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Tradition And Innovation Are On The Menus of San José, Costa Rica

The gastronomy of Costa Rica does not differ radically from other countries’ in Central America, with rice, beans, corn, pork and seafood always playing major parts. But the internationalism of its capital, San José, means you’ll find both typical and refined versions of favorite dishes, along with upscale restaurantes and places committed to the most ancient culinary traditions of the indigenous people, whose numbers continue to dwindle. Here is a range of places I ate at with pleasure on a recent trip. (And if you’re dying for Chinese food, there’s a four-block Chinatown in the city.)

MERCADO CENTRAL

Between Calle 8 y Avenida 1 Entrada Noroeste

Today In: Lifestyle

The best way to get a crash course in Costa Rican food culture is to visit the vast Central Market, where you’ll find every kind of fruit, vegetable, seafood, meat and condiment for very little money. There are tiny stalls where women are making fresh tortillas, but the principal eateries —called sodas, dating back to when soda was the principal item sold—are just inside the entrance where scores of people jockey for a table, ordering their favorite dishes and watching the cooks do their magic from compact kitchens.  The menus at these sodas are all pretty much the same and very traditional. At Soda Cristal I stuffed myself at lunch with a rich soup of mixed meats and vegetables with a huge platter of rice; tender boiled chicken with French fries; and lengua (tongue) tortillas. I then walked over to the bustling La Sorbetera de Lolo Mora, the city’s oldest ice cream shop (1901), for some wonderful vanilla-cinnamon ice cream—the only flavor they sell.

 

A meal will cost about $10-$15, plus drinks.

only flavor they sell.

 

LA POSADA DE LA BRUJAS

400 Este de la Municipal de Escazu

2228-1645

This open air “place of the witch” is packed every day of the year, largely with locals who might happily wait an hour outside, sipping Pilsen beer and getting hungrier by the minute. The night I ate there a table of 20 Chinese tourists were trying to make sense of a menu in Spanish with 79 small bites and soups and 29 main courses.  My local friend ordered patacones (fried green plantains) stuffed with black beans, shredded beef, cheese and mayo (Costa Ricans use a lot of mayo); a platter of huge barbecued ribs with cassava; very tender oxtail with tomato sauce; and a delicious tripe soup.  Nobody rushes you, but tables turn fast.

A meal will costs about $20-$25, plus drinks.

SIKWA

Avenida 1 Calle 33, 100 Norte del Antiguo Bagelmens

506-8499-0585

 

Located in the East Side’s Barrio Escalante, one of the city’s nightlife neighborhoods with bocastapas bars and restaurantes on every corner, Sikwa would be unique anywhere in Central America for its fervid commitment by owners Diego Hernandez and Pablo Bonilla to serve the food of the indigenous people of Costa Roca (the menu changes every three months), based on the sacred traditions of four strains of corn. It is a small, rustic place with a counter up front, wooden tables and a brighter room to the rear.

 

My meal was truly like an expedition through an ancient food culture, beginning with an infusion of orange, lemon, wild cinnamon and guava intended to “balance mind, body and spirit.” Then came a wide swathe of fascinating dishes: a chica infusion of corn, ginger and sugar cane fermented for three days; a corn husk with garlic, cilantro and cheese;  a posole with smoked pork, radish and tomato sauce (I noted that hogs were brought by the Spanish to the Americas); sweet corn tamale with pork and onions in vinegar, and an ice cream of smoked plantain with cacao truffles.

Sikwa deserves the attention it has received from the media and is a terrific way to get a sense of the very old done in a very novel way.

A big meal will cost about $15-$29.

 

TONY’S HOUSE 

Calle 4 y Avenida 2

Ciudad Colon, Costa Rica

506 8836 7074

I can’t imagine there are many places like Tony’s House in San José. The Tony in question is Antonio Aguillar Solis, who, along with his sister Melissa, operates this tiny eatery in the backyard of their house, where Tony also fashions extraordinary folk mannequins for parades and social events.

 

The Solises are very sweet hosts, and Melissa makes everything from scratch right in front of you, measuring the ingredients by experienced eye, building textures and flavors and serving them straight from the stove. There was a picadillo of beef broth to which she added bananas, then onions, cilantro and bell peppers, and annatto paste. Then she cooked a perfect omelet using eggs from their own hens, with cilantro and onions, together with steaming rice and beans, homemade tortillas with queso blanco and a rich sour cream-like mayonnaise.  Tony’s is BYOB, but they offer a delicious sour guava drink that goes perfectly with this food.

You may telephone at the number above, or better, have hotel concierge arrange a reservation, for two to 20 people.

A meal will cost about $20.

RESTAURANTE GRANO DE ORO

Calle 30 Avenid

855-875-49030

Though 33 years old, a re-opening in 2013 of the Hotel Grano de Oro has made it one of the top places to stay in San José, very contemporary in its amenities but also with public and private rooms—some very grand indeed; mine had a little patio—done with a carefully refined traditional look. The pretty, leafy outdoor patio, where guests have breakfast under umbrellas, is as peaceful an oasis as any in this fast-paced city. The handsome, hacienda-like restaurante that surrounds the patio is elegantly set with white tablecloths, signature china and soft lighting, and the menu incorporates Costa Rican dishes with modern culinary techniques and presentations. The international wine list is the most extensive in the city.

 

We began with the house cocktail, a tico sour of white rum and lime, and a first course of sweet palm fruit soup ($6.50) and an extensive plate of housemade  charcuterie with rabbit rillettes, sausages, head cheese and smoked ham ($15.50). There are four pasta dishes, including delicious tender ravioli filled with mozzarella and ricotta, accompanied by ratatouille and verdant herb oil ($13). Costa Rican roasted pork tenderloin ($18.25) came with a yucca croquette, mango chutney and a sweet-sour tamarind sauce. Sample an array of seafood on a plate that includes sautéed sea bass, jumbo prawn, wilted spinach and an aromatic cardomon essence ($22).  Desserts include a luscious signature pie of coffee cream and chocolate cookie crust ($6.69).

By the way, a portion of the restaurant’s profits goes to support Casa Luz, a home for poor or abused adolescent women and their children.

 

SILVESTRE

Ave. 11 Calle 3A – 955

506 2221 2465

 

Sylvestre, now two years old, purports to serve “cocina sotarecense contemporane,” and in its artful look and use of global ingredients along with traditional spices delivers on that idea, based on Chef Fernandez Benedetto’s experience cooking in Dubai, Australia and Spain.

Downstairs is a cantina that plays movies against the wall; upstairs is a lovely, formal room with red brocade wallpaper, and a more casual one with some folkloric furniture and low lighting.

To get a good sense of Benedetto’s range, go with the  ambitious tasting menus (three courses $36, six courses $50), available with individual wine pairings (though the pours are stingy). I began with an amuse of pejibaye palm chips with mayonnaise, then two starters: an empanada of goat’s cheese and spinach with an egg yolk relish, daikon, grilled asparagus and watercress salad; and house-smoked bacon with noodles. The fish course was a fillet of snook baked in hoja santo leaves, with a hearts of palm puree, roasted green peppers, mussel blanquettes and cassava crisp. The meat course was a fine, slow-roasted shoulder of lamb scented with fennel and served with a mint salad, new potatoes and light mustard sauce.

For dessert there was a superb osa tart made from “primitivo” chocolate beans from Talamanca, guava, caramelized corn and cashew nut butter.  With this I thought the only thing to do was  a 25-year-old Costa Rican Centenario rum.

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John Mariani is an author and journalist of 40 years standing, and an author of 15 books. He has been called by the Philadelphia Inquirer, “the most influential food-wine critic in the popular press” and is a three-time nominee for the James Beard Journalism Award. For 35 years he was Esquire Magazine’s food & travel correspondent and wine columnist for Bloomberg News for ten. His Encyclopedia of American Food & Drink was hailed as the “American Larousse Gastronomique” His next book, “America Eats Out” won the International Association of Cooking Professionals Award for Best Food Reference Book. His “How Italian Food Conquered the World” won the Gourmand World Cookbooks Award for the USA 2011, and the Italian Cuisine Worldwide Award 2012. He co-authored “Menu Design in America: 1850-1985” and wrote the food sections for the Encyclopedia of New York City. In 1994 the City of New Orleans conferred on him the title of Honorary Citizen and in 2003 he was given the Philadelphia Toque Award “for exceptional achievements in culinary writing and accomplishments.”

Source: Tradition And Innovation Are On The Menus of San José, Costa Rica

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A variety of street food dishes on friendly Central Street Food Market in San José in Costa Rica. Seafood, cheese tortillas, Gallo Pinto, Ceviche, fruit shakes – you name it.

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Pizza Hut Goes Green With ‘Incogmeato’ Sausage, Eco-Friendly Box

Pizza Hut is teaming up with Kellogg’s MorningStar Farms brand to test pizza lovers’ reaction to the brand’s new, plant-based Italian-style “sausage” called Incogmeato.

Starting Wednesday, October 23, the fast-food chain will sell the Incogmeato on its Garden Specialty Pizza for a limited time—at a single store location in Phoenix, Arizona.

“Incogmeato is a new-to-the-world brand created to challenge convention on delicious plant based food,” said Kellogg Away from Home President Wendy Davidson in a statement, as reported by Yahoo Finance. “Pizza Hut is the innovation leader in its category and we are excited to partner with them to develop a tasty, first-ever plant-based pizza to satisfy what flexitarians are seeking today.”

Pizza Hut is also cutting back on waste by using a smaller, rounder pizza box. The innovation came out of a partnership with Zume, a pizza delivery company that aims to implement sustainable practices in the food industry. The box is also compostable, according to Market Watch.

In addition to going green, the new design promises a better dining experience, Yahoo Finance noted.

“This revolutionary round box—the result of a two-year journey—is the most innovative packaging we’ve rolled out to date,” Pizza Hut Chief Customer and Operations Officer Nicolas Burquier said in a statement. “The round box was engineered to make our products taste even better—by delivering hotter, crispier pizzas. This box is a win, win—it will improve the pizza-eating experience for our customers and simplify the operating experience for our team members.”

According to The Verge, pizza boxes’ traditional square shape is due to lower production costs (they can be made from a single sheet of folded cardboard). Inventors have previously attempted to win the public over to round boxes—such as John Harvey’s 2004 creation, the “Presseal” and a design patented by Apple—without much success so far.

Pizza Hut now joins the growing list of other fast-food giants looking to go green. As CNN Business reported, Dunkin’ will be unveiling its Beyond Meat breakfast sandwich across the country in November after a successful product test in New York City. Burger King announced that it would make its Impossible Whopper available nationally after just one month of testing. The outlet also reported that plant-based food sales in the U.S. have increased 11 percent in the last year, according to a study by the Plant Based Foods Association and the Good Food Institute.

That study further concluded that plant-based food sales grew 31 percent between April 2017 and July 2019 while total food sales remained flat, leading Plant Based Foods Association senior director Julie Emmett to call them “a growth engine.” According to the association, the market for plant-based foods now tops $4.5 billion in the United States.

The limited-edition garden pizza with Incogmeato topping and round box will sell for $10. All proceeds will go to Arizona Forward, a Phoenix-based sustainability nonprofit organization

By: 

Source: Pizza Hut Goes Green With ‘Incogmeato’ Sausage, Eco-Friendly Box

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Reported today on The Verge For the full article visit: http://bit.ly/2P9YkFf Global Tech News was built by the boffins at Boyd Digital – For creative traffic and sales generation give the Boyd Digital team a shout +44 141 332 0063 or visit us at https://www.boyddigital.co.uk Reported today in The Verge. Pizza Hut is testing plant-based ‘Incogmeato’ sausage toppings and round boxes Pizza Hut is cautiously testing out the plant-based meat trend, starting with a new Garden Specialty Pizza that’s topped with MorningStar Farm’s “Incogmeato” Italian sausage, which will only available for a day in one Phoenix location. The pizza will also be served in a round pizza box, which is industrially compostable and interlocks with other boxes for stability. After the event, the company says it’ll look for more ways to roll out the box more widely in the future. The round box was developed in partnership with Zume, an automated pizza delivery startup with a focus in sustainable practices. Compared to a normal, square pizza box, the round box uses less overall packaging. “This revolutionary round box—the result of a two-year journey—is the most innovative packaging we’ve rolled out to date,” said Pizza Hut chief customer and operations officer Nicolas Burquier. “The round box was engineered to make our products taste even better—by delivering hotter, crispier pizzas.” Pizza boxes have always been square since it’s cheaper to produce, as they can be made from a single sheet of cardboard. But that hasn’t stopped people from trying to innovate. In 2004, an inventor named John Harvey created a round pizza box called the Presseal, which never quite caught on. And in 2010, Apple patented a round pizza box, which has been used in its employee cafeteria since. Fast food companies like Burger King and KFC have been working with startups like Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods to roll out fake meat versions of popular menu items, like the Beyond Fried Chicken and Impossible Whopper. Pizza Hut’s Garden Specialty Pizza uses MorningStar Farms’ Incogmeato Italian sausage, which parent company Kellogg launched just last month. Made from non-GMO soy, it too, bleeds like real meat like its competitors’ products. If you’re interested in trying out the limited-edition Incogmeato pizza, you can head over to the Phoenix Pizza Hut at 3602 E. Thomas Rd. on October 23rd at 11AM MT. The Garden Specialty Pizza and round pizza box will cost $10, and all proceeds will go to Arizona Forward, a Phoenix-based sustainability nonprofit.

Popeyes Chicken Sandwich, Now A Sell-Out, Is A $65 Million Marketing Win

You couldn’t watch a television news program or scour Twitter or Facebook the past week without spotting some mention of Popeyes fried chicken sandwich. But how did that translate to marketing value?

Awfully well, as it turns out.

Apex Marketing Group estimated Wednesday that Popeyes reaped $65 million in equivalent media value as a result of the Chicken Sandwich Wars.

The firm, based outside Detroit, defines that as the price a company would have to pay to purchase the attention it received for free.

Apex takes into account television, radio, online and print news reports, as well as social media mentions.

The evaluation was conducted from Aug. 12, when the sandwich went on sale nationally, through Tuesday evening, yielding 15 days’ worth of data.

Today In: Consumer

The $65 million figure is nearly triple the $23 million in media value that the sandwich generated in its first few days on sale, according to an earlier Apex estimate.

On Tuesday, Popeyes announced that the chicken sandwich would be sold out by the end of the week at its U.S. restaurants.

But it says it is scurrying to bring back the chicken sandwich as a feature of its regular menu, not simply a limited-time offer.

“It is a permanent menu item,” Dana Schopp, a Popeyes spokesperson, said Wednesday.

Eric Smallwood, the president of Apex Marketing, says the chicken sandwich’s media value built relatively slowly in the days right after it went on sale.

The big jump in media value came when news outlets began running taste tests comparing the sandwich with other fast food companies’ chicken offerings.

That coincided with social media and news reports that Popeyes restaurants were running out of sandwiches.

The Chicken Sandwich Wars have been a godsend to Popeyes’ owners, Restaurant Brands International, in their effort to raise the chicken restaurants’ profile.

RBI bought Popeyes in 2017, and has been on a drive to expand Popeyes 3,000 outlets world wide. It recently announced a Popeyes push into China.

“Popeyes is not top of mind when it comes to fast food,” Smallwood said. But thanks to the chicken sandwich, “now everybody’s looking and asking, ‘Where’s the closest Popeyes?'”

The attention that Popeyes received could not have happened a decade ago without social media, Smallwood said.

As soon as a company launches a promotion that is noticed in Twitter, Facebook and Instagram, “it picks up, and it explodes from there,” he said.

Until Popeyes launched its sandwich, Chick-fil-A was considered the fast food industry gold standard in chicken sandwiches.

McDonald’s franchise holders recently pleaded with the company to give them a sandwich that could compete with Chick-fil-A’s offering.

Now, “Popeyes comes in and steals some of the glory,” he said.

Some Twitter users have criticized the company for running out of chicken sandwiches so fast. On Tuesday, Popeyes said that it had sold the allotment it expected to have through the end of September.

But Smallwood said that’s an acceptable excuse. “Running out of a supply is ideal economics,” he said.

Depending on how Popeyes handles the sandwich’s return, “there will be a boost” to its business, Smallwood predicts.

But he doesn’t think Popeyes should handle the sandwich any differently than it already has. “I don’t want to spoil their recipe,” he says.

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I’m an alumni of the New York Times and NPR. I learned to cook from my mom, and studied with Patricia Wells and at Le Cordon Bleu. E: vmaynard@umich.edu T: @mickimaynar

Source: Popeyes Chicken Sandwich, Now A Sell-Out, Is A $65 Million Marketing Win

When Popeyes launched its fried chicken sandwich on August 12, it got a lot of positive attention — the Twitter announcement got more than 31,000 likes, which is pretty impressive considering that their posts usually get less than 400. What the world didn’t know was that tragedy was soon to strike. Popeyes ran out of chicken sandwiches before the month was over. But what’s the real reason it disappeared? And when will the Popeyes chicken sandwich be available again, if ever? To find out, we have to go back to the beginning. For the longest time, Popeyes only sold chicken pieces and tenders, with no sandwiches on their menu. They have a loyal fan following nonetheless, including the late Anthony Bourdain, who is said to have once eaten at a Popeyes buffet for three days in a row. The Popeyes chicken sandwich, made with their signature crispy fried chicken on a spicy mayo-slathered brioche bun and topped with pickles, was bound to be a hit with fans, but it had a few competitors who wanted to make their presence known when the newcomer started getting attention. Chick-fil-A, a big name in the chicken sandwich game, was compelled to tweet out an equation alluding to the fact that they have the original chicken sandwich, stating: “Bun + Chicken + Pickles = all the [love] for the original.” Popeyes wasn’t having it, tweeting a simple “… y’all good?” in response. While Chick-fil-A’s tweet got more than 23,000 likes, the reply from Popeyes got almost 325,000. Round one goes to Popeyes. Wendy’s, with its notoriously on-point Twitter game, also tried to get in the fight, posting a tweet that said: “Y’all out here fighting about which of these fools has the second best chicken sandwich.” But once again Popeyes’ reply — “Sounds like someone just ate one of our biscuits. Cause y’all looking thirsty.” — got way more engagement from customers. The fast food chicken sandwich war has officially begun. It’s not just social media hype, either. The masses seem to agree that Popeyes chicken sandwich really is superior to Chick-fil-A’s chicken sandwich, calling it better and cheaper. CBS This Morning’s Gayle King, who called 15 different Popeyes locations trying to get her hands on one, said on her first bite, Even celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse gave his version of a five-star review. He posted on Twitter that he was about to try the Popeyes chicken sandwich, and when a fan asked what he thought of it, Lagasse replied with two explosion emojis, the picture version of his famous catchphrase. But not everyone managed to try one of the chicken sandwiches. Just 15 days after they launched, Popeyes made an announcement on Twitter, dashing the dreams of hopeful diners. “Y’all. We love that you love The Sandwich. Unfortunately we’re sold out (for now).” A Popeyes spokesperson told CBS why the sandwich sold out so quickly, explaining: “The demand for the new Chicken Sandwich in the first few weeks following its launch far exceeded our very optimistic expectations. In fact, Popeyes aggressively forecasted demand through the end of September and has already sold through that inventory.” The chain hasn’t said exactly when the Popeyes chicken sandwich is coming back, only that they, along with their suppliers, are quote, “working tirelessly to bring the new sandwich back to guests as soon as possible.” If you want to know the second it becomes available, you can download the Popeyes app and enable push notifications. You’ll get an alert as soon as the sandwich hits stores, so keep gas in your car and a go-bag by the door, because you never know when the call might come. And don’t worry — once the Popeyes chicken sandwich becomes available it won’t be disappearing again. According to a Popeyes spokesperson, the chicken sandwich is permanently on the menu. That’s great for fans of the chain, but the question remains: What are we going to do with ourselves while we wait for its return? Watch the video to find out the real reason Popeyes ran out chicken sandwiches! #Popeyes #Chicken #ChickenSandwich

Singapore’s Richest 2019: ‘Popiah King’ Outfits Factory Buildout For Meat Alternatives

At 70, Singapore’s “popiah king” Sam Goi still has his sights set on expanding his food and property empire. After earning his royal sobriquet—and his $2 billion fortune—making the paper-thin crepes used to wrap spring rolls known as popiah, he is now branching out. He wants to invest in meat substitutes and other special-diet foods, and play angel investor to food startups like the one he started in 1977, Tee Yih Jia Food.

More On Forbes: Singapore’s Richest 2019: At 101, The World’s Oldest Billionaire Has No Plans To Slow Down

Today In: Asia

Goi knows something about building a brand. Privately held Tee Yih Jia (TYJ) today exports Asian food items such as spring rolls, glutinous rice balls and samosas to more than 80 countries. It’s now in the process of doubling its production capacity with a new facility due for completion in 2021.

Goi’s Singapore-listed development company GSH, however, has hit a lull. After a S$75 million windfall in 2017 from its sale of private-equity unit Plaza Ventures, net profits dropped 93% in 2018 to S$6 million on a 9% decline in revenues. That’s pushed GSH’s shares down 13% in the past year, helping pull Goi’s fortune down by $100 million.

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Goi arrived in Singapore in 1955 when he was six years old with little but the shirt on his back after his family fled China’s Fujian province in a small boat. Goi dropped out of high school, but used his training in a repair shop to gain a toehold in the food industry.

With S$450,000 borrowed from a bank and his father, he bought an underperforming food company and overhauled it, increasing production from 3,200 popiah skins a day to 25,000. In 1980, he brought in technicians to design the world’s first automated system for making spring roll pastries at the blistering rate of 30 million a day. He then branched out, pumping out fortune cookies, flatbread and samosas.

More on Forbes: Singapore’s Richest 2019: Daryl Ng Takes His Family’s Sino Group Into The Future With 5G, AI

Goi returned to his hometown in Fujian in 1985 and built his first China factory there, later adding a frozen-food facility, a brewery and a vinegar plant in other parts of China. Goi also snapped up land in China’s second-tier cities long before China’s property boom. Most of Goi’s exposure to property, though, has come through GSH, where he now has a nearly 60% stake.

TYJ also has a subsidiary in Yangzhou focused on developing residential and commercial properties in surrounding Jiangsu province. But Goi’s plans for TYJ are more food-related. Goi’s daughter Laureen, who runs TYJ Food Manufacturing, has been building a state-of-the-art food factory nearly four times larger than the present one in Singapore, with the latest in automation, including driverless vehicles.

The new facility will also have a laboratory developing new products, and TYJ may even invest in and incubate promising food ventures, furthering Goi’s legacy as a foodstuff innovator.

Correction: the original version of this story incorrectly stated Goi’s late son Ben was involved in TYJ’s factory expansion. It is his daughter Laureen. Also corrected is that the new facility is an expansion not a replacement of the existing manufacturing plant.  

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Pamela covers entrepreneurs, wealth, blockchain and the crypto economy as a senior reporter across digital and print platforms. Prior to Forbes, she served as on-air foreign correspondent for Thomson Reuters’ broadcast team, during which she reported on global markets, central bank policies, and breaking business news. Before Asia, she was a journalist at NBC Comcast, and started her career at CNBC and Bloomberg as a financial news producer in New York. She is a graduate of Columbia Journalism School and holds an MBA from Thunderbird School of Global Management. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Washington Post, Yahoo, USA Today, Huffington Post, and Nasdaq. Pamela’s previous incarnation was on the buy side in M&A research and asset management, inspired by Michael Lewis’ book “Liar’s Poker”. Follow me on Twitter at @pamambler

Source: Singapore’s Richest 2019: ‘Popiah King’ Outfits Factory Buildout For Meat Alternatives

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This Popular Atlanta Pizzeria Just Launched An All-Vegan Menu Loaded With Plant-Based Goodness

It’s hard to believe that in 2016, Atlanta-based restaurant Ammazza was forced to close its doors after not one, but two car accidents severely damaged the popular Edgewood Avenue space. But in November 2018, Ammazza opened the doors to a new restaurant in downtown Decatur. And months later, in March 2019, the local pizza joint officially re-opened its Edgewood location. Since November, the crowds have quickly returned and in addition to a new, second space, Ammazza has also welcomed several additions to its menu.

In June, likely to the excitement of foodies dedicated to a plant-based lifestyle, Ammazza announced a new, all-vegan menu. The hearty, all-vegan menu is comprised of five antipasto dishes, eight pizzas, dessert and a kids section.

On the pizza end, there’s the classic Vegan Margherita. A simpler option for those hoping to quell a pizza craving, the Vegan Margherita is made using house tomato sauce, fresh basil, extra virgin olive oil and vegan cheese. If a plethora of toppings is more your thing, there’s also the Vegan Piccante. The Vegan Piccante comes loaded with house tomato sauce, fresh basil, spicy calabria peppers, caramelized onions, red peppers, marinated artichokes and vegan cheese.

Need even more toppings? Ammazza offers about a dozen additional toppings (for an added cost) that range from sauteed wild mushrooms to spicy calabrian agave. Pizzas vary in price from $15 to $24, depending on size and selection.

The Antipasto selection on the new menu is brimming with a variety of salads. There are classics like Caesar and Spinach Salad, as well as not so traditional options like the Orzo Salad and Basil Salad. Simple yet robust, the Basil Salad is a medley of field greens, marinated artichokes, olives, red bell peppers, Roma tomatoes and house basil vinaigrette.

And since there’s always room for dessert, Ammazza’s all-vegan menu includes a vegan seasonal fruit tart, as well as a chef’s selection.

Curious about Ammazza’s boozier options? The pizzeria’s beverage director and general manager, Daniel Bridges revealed to the Atlanta Journal Constitution in January that Italian liqueurs and fresh ingredients will be a focus.

“We’re focusing on Italian liqueurs, amaro, and things like that,” Bridges said. “I like to keep my cocktails pretty simple, just use fresh ingredients, and let the spirits speak for themselves. But we definitely sell a lot of beer and wine. We change up the draft list almost daily. We try to stay local and regional with beer, and we have Italian wines.”

Ammazza’s all-vegan menu can be found at both their Decatur and Edgewood locations.

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As the owner of Lushworthy.com (a beer, wine and cocktail blog), I’ve penned stories on all things booze-related for nearly a decade. In addition to holding down the fort at Lushworthy.com, my musings and other written works on food and drink can be found across the web. With my writing, I’ve had the opportunity to talk craft beer with rapper Tech N9ne, explore the history of New Orleans’ famed Café Brulot cocktail, sample spirits and cocktails from across the globe, and much more. I’m also a proud, longtime resident of Atlanta, Georgia, and an avid foodie. I keep myself heavily in the know when it concerns news on the latest restaurants, breweries and bars in the city.

Source: This Popular Atlanta Pizzeria Just Launched An All-Vegan Menu Loaded With Plant-Based Goodness

How to make crispy tofu perfectly every time | Well+Good

I like my tofu extra crispy. Unfortunately getting it to that point often means keeping a watchful eye on a frying pan. (Nobody likes burnt tofu.) But the trick to perfectly crispy tofu is as simple as popping it in the freezer first.

When tofu freezes, the water within it expands, creating pockets of air. As you cook it and the water evaporates, these air bubbles give tofu a chewier, meatier texture while enabling it to soak up flavor from a marinade or sauce.

Follow these easy instructions for the best way to ensure crispy tofu every time you cook it (with five delicious recipes you’ll want to use again and again) because nothing hits the spot more than tofu at its crispiest.

How to freeze tofu

  1. Drain your extra-firm tofu and remove it from the packaging. Pat it dry with a kitchen towel or paper towel.
  2. Cut the tofu into cubes or slices—whatever size you need for your meal. Then, place the pieces in a container and store them in the freezer. You can also put the entire block in the freezer as-is, but it takes longer to cook.
  3. For best results, leave your tofu in the freezer for 12 to 24 hours. If you’re short on time, you’ll still get decent results with 3 to 6 hours.

How to cook with frozen tofu

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil and submerge the frozen tofu. Bring it back to a boil.
  2. If you’re working with smaller pieces, remove them from the water after 6 to 7 minutes. If you’re working with an entire block of tofu, cook for 7 minutes, flip it over in the water, then cook for another 7 minutes.
  3. After draining the water, set the tofu on paper towels or a clean kitchen towel on a flat surface to help soak up any excess water as it cools. If it’s still in a block, cut the tofu into cubes or slices after it cools.
  4. Bring a skillet to medium heat. Lightly spray the skillet with olive or avocado oil, then cook the tofu pieces for a few minutes on each side, or until browned. Remove from the heat once the pieces are crispy to your liking.

How to use crispy tofu

Now that you have a new batch of crispy tofu, there are many different ways to enjoy it throughout the week. Whether it’s slathered in fun sauces or on kebabs, these are the tastiest recipes to start with. And the best part? The tofu prep is already done.

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Photo: Simple Vegan Blog

1. General Tso’s crispy tofu

For a healthier version of your favorite takeout, use this General Tso’s sauce that’s the perfect mix of sweet and spicy.

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Photo: Emilie Eats

2. BBQ tofu vegetable kebabs

Tofu makes for a seamless meat replacement in kebabs, especially when slathered in homemade BBQ sauce.

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Photo: Minimalist Baker

3. Almond butter crispy tofu stir-fry

Nothing improves a stir-fry like crispy tofu. This almond butter-based sauce will make you want to eat up all your veggies.

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Photo: I Love Vegan

4. Crispy chick’n Caesar salad

The Caesar salad gets a plant-based twist in this combo that features crispy tofu and a creamy vegan dressing made from cashews.

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Photo: Killing Thyme

5. Crispy buffalo tofu bites with garlicky yogurt dip

This meal will only take a few minutes to make since your crispy tofu is ready to go. The buffalo-style sauce goes great with the garlicky dip made from dairy-free yogurt.

Still hungry? You might want to grab some cucumbers, which—if you didn’t know—might just be a better salad base than kale. You can also try out these keto-approved recipes in your Instant Pot.

Source: How to make crispy tofu perfectly every time | Well+Good

The Dangers of Eating Late at Night – Jamie A. Koufman

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ACID REFLUX is an epidemic affecting as many as 40 percent of Americans. In addition to heartburn and indigestion, reflux symptoms may include postnasal drip, hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, chronic throat clearing, coughing and asthma. Taken together, sales of prescribed and over-the-counter anti-reflux medications exceed $13 billion per year.The number of people with acid reflux has grown significantly in recent decades. Reflux can lead to esophageal cancer, which has increased by about 500 percent since the 1970s……..

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/opinion/sunday/the-dangers-of-eating-late-at-night.html

 

 

 

 

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