first computer program. Lovelace spent two years translating an article by Charles Babbage, a renowned mathematician, who was honing a method for using punch cards to store ‘programs’ on a device he had created called the ‘Analytic Engine’.

When Ada’s notes were examined, they were determined to contain a description of the world’s first computer program, hence forth she had a programming language ‘Ada’ named after her!

In 1906, a man called Herman Hollerith used the punch cards that Lovelace had described in his ‘electric tabulating machine’ which could perform separate tasks without being reconstructed between them – one of the first computers was born, and Hollerith’s company went on to become IBM.

Up until the 1980s, computer programing was perceived as being the preserve of specialized companies or teams of individuals, and from an outsiders perspective, it was an opaque and somewhat impenetrable industry, compounded by the fact that most of the programs produced at the time were for industrial or military applications.

This all changed with the advent of the ‘home computer’, when, for the first time, programming platforms were available to households who could afford the relatively high cost of entry. Of course early PC coders had to be undaunted by the prospect of manually typing in pages and pages of ‘BASIC’ code when one misplaced ‘:’ would cause the program not to run, as well as watching a flickering screen for minutes at a time while programs were loaded via cassette tape.

Nevertheless, the computing generation had arrived and, nourished by a generation brought up in video game arcades starting to realize they could create and enjoy the same sort of experiences at home on their tv screens, it flourished and matured. The profusion of ‘open source’ software in the 2000’s and the (relatively) recent advent of the smart phone supercharged the industry and made it what it is today.

Talking of today, the industry demand for coders is skyrocketing as it is increasingly recognized as a rewarding, future-proof and truly flexible and democratic vocation. Unlike previous generations, we are living in a digitized world and are constantly surrounded by, and engaged with, the products that coders produce.

This has allowed coding to become a much more relatable and desirable career for many of us. Consequently, coders have gone from being yesterday’s low profile and detached specialists to today’s workplace Rockstar!

A snapshot of today’s coders:

419,000 active coders in the U.S. workplace

Average age of 42.5

Average Salary – $87,870 in 2017, which is $35,805 more than the average national salary of $52,065.

Almost a 25% of coders are female – a proportion that is rising exponentially as concerted efforts are made to encourage girls to code.

Data from datausa.io

Education in Coding

To complement this coding ‘goldrush’, an abundance of great coding schools have sprung up that can quickly and efficiently furnish you with the necessary skills needed to join the digital revolution.

Unlike a traditional school vocational degree, Coding School courses typically last for just 12 weeks (but can vary from 6 to 28 weeks) and will suit those who prefer hands-on, project-based learning and feel a sense of accomplishment from mastering a real-world concept. In addition to instructor-based learning, students are encouraged to explore concepts with others and on their own volition.

Since students usually work in teams, much the same way as they would in the working world, participants learn first-hand the importance of effective communication and teamwork, as well as understanding the fundamentals and adopting best practices.

Coding Schools also offer individuals who have not got a background in coding, an affordable, efficient and accessible way to switch tracks and get involved – indeed many of today’s coders started their work lives in unrelated areas but decided to carve out a new direction and join the coding movement!

Source: The Top Coding Schools of 2019

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When it comes between you getting a 4-year computer science degree, specializing in a high demand skill by attending a coding bootcamp, or learning to code on your own, what is the best path? This video isn’t sponsored by Team Treehouse, but I am an affiliate for them. Just by signing up for a free trial, you’re helping support this channel. Sign up for a free trial here ➡ https://treehouse.7eer.net/c/290665/2… I’ve spoken about this topic in the past with Quincy Larson, the creator of Free Code Camp. He spoke about his opinion between computer science, coding boot camps and being self taught. Now it’s my turn. Rich Friends, Poor Friends (free video series): http://engineeredtruth.com/rich-frien… Are you looking to work remotely? Find a remote job on our job board: https://www.remotise.com/ Social Media: https://Facebook.com/EngineeredTruth https://Twitter.com/EngineeredTruth https://Instagram.com/EngineeredTruth

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