Decentralized Finance Is on The Rise What You Need To Know in 2021

Few had heard much about decentralized finance (DeFi) in its early days in late 2017 and late 2019, beyond murmurs about Bitcoin and a mysterious new digital technology called blockchain

But a pandemic can change everything. 

Since May of this year, the total value locked (TVL)—the amount of any currency locked into tokens, the vehicle of holding and moving assets on blockchain, in smart contracts on a blockchain ecosystem—in decentralized finance projects rose a whopping 2,000 percent, according to DeFi Pulse. Many investors would be hard-pressed to find such an astronomical rise of any assets or expansion of any financial ecosystem, but DeFi app developers seemed to find success. So what’s the rage, and why does it matter going into the new year? 

What is DeFi?

DeFi, many fintech leaders argue, is the world’s answer to the 2008 financial crisis. Thanks to poor decision making and a lack of proper financial regulation, legacy financial institutions brought the world’s economy to its knees in the most major financial crisis since the Great Depression. The knee-jerk reaction was to create an ecosystem dependent on every link in the chain, rather than centralized authorities—hence the term “decentralized finance.”

The concept of blockchain, a decentralized ledger, was designed to ensure financial transactions would be transparent. Moreover, transaction approval would come from network individuals incentivized to approve them by solving complex mathematical equations or by network consensus voting. 

Later, the idea of operating a decentralized financial system on a decentralized ledger, independent of legacy institutions, grew into a thriving, albeit relatively small, ecosystem. Now, users can find financial services on the distributed ledger for loans, insurance, margin trading, exchanges, and yield farming (yielding rewards from staking digital assets on a network to help facilitate network liquidity).

But there is still a way to go. Not enough consumers are comfortable with DeFi quite yet, because platform accessibility and blockchain tribalism remain a problem. Nevertheless, now the world is experiencing another economic crisis brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, and DeFi is finally getting its day in the sun.

Related: Getting Drawn Into DeFi? Here Are Three Major Considerations

E-wallets are leveling up

For companies and individuals already active in the space, navigating the ecosystem remains impeded by technical limitations. In order to access certain markets and execute transactions on the blockchain—whether it’s borrowing or lending, staking assets in liquidity pools, or trading on an exchange—users need to own an e-wallet that’s properly connected to the ecosystem. 

E-wallets are the backbone of transactions on blockchain. Just as the digital assets they help transact and store, these wallets are secure, transparent, and easily accessible to users. At least, that’s the idea behind them, though there are various degrees of security and transparency. For DeFi to attract more users, the wallets must be compatible with multiple blockchains running financial dApps (decentralized apps that operate on a blockchain system). One of the first wallets, created by Ethereum and called “MyEtherWallet” (MEW), lacked a user-friendly interface and was challenging to grasp for people outside the hardcore crypto crowd.

Since then, a number of blockchain developers have created alternative e-wallet solutions. Most recently, Spielworks, a blockchain gaming startup, reached an agreement with Equilibrium and DeFiBox to integrate its e-wallet “Wombat,” which is currently available on the Telos and EOS blockchain mainnet (a blockchain network that is fully developed, deployed, and operational).

The Wombat wallet provides users with access to several DeFi platforms that offer token exchanges, yield farming, borrowing, and lending. Wombat recently also integrated with Bitfinex’s new EOS exchange, Eosfinex, as well as 8 other DeFi networks. Rather impressively, the wallet also offers free and fast account creation, automatic key backup, and free blockchain resources. 

Related: Cryptocurrency Innovators Need to Simplify User Experience

Developments in blockchain wallets, such as Wombat’s, will be pivotal in the next few years in the growth of DeFi applications and the movement of users toward decentralized finance and away from traditional finance. While wallets are important, so are the underlying mechanisms to piece the entire ecosystem together, because one a DeFi ecosystem is not enough if confined to just one blockchain mainnet.

Piecing it all together

“A house divided against itself cannot stand.” President Lincoln’s famous quote referred to the Civil War that ravaged the United States at the time, but his historically renowned words can apply very well to the blockchain community today. 

For DeFi to reach its maximum potential, as a decentralized ecosystem that doesn’t answer to a central authority, blockchain platforms must stand united and interoperate. Could anyone imagine if payment transfers between regular banks were not possible? How could an economy function? This is the sort of technical problem plaguing the DeFi world: Each blockchain platform has its own benefits, but each remains largely separated from the others in its own silo. The root of the problem is attitude, the other part is technical limitations.

Related: 15 Crazy and Surprising Ways People Are Using Blockchain

Ethereum and EOS are primary examples of this sort of rivalry, both of which have their own technical benefits for dApp developers. If the two ecosystems could be connected to one another, EOS-based and Ethereum-based developers alike, for example, could benefit from each other’s platform’s strengths. Users could also benefit, via financial opportunities without having to sacrifice shifting their base from one blockchain to another.

This is precisely what LiquidApps’s latest development—its DAPP Network bridging—has solved. LiquidApps’s technology provides the technical mechanisms to connect separate blockchain mainnets and recently provided its tools to EOS-based developers to successfully deploy a bridge between EOS and Ethereum.

This was shortly followed by decentralized social media app Yup’s deployment that demonstrated the possibility of moving tokens easily between different once-separate blockchain mainnets. It still remains to be seen how long it will take before blockchain platforms themselves integrate built-in cross-chain technologies, but LiquidApps is starting the next crucial step to DeFi development.

Whether it’s cross-chain technology or the e-wallets that grant access to dApps, tech developments and attitudes in the DeFi space over the next few years will determine its success. The latest developments suggest the future of DeFi looks promising. Time to go decentralized.

By: Ariel Shapira Entrepreneur Leadership Network Contributor

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Paris Fintech Forum

by O. Bussmann, CEO, Bussmann Advisory (CH) Speakers *M. Froehler, CEO, Morpher (AT) *H. Gebbing, Managing Director, Finoa (DE) *U. Shtybel, Vice president, HighCastle (UK) *N. Filali, Head of Blockchain Program, Caisse des Dépôts (FR) more on http://www.parisfintechforum.com/videos2020

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Start trading Bitcoin and cryptocurrency here: http://bit.ly/2Vptr2X DeFi applications – https://defipulse.com/defi-list/ DeFi is becoming more and more popular as the main use case for cryptocurrencies. This video explains in detail what DeFi is and what you should know about before getting involved. 0:38 Bitcoin and Our Financial System 1:24 Our Centralized Financial System 1:59 What is DeFi? 2:22 DeFi Components 4:16 – DAI explained 5:51 – DEXs explained 6:33 – Decentralized money markets 8:06 Money Legos 8:56 DeFi Advantages and Risks 10:02 Conclusion For the complete text guide visit: https://bit.ly/2R35g6Z Join our 7-day Bitcoin crash course absolutely free: http://bit.ly/2pB4X5B Learn ANYTHING about Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies on our YouTube channel: http://bit.ly/2BVbxeF Get the latest news and prices on your phone: iOS – https://apple.co/2yf02LJ Android – http://bit.ly/2NrMVw2

Your Financial Year-End Checklist

2020 is over, and for many of you, it can’t end soon enough. There will be plenty of time to celebrate the end of one year and to hope for better days in the one ahead. But before we get to that, take these steps to get financially ready for 2021.

1) Review your goals: The end of the year is a great time to review the goals you made at the beginning of the year and set new ones for 2021. How did you do this year? Is there anything you’re proud of accomplishing? I like to start with bright spots because they can guide you toward success as you set new goals. But let’s be realistic, too; 2020 threw us a lot of curveballs.

Was there anything you wish you could have done better? You can also learn from any potential stumbling blocks and figure out how to use them as stepping-stones next year. You may also want to take time now to review your net worth. That’s one way to gauge the progress you’ve made in your financial health this year.

2) Update your budget: Did you save the money that you wanted to? Pay off the debt that you needed to? The end of the year gives you a solid end point to assess whether met the goals you set at the outset of 2020. What if you didn’t have a budget or financial goals? You’ve got a blank slate ahead. Why not create a budget that works? 

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3) Create a holiday bucket: Holidays can be budget breakers, so why not incorporate them into your spending goals right from the start? Christmas may look a lot different this year. But you can still create a separate bucket for holiday spending and when that money is gone, stop spending. You’ll thank yourself in January when you don’t have an unusually large credit card bill.

4) Use it or lose it: Some of your benefits—like vacation days or a medical or dependent care flexible spending account (FSA)—expire at the end of the year. Take stock of what you have left and use these benefits to your advantage. MORE FOR YOUPPP Loan Forgiveness Application Guidance For The Self-Employed, Freelancers And ContractorsSBA Approving Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs): What You Need To KnowWhat You Can Do Now To Maximize Paycheck Protection Loan Forgiveness

5) Make any last charitable contributions: December 31st is the last day your charitable contributions can be deducted on your 2020 tax return. If giving to charity is a part of your spending plan, you can use these questions to help make the most of your charitable giving.

6) Pump up your 529: Just like charitable contributions, contributions to your 529 college savings plan must be made by December 31st to count for this tax year. Find out if your state is one of over 30 that allow you to deduct your contribution. You can find the specific deduction here. If your state is one of the four that allow an unlimited deduction, keep in mind the yearly gift-tax and super-funding rules.

7) Max out your 401k: While you have until April to make contributions to your traditional IRA, Roth IRA and HSA, you can only contribute to your 401k through December 31st. So, if you have extra cash and are looking to boost your savings, consider contributing your last couple of checks entirely to your 401k. Business owners can do the same with the employee portion of your Solo 401k contributions.

8) Find your tax return: You’ll be doing your taxes before you know it, so use this time to get prepared. Review last year’s return and make a mental list of records you’ll need to assemble. Year-end is also a good time to decide whether a Roth conversion makes sense for you.

9) Review your business structure: Evaluate your business structure and the QBI deduction to identify any changes you need to make to your business. You might want to set up a solo 401k, for instance, and if so, you’ll have to act before December 31st (although you can make employer/profit sharing contributions up to the business tax filing deadline).

10) Defer income and incur expenses: If you’re a business owner, you may also want to look at ways to defer income into 2021 or pay for business expenses you anticipate for early next year. This is any easy way to reduce your tax liability for 2020. However, remember not to spend money on business expenses that you wouldn’t otherwise incur just for a tax deduction. Spending a $1 to save 24 cents still costs you 76 cents.

 11) Will and trust review: The end of the year is a good time to take stock of changes in your life—like getting married or divorced, having children, starting a business or retiring.  Your estate plan should reflect these changes. Get out your will, documentation for trusts you’ve established and powers of attorney and make sure they match your current situation.

12) Insurance documents: Insurance documents also need to cover your current situation. Take a look at your life and disability insurance policies to make sure they protect your current income and those dependent on it. Your renters or homeowners insurance should cover any additional big purchases you made during the year. And lastly, you should review your health insurance policy for any upcoming changes for 2020. For those of you enrolling in the Market Place, you have until December 15th to pick your plan.

genesis-2-1

My last bonus task is to enjoy this holiday season. I love the holidays because you can reflect and appreciate what you have. We’ve been tested a lot this year, living our lives through a pandemic, racial unrest and a contentious election. I hope the end of the year brings you comfort and peace. Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website

Brian Thompson

Brian Thompson

As both a tax attorney and a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, I provide comprehensive financial planning to LGBTQ entrepreneurs who run mission-driven businesses. I hold a special place in my heart for small-business owners. I spent a decade defending them against the IRS as a tax attorney and have become one as a financial advisor. It’s a position filled with hope and opportunity. It gives you the most flexibility to create the life that you want. I also understand the added stresses of running a business while being a person of color and a part of the LGBTQ community. You may feel like you don’t have access to the knowledge that others do. I’m here to help lift some of that weight from your shoulders.

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Critics:

A personal budget or home budget is a finance plan that allocates future personal income towards expenses, savings and debt repayment. Past spending and personal debt are considered when creating a personal budget. There are several methods and tools available for creating, using and adjusting a personal budget. For example, jobs are an income source, while bills and rent payments are expenses.

Contents

The Interest Rate Volatility And Inflation Hedge ETF: An Interview With Fund Manager Nancy Davis

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Nancy Davis founded Quadratic Capital Management in 2013 and manages the portfolio for the firm’s Interest Rate Volatility and Inflation Hedge Exchange Traded Fund. Forbes Senior Contributor William Baldwin outlined her career and the establishment of this novel ETF in this September, 2019 article.

After the extraordinary volatility of all markets in March of this year, I wanted to follow up with Quadratic and see how the fund with volatility in its very name had managed those historic few weeks. Nancy agreed to answer a few questions and here’s how it went:

John Navin: What’s stagflation? Why should investors be concerned now?

Nancy Davis: Stagflation is an economic condition in which slow economic growth (or even contraction) occurs simultaneously with rising prices. I’m sure there’s a better definition but that’s pretty close.

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Stagflation is a disastrous outcome for investors. Higher prices coupled with lower growth is a potentially terrible environment to generate positive real returns. With the virus curtailing economic activity while simultaneously disrupting and altering supply chains around the world, we could see prices for many goods rise even as the economy slows.

Policy changes that result in reductions of international trade or immigration could also be catalysts for stagflation.Investors might hope that a large bond portfolio would provide some protection in this stagflation environment, but stagflation could be difficult for holders of fixed income instruments.

Bonds could be just as likely to sell off as equities, foiling the popular “risk parity” strategy.

Quadratic Interest Rate Volatility And Inflation Hedge ETF daily price chart:

Navin: With oil prices in deflationary mode, how might inflation arise anyway?

Davis: The decrease in oil prices create a onetime deflationary shock. It is not recurring. We may see rising prices in other parts of the economy as supply chains are disrupted. Rising food prices are one example that come to mind. I’ve read about potential shortages of meat and dairy products, for example.

An economist would say that a reduction in supply should lead to a rise in the market-clearing price. Trade tensions and economic policies that prioritize national self-sufficiency could also contribute to inflationary pressure. I’m not making a prediction on inflation.

Our products don’t need a hyper inflationary environment to perform well. I believe we are among the top 5% of all ETFs in performance year to date and there’s not a lot of inflation right now.

Quadratic Interest Rate Volatility And Inflation Hedge ETF weekly price chart:

Navin: Without giving away secrets or getting too technical, how do you construct an ETF for stagflation?

Davis: In a period of stagflation, one could expect increased volatility, rising prices and higher inflation expectations. IVOL’s TIPS and options might do well in stagflation if the interest rate curve is likely to steepen and volatility increases in such an environment. We certainly do not hope for a stagflation scenario in the US, but, under such an interest rate scenario as described, IVOL’s portfolio may help.

Navin: What’s the market for your ETF? ? Mutual funds? Ordinary investors?

Davis: We have a diverse group of investors in IVOL. We have seen other fund managers use the fund.

IVOL is also an ESG fixed income fund. The ETF is an inflation protected bond strategy that is innovative and unique. We embody democratization of financial markets by providing access to inflation expectations for our shareholders.

TIPS only give you the CPI basket – it’s today’s inflation basket per the US government. Whereas IVOL gives you CPI with TIPS and the enhancement with inflation expectations given that the yield curve is largely a result of investor’s expectations for inflation in the future.

Also IVOL maybe a potentially attractive addition to a portfolio looking for diversification during a time when many other holdings may have behaved very similarly.

Navin: Average daily volume of your ETF is 47,000 shares. This is relatively low. What are your plans, if any, for increasing liquidity?

Davis: The secondary market liquidity is an important number to watch, but it does not properly reflect the underlying liquidity of the ETF. As the fund grows, I expect the secondary market liquidity to improve over time.

Institutional investors can achieve ample liquidity in IVOL. One can access massive liquidity by using the primary markets in ETFs. It is called “NAV based creates” or “NAV based redeems” for buys and sells respectively. That way investors execute their order in the primary market at the NAV (similar to a mutual fund).

I have been in the industry since 1998 but was not aware of this “technology” for trading until I learned about ETFs. And keep in mind that the fund is less than a year old.

Navin: Your ETF experienced the volatility that hit all markets in March. What’s different about “interest rate volatility?”

Davis: We have long been advocates for owning volatility, but IVOL is not a standard “long vol” product. An investor who is convinced of the benefits of owning volatility still has other decisions to make. Market commentators (and even sophisticated investors) often lump all long volatility into the same bucket. IVOL is one of the few ETFs available today that use interest rate volatility instead of equity volatility.

Equity volatility is generally limited only to options on US equities.One of the major drawbacks of any option is the negative carry. All options suffer from time decay and decline in value as time passes, all else being equal. But interest rate options have one factor that makes them different from equity options: the concept of rate roll down.

In the interest rate market, the forward rate can be significantly different from the spot rate. In the case of the options held by IVOL, whenever the interest rate curve is upward sloping, then the rates roll down could be positive and might improve the carry of the options.

This means that under these market conditions, the interest rate options owned by IVOL could have their negative time decay mitigated partially or completely by the roll down in the interest rate curve.

Of course, the inverse would also be true: if the curve is downward sloping, then the rates roll up would be an additional hurdle for the options. Historically, the curve has had a positive slope most of the time, making the positive roll down more frequent than the negative roll up.

Navin: A classic inflation hedge has been gold. Why might your ETF be an improvement over the barbarous relic?

Davis: No one gets paid coupons or dividends to own gold. It actually has storage costs which are a drag on the long run performance. This is probably OK when interest rates are very low, like now. But I would rather own things that don’t cost me money to own them. I don’t want to predict the future and anything could happen, so it is always advisable to have a diversified portfolio. Gold could be a piece of a portfolio.

I do not hold positions in these investments. No recommendations are made one way or the other.  If you’re an investor, you’d want to look much deeper into each of these situations. You can lose money trading or investing in stocks and other instruments. Always do your own independent research, due diligence and seek professional advice from a licensed investment advisor.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn.

My Marketocracy work is profiled in The Warren Buffetts Next Door: The World’s Greatest Investors You’ve Never Heard Of by Forbes Investments Editor Matt Schifrin. I’m a graduate of the University of North Carolina.

Source: https://forbes.com

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Stagflation is an economic condition with persistent high inflation combined with high unemployment and relatively stagnant demand for products. ————————————————————— Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Dictionary of Economics Course: http://bit.ly/2t8PNGR Additional practice questions: http://bit.ly/2JPjeby Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2M2VVHP Help translate this video: http://bit.ly/2t8aqmK

The Stock Market Is In Free Fall On Coronavirus Fears. How Much Worse Will It Get?

Topline: The U.S. stock market has officially plunged into correction territory—at the fastest rate ever recorded, suffering its worst losses since the 2008 financial crisis this week amid ongoing panic over the spreading coronavirus and its impact on the global economy.

  • This week alone, the Dow Jones industrial average fell a total of 14%, the S&P 500 by 13% and the Nasdaq Composite by 12.3%.
  • The Dow plummeted nearly 1,200 points on Thursday—its biggest one-day drop ever, thanks to the coronavirus, which has now spread to at least 49 countries in a matter of weeks. Those losses continued on Friday, though the drop was somewhat less severe: The Dow fell 1.4%, while the S&P 500 sank 0.8%.
  • In a statement to reassure anxious investors, the Federal Reserve said on Friday that it was monitoring the “evolving risks to economic activity” posed by the coronavirus and further pledged to “act as appropriate” to keep the U.S. economy stable.
  • Some experts are skeptical any action from the central bank can stem market fallout from the coronavirus; Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic advisor for Allianz, told CNBC on Thursday that “markets will start freezing up even if the Fed cuts rates, which I think they will.”
  • National Economic Council director Larry Kudlow on Tuesday told CNBC that the virus is unlikely to become a full-fledged economic crisis, and described this week’s sell-off as a good buying opportunity. That same day, however, the CDC warned that the American public should brace for major disruptions from the coronavirus.
  • Among the stocks that have been hard hit this week are Apple (which is now flirting with bear market territory after falling 20% off its record highs) and American Airlines, which fell more than 25% this week.

Tangent: Hundreds of companies, from Apple and Nike to Starbucks and Microsoft, have issued warnings that the coronavirus will impact financial results for the first quarter and beyond. In a note on Wednesday, investment banking giant Goldman Sachs revised down its estimate for U.S. corporate earnings in 2020, forecasting 0% earnings growth for 2020 as a result of the outbreak.

Chief critic: “Markets are much too negative on the coronavirus. . . . The market was too expensive earlier in the year, but the coronavirus panic is overdone,” says Vital Knowledge founder Adam Crisfaulli. He points out that though the economic and corporate earnings fallout from the coronavirus will be severe, economic activity in China is normalizing, and that should help the bulk of the fallout remain confined to the first quarter.

Crucial quotes: “The global stock sell-off is showing no signs of slowing down,” says Edward Moya, senior market analyst at Oanda. He predicts the major indexes could “easily” enter bear market territory, though “expectations are still pretty high that the market will eventually snap back.”

“It has been a brutal week,” says Mark Freeman, chief investment officer at Socorro Asset Management. He expects a further sell-off next week, as investors wait to see how the situation evolves and how the Fed will respond, but says that “it is too early for the Covid-19 crisis to have a material impact on [U.S. economic] data.”

“This week reminded many investors of 2008, which isn’t a happy memory,” says Ryan Detrick, senior market strategist for LPL Financial. “Nonetheless, remember that the overall economic backdrop is still healthy in the U.S., but when fear grips, that doesn’t matter.”

“The impact to the economy will be severe, but not enough to create a recession (e.g., two consecutive quarters of negative growth),” says Chris Zaccarelli, chief investment officer for Independent Advisor Alliance. “It is the uncertainty that is most difficult to price in, so people are selling in the advance of concrete information.”

Crucial statistic: The benchmark U.S. ten-year Treasury yield hit a new bottom on Friday, falling below 1.12%.

Key background: Stock market losses accelerated after the CDC confirmed the first case of “community transmission” of the coronavirus in Sacramento, California. Globally, more than 83,700 people have been infected as of Friday, with more than 2,800 dead. Earlier this week, Italy, South Korea and Iran emerged as new coronavirus hot spots outside of China, causing further concern that the outbreak will spread to other major economies. The World Health Organization said on Friday that the virus now poses a “very high” risk at a global level.

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I am a New York—based reporter for Forbes covering breaking news, with a focus on financial topics. Previously, I wrote about investing for Money Magazine and was an intern at Forbes in 2015 and 2016. I graduated from the University of St Andrews in 2018, majoring in International Relations and Modern History. Follow me on Twitter @skleb1234 or email me at sklebnikov@forbes.com

Source: The Stock Market Is In Free Fall On Coronavirus Fears. How Much Worse Will It Get?

Investors are on the retreat world-wide as fears of the coronavirus deepen. Supply chains are starting to falter and tourists are staying home. The virus is also sparking the sell-off of pandemic bonds. As the business community struggles to predict the coronavirus’ economic fallout, observers warn the virus could be the final blow that throws the world economy into recession. The Dow Jones had its worst one day point drop in history, tumbling almost 4 and a half percent. That sentiment spilled over to Asia with Tokyo’s Nikkei shedding 3 point 6 percent today. And Hong Kong’s Hang Seng also closed down 2 point 4 percent. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/deutsche… For more news go to: http://www.dw.com/en/ Follow DW on social media: ►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/deutschewell… ►Twitter: https://twitter.com/dwnews ►Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dw_stories/ Für Videos in deutscher Sprache besuchen Sie: https://www.youtube.com/channel/deuts… #Coronavirus #dwNews

Financial Advisors: Here’s How Market Volatility Impacts Investor Psychology

Market volatility is a stressful reality for any investor. But when market turbulence strikes, financial advisors are in a unique position to help their clients anticipate and manage their anxiety around money. All it takes is understanding a little psychology.

And while it’s true that stock markets have improved since the recession in 2008, surveys show that investors and financial advisors still expect volatility to return throughout the next few cycles.

In fact, according to the Eaton Vance Spring 2019 ATOMIX survey, financial advisors consider managing their clients’ relationship to volatility to be one of their major concerns this year.

So what is an advisor to do? To better understand how a client might react to a volatile trend, it might help to think about their deep-rooted feelings about money and how they view their personal control of events.

Research shows that the wealthiest investors — those who make up the richest “one percent” — have a different relationship to investments than the less wealthy: They have what’s known as a heightened internal locus of control.

For the most part, humans either think that they’re in charge of what happens in their life, or they believe that life happens to them (those who believe they’re in control of their life and its outcomes have an internal locus of control).

Having an internal locus of control is associated with higher wealth, and because these people are more likely to take responsibility for the outcomes in their life, the top one-percenters are also more likely to believe in their own abilities to solve problems and achieve goals, make better investment decisions and react more calmly when volatility strikes.

Having an external locus, however, is associated with self-destructive financial behaviors.

Financial advisors can help clients move to a more centered approach by asking thoughtful questions about past financial decisions, and can assist in determining where a client’s locus of control lies.

Dr. Brad T. Klontz, an associate professor of practice in financial psychology at Creighton University Heider College of Business and the cofounder of the Financial Psychology Institute, uses what he calls “money scripts” to help understand investor behavior.

Money scripts are unconscious beliefs about money, which are developed in childhood, and drive financial behaviors as adults. Klontz considers there to be four groups: money avoidance, money status, money worship and money vigilance — and the first three are associated with lower levels of net worth, lower income and higher amounts of revolving credit.

Klontz offers questions that you can ask to determine a client’s unique script makeup.

What’s also encouraging is that, while volatility can be stressful for any investor, recent research shows that volatility can indeed lead to increased adaptability. Yale researchers found that primate brains are more actively learning when a situation is unpredictable than when the situation is easier to predict. This suggests that our brains become more engaged when facing a high-risk-high-return situation, because this is when we absorb new information and adapt for future outcomes with preferred results.

Watch our video above to see how you can leverage your clients’ psychological background to inform and build an investment strategy to help meet their goals.

From iShares:

Championing investor progress has been at the heart of BlackRock iShares’ mission from the very beginning, relentlessly pursuing better ways to invest. That’s why iShares by BlackRock is bringing you Macro Mindset, a series that equips financial advisors with psychological knowledge to enlighten their clients about the myriad factors that come into play when in tricky investment situations. To learn more about why ETFs should be considered in building a strong strategy, visit iShares.com.

Important information about iShares ETFs:

Visit www.ishares.com to view a prospectus, which includes investment objectives, risks, fees, expenses and other information that you should read and consider carefully before investing. Investing involves risk, including possible loss of principal.

Investing involves risk, including possible loss of principal.

Diversification and asset allocation may not protect against market risk or loss of principal.

This information should not be relied upon as research, investment advice, or a recommendation regarding any products, strategies, or any security in particular. This material is strictly for illustrative, educational, or informational purposes and is subject to change.

The iShares Funds are distributed by BlackRock Investments, LLC (together with its affiliates, “BlackRock”).

Source: Financial Advisors: Here’s How Market Volatility Impacts Investor Psychology

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What is Volatility? -The magnitude of the change -It is independent of direction, it refers to the change of ups and downs Why is it Important? -The more volatile the market is, the crazier it gets -Trends are harder to spot when they are more volatile -Swing trading becomes riskier -It is better to stick to day trading during high volatility days or months because you want to lower your risk on those days What to do on High Volatility Days: -Inverse ETFs (e.g. BGZ, SKF, TZA, FAZ) -They are opposite of the market -They are more stable than one specific stock. -Can trade off of 15 minute or 5 minutes charts (day trading charts) #marketvolatility #tradingvolatiledays #volatiledays #understandmarket #stockmarket Posted at: https://tradersfly.com/blog/understan… 🔥 GET MY FREEBIES https://tradersfly.com/go/freebies/ 🎤 SUBMIT A VOICE QUESTION https://tradersfly.com/go/ask 👀 START HERE: FOR NEW TRADERS https://tradersfly.com/go/start/ 🎉 START HERE: OPTION TRADERS https://tradersfly.com/go/start-options/ 📈 MY CHARTING TOOLS + BROKERS https://tradersfly.com/go/tools/ 💻 MY COMPUTER EQUIPMENT https://backstageincome.com/go/comput… 💌 GET THE NEWSLETTER https://tradersfly.com/go/tube/ 🔒 SEE OUR MEMBERSHIP PLANS https://tradersfly.com/go/members/ 📺 STOCK TRADING COURSES https://tradersfly.com/go/courses/ 📚 STOCK TRADING BOOKS: https://tradersfly.com/go/books/ ⚽ GET PRIVATE COACHING https://tradersfly.com/go/coaching/ 🌐 WEBSITES: https://tradersfly.com https://rise2learn.com https://backstageincome.com https://mylittlenestegg.com https://sashaevdakov.com 💌 SOCIAL MEDIA: https://tradersfly.com/go/twitter/ https://tradersfly.com/go/facebook/ ⚡ SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL https://tradersfly.com/go/sub/ 💖 MY YOUTUBE CHANNELS: TradersFly: https://backstageincome.com/go/youtub… BackstageIncome: https://backstageincome.com/go/youtub… 📑 ABOUT TRADERSFLY TradersFly is a place where I enjoy sharing my knowledge and experience about the stock market, trading, and investing. Stock trading can be a brutal industry, especially if you are new. Watch my free educational training videos to avoid making big mistakes and just to continue to get better. Stock trading and investing is a long journey – it doesn’t happen overnight. If you are interested to share some insight or contribute to the community we’d love to have you subscribe and join us!
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