Morning Routine Mistakes Could Cost You Productivity and Peace

Morning Routine Mistakes Could Cost You Productivity and Peace

Everyone loves to swap tips about how to make an epic morning routine, but when it comes to implementation, there are a few easy whoopsies that are far too easy to make. Hitting the snooze button, starting your day from the bed and sacrificing your morning for a late-night marathon are all potential ways to sabotage the potential your mornings have.

And potential, indeed. A growing body of research is finding that mornings are actually the most optimal time for you to ideate or be creative. A study in the Thinking & Reasoning Journal reported that the perceived-to-be least optimal times for thinking and (such as first thing in the morning, when you’re groggy and still on your first cup of ) are actually the most optimal times. “Results showed consistently greater insight problem-solving performance during non-optimal times of day compared to optimal times of day,” the research stated.

Related: What Your Morning Routine Is Missing

So, the cost of making mistakes in your morning routine is quite high. Imagine the groundbreaking ideas for your business, next book, or even next family vacation that could surface in the light of the morning! Make sure you aren’t making the following mistakes that will cost you productivity and peace.

Mistake 1: Diving out of bed the second the alarm goes off

For sure, this mistake is done with good intentions — as a bit of a defense mechanism, if you will. If you force yourself to fly out of bed the moment you hear the dreaded alarm, you may be less likely to lay there and break into a mental argument about whether or not the morning commute can afford you an extra five minutes of snooze time. But, this drastic action disconnects you from your body immediately. A better alternative? Take just a few minutes to stretch and elongate your body as much as possible.

This concept is inspired by researcher Amy Cuddy, who coined the term “Power Pose.” When your body stretches out, you’ll actually feel more confident. In addition to this mood boost, a stretch first thing (even by putting your arms into a V shape, which Cuddy says boosts incredible happiness) increases your blood flow to all areas of your body.

After a few minutes of stretching, take your time getting out of bed and going about your immediate morning routine: making coffee, brushing your teeth and getting dressed. Then, consider doing the Power Pose again while standing up, or even during your morning shower!

Related: 14 of the Best Morning Routine Hacks Proven to Boost Productivity

Mistake 2: Checking your phone immediately

A Lifestyle of Mobile Consumers Survey reported that 1 out of every 4 young adults checks their phones within one minute of waking up. It’s tempting, for sure — especially nowadays, when there is so much information on your , and in your text messages. But Glenn Lundy, the host and founder of the incredibly popular #RiseandGrind podcast, says this is a major mistake.

“Neither your mind nor your body are ready for that type of stimulation first thing,” Lundy shared. “When you’re groggily waking up, it’s important to focus on presence and gratitude, rooting yourself in your own body through some morning movement and writing down your goals.” These pieces of advice are from his #TheMorning5 67 day challenge, which has been taken up by tens of thousands of individuals across the globe.

“Remember that there’s nothing on your phone that can’t wait for you,” Lundy explained. “And, you’ll be better equipped to handle any work crisis or exciting when you’ve fully woken up and completed a healthy morning routine.”

Mistake 3: Sleeping in too late

Now, we aren’t telling you which hours you should or shouldn’t be sleeping, but consider this. If you know you’re tempted to check your phone first thing because you feel like you’re missing something, imagine how much that temptation will reside if you wake up earlier than most do. There’s something to this. A study by Amerisleep shared the stunning differences between early risers and late risers in productivity, salary, and general quality of life.

The study reported that “people who get themselves out of bed at the crack of dawn — yes, we’re talking about 4 am — responded they felt “highly productive” 71% of the time. Compare that to people who snooze until 11 am, the least likely group to report being productive. They’re only productive 36% of the time.”

This productivity also translates to money, as the study found that the early risers made an average of $15,000 more each year than the late sleepers.

Related: Working From Home? Here’s Why You Need a Fake Commute.

Ultimately, what works best in your morning routine does come down to personal preference. This is an invitation to experiment. We all have the same 24 hours, and we all have a “morning routine,” whether it’s set in stone and followed habitually, or something that looks different every single day. Consider that the first hour of your day sets the tone for the rest of your day, and therefore, is likely the most important time to take full advantage of. Stretch out, keep that phone turned off, and consider rising earlier than you’re used to. The proof in both productivity and peace will reveal itself.

Aimee Tariq

By: Aimee Tariq Entrepreneur Leadership Network Contributor

 

Source: Morning Routine Mistakes Could Cost You Productivity and Peace

.

.

What are the morning routine mistakes that can derail your day? Many people start a new morning routine only to give up a few days later\. And others will watch videos about “successful routines,” but feel frustrated because these morning habits don’t match their day-to-day reality.
RESOURCES: ○ Time Flies: U.S. Adults Now Spend Nearly Half a Day Interacting with Media: https://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insight… ○ Find more satisfaction by changing daily routines, study says: https://news.miami.edu/stories/2020/0… ○ Psychologists: Make this your 30-minute morning routine for a successful day: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/08/02/30-mi… ○ The Importance of Creating Habits and Routine: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/arti… ○ How Your Morning Mood Affects Your Whole Workday: https://hbr.org/2016/07/how-your-morn… ○ Variability in Weight Change Early in Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment: Theoretical and Clinical Implications: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1….
.
5 Habits You Should Avoid First Thing In The Morning | HuffPost Life
http://www.huffpost.com – February 10
[…] We asked experts for some of the most common morning routine mistakes and easy fixes to try instead […]
228
Performance management gets a boost – here’s how
mirro.io – December 8, 2020
[…] The bad news is they’re not occasional lapses in judgment, but routine mistakes and repeated patterns governing our lives from the shadows […]
5
Presidential Transition Highlights: Recounts in Wisconsin Reaffirm Biden’s Victory – The New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com – November 29, 2020
[…] The Trump team seized on any routine mistakes to advance the cause […]
N/A
Even as Trump Claimed Fraud, These Republicans Didn’t Bend – The New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com – November 28, 2020
[…] But the Trump team seized on any routine mistakes or far-fetched allegations to advance the cause […]
164
My Weight Loss Journey (Routine, Mistakes, and more)
youtu.be – November 24, 2020
N/A
Big Tech CEOs claiming they don’t censor conservatives is like Big Tobacco executives claiming nicotine is not addictive –
http://www.naturalnews.com – November 20, 2020
[…] Cruz then responded by suggesting that Twitter’s selective censorship, which includes routine “mistakes” being made only against conservatives, only further proves that the tech platform is now a content […]
N/A
How Genetic Mutations Affect Metastatic Breast Cancer Prognosis and Treatment
powerfulpatients.org – October 21, 2020
[…] So, if you inherit a mutation in one of those genes, you still have some ability to repair any routine mistakes that are being made, but over time, you have less ability, and then, if you get a cancer that has a […]
0
5 Morning Routine Mistakes You Might Be Making
http://www.developgoodhabits.com – October 17, 2020
5 Morning Routine Mistakes You Might Be Making There might be affiliate links on this page, which means we get a smal […] So, in this article, we will look at 5 morning routine mistakes that you might be making that can decrease the potential that this critical time of day has t […] Final Thoughts on Morning Routine Mistakes Do you find that you’re making any of the mistakes we listed in this article? If so, consider ho […]
2
50,000 Ohio Voters To Receive New Absentee Ballots After Error Found | Michigan Radio
http://www.michiganradio.org – October 9, 2020
[…] President Trump has seized on errors in the voting system, even small routine mistakes, to amplify false claims about voter fraud […]
9
Receivers throwing TDs? Unstoppable defenders? Meet the all-new Browns | Cleveland Browns | The Guardian
http://www.theguardian.com – October 5, 2020
[…] But he once again proved that he has eliminated the routine mistakes that dogged his first two seasons in the league while maintaining his every-down aggression […]
1
Roland Garros 2020 Report: Trio of Women’s 2nd Matches –
[…] She lost the next 8 points, six on routine mistakes, to find herself down 0-4 […]
1
Metastatic Breast Cancer: Accessing the Best Treatment For YOU
powerfulpatients.org – September 23, 2020
[…] So, if you inherit a mutation in one of those genes, you still have some ability to repair any routine mistakes that are being made, but over time, you have less ability, and then, if you get a cancer that has a […]
N/A
Tony Evers recall effort divides GOP heading into November election
http://www.jsonline.com – September 9, 2020
[…] “There’s a couple routine mistakes she’s made,” he said […]
6
A quick guide to optimising your Google Ads | by Cognism | Sep, 2020
http://www.cognism.com – September 9, 2020
[…] take to optimise your Google ads? “When optimising Google ads, it’s very important to get into a routine. Mistakes can be very easy to miss if you don’t look too often […]
2
3 Drop Shipping Secrets Beginners Need to Know
http://www.entrepreneur.com – August 24, 2020
[…] Related: 6 Routine Mistakes People Make When Setting Up a Drop Shipping Online Store
19
Great News for Taxpayers: You’ll Soon Be Able to File Amended Returns Online
http://www.fool.com – June 29, 2020
[…] error you make on your taxes, though, as the agency has indicated it discovers and corrects many routine mistakes for you […]
11
7 Common Korean Skincare Routine Mistakes You Might Be Making
http://www.preview.ph – May 15, 2020
Here, we run down some common mistakes you should definitely ditch or avoid….
6
Supply chain collaboration in discrete manufacturing
http://www.plataine.com – May 5, 2020
[…] As today, production is slowly getting back routine, mistakes cannot afford to be made […]
16
Plastic Surgeons Talk Celebrity Face Upkeep
jezebel.com – April 27, 2020
[…] Once you deviate from the normal routine, mistakes happen […]
37
25 years on: Remembering the OKC bombing — and how the media erred
1995blog.com – April 17, 2020
[…] But reporting lapses at Oklahoma City 25 years ago were more profound and troubling than routine mistakes […]
31
The Art of Clear Writing
indiauncut.com – April 7, 2020
[…] What are the broad principles you should embrace, and why? What are the routine mistakes you should watch out for and avoid? What tips can we keep in mind to make our writing clear? Ther […]
N/A
Color + Design Blog / The 5 Routine Mistakes That Designers Make and How to Avoid Them by COLOURlovers :: COLOURlovers
http://www.colourlovers.com – March 5, 2020
We are all prone to making mistakes, even in areas we are experienced in. Approaching a task without the fear of making mistakes is the best attitude, and if and when they occur, they teach great lessons. For designers, some may be as simple as forgetting a small detail to bigger ones that would require a redo of the whole project. Mistakes should not prevent you from being creative and designing that system or software for your client or business. Instead, they present you with a great chance to improve your skills and career. Here are some of the most common mistakes that a designer is prone to make and how you can avoid them. Not Using Logs Logs are an essential part of every system. They oversee system events as well as storing user actions like passwords and file renaming. They act as watchtower lookouts alerting you when there’s a security breach in the system. Using logs when designing a system is therefore essential to ensure the security of the data and also spend more time-solving problems rather than looking for what is wrong. You might require the services of a log monitoring company for proper log management. Papertrail offers you an all-in-one cloud based log management solution to ensure your data is safe. Taking on Many Projects at the Same Time Having too much work to handle may mean more income and sometimes an overworked brain. The divided attention plus the tension of not meeting the deadlines may result in reduced output and a less than satisfied client. Imagine the quality of a project that you have given your focus. It will definitely improve your portfolio. Solution: Even though it means less income, learning to say no to work you can’t handle, is a virtue. You will have more time to concentrate on the tasks at hand and deliver quality work that can earn you referrals and recurrent clients. Unclear Responsibilities This happens especially when you are handling a group project. If there’s no project manager, then individual tasks often overlap, some tasks may be left unattended to, or worse still other team members may be less concerned about their roles. The client will notice the mistakes in the work delivered, and whether or not you did your part excellently, the mistakes lie on every team member since there were no guidelines and expectations laid down at the start. Solution: The best way to handle this would be clearly stating what is expected of every member of the team and tasks that each individual should handle by a project manager assigned to the project. According to the National Institute of Corrections, teams function more successfully when everyone understands their roles. That way, everyone will be answerable about their tasks. Lack of Proper Communication Some instructions sent by the client weren’t clear, but you did not seek clarification. Or it may be a question you should have asked during the meeting, but you did not because you feared been seen as dumb. The deadline draws near, and because you cannot avoid it anymore, you ask, and you are forced to correct parts you had already done or worse still, start the whole project again. Solution: You can avoid all these problems by communicating all the relevant information with the client. Ask for clarification where you don’t understand, sort out any uncertainties. It’s better to over-communicate and avoid mistakes than not communicate at all and end up with a load of errors. Working Alone Doing everything yourself is a recipe for making mistakes. You love to think you’re the solution to all the problems. You don’t ask someone to proofread your work or their insights, and you end up delivering work that is full of errors. Some of these details are very minute, and it’d take a different person to notice them. Solution: Design is a collaborative discipline. Learn to involve other people, look for a variety of perspectives, and different insights. Most importantly, learn to tame your ego. There is no harm in looking for an editor to correct the errors. Design is inclusive or else it won’t work out. Conclusion Learning how to avoid these mistakes or even fixing them may take some time and sometimes even more investment. But in the end, it will pay off in other forms like client retention, increased income, more referrals, an excellent reputation, and reduced reworks.
N/A
The 5 Routine Mistakes That Designers Make and How to Avoid Them
feedproxy.google.com – March 5, 2020
N/A
The Best Way To Improve Your Website Security
http://www.tecocraft.co.uk – March 4, 2020
[…] I attached all practical and routine mistakes that are doing beginners right now […]
N/A
Electric toothbrushes — how high-tech do they need to be?
chicago.suntimes.com – February 17, 2020
[…] It’s us, and better toothbrushes can address routine mistakes that we make as caretakers of our dental health […]
6
Best electric toothbrush?: How a better brush gets you healthier teeth
http://www.usatoday.com – January 20, 2020
[…] It’s us, and better toothbrushes can address routine mistakes that we make as caretakers of our dental health […]
1
Why Most Dropshipping Businesses Fail
businessblogshub.com – January 13, 2020
[…] Thankfully there are plenty of articles on the topic of dropshipping, including Entrepreneur’s 6 routine mistakes with the set up of the store […]
1
Critical Thinking from ASM Plus: “I wish to make a complaint”
http://www.asmadr.co.uk – January 10, 2020
[…] the underlying significant errors and delays that her strategy had not addressed resulted in routine mistakes and failures being replicated at doubtless enormous cost to both council taxpayers and th […]

In Denmark, Empathy Is Taught As A School Subject That Kids Must Learn From A Very Young Age

When a baby is born, their mind is a clean slate. How they are exposed to the world decides what gets written on it, which subsequently decides what type of person they will become. This does mean that at an impressionable age, the child should be taught things that will shape them into a person who will grow up to contribute to society.

They will learn to pick up kindness, empathy, generosity, honesty instead of other detrimental qualities. When a whole generation of children grows up with good attributes, the world will definitely be a better place to live in.

In Denmark, they place a lot of importance on cultivating empathy in their children. Believe it or not, people do not actually care about others’ well-being. It is something we are socialized into and something that is necessary for us to survive. While math and science are important in life, Denmark knows that empathy is much more important a life lesson that will take people further than numbers and formulas ever will.

This is why Danish schools decided to introduce mandatory empathy classes in 1993. In these classes, children aged 6-16 are taught how to be kind, according to My Modern Met.

The children during the empathy classes or “Klassens tid” are asked to share any problems or issues they are going through. The entire class pitches in to help find a solution. Kids grow up to become confident, emotionally intelligent adults, who will know not to judge people for their struggles. This also means that they are more likely to raise happier kids themselves.

Denmark has consistently been at the top of the UN’s World Happiness Report. In the latest report, Denmark stood in second place followed by Finland. Denmark has been at the top in 2012, 2013, and 2016. Perhaps the empathy classes have a lot to contribute in this aspect.

The Danish Way stated, “Empathy helps build relationships, prevent bullying and succeed at work. It promotes the growth of leaders, entrepreneurs, and managers. ‘Empathic teenagers’ tend to be more successful because they are more oriented towards the goals compared to their more narcissistic peers.” Empathy is also taught through teamwork where those excelling and those lacking are made to work together.

This not only helps with understanding the positive qualities of each other but also lift each other up to complete a task without being pulled down by competition with each other. Another popular program is called the CAT-kit. In this program, the aim is to improve emotional awareness and empathy by focusing on how to articulate experiences, thoughts, feelings, and senses, reported The Atlantic.

There are picture cards of faces, measuring sticks to gauge the intensity of emotions, and pictures of the body, included in the CAT-kit so kids can understand the emotions being exhibited while also learning to conceptualize their own and others’ feelings. In the classroom setting, along with the facilitator, the children are taught not to be judgemental but acknowledge and respect these sentiments.

“A child who is naturally talented in mathematics, without learning to collaborate with their peers, will not go much further. They will need help in other subjects. It is a great lesson to teach children from an early age since no one can go through life alone,” says Jessica Alexander, author of the book The Danish Way of Parenting: What the Happiest People in the World Know About Raising Confident, Capable Kids. She adds,

“Many studies show that when you explain something to someone – like a math problem for example – you not only learn the subject much better than you would do by memorizing it yourself, but you also build our empathy skills which are further strengthened by having to be careful about the way the other person receives the information and having to put oneself in their shoes to understand how learning works.”

Source: In Denmark, Empathy Is Taught As A School Subject That Kids Must Learn From A Very Young Age

.

.

Anxiety levels are rising among primary and secondary school children across the globe. For parents and educators, this is a worrying trend. What are we doing wrong and what could we be doing to fix it? Could Denmark’s teaching practices hold the key to happiness in the classroom. By Mariana Rudan. #denmark #education #teachingempathy #danisheducation #marianarudan
.
.
More Contents:
Coronavirus: How your school can focus on empathy in 2021 | Tes News
http://www.tes.com – February 17
[…] Coronavirus: Prioritising empathy in schools The challenges of the past year have prompted us to focus on empathy over the coming months […]
N/A
Teach empathy to help boys express emotions, Cambridge researchers say
Children should be taught empathy in schools to help boys express their emotions and creativity, Cambridge University academics have said […]
Kaiser Permanente, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, and Discovery Education Offer New, No-Cost, Digital Resources Supporting Emotional Resiliency in Teachers and Students | Ethical Marketing News
ethicalmarketingnews.com – January 9
[…] of no-cost, on-demand e-learning modules built to highlight the importance of human connection and empathy in schools […]
Discover Resources to Support Emotional Resiliency in Teachers and Students with Ready, Set, RISE 
blog.discoveryeducation.com – December 21, 2020
[…] educators on-demand e-learning modules built to highlight the importance of human connection and empathy in schools […]
N/A
Kaiser Permanente, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, and Discovery Education Offer New, No-Cost, Digital Resources Supporting Emotional Resiliency
http://www.eschoolnews.com – December 14, 2020
[…] of no-cost, on-demand e-learning modules built to highlight the importance of human connection and empathy in schools […]
Announcing Ready, Set, RISE! — Digital Resources Supporting Emotional Resiliency in Teachers and Students
thrivingschools.kaiserpermanente.org – December 14, 2020
[…] a series of on-demand e-learning modules built to highlight the importance of human connection and empathy in schools […]
N/A
Kaiser Permanente, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, and
http://www.3blmedia.com – December 14, 2020
[…] of no-cost, on-demand e-learning modules built to highlight the importance of human connection and empathy in schools […]
Kaiser Permanente, Alliance for a Healthier Generation, and Offer New, No-Cost, Digital Resources Supporting Emotional Resiliency in Teachers and Students
http://www.discoveryeducation.com – December 14, 2020
[…] of no-cost, on-demand e-learning modules built to highlight the importance of human connection and empathy in schools […]
N/A
Issue 1: Relax. Welcome to the post-perspective era.
http://www.linkedin.com – December 4, 2020
[…] Amazing for teaching empathy in schools and business […]
Is it time to restore the wellbeing, focus and regard for our teachers? – Mornings
http://www.abc.net.au – November 26, 2020
[…] For this reason alone, our focus on empathy in schools is of critical importance’: Adam Voigt
The key to a better world? Teach empathy early
http://www.smartbrief.com – November 10, 2020
[…] The process of learning empathy For all the talk about empathy in schools, it’s rarely backed up with the structure, process and discipline that is necessary to lear […]
Shelf Care Interview: Duchess Harris by Booklist’s Shelf Care Podcast | Free Listening on
soundcloud.com – November 2, 2020
[…] of Being LGBTQ in America: LGBTQ Social Movements in America, and she discusses the importance of empathy in schools today […]
N/A
A quantum leap for a dalit boy into Cambridge University – Raise Funds | Milaap
milaap.org – August 8, 2020
[…] to become good trainers, how to inculcate the concept of lifelong learning, enforcing pedagogy of empathy in schools, eliminating rote-learning mechanisms, designing culture specific curriculum and learning etc […]
Free Mindfulness Classes Help Kids’ Mental Health (Featured on CNN)
[…] Donations help Mindful Schools cultivate greater focus, resilience and empathy in schools across the globe […]
Reading Corner
[…]     Start Empathy: A toolkit for promoting empathy in schools A great collection of activities to help create learning environments which meet every child’ […]
What can we learn from corona-virus situation? #3 – The importance of empathy in schools
http://www.edupolicy.net – April 6, 2020
The impact of the pandemic on the education systems across the globe is immense for numerous reasons.On one hand, most countries in the world have closed down schools and moved to some type of online learning which will surely impact the quality of learning but at the same time impacts the home lives…
3 Great ideas on how to teach empathy to K-12 students
blog.neolms.com – March 17, 2020
[…] The benefits of an empathic mindset approach to classroom management Let’s see how we can teach empathy in schools and better prepare our students for adulthood: Multicultural education Teaching students abou […]
Getting Business to fund confidence building in schools? what a silly idea! (Except we have already done it.) Systems/Design Thinking for Schools.
http://www.linkedin.com – March 13, 2020
[…] Leaders are becoming much more aware and compassionate and have offered to help create more empathy in schools […]
Video: How to Eat More Mindfully
[…] DONATE NOW All donations help Mindful Schools cultivate greater focus, resilience and empathy in schools across the globe […]
Have a Heart: Promoting Empathy in Schools
blog.gaggle.net – February 24, 2020
SEL helps children learn how to manage and understand their emotions, which can be especially useful on special occasions such as Valentine’s Day….
An Experimental Program Is Using Science Fiction to Teach Kids Radical Empathy Online
onezero.medium.com – February 12, 2020
[…] The idea of teaching empathy in schools is not new, though openness and creativity about it have grown in recent times […]
Gregory D. Evans | Ex-Hacker | TV Personality | Author | Public Speaker
gregorydevans.com – February 11, 2020
[…] The idea of teaching empathy in schools is not new, though openness and creativity about it have grown in recent times […]
Danish Students Learn About Empathy In Schools
http://www.thinkinghumanity.com – February 1, 2020
Sometimes, it gets really hard to find happiness in a society that tends to normalize toxic behaviors and make sensitivity look like a sign of weakness.
SEND: How teachers can support disabled pupils
http://www.tes.com – January 30, 2020
[…] Pity is insulting Loads of emphasis is put on empathy in schools, and understandably so […]
Empathy in education: ‘It’s just as important as learning maths’
http://www.irishtimes.com – January 24, 2020
[…] “We need to get really serious about empathy in schools and education […]
Niroga Institute – healthy, peaceful, and compassionate communities through Dynamic Mindfulness
http://www.niroga.org – January 22, 2020
[…] Institute promotes equity through trauma-informed Dynamic Mindfulness, strengthening resilience and empathy in schools and communities […]

11 Ways To Save Fuel & Money In 2021

Following hefty fuel price increases this month – petrol by between 40c and 43c per litre, and diesel by between 54c and 55c a litre – cash-strapped and Covid-battered South African motorists have to find innovative ways to save fuel and money.

According to Bianca de Beer from Dialdirect Insurance: “An average increase of 48c per litre is steep on its own, but when coupled with the fact that a 60-litre tank already cost more than R800 to fill, this places a significant strain on motorists’ wallets.

 The good news is that with a few minor adjustments to your driving habits and with regular car maintenance, you can boost the fuel efficiency of your car by as much as 40%. If you fill up 48 times a year at roughly R900 per tank, a 40% reduction in fuel consumption could save you more than R17,000 a year.”

Dialdirect provides the following tips for better fuel economy:

1: Don’t skimp on servicing

A car can burn up to 30% more fuel if proper maintenance is not performed on a regular schedule.  With this in mind, make sure your car is serviced regularly. Things like worn spark plugs, worn rings, faulty injectors, sticky brakes, low coolant levels, dirty oil and dirty filters all add up to engine inefficiency which leads to increased fuel consumption.

2: Be wheel wise

Check your car’s wheel alignment. Bad wheel alignment causes more friction which takes more power to overcome and results in higher fuel consumption.

3: Keep tabs on tyre pressure: 

Check for underinflated tyres as these also increase resistance.

4: Use your AC sparingly

Use the air-conditioning only when necessary as it places additional load on the engine.

5: Remove unnecessary weight

Reduce the vehicle’s weight by removing unnecessary items and, if you mostly do city driving, consider driving with only half a tank of fuel.Five top motoring innovations of 2020From solar-powered cars to “see-through” bonnets, these clever ideas turned science fiction into realityGood Life1 week ago

6: Slow and steady wins the fuel economy race

Don’t speed. The gas-guzzling effects of “stepping on it” are well-known.

7: Avoid stop-start driving

Maintain momentum as far as possible by looking and planning ahead, flowing with traffic and timing your approaches to hills, traffic lights and crossings better.

8: Gear yourself for efficiency 

Drive at the lowest speed in the highest gear that the road and traffic conditions allow without laboring the engine.

9: Be tech-savvy

Many vehicles have economy settings to optimize performance, throttle response, ride height and so on for maximum fuel efficiency. Use them to your advantage.

10: Plan ahead

Do several tasks on one round trip as opposed to many shorter ones. This not only limits mileage and the amount of time it takes to get your chores done, but also keeps your vehicle’s engine running at optimal temperature.

11: Wait out the rush

Battling through traffic not only increases fuel consumption, but also wear and tear on your vehicle’s transmission and brakes.

De Beer said: “Saving on fuel by keeping your vehicle in shape and changing the way you drive may seem like a bit of a hassle, but if you increase your fuel economy by 40%, a tank that normally gets you 700km could get you close to 1,000 km. This translates to almost a tankful of savings for every two times you fill up.”

By : Motoring Staff

.

More Contents:

We were wrong about when second wave would hit: Prof Salim Abdool Karim

sowetanlive.co.zaICA unsurprised insurer will only pay three months for business interruption claims

sowetanlive.co.zaKaizer Chiefs coach Hunt: ‘We know we are in a fight now’

sowetanlive.co.zaMBUYISELO BOTHA | Bongani Khumalo was a man ahead of his time on GBV

sowetanlive.co.zaMALAIKA MAHLATSI | Traversing the murky waters of consumer data mining

sowetanlive.co.zaOvercoming the ‘yuck factor’: Yellow grub becomes EU’s first insect food

sowetanlive.co.za‘Players will ignore talks of TTM’s potential sale’

sowetanlive.co.zaMandla N shares touching tribute to veteran actress Lindiwe Ndlovu

.

Proactive Thinker

▶️ Invest With Me: https://www.patreon.com/proactivethinker ▶️ Get 4 FREE Stocks on WeBull (Deposit $100 and get 2 stocks valued up to $1600): https://act.webull.com/k/oMykVRLIfkHE… ▶️ Get 14 Days Free Trial Of Skillshare Premium: https://skillshare.eqcm.net/proactive… ▶️ Get 1 Free Audiobook: https://amzn.to/2uLLFjz ▶️ My premium Course – Unshakable Confidence: https://goo.gl/qyJFXg ▶️ My second channel: https://bit.ly/2zTTMNU ▶️ Merch: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5YK… ▶️ Follow us on Instagram: https://goo.gl/vzBDdg ▶️ My editing software: https://www.adobe.com/?red=a#investing#Stockmarket#money

How Empathy Helps Bridge Generational Differences

As long as we have generations, we will have the following: nods of disapproval, eye rolls and facepalms while we take a deep breath. There’s just something about the generation older and younger than on our own that makes us do these things.

SPOILER ALERT: They are doing the same things to us.

Bridging the Generation Gap with Empathy

For many, this triggering of emotions through seemingly uncontrollable body language appears as a sign of disrespect. But for me, it shows a lack of empathy on everyone’s part — an unwillingness to understand the other person. It is that emptiness of empathy that is a regular struggling point between generations.

This is a topic that has come up many times on Thin Difference.

Empathy, the ability to understand someone else’s feelings, is one of the most important traits we can have. Leading with empathy creates a road map that will always benefit both parties.

I’ve always felt that at the root of any disagreement or displeasure with a situation is a deep misunderstanding of that situation. When we have “had enough” of someone, we’ll often use phrases like “I’m trying to get him to understand,” or “doesn’t she realize,” “I don’t get what he’s doing.”

You’ll never understand what that other person is thinking if you don’t attempt to find out.

Caught Between Two Generations

For the first time in my life I’m feeling smack dab in the middle of two generations. I have my parents on one side and my daughter on the other. Being in this position, I’ve also found that I’ve become more dependent on my parents and daughter.

When I am asked for assistance or perhaps seek it out, many times, without thinking straight, I want it on my terms; this is how I would do it, so this is how you should do it.

But it does not work that way, regardless of which generation you are dealing with.

Technology and the growing dependence our world has on it, has become an area of friction between Baby Boomers and, well, pretty much every generation after them. For example, my mom was having a problem with something on her phone, and I asked her “to text me a screen cap” of what she was seeing. Huh? That phrase is literally a foreign language to her and many people.

This struggle regularly shows up in the workplace. Technology aids us in doing things more efficiently and keeping us better connected. So when someone is out of the loop or working slower, it’s just so irritating … to us. And while many people will forever be stuck in their old ways, there are many that are willing to learn. But we need to understand that not everyone learns at the same pace. If we gain a better understanding of why someone is having trouble, then we can help find the right solution.

Teaching Empathy

When it comes to my daughter, our struggles are mostly about time management. Up until she was 10, she was pretty content going with the flow of whatever myself and my wife were up to. If we said we were going somewhere, she was going too. She also rarely suggested play dates, sleepovers or trips to the mall. This all changed once she became a tween.

Now she wants to do all of those things, all of the time. Those trips to the mall, the roller rink, coffee shops and trampoline cost money and perhaps even worse, my time … and my wife’s time and the time of the other parents.

If they want to do these things, someone has to drive them and in some cases wait for them. While it’s easy to say no, because it would inconvenience me, I have to remember to empathize.

Whenever I am using “I” too much in a conflict, I do not fully understand the big picture. I have to remember what it was like to be 12 years old and not want to sit at home on a Saturday. I have to remember what it’s like to walk around a mall with my friends, the freedom, the fun. I have to remember what it feels like to always hear the word “no.”

And so I oblige, sometimes.

But I also use it as an opportunity to teach empathy. When the answer is “no,” she needs to understand why. Because “no” isn’t because I don’t want her to be with her friends — which would be the assumption and why she would get angry with me. It’s usually because the ask is disrupting an already scheduled out day. I’ve noticed her approach has been different lately.

She now asks “are we doing anything later today,” or tomorrow, or on Saturday night, etc. She has a much better understanding of our situations and how she needs to consider them so she can have the result she wants.

There’s No “I” in Empathy

Earlier I mentioned phrases that are often born out of frustration we are having with someone. Those phrases all included the “I.” I have found whenever I am using “I” too much in dealing with conflict, then I do not fully understand the big picture.

I am not empathizing.

It’s when “I” turns into “we” that we can reach the ideal compromise. And when we have compromise through empathy, the walls built between generations become be much smaller.

By : Justin Kanoya

Photo by Dario Valenzuela on Unsplash

GenerationsCommunication, Culture, Empathy, Family, Generations. Post link.

More Contents:

How to Develop a Leadership Philosophy?

The process to develop a leadership philosophy may vary by individual. Developing one is the key so don’t get bogged down in the process. Use a process that works for you.

A Mindful Difference: Respond vs React

Being mindful in our responses ensures integrity in our interactions. Absence of mindfulness will raise the likelihood of emotional reactions.

The Importance of Story

Through social media or just more awareness, we gravitate toward good stories. The importance of story grows in how we lead and live.

Five Practices to Enhance Your Problem-Solving Mindset

A growth mindset also means we need a problem solving mindset. Solving problems is what makes us a better leader, team member, and citizen.

Do You Need to Aspire to Inspire?

To aspire is to rise up to a great plan, an abundant hope of fulfilling a worthwhile mission.

.

TEDx Talks

In a fractured world, can we hack our own sense of empathy and get others to become more empathic? Professor, Department of Psychology, Stanford University Jamil Zaki is an assistant professor of psychology at Stanford University. His research examines social cognition and behavior, especially how people understand and respond to each other’s emotions. This work spans a number of domains, social influence, prosocial behavior, and especially empathy (see ssnl.stanford.edu for details). In addition to studying the mechanics of empathy, Dr. Zaki’s work focuses on helping people empathize better. For instance, new research from his lab examines how to encourage empathy for people from distant political and ethnic groups, and also how caregivers and healthcare professionals can effectively empathize with their patients while maintaining their own well being. http://ssnl.stanford.edu

Empathy & Perspective Taking: How Social Skills Are Built

Understanding what other people want, how they feel, and how they see the world is becoming increasingly important in our complex, globalized society. Social skills enable us to make friends and create a network of people who support us. But not everyone finds it easy to interact with other people. One of the main reasons is that two of the most important social skills — empathy, i.e. being able to empathize with the other person’s emotions, and the ability to take a perspective, i.e. being able to gain an information by adopting another person’s point of view — are developed to different degrees.

Researchers have long been trying to find out what helps one to understand others. The more you know about these two social skills, the better you can help people to form social relationships. However, it still not exactly clear what empathy and perspective taking are (the latter is also known as “theory of mind”).

Being able to read a person’s emotions through their eyes, understand a funny story, or interpret the action of another person — in everyday life there are always social situations that require these two important abilities. However, they each require a combination of different individual subordinate skills. If it is necessary to interpret looks and facial expressions in one situation, in another it may be necessary to think along with the cultural background of the narrator or to know his or her current needs.

To date, countless studies have been conducted that examine empathy and perspective taking as a whole. However, it has not yet been clarified what constitutes the core of both competencies and where in the brain their bases lie. Philipp Kanske, former MPI CBS research group leader and currently professor at the TU Dresden, together with Matthias Schurz from the Donders Institute in Nijmegen, Netherlands, and an international team of researchers, have now developed a comprehensive explanatory model.

“Both of these abilities are processed in the brain by a ‘main network’ specialised in empathy or changing perspective, which is activated in every social situation. But, depending on the situation, it also involves additional networks,” Kanske explains, referring to the results of the study, which has just been published in the journal Psychological Bulletin. If we read the thoughts and feelings of others, for example, from their eyes, other additional regions are involved than if we deduce them from their actions or from a narrative. “The brain is thus able to react very flexibly to individual requirements.”

For empathy, a main network that can recognise acutely significant situations, for example, by processing fear, works together with additional specialised regions, for example, for face or speech recognition. When changing perspective, in turn, the regions that are also used for remembering the past or fantasising about the future, i.e., for thoughts that deal with things that cannot be observed at the moment, are active as the core network. Here too, additional brain regions are switched on in each concrete situation.

Through their analyses, the researchers have also found out that particularly complex social problems require a combination of empathy and a change of perspective. People who are particularly competent socially seem to view the other person in both ways — on the basis of feelings and on the basis of thoughts. In their judgement, they then find the right balance between the two.

“Our analysis also shows, however, that a lack of one of the two social skills can also mean that not this skill as a whole is limited. It may be that only a certain factor is affected, such as understanding facial expressions or speech melody,” adds Kanske. A single test is therefore not sufficient to certify a person’s lack of social skills. Rather, there must be a series of tests to actually assess them as having little empathy, or as being unable to take the other person’s point of view.

The scientists have investigated these relationships by means of a large-scale meta-analysis. They identified, on the one hand, commonalities in the MRI pattern of the 188 individual studies examined when the participants used empathy or perspective taking. This allowed the localisation of the core regions in the brain for each of the two social skills. However, results also indicated how the MRI patterns differed depending on the specific task and, therefore, which additional brain regions were used.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Matthias Schurz, Joaquim Radua, Matthias G. Tholen, Lara Maliske, Daniel S. Margulies, Rogier B. Mars, Jerome Sallet, Philipp Kanske. Toward a hierarchical model of social cognition: A neuroimaging meta-analysis and integrative review of empathy and theory of mind.. Psychological Bulletin, 2020; DOI: 10.1037/bul0000303

Cite This Page:

Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences. “Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 November 2020. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201110090427.htm>.

advertisement


RELATED STORIES


Empathy Exacerbates Discussions About Immigration

Oct. 14, 2020 — Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy? A study reveals that people who support immigration are …

Empathy Can Be Detected in People Whose Brains Are at Rest

Feb. 18, 2020 — Researchers have found that it is possible to assess a person’s ability to feel empathy by studying their brain activity while they are resting rather than while they are engaged in specific …

Empathy and Cooperation Go Hand in Hand

Apr. 9, 2019 — Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a team shows that the act of taking another …

Oxytocin Can Improve Compassion in People With Symptoms of PTSD

Mar. 10, 2016 — Oxytocin — “the love hormone” — may enhance compassion of people suffering from symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to new study. Compassion is pro-social motivation to … FROM AROUND THE WEB


ScienceDaily shares links with sites in the TrendMD network and earns revenue from third-party advertisers, where indicated.

  1. ‘What happened to your face?’ Managing facial disfigurement Alex Clarke MSc et al., British Journal of Community Nursing, 2013
  2. Facial expressions: understanding the social information code Paula Brown, Early Years Educator, 2017
  3. Laser facial hair removal protocol and key consultation considerations Liliana Marza, Journal of Aesthetic Nursing, 2014
  4. Ageing and the older person part 1: the brain and the heart Ian Peate, British Journal of Healthcare Assistants, 2013
  1. Saying sorry Judith Harries, Practical Pre-School, 2013
  2. Reducing impulsiveness in young people Dr Stephanie Thornton, British Journal of School Nursing, 2017
  3. Overall Survival from the phase 3 EMBRACA trial of talazoparib in patients with germline BRCA1/2-mutated advanced breast cancer Litton JK et al., Annals Oncol, 2020
  4. Stool Microbiome Sequencing Sheds Light on Immunotherapy Response in Metastatic Kidney Cancer Precision Oncology News, 2020

.

%d bloggers like this: