Facebook Unveils Section Dedicated To Debunking Coronavirus Misinformation

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Facebook announced Wednesday it would launch a section that will be devoted to debunking common myths about coronavirus, as it aims to combat criticism that its been too lax about misinformation on its platform.

KEY FACTS

Called “Facts About Covid-19,” the new section will appear under the Covid Information Center part of the site that features local and national updates about the pandemic as well as suggestions of pages to follow for more information.

In an example of what the section will look like that was posted to Twitter on Wednesday, tabs appeared to show information to dispute common myths repeated throughout the pandemic, like how hydroxychloroquine is not generally recommended as a preventative or treatment for the virus, along with consuming bleach or disinfectants.

The aim of the section is “to further limit the spread of misinformation,” the social media giant said in a tweet Wednesday.

The company also announced that both Facebook and Instagram will feature new alerts to remind users to wear face masks.

On Thursday, CEO Mark Zuckerberg will interview Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease official, including about the country’s efforts to slow the pandemic, how close a vaccine could be and what everyday people can do to pitch in—all to be livestreamed on Facebook, of course.

Zuckerberg has invited Facebook users to submit questions they would like to see Fauci answer.

KEY BACKGROUND

Facebook has recently taken steps to curb misinformation on the platform in a change of course for Zuckerberg, who just months ago criticized Twitter for its decision to fact check President Donald Trump’s tweets. “Facebook shouldn’t be the arbiter of truth of everything that people say online,” Zuckerberg said to Fox News anchor Dana Perino in a May interview. However, by April, Facebook announced that users who engaged with posts flagged as containing misinformation about coronavirus would get a notification to direct them to the World Health Organization’s information about the virus.

Last month, Zuckerberg finally followed Twitter’s lead to flag political figures’ posts that violate Facebook policies but are considered newsworthy. Last week, Facebook chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg said the firm “has to get better at finding and removing hateful content,” after a campaign called Stop Hate For Profit called on companies to boycott advertising on the site until Facebook addresses the “hate and disinformation being spread” on the platform.

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I am a Texas native covering breaking news out of New York City. Previously, I was a Forbes intern in London. I am an alum of City, University of London and Texas State University.

Source: https://www.forbes.com/

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Libra: Cryptocurrency By Facebook (In 5 Minutes)

 

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How many times have you faced difficulties while transferring from one person to another? Have you ever questioned why transactions are so slow? Why do I have to pay charges for the transaction?

Then this article will definitely help you to get rid of all your problems regarding transactions.

But before that let us find an answer to the question, where are we right now in the process of evolution? We are living in a world of revolutions, machines and digitization. We improved ourselves and updated technology as time passed but we still lack in offering basic financial services to everyone and satisfy them with the results.

Libra is a cryptocurrency built on blockchain technology, it is developed to improve millions of people by giving them a platform to be a part of digital currency. And to do this all you need is a mobile and data connection. It is fast, safe, and stable.

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The Libra association is a group of companies that are founding members of Libra. There are 28 companies which busily take part in the association and the strategy is to reach a total of 100 members who will act as the validators of the Libra currency.

Every institution present in this organization will get their share of the vote to make and finalize decisions regarding Libra and no individual will get higher than 1% of the total vote share.

People have different takes when it comes to trust in cryptocurrencies, one can easily trust Libra as it is backed by a reserve with constant liquid assets by combining with several other groups of exchanges and other liquidity providers. These assets stabilize the value of Libra.

The software used for developing Libra is a new programming language called Move it is used to execute and develop decentralized finance, smart contracts, and transaction logic.

To know more Libra, Click here on the infographic designed by Mrbtc.org

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When Facebook first announced it was getting into the crypto business—with a basically unregulated currency called Libra—the reaction from Wall Street and government bankers was about as expected. Fast-foward a few months, and Libra is in trouble. The social media giant had lined up a long list of corporate backers for the initiative, including major players in the payments space. And in October 2019, several prominent backers began to back out. Here’s how Facebook’s crypto future got into serious trouble. » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision » Subscribe to CNBC Classic: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCclassic About CNBC: From ‘Wall Street’ to ‘Main Street’ to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: https://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC Why Facebook’s Libra Cryptocurrency Is In Trouble

Experts Say Facebook’s Mind-Reading Brain Interface Isn’t That Crazy

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Facebook says it’s getting closer to eliminating one of the tech world’s biggest problems: namely how ridiculously long it’s taken me to type this sentence.

Ok, so it only took me about 30 seconds, but the words formed in my head in a fraction of that time. This problem of human latency is a key hurdle for tech giants like Google and Facebook that are looking for new ways to grow by shoving ever-more petabytes of data into our brains, and vice versa.

Two years ago, Facebook announced it was working on a non-invasive wearable device that would allow users to type by imagining themselves speaking the words. The hope is that such a device can be used as an input interface for augmented reality glasses.

As part of their effort, Facebook has been funding a team of researchers at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) working to help patients with neurological damage to speak again by detecting imagined speech in real time.

The team published its results in the latest issue of Nature Communications, and although the patients it worked with each had implanted electrodes measuring brain activity, the demonstrated ability to decode a small set of words and phrases in real-time represents a significant breakthrough.

 Facebook hopes the work of the UCSF team will serve as a proof of concept to inform the development of the non-invasive wearable it dreams of pairing with AR glasses.

“We’re a long way away from being able to get the same results that we’ve seen at UCSF in a non-invasive way,” reads a Facebook blog post detailing its efforts. “It could take a decade, but we think we can close the gap.”

Karen Panetta, IEEE Fellow and Dean of Graduate Engineering at Tufts University agrees that Facebook’s ambitions are feasible.

 “If we can now measure signals in the brain via implantable devices, then we can transmit those signals outside of the brain.”

Facebook thinks that a promising way to make the leap from “reading minds” via wired electrodes to a wireless system is by measuring changes in oxygen levels in the brain using infrared light similar to a pulse oximeter at a doctor’s office.

“This could work, though I am afraid that the rates (timing) of oxygenation processes are much lower than the actual rate at which speech is produced,” Josep Jornet, a professor of electrical engineering at the University of Buffalo, told me. “Certainly more work is needed, but this is what research is about and should be promoted.”

Todd Richmond, an IEEE member and Director of the Tech and Narrative Lab at the Pardee RAND Graduate School in Santa Monica says “having a viable capability in the lab” to wirelessly send brain signals to a computer could be less than five years away.

 “It will likely take longer to move from the lab to commercial deployment for a variety of reasons,” he adds.

Richmond thinks the first hurdles will be solving technical problems to make the system lighter, smaller, faster and essentially, more practical. Next comes the process of refining the user experience to make brain interfaces a necessity rather than a novelty.

 “The third set of developments will be around improving accuracy, efficacy, and safety,” he explains. “Like any consumer product, we’ll need to sort out what agencies are looking at what aspects of how devices impact humans, both individually and from a societal level.”

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

I’ve covered science, technology, the environment and politics for outlets including CNET, PC World, BYTE, Wired, AOL and NPR. I currently produce the Warm Regards podcast and I’ve written e-books on Android and Alaska.

I began covering Silicon Valley for the now defunct Business 2.0 Magazine in 2000, but when the dot-com bubble burst, I found myself manning a public radio station in the Alaskan Bush for three years.

Upon returning to the lower 48, I covered politics, energy and the environment as a freelancer for National Public Radio programs and spent time as an online editor for AOL and Comcast. For the past 7 years, I’ve returned to focusing on the world of technology.

Source: https://www.forbes.com

 

Facebook defends controversial ‘research’ app — INKLING LEAGUE

The world’s biggest social network is in hot water over privacy rights yet again, with another controversy involving user data revealed this week. Facebook revealing they’ve been using an app, called “Facebook Research,” to track the behavior of its users, many teenagers. The app was a voluntary download, with users 13-to-35 receiving compensation in exchange […]

via Facebook defends controversial ‘research’ app — INKLING LEAGUE

Social Video Formula – Traffic Getting System That’s Turning $10 Facebook Ad Budgets into Six Figure Income Machines

More and more, people are uploading, sharing and discovering videos on Facebook. Video views grew more than 50% from May through July of this year, and since June there has been an average of more than 1 billion video views on Facebook each day. Finally, you can steal the secret blueprint that turns “ordinary” Facebook video ads into unstoppable sales machines, starting with the loose change down the back of your couch. We’re going to show you how to create simple 30 second videos and deploy them strategically to breach people’s busy newsfeeds and finally create a traffic and sales avalanche like you’ve never seen before……..

Read more: http://www.socialvideoformula.com/launch/

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