Findings About Dostarlimab, A New Antibody Drug, Very Encouraging, Says Expert In Cancer Treatment

According to New York Times, in a small clinical trial, 18 patients took a drug called Dostarlimab for around six months, and in the end, every one of them saw their tumours disappear. The findings concerning dostarlimab, an antibody drug, in experimental treatment of rectal cancer patients is very encouraging but there is need for long-term studies to understand the real impact, an expert in cancer treatment has said.

“This new trial at MSKCC in a small number of patients, with locally advanced rectal cancer patients who had MMR (MisMatch repair) deficiency, have shown total disappearance of tumour without any additional treatment in all 100 percent of them. This is very encouraging but we must note that long term studies are required to understand the real impact,” Dr. (Col.) R. Ranga Rao, Chairman, Oncology, of Paras Hospitals in Gurugram said.

“The drug is still investigational and the trial is limited to patients of a specific type , that constitute about 4 to 5 per cent of rectal cancers. While this is highly encouraging, we must not prematurely jump to conclusions that we have found a cure for all cancers, all stages, and no chemotherapy, surgery is ever required,” he added.

He said it is well recognized that Immunotherapy with PDL 1 blockers in MMRd patients is effective. “Already immunotherapy has made a big difference in the field of cancer of all types. Several earlier trials have shown encouraging responses,” Dr Rao said.

In what appears to be a miracle and ‘first time in history’, a small clinical trial has found that every single rectal cancer patient who received an experimental treatment found that their cancer had vanished.

According to New York Times, in the small clinical trial conducted by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 18 patients took a drug called Dostarlimab for around six months, and in the end, every one of them saw their tumours disappear. Dr Luis A. Diaz J. of New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) said this was “the first time this has happened in the history of cancer”.

According to experts, Dostarlimab is a drug with laboratory-produced molecules and it acts as substitute antibodies in the human body. The cancer is undetectable by physical exam; endoscopy; positron emission tomography or PET scans or MRI scans, added Experts. This proves that Dostarlimab can be a ‘potential’ cure for one of the most deadly common cancers.

According to New York Times, patients involved in the clinical trial earlier underwent treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and invasive surgery that could result in bowel, urinary, and even sexual dysfunction. The 18 patients went into the trial expecting to have to go through these procedures as the next step. However, to their surprise, no further treatment was needed.

The findings of this trial have shocked experts and they have pointed out that complete remission in every single patient is “unheard-of”. Dr Alan P. Venook, who is a colorectal cancer specialist at the University of California, said that the complete remission in every single patient is “unheard-of”. He hailed the research as a “world-first”. Experts stated that the research was impressive as not all of the patients suffered significant complications from the drug trial.

Critics:

Tesaro, a biotech company based out of Massachusetts developed the drug. Tesaro was acquired by GlaxoSmithKline in 2019, dostarlimab is also known by the brand name Jemparli. Dostarlimab was developed to treat women with recurrent or advanced endometrial cancer.

On August 17, 2021, the FDA approved dostarlimab-gxly (brand name Jemperli) for adult patients with mismatch repair-deficient recurrent or advanced solid tumours, as determined by an FDA-approved test, that have progressed on or following prior treatment and who have no satisfactory alternative treatment options.

Rectal cancer remission

According to reports, 18 patients in the clinical trial took Dostarlimab for around six months and after over 12 months the doctors found that their cancer disappeared. While it’s a small trial so far, the results have been impressive; they were published in The New England Journal of Medicine and featured at the nation’s largest gathering of clinical oncologists in June 2022.


In every case, rectal cancer disappeared after immunotherapy — without the need for the standard treatments of radiation, surgery, or chemotherapy — and cancer has not returned in any of the patients, who have been cancer-free for up to two years.

It’s incredibly rewarding to get these happy tears and happy emails from the patients in this study who finish treatment and realise, ‘Oh my God, I get to keep all my normal body functions that I feared I might lose to radiation or surgery,’ expressed Dr Andrea Cercek, Medical Oncologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK).

Dr Cercek added, “The most exciting part of this is that every single one of our patients has only needed immunotherapy. We haven’t radiated anybody, and we haven’t put anybody through surgery.” She continued, “They have preserved normal bowel function, bladder function, sexual function, fertility. Women have their uterus and ovaries. It’s remarkable.”

This clinical trial could pave the way for treating other forms of cancer in the future. As the trial continues at MSK, Dr Luis Alberto Diaz, Medical Oncologist, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) said, “It’s the tip of the iceberg.” He explains, “We are investigating if this same method may help other cancers where the treatments are often life-altering and tumours can be MMRd. We are currently enrolling patients with gastric (stomach), prostate, and pancreatic cancers.”

Dostarlimab clinical trial reception by the Indian medical community

Since the trial results have been published, it has created a lot of buzz and has got the entire medical community discussing how it could pave the path for future treatment for various cancers, ETHealthWorld spoke to few experts on the drug trial. Commenting on the trial, “It is definitely a big step towards efficient cancer care. The preliminary data on Dostarlimab PD1 monotherapy has been very encouraging in high-risk rectal cancer patients and has been recently presented at the ASCO meeting in Chicago and subsequently published in NEJM.

We would definitely need further studies on larger groups of patients across the globe to establish it as a standard of care for rectal cancer. Trials are also being conducted to study its effectiveness for cervical cancer, and endometrial cancer amongst others,” said Dr Pankaj Kumar Panda, Senior Research Officer, Apollo Proton Cancer Centre.

Source: Findings about Dostarlimab, a new antibody drug, very encouraging, says expert in cancer treatment

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Pfizer Sues Employee, Alleging She Stole Covid-19 Vaccine Documents

Pfizer is suing one of its employees after she allegedly stole thousands of the company’s files with the intent to take a job with one of its competitors, with some of the files including information about the Covid-19 vaccine.

Key Facts

In a complaint filed Tuesday in San Diego federal court, Pfizer alleged one of its associate directors of statistics, Chun Xiao Li, uploaded over 12,000 files to her personal devices from a company issued laptop without permission.

Pfizer said it believes Li was offered a job at one of its competitors—Xencor Inc., a biopharmaceutical company. Pfizer claims Li is still in possession of a laptop containing documents “potentially related to numerous Pfizer vaccines, drugs, and other innovations,” with the complaint specifically focusing on information she allegedly has pertaining to the Covid-19 vaccine and monoclonal antibodies.

The drug company claimed Li tried to mislead it by providing a “decoy” laptop when they confronted her about the issue.

A U.S. district judge ordered a temporary block on Tuesday, halting Li from using any of Pfizer’s trade secrets, according to Reuters. Li did not respond to Reuters’ request for comment.

Crucial Quote

“Had Ms. Li left Pfizer honorably, she would not be named in this Complaint. But she made a different choice,” Pfizer wrote.

Key Background

Pfizer noted in the complaint that competitors have been trying “relentlessly” to recruvaccineit its employees, particularly in 2021.

Tangent

On Monday, the company announced its Covid-19 vaccine demonstrated 100% efficacy in adolescents ages 12-15. It plans to submit the vaccine for full regulatory approval in the age group in the U.S. and internationally.

I’m a Los Angeles-based news desk reporter for Forbes. Please feel free to contact me via email (mbissada [@] forbes.com) or Twitter (@masonbissada).

Source: Pfizer Sues Employee, Alleging She Stole Covid-19 Vaccine Documents

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Impact Of Covid-19 Pandemic Extends To Tuberculosis And Neglected Tropical Diseases

Last month, the World Health Organization reported that for the first time in 15 years the number of people who have died from tuberculosis has increased. Worldwide, in 2020, more than 1.5 million deaths were attributed to tuberculosis; the first year-on-year increase since 2005. Multiple reasons have been cited, one of which is diversion of resources due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

And, tuberculosis is not the only diseasethat has been impacted, with disproportionately severe health burdens on the world’s poorest populations.

Since the spring of 2020, there has been acute disruption of activities, such as neglected tropical disease (NTD) control and elimination programs. Across the globe, for example, mass drug administration campaigns targeting NTDs have been postponed. NTDs are a heterogeneous group of infections which are common in developing regions of Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

These diseases – caused by a variety of pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and parasites – include, among others, onchocerciasis (river blindness), African trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, cholera, Chagas disease, and Dengue fever. Diseases are said to be neglected if they are (often) overlooked and therefore underfunded by drug developers, owing to a lack of commercial prospects.

And, while tuberculosis has also suffered from neglect, it belongs to the so-called “big three infectious diseases” – HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis,and malaria – which have generally received more media attention and research and development funding than the NTDs.

The WHO had developed an NTD roadmap that was meant to officially launch in June 2020. The roadmap included specific disease targets to control and eliminate NTDs by 2030. Not only did the Covid-19 pandemic postpone the launch of the work plan, many NTD activities that had been ongoing were suspended to prevent the risk of additional transmission of the coronavirus.

In fact, interruptions in NTD program work were experienced in at least 44% of low and middle income countries: Specifically, suspension of mass administration campaigns of vaccines and treatments, case detection, and vector control. In addition, there was disruption to supply chains and reduction in the manufacturing of active pharmaceutical ingredients. In brief, there was diversion of financial resources, which effectively meant a reassignment of NTD personnel to the Covid-19 response.

It’s not all been bad news, as a month ago the WHO endorsed the first malaria vaccine (a recombinant, protein-based agent) for use among children in at-risk areas. Malaria is a preventable disease that kills around 500,000 people a year; mostly African children.

It should be noted, however, that most of the clinical development of the malaria vaccine occurred prior to the Covid-19 pandemic. Furthermore, the vaccine – called Mosquirix – has modest efficacy, as it reduces the number of severe malaria cases by approximately 30%.

To save the most lives, African countries must continue to scale up teams of local health workers to identify and respond to cases, and increase access to mosquito nets and antimalarial drugs, such as the fixed dose combination Coartem (artemether/lumefantrine). Yet, it’s precisely in these areas that the pandemic has been the most disruptive.

Opportunity Cost

One of the core tenets of economics is that resource allocation decisions invariably involve trade-offs. As an illustration, there is an opportunity cost of allocating large amounts of resources towards the Covid-19 response. The dollars spent on combating the coronavirus can’t be used to address other diseases.

Unless the overall amount of healthcare resources is expanded, there will be forgone alternatives left unfunded. And, government budgetary constraints often prevent expansion of healthcare budgets from happening. Alternatively, it is difficult to draw down budgets in other sectors, such as defense, in order to fund healthcare sector expansion, whether domestically or for the purposes of international health aid projects.

Budget impact analyses lay bare the individuals or groups who lose out; in other words, those who bear the opportunity cost of spending resources in one area, say, Covid-19, rather than another.

This doesn’t mean that a substantial amount of resources shouldn’t have been spent (or continue to be expended) on developing and paying for coronavirus vaccines or Covid-19 treatments. It does, however, imply that policymakers be made aware of forgone alternative uses of resources, account for the extent to which society can afford to crowd out non-Covid-19 resources, and fill in the budgetary gaps where necessary.

At multiple levels – local, state, federal, and global – when a healthcare system or international program with a relatively fixed budget “overpays” in one area, it must extract resources from elsewhere in the budget, or enlarge the budget.

Early in the pandemic, it was clear that federal regulators in the U.S. were aware of the issue of opportunity cost. In reallocating resources to address the novel coronavirus, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stated that new drug and biologics programs were being impacted by “considerable increases in Covid-19 related work.” As a result, the agency said “it’s possible that we will not be able to sustain our current performance level in meeting goal dates.”

Of course, this wasn’t just an issue at the FDA. Other government regulators, as well as global agencies such as WHO, were faced with similar sets of problems.

With government deficits running at record levels, it’ll be extraordinarily difficult to expand budgets to sustain non-Covid-19 related work at the desired levels. But, moving forward, such expansion will have to occur in order to meet the needs of underserved populations worldwide.

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I’m an independent healthcare analyst with over 22 years of experience analyzing healthcare and pharmaceuticals. Specifically, I analyze the value (costs and benefits) of biologics and pharmaceuticals, patient access to prescription drugs, the regulatory framework for drug development and reimbursement, and ethics with respect to the distribution of healthcare resources. I have over 110 publications in peer-reviewed and trade journals, in addition to newspapers and periodicals. I have also presented my work at numerous trade, industry, and academic conferences. From 1999 to 2017 I was a research associate professor at the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. Prior to my Tufts appointment, I was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Pennsylvania, and I completed my PhD in economics at the University of Amsterdam. Before pursuing my PhD I was a management consultant at Accenture in The Hague, Netherlands. Currently, I work on freelance basis on a variety of research, teaching, and writing projects.

Source: Impact Of Covid-19 Pandemic Extends To Tuberculosis And Neglected Tropical Diseases

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Related Contents:

Njie GJ, Morris SB, Woodruff RY, Moro RN, Vernon AA, Borisov AS (August 2018). “Isoniazid-Rifapentine for Latent Tuberculosis Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis”. American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 55 (2): 244–252. doi:10.1016/j.amepre.2018.04.030. PMC 6097523. PMID 29910114.

To Get Kids Vaccinated Against COVID-19, Health Officials Will Need to Reach Hesitant Parents

For as long as COVID-19 vaccines have existed, Melissa Chernofsky has been practically counting down the days until she can get one for her 5-year-old son. “If it was like getting Lollapalooza tickets, where you have to camp out all night, that’s what I would do,” says the 46-year-old from Brooklyn.

Chernofsky got a shot for herself as soon as she was eligible, and says she has never hesitated about doing the same for her child once she has the option. “As a parent, our number one job is to keep our kids safe,” she says. “I don’t really understand the idea that if there is a tool that can keep your kid from getting a disease, that you wouldn’t give it to them.”

One such tool—Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine for 5- to 11-year-olds—was authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Oct. 29, bringing it a step closer to widespread availability. If the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends it for some or all children in that age group, kids could start getting vaccinated in the coming days.

But for every parent who feels as passionately pro-vaccine as Chernofsky does, there is at least one other with serious concerns about vaccinating their child. According to an October Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 27% of parents with kids ages 5 to 11 said they would vaccinate their child right away. But even more—35%—said they either definitely wouldn’t vaccinate or wouldn’t unless required. The rest were somewhere in the middle and said they would “wait and see.”

That split illustrates the significant challenge ahead of federal officials and health care workers, who must be ready to fulfill many families’ urgent desire for shots while also reaching those who are hesitant. Dr. Sara Bode, who is the medical director of school-based and mobile-care clinics for Ohio’s Nationwide Children’s Hospital, says pediatric hospitals and public-health departments around the country are gearing up to hold larger-scale clinics that can satisfy much of the pent-up demand for pediatric shots.

Vaccine supply is no longer an issue, so she thinks parents who want to vaccinate their kids should be able to do so easily. But “once this initial surge is over and everyone who wanted it gets it,” Bode says, “that’s where the real work starts to happen.”

Once it begins, a successful vaccine rollout must serve parents with questions or concerns about the vaccine in addition to those who are highly motivated—not just for the sake of those families, but for U.S. public health. Immunizing the roughly 28 million U.S. kids between the ages of 5 and 11 is a key piece of federal officials’ plan for controlling the virus, following their push to vaccinate older children after a shot was authorized for 12- to 15-year-olds in May.

“Not getting vaccinated means that our kids could potentially pass on the virus to others if they get infected,” U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy said during a May call with parents, pediatricians, youth organizations and community leaders. “Breaking the chain of transmission is going to require us vaccinating our children.”

And, since 5- to 11-year-olds are too young to consent to vaccination themselves, that’s going to require convincing parents who, in many cases, are even more skeptical about vaccinating their children than they were about getting inoculated themselves. All told, about 78% of U.S. residents 12 and older have gotten at least one dose, but looking specifically at 12- to 15-year-olds, that number falls to about 57%.

“Messaging has to be to the parents, not to the kids,” Bode says. “It has to be sensitive and it has to be, usually, one-on-one,” so it can address each parent’s specific concerns. Individuals also tend to respond better when they hear about the vaccine from people who live and work in their community, rather than from government agencies or mass-communications campaigns, Bode adds.

The Biden Administration is banking on that. Its plan to vaccinate kids ages 5 to 11 hinges largely on distributing shots in pediatricians’ offices and schools, capitalizing on the trust parents often inherently hold for those institutions. “You are so often the people that folks want to hear from,” Murthy said on the May call with pediatricians and community leaders. “Your story, your outreach, can make all the difference in helping people get the information they need … and ultimately take that step of protecting their children.”

Dr. Tyree Winters, a New Jersey-based pediatrician, says he and his colleagues have been fielding questions from parents of older children for months, and he expects that to continue once younger kids can get the shot. Parents—even those who are vaccinated—often come in with concerns about their children experiencing vaccine-related side effects, or worried about misinformation they’ve read online.

(The incorrect idea that the shots can cause infertility is a big source of hesitation, he says.) Some are just plain uncomfortable with giving their kids a fairly new vaccine, even if they were willing to get it themselves. Getting through to these parents requires a balance of empathy and careful explanation of the science behind the vaccines, Winters says. “I let them know, ‘You’re not crazy, you’re not being over-dramatic, you’re not being unreasonable,’” he says. “That’s the beauty of being a pediatrician …we can relate to our patients and our families.”

Dr. Kelly Moore, CEO of the pro-vaccine Immunization Action Coalition, agrees that pediatricians can get through to many parents. But “not all children have a regular health care provider that they see, and public education through school systems will be important to reach families more widely,” Moore adds. Offering the shots in schools will also improve access to them, particularly for families that do not have a strong relationship with the traditional health system or parents who can’t take time off work to bring their child to a vaccine clinic.

The desire to keep kids in school can also convince some parents to vaccinate, says Dr. Sherri Young, who led adult and adolescent vaccination efforts in West Virginia’s Kanawha County. By mid-September, just a few weeks into the 2021-2022 school year, more than 1,800 U.S. schools had already experienced COVID-related closures, according to CDC data. That’s something both parents and kids want to avoid—and pitching vaccines as the way to do that can be effective, Young says.

“Sports are very important to kids. Going to school is very important to kids. Going to school is very important for parents,” Young says. “We’re going to keep our schools open longer if we all get in this together.”

Still, there are some parents who don’t believe their children need to be vaccinated, given the low rates of serious illness and death among people 18 and under. Others, concerned by reports of rare heart-related side effects among young people, think the risks of vaccination outweigh the benefits.

More Must-Read Stories From TIME

In authorizing Pfizer’s shot, the FDA said the opposite is true. The vaccine appears more than 90% effective at preventing symptomatic infections among 5- to 11-year-olds, and no serious side effects have been reported among a group of more than 3,000 kids who participated in trials. The CDC’s advisory group will soon discuss in more detail whether certain groups of kids should or should not get the shot.

Moore says the recent Delta-related spike in cases should show parents that there is serious benefit to vaccination. It remains true that children develop severe disease much less often than adults and die from coronavirus even less frequently—but images of overflowing pediatric ICUs and kids on ventilators from this past summer prove that the worst does sometimes happen, she says. Vaccines drastically reduce that risk.

Getting parents to understand that could not only save their children’s lives, but also help the U.S. finally put the worst of the pandemic in the past.

By Jamie Ducharme

Source: How Health Officials Can Reach Vaccine-Hesitant Parents | Time

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Pfizer Says Its Vaccine is 90.7% Effective Against Symptomatic Covid-19 In Children Ages 5 To 11

Bridgette Melo, 5, holds the hand of her father, Jim Melo, during her inoculation of one of two reduced 10 ug doses of the Pfizer BioNtech COVID-19 vaccine during a trial at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina September 28, 2021 in a still image from video. Video taken September 28, 2021. Shawn Rocco/Duke University/Handout via REUTERS NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY.

In a new document posted ahead of a key meeting of the US Food and Drug Administration’s vaccine advisers, Pfizer says its vaccine is safe and 90.7% effective against symptomatic Covid-19 in children ages 5 to 11.

In the trial, which included around 2,000 children, there were three Covid-19 cases among the group that received the vaccine and 16 cases in the placebo group. In the trial, twice as many children received the vaccine as the placebo.

Pfizer/BioNTech are seeking FDA emergency use authorization of a two-dose regimen of their 10-microgram dose for children ages 5 to 11. The two doses would be administered three weeks apart. Last month, Pfizer released details of a Phase 2/3 trial that showed its Covid-19 vaccine was safe and generated a “robust” antibody response in children ages 5 to 11. The trial included 2,268 participants ages 5 to 11.

Participants’ immune responses were measured by looking at neutralizing antibody levels in their blood and comparing those levels to a control group of 16- to 25-year-olds who were given a two-dose regimen with the larger 30-microgram dose. Pfizer said the levels compared well with older people who received the larger dose, demonstrating a “strong immune response in this cohort of children one month after the second dose.”

The FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee is scheduled to meet October 26 to discuss whether to recommend the vaccine for authorization for those ages 5 to 11.

If authorized, this would be the first Covid-19 vaccine for younger children. The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is approved for people age 16 and older and has an EUA for people ages 12 to 15.

The data summarized from this Phase 2/3 study, which is enrolling children 6 months to 11 years of age, was for 2,268participants who were 5 to 11 years of age and received a 10 µg dose level in a two-dose regimen. In the trial, the SARS-CoV-2–neutralizing antibody geometric mean titer (GMT) was 1,197.6 (95% confidence interval [CI, 1106.1, 1296.6]), demonstrating strong immune response in this cohort of children one month after the second dose.

This compares well (was non-inferior) to the GMT of 1146.5 (95% CI: 1045.5, 1257.2) from participants ages 16 to 25 years old, used as the control group for this analysis and who were administered a two-dose regimen of 30 µg. Further, the COVID-19 vaccine was well tolerated, with side effects generally comparable to those observed in participants 16 to 25 years of age.

Pfizer and BioNTech plan to share these data with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), European Medicines Agency (EMA) and other regulators as soon as possible. For the United States, the companies expect to include the data in a near-term submission for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) as they continue to accumulate the safety and efficacy data required to file for full FDA approval in this age group.

A request to the EMA to update the EU Conditional Marketing Authorization is also planned. Topline readouts for the other two age cohorts from the trial – children 2-5 years of age and children 6 months to 2 years of age – are expected as soon as the fourth quarter of this year.

Pfizer and BioNTech plan to share these data with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), European Medicines Agency (EMA) and other regulators as soon as possible. For the United States, the companies expect to include the data in a near-term submission for Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) as they continue to accumulate the safety and efficacy data required to file for full FDA approval in this age group.

A request to the EMA to update the EU Conditional Marketing Authorization is also planned. Topline readouts for the other two age cohorts from the trial – children 2-5 years of age and children 6 months to 2 years of age – are expected as soon as the fourth quarter of this year. Pfizer and BioNTech plan to submit data from the full Phase 3 trial for scientific peer-reviewed publication.

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Source: Pfizer says its vaccine is 90.7% effective against symptomatic Covid-19 in children ages 5 to 11 – ABC17NEWS

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Patients should always ask their healthcare providers for medical advice about adverse events. Individuals are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967. In addition, side effects can be reported to Pfizer Inc. at www.pfizersafetyreporting.com

or by calling 1-800-438-1985.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information (16+ years of age). Please click here for Fact Sheet for Vaccination Providers (12+ years of age)

Public Assessment Report Authorisation for Temporary Supply COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine BNT162b2 (BNT162b2 RNA) concentrate for solution for injection (PDF). Regulation 174 (Report). Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). 15 December 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on 16 December 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2021. Burger L (15 March 2020). “BioNTech in China alliance with Fosun over coronavirus vaccine candidate”. Reuters. Archived

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