Advertisements

The Popeyes Fried Chicken Sandwich Is Back. Here’s What You’ll Find

The Popeyes fried chicken sandwich that kicked off last summer’s Great Fried Chicken Sandwich Wars returned on Sunday. And judging by my experience in getting one, the buzz around the sandwich is back, too. Popeyes announced the sandwich’s return last week, in time for National Sandwich Day. The signs were up, but there was no sign of the sandwich.

“Sunday at 10 am sharp,” the counter clerk told me, via the drive-thru intercom. “You better get here early.”

I hadn’t been planning to be there at the opening bell, but I woke up in time, thanks to the end of Daylight Savings Time. So, I bundled my 91-year-old aunt, Maxine Clapper, into my Prius and set off.

The scene. We arrived at 9:50 am to find a knot of people waiting outside the door, and 14 cars in the drive-thru and the parking lot. We were car No. 11 in the drive-thru.

But at 10 am, we were told there was a delay. The restaurant would open at 11 am, despite the instructions we were given and the hours posted on the door .

The delay wasn’t explained, but the restaurant then posted “cash only” signs which made me think it might have been a credit card processing issue.

The wait. We contemplated leaving, but decided to stay. Around us, others stayed, too, including the group at the door. A manager eventually came out and gave those people numbers so they could go wait in their cars in the 37F cold.

As the 10 am hour ticked by, more people arrived. The drive-thru line re-formed, and eventually, it stretched down the side of the restaurant, through the parking lot, past the front of the restaurant and onto the road outside.

I chatted with a couple of customers, and learned they had been unable to get the Popeyes sandwich during its first appearance (I nabbed one just before it sold out).

They were determined to get one this time. And after the restaurant doors finally opened at 11 am, the first customers emerged, holding their Popeyes bags high in victory.

It took us about 25 minutes to get up to the drive-thru window and collect our sandwiches. We pulled into a parking lot space, and opened the bag. On Friday, I stopped by my local Popeyes near Ann Arbor, Mich., just to see if it had arrived early.

The sandwich. This iteration of the Popeyes fried chicken sandwich seems identical to the previous version. For $3.99, you get a generous portion of fried chicken breast, a dollop of mayo, two pickles and a soft bun.

If anything, the chicken was even more moist than last time, perhaps because it was prepared in the morning rather than afternoon.

And the pickles seemed thicker, almost a little too thick for a sandwich. We both took them off the sandwich and ate them as a side dish.

Since I’d tried it before, I was curious what Maxine thought of it.

She pronounced it “good,” her all-purpose compliment for something she enjoys eating, and said she would have one again if I brought it home to her. (She’s not from the eat-in-your-car generation, which is understandable.)

She was unable to finish her sandwich, which seems a little large for elderly appetites. Popeyes would do just fine if it made a chicken sandwich slider.

The buzz. A huge advantage to this Popeyes launch, of course, is that it took place on Sunday, when its main rival, Chick-fil-A is closed, and something Popeyes touted in its run up to the chicken sandwich’s return.

Popeyes sign

That Sunday availability is likely to result in a big launch day.

As we drove off, I counted 25 cars waiting in the drive-thru line, and the parking lot was nearly full. I asked the counter clerk how many she thought they would serve, and she estimated it would be more than 100.

Based on the early demand, they most likely sold them all by the end of the lunch hour.

Business may not keep up at that rate, and Popeyes might not get the massive marketing boost that the chicken sandwich generated last time.

But at least for now, it has successfully fired its second shot.

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

I’m an alumni of the New York Times and NPR. I learned to cook from my mom, and studied with Patricia Wells and at Le Cordon Bleu. E: mamayn@aol.com T: @mickimaynard I: @michelinemaynard Sorry, I don’t honor embargoes.

Source: The Popeyes Fried Chicken Sandwich Is Back. Here’s What You’ll Find

1.12M subscribers
Popeyes Chicken Sandwich returned to all locations today, ready for all to enjoy but what has changed IF ANYTHING AT ALL?!?! Let’s discuss this in the comments and be sure to slap a like on this video if you enjoyed it. Sharing is Caring and so be sure to share this video with friends and family. Tell them all to SUBSCRIBE and TURN ON THOSE NOTIFICATIONS my SEXY PIECES!!! Mrs Drops Update: For anyone curious, all you had to do was follow your boy on my IG: @OFFICIALDAYMDROPS and you would have known what time it was! 😉 I post there DAILY is all I am saying 😉 Royalty Free Music: Epidemic Sound ► (DD Ice Cream & MORE) https://linktr.ee/officialdaymdrops ► I’m now w/ McJuggerNuggets on his StoryFire App: https://storyfire.com/write/series/st… Royalty Free Music: Epidemic Sound BEST & WORST RESTAURANTS LISTING: BEST CHINESE: https://youtu.be/CFTnPqIRFOs WORST CHINESE: https://youtu.be/h9dAUaWFuto BEST JAMAICAN: https://youtu.be/73xnuACRLCM WORST JAMAICAN: https://youtu.be/8aa0uojyWBM BEST PIZZA: https://youtu.be/XQ6n1A7uMwY WORST PIZZA: https://youtu.be/USP3TA7JHKA BEST BREAKFAST: https://youtu.be/oOUsmkOdqjQ WORST BREAKFAST: https://youtu.be/a8nA7mVctAo BEST MEXICAN: https://youtu.be/Dzd3Doqj-YA WORST MEXICAN: https://youtu.be/UnKIqpozsGQ BEST STEAKHOUSE: https://youtu.be/OOw_hM7u–0 WORST STEAKHOUSE: https://youtu.be/JmjRfontkTo BEST GOURMET BURGER: https://youtu.be/gF9ZTMxhWDA WORST GOURMET BURGER: https://youtu.be/lUxmuq0lEoE BEST BBQ: https://youtu.be/3xX9zJVcZ38 WORST BBQ: https://youtu.be/BxKCI-IuikM BEST SEAFOOD: https://youtu.be/wZadbE_sRv4 WORST SEAFOOD: https://youtu.be/K052EEog2YU BEST WINGS: https://youtu.be/hTiPKWUvCG4 WORST WINGS: https://youtu.be/UK21FhxbRWs BEST ITALIAN: https://youtu.be/bw8TidYD_1s WORST ITALIAN: https://youtu.be/mKmS6KIQgxs BEST FOOD TRUCK: https://youtu.be/LqsESitm0s4 WORST FOOD TRUCK: https://youtu.be/BvnG330VWVo BEST BUFFET: https://youtu.be/en842DdTHaQ WORST BUFFET: https://youtu.be/UBNWGpJo3tw BEST SANDWICH: https://youtu.be/sdNm6eRoQ-w WORST SANDWICH: https://youtu.be/fgKprIVLNhg BEST RIBS: https://youtu.be/NmWEbDF6YX4 WORST RIBS: https://youtu.be/rWr3Id136pQ BEST LOBSTER: https://youtu.be/7I9lyPnik0k WORST LOBSTER: https://youtu.be/fX4-lO7YkK0 BEST HOT DOGS: https://youtu.be/_4QKKCPHQbU WORST HOT DOGS: https://youtu.be/0-l-wYldRMI BEST FRIED CHICKEN: https://youtu.be/PMkC2D3U-Uk WORST FRIED CHICKEN: https://youtu.be/Ba-nwSXRoR4 BEST ICE CREAM: https://youtu.be/2hSdsZ0MHaI WORST ICE CREAM: https://youtu.be/LUPWXcNShUg BEST BAKERY: https://youtu.be/8A-lQnuBf9c WORST BAKERY: https://youtu.be/PTudTfCVLEA #daymdrops #popeyeschickensandwich

Advertisements

Capital One BrandVoice: 5 Fall Festivals For Food Lovers

Fall is peak foodie season—and packed with great culinary events, from coast to coast. If you’re hungry for a culinary adventure this autumn, try these standout food festivals. They’re as fun as they are delicious.

South Beach Seafood Festival

The South Beach Seafood Festival is much like the Miami neighborhood that gives it its name: chic, glossy and very VIP.

This weeklong event includes ticketed dinners where cutting-edge chefs do their stuff in exclusive locations.

Star chefs doing innovative things with expensive ingredients is a big part of the event. But there are still plenty of affordable, family-friendly activities to enjoy.

Pop-up cafes will serve great inexpensive food in the balmy air. DJs will spin music. And the Milam’s Markets Culinary Showcase Kitchen will feature live cooking demos, so attendees can sharpen their kitchen skills.

Arkansas Cornbread Festival

People in Arkansas take their cornbread seriously.

That’s all to the culinary benefit of visitors to this late-October event in Little Rock’s fashionable SoMa district.

But great cornbread isn’t all there is here. There’s also live music and artisan booths, heaps of Southern cooking besides cornpone and lots of debate about those eternal cornbread questions: White flower or yellow? Sugar or no sugar? Baking pan or cast-iron skillet?

The festival peaks with a cornbread baking competition that Southern foodies take very seriously. Festival attendees get to vote for the winner, so get ready to sample lots of the big-flavored golden stuff that gives this event its reason for being.

Eagle River Cranberry Fest

Just shy of Wisconsin’s northern border, the small town of Eagle River celebrates one of autumn’s quintessential foods. More than 40,000 visitors buy 10,000-plus pounds of fresh and dried cranberries there each October. Impressive for a town with a population of 1,500.

The event is both culinary and educational. Sure, visitors will get their fill of cranberry pancakes, cranberry sausages, hot cranapple cider and shredded cranberry pork sandwiches. But they can also tour the local cranberry marsh to learn about the role that this tiny red fruit has played in Eagle River’s economy and culture over the centuries.

And to round out a long weekend of fun, there’s an art show, an antiques market and live entertainment.

Pickle Day

A big festival in a small town is great. But a small festival in a big city can be just as delicious.

Each October, New York City’s Lower East Side celebrates its immigrant history with Pickle Day. In a nod to the neighborhood’s long-ago pushcart market, vendors line three city blocks with pickled everything, courtesy of local restaurants and other picklers.

There’s also live music, face painting, carnival games and a giant talking pickle.

If you don’t actually make it to lower Manhattan to give pickled watermelon, kimchi or good ol’ pickle-on-a-stick a whirl, you can still get in on the fun. The festival sells whimsical Pickle Day merchandise online. It’s perfect for pickle enthusiasts everywhere.

West Virginia Roadkill Cook-off

Don’t worry. There’s no actual roadkill at this festival. But if it was called the “West Virginia Wild Game Cook-off,” it just wouldn’t be as fun.

And fun is at the heart of this quirky event in the tiny town of Marlinton, West Virginia. At the end of each September, inventive chefs assemble here from all over the country.

They join locals in taking a gourmet approach to ingredients ranging from the humble—like squirrel, deer and rabbit—to the exotic—think iguana, snapping turtle and wild boar.

In addition to the chance to try once-in-a-lifetime dishes like squirrel gravy over biscuits and teriyaki-marinated bear, visitors get to enjoy a bit of true Americana. Come for the rabbit Alfredo, stay for the square dancing and Miss Roadkill contest.

Ready to taste your way through fall? With these mouthwatering food festivals on your calendar, this could be your most appetizing autumn yet.

A former downtown development professional, Natalie Burg is a freelancer who writes about growth, entrepreneurialism and innovation.

This article is for educational purposes only, and is not intended to provide medical or legal advice, or to indicate the availability or suitability of any product or service for your unique circumstances.

Capital One does not provide, endorse, or guarantee any third-party product, service, information or recommendation listed above. The third parties listed are solely responsible for their products and services, and all trademarks listed are the property of their respective owners.

Capital One offers a broad spectrum of financial products and services to cardholders, including digital tools, that help cardholders save time and money. Being confident in knowing that finances are under control should be a priority for rewards cards customers. Capital One has its customers’ backs so they can be confident and in control of their finances. Capital One is committed to finding new ways to make the payment experience easy for customers and is always innovating with cardholders – and their busy lives – in mind. For more information on Capital One credit cards, visit https://www.capitalone.com/credit-cards/rewards/.

Source: Capital One BrandVoice: 5 Fall Festivals For Food Lovers

433K subscribers
my lifestyle ebooks // https://www.madeleineolivia.co.uk/ebooks watch a mukbang of the pasta bake // https://bit.ly/2yKeRWy r e c i p e s spiced sweet potato soup // https://bit.ly/2IYEM1u aubergine & chickpea curry // https://bit.ly/2Cn02wW hearty autumn stew // https://bit.ly/2yIDFyr autumn apple & pear porridge // https://bit.ly/2OwNkmj roasted pumpkin pasta bake // https://bit.ly/2AdykRq c o n n e c t website // https://www.madeleineolivia.co.uk instagram // https://www.instagram.com/madeleineol… twitter // https://twitter.com/MadeleineOlivia facebook // https://www.facebook.com/MadeleineOli… pinterest // https://www.pinterest.co.uk/madeleine… snapchat // maddieabb f a c e b o o k g r o u p s versatile vegan // https://bit.ly/2IMVWhn declutter your life // https://bit.ly/2HsLHzh minimal beauty // https://bit.ly/2pLArZ8 l i s t e n epidemic sound // http://www.epidemicsound.com/ c o n t a c t business enquiries only // hello@madeleineolivia.co.uk m y r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s food & supplements // https://bit.ly/2r8KqXl low waste // https://bit.ly/2w0nDlt vegan beauty // https://bit.ly/2rcTTMA camera equipment // https://bit.ly/2jlQU0M kitchen equipment // https://bit.ly/2JIQbls fitness // https://bit.ly/2JLlCf0 s p o n s o r s h i p s This video is not sponsored. Some links above are affiliate links (you don’t pay more, but I earn a small commission for my recommendation).

Impossible Foods Founder Pat Brown Didn’t Want to Be an Entrepreneur, But His $2 Billion Idea Was Hard to Resist

Pat Brown isn’t an inventor so much as a reinventor. He sees something that works, but not well, and figures out how to do the same thing, only a lot better. And along the way, he’s reinvented himself into perhaps the most unlikely entrepreneur in Silicon Valley.

Brown trained as a pediatrician but, seeing that genetics figure prominently in diseases such as cancer, repurposed himself as a scientific researcher. Within a few years, he’d created something called the DNA microarray, a technology that has allowed scientists to better study genetic code. It was a breakthrough, and for most people that would be a career peak. Not Pat. In 2001, frustrated by limited worldwide access to scientific research, he co-founded the Public Library of Science, a radical revision of academic publishing.

A decade later, he saw a vastly greater inefficiency: meat. Raising and killing animals, he realized, is an environmentally expensive way to produce protein, demanding tremendous amounts of water, land, and energy. “There’s a $1.6 trillion global meat and poultry market being served by prehistoric technology,” he fumes. So Pat, then at Stanford, ditched academics for startup life. Today, he’s the founder and CEO of Impossible Foods, a company that’s reinventing meat.

Unlike entrepreneurs who tally their startups like animal heads mounted in a man cave, Brown wasn’t looking to add founder to his résumé. “I couldn’t have imagined myself doing this,” he told me over a lunch of Impossible burgers in Redwood City, California. “But the most powerful, subversive tool on earth is the free market. If you can take a problem and figure out a solution that involves making consumers happier, you’re unstoppable.”

And so, in 2011, and nearing 60, he launched Impossible Foods. First, he needed investors. “My actual pitch, if you showed it to a business school class, would’ve had people rolling in the aisles because it was so amateurish,” he admits. But he could tell potential investors, with complete conviction: What I am proposing is going to make you even more obscenely rich than you already are. “I didn’t say it in quite those words,” he notes, “but I knew that this was something that was going to be incredibly successful. And that worked.”

Oh, yeah. Starting with a $9 million round in 2011, Impossible has raised nearly $750 million, including $300 million in May. It is now valued at more than $2 billion.

To say Pat Brown is unconventional is to say that cows moo. But it’s important to celebrate him, because, though few of us are as smart, many of us are possessed of the same inspiration. We just lack the conviction that we’re the entrepreneurial type. Yet many of the best founders don’t have an MBA–what they have is a sense of opportunity, a hunch that they’re on to something the rest of the world hasn’t quite spotted. Some­thing they can’t let pass by. I was inspired by Pat to take my own leap away from a secure job and hatch my own startup.

Part of his success is that he’s honest about his capabilities. He has hired well, including a terrific operations team and an ace CFO whom he calls an “investor whisperer.” How did he know he could survive moving from scientist to CEO? He figured that, given the scope of the meat problem (massive and global), few people would actually go about trying to solve it.

He’s not a guy who places limits on himself, and that’s his message. “There’s a big phenomenon of people self-censoring, worrying about the imposter syndrome,” Brown says. “They say, ‘Someone has to do this, but I’m not the guy,’ or, ‘I’m not qualified.’ People limit their own opportunities.”

He pauses to take a big bite of burger. “There’s no road map for what we’re doing,” he continues. “But someone has to solve this problem.” He figures it might as well be him.

By: Thomas Goetz

Source: Impossible Foods Founder Pat Brown Didn’t Want to Be an Entrepreneur, But His $2 Billion Idea Was Hard to Resist | Inc.com

Impossible Foods looks to expand as the demand for meat alternatives continues to grow. The company is a leader in the food-tech industry producing plant-based foods that look at taste like meat. David Lee, CFO of Impossible Foods, joined CBSN to talk about the company and the emergence of the meatless market. Subscribe to the CBS News Channel HERE: http://youtube.com/cbsnews Watch CBSN live HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1PlLpZ7 Follow CBS News on Instagram HERE: https://www.instagram.com/cbsnews/ Like CBS News on Facebook HERE: http://facebook.com/cbsnews Follow CBS News on Twitter HERE: http://twitter.com/cbsnews Get the latest news and best in original reporting from CBS News delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to newsletters HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1RqHw7T Get your news on the go! Download CBS News mobile apps HERE: http://cbsn.ws/1Xb1WC8 Get new episodes of shows you love across devices the next day, stream CBSN and local news live, and watch full seasons of CBS fan favorites like Star Trek Discovery anytime, anywhere with CBS All Access. Try it free! http://bit.ly/1OQA29B — CBSN is the first digital streaming news network that will allow Internet-connected consumers to watch live, anchored news coverage on their connected TV and other devices. At launch, the network is available 24/7 and makes all of the resources of CBS News available directly on digital platforms with live, anchored coverage 15 hours each weekday. CBSN. Always On

A Look At The Menu Innovation Driving KFC Global’s Sales Momentum

About 300 of KFC’s top marketers from around the world will descend upon the company’s global headquarters in Dallas this week to share best practices, industry trends and menu ideas. It’s at this Marketing Planning Meeting—which has been held since 2006—where much of the brand’s menu magic happens.

If you’re not fully familiar with what that “magic” entails, consider KFC product launches from around the world: KFC Thailand’s shrimp doughnuts, Singapore’s egg tarts, Australia’s nacho box, the Double Down Dog (a hot dog wrapped in a bun-sized piece of fried chicken) the Mac ‘n Cheese Zinger (with a bun made of mac ‘n cheese) and, of course, the original Zinger Chicken Sandwich, which originated in Trinidad and Tobago in 1984 and finally came to the U.S. in 2017. (Australia sells more than 22 million Zingers each year.)

The company’s massive scale of 22,000-plus restaurants in more than 135 countries certainly hasn’t slowed down its innovation wheel. In fact, KFC just launched a chicken tender taco in France, debuted green chili crunch chicken in Malaysia and added “Chizza” (pizza with a fried chicken crust) to the menu in the Philippines. In Canada, the chain unveiled Chachos earlier this year, a take on nachos but with KFC’s chicken tenders instead of tortilla chips.

The scope of menu creativity is impressive and the approach has been quite successful. KFC Indonesia rolled out chicken skin fries earlier this summer, for example, and the product sold out on day one. The company’s vegan Imposter Burger, launched in June in the U.K., sold out in just four days.

KFC is able to set this pace because it has 18 food innovation teams throughout the world filled with culinarians with big imaginations. Simultaneously, the company stringently adheres to its brand standards (the very 11 herbs and spices that put the chain on the map), thanks to a four-person Food Innovation Team based out of its Dallas headquarters.

I recently had the opportunity to spend the day with this team to see firsthand how some of these ideas are brought to life in the KFC Global kitchen. What I witnessed was a group of food enthusiasts with deep global experiences and a deeper appreciation for the work they’re doing.

The team is led by Ana Maria Basurto, a Mexico City native who joined the team in 2015 and is tasked with “guarding” the KFC brand standards while expanding its culinary portfolio.

Jacinta Pounsett is the senior scientist for FIT, working with KFC’s markets to develop a nutrition strategy and identify opportunities for innovation. She started her career with KFC Australia.

Gaana Nagaraj, a food innovation technologist, heads up poultry innovation and development and also leads seasoning and marinade developments. She moved to the U.S. from India, where she was born and raised.

The fourth member of the team is Robert Merrill, associate manager who supports the alignment of the chain’s signature recipes and provides protocols for standard products. He received a master’s degree in food science and technology from Texas A&M.

That this particular team includes four people from diverse international backgrounds is notable.

“A major challenge happening now in the restaurant space is to stay relevant as global demographics shift,” said James Fripp, Yum Brands’ chief diversity and inclusion officer. “If this team can’t work with multiple cultures from around the world, what we’re doing is not going to work.”

Indeed, the way KFC approaches innovation is not centralized. The cuisines are different, as are the cultures and preferences.

“We leverage that expertise around the world and serve as a guardrail for the 18 units. We want them to take our food and make it their own, adapted for their flavors,” Pounsett said.

Asian consumers, for example, prefer hot and spicy flavors, while the brand’s extra tasty crispy recipe performs well in Latin America and Mexico.

“We spend time working on how to elevate our 11 herbs and spices for each market. Our strength as a global company is leveraging food innovation and marketing teams around the world to have a better understanding of what consumers prefer,” Basurto said.

Challenges exist, such as how to fulfill volume demands at such a large scale and how to roll out exciting new products that meet both brand and operational standards. Many of these kinks are ironed during the MPM event.

But much of the time spent at that event this week will be on the exchange of new and big ideas on how to keep KFC’s menu exciting in markets all over the world.

“We get to taste products that have been the most successful in different markets. We want to foster that pride within our community so people are willing to learn what other markets are doing and then adopt it,” Basurto said.

KFC’s Chizza is a great example of a successful product launched in a market, originating in the Philippines, and adopted elsewhere. The menu item is now available in more than 15 countries across Europe, Asia and Latin America, specifically in Germany, the Netherlands, Indonesia, Malaysia, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Mexico, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Panama, Puerto Rico, Korea, Thailand and India.

Considering the brand’s momentum of late, expect these types of market-to-market translations to continue at a staggering pace, especially as consumers are becoming more adventurous with their palates.

During Q1, Yum Brands’ KFC division delivered system sales growth of 9%. CEO Greg Creed specifically credited creative products for the performance.

“The innovation that’s happening is (driving KFC’s momentum),” Creed said during the earnings call. “We’re seeing a lot of great innovation, flavor innovation, on existing forms and new form innovation also occurring.”

I have covered the restaurant industry since 2010 when I was named editor of QSRweb. I later added fast casual and pizza beats to my portfolio as editorial director of foodservice media. This coverage spanned the gamut of topics that make up the foodservice space, from marketing and customer service, to the supply chain and display technology. My work has been featured in publications around the world, including NPR, Bloomberg, The Seattle Times, Crain’s Chicago, Good Morning America and Franchise Asia Magazine. I continue to serve as a contributor for many publications, including QSRweb, Food Dive, Innovation Leader and the Digital Signage Federation.

Source: A Look At The Menu Innovation Driving KFC Global’s Sales Momentum

How to make crispy tofu perfectly every time | Well+Good

I like my tofu extra crispy. Unfortunately getting it to that point often means keeping a watchful eye on a frying pan. (Nobody likes burnt tofu.) But the trick to perfectly crispy tofu is as simple as popping it in the freezer first.

When tofu freezes, the water within it expands, creating pockets of air. As you cook it and the water evaporates, these air bubbles give tofu a chewier, meatier texture while enabling it to soak up flavor from a marinade or sauce.

Follow these easy instructions for the best way to ensure crispy tofu every time you cook it (with five delicious recipes you’ll want to use again and again) because nothing hits the spot more than tofu at its crispiest.

How to freeze tofu

  1. Drain your extra-firm tofu and remove it from the packaging. Pat it dry with a kitchen towel or paper towel.
  2. Cut the tofu into cubes or slices—whatever size you need for your meal. Then, place the pieces in a container and store them in the freezer. You can also put the entire block in the freezer as-is, but it takes longer to cook.
  3. For best results, leave your tofu in the freezer for 12 to 24 hours. If you’re short on time, you’ll still get decent results with 3 to 6 hours.

How to cook with frozen tofu

  1. Bring a pot of water to a boil and submerge the frozen tofu. Bring it back to a boil.
  2. If you’re working with smaller pieces, remove them from the water after 6 to 7 minutes. If you’re working with an entire block of tofu, cook for 7 minutes, flip it over in the water, then cook for another 7 minutes.
  3. After draining the water, set the tofu on paper towels or a clean kitchen towel on a flat surface to help soak up any excess water as it cools. If it’s still in a block, cut the tofu into cubes or slices after it cools.
  4. Bring a skillet to medium heat. Lightly spray the skillet with olive or avocado oil, then cook the tofu pieces for a few minutes on each side, or until browned. Remove from the heat once the pieces are crispy to your liking.

How to use crispy tofu

Now that you have a new batch of crispy tofu, there are many different ways to enjoy it throughout the week. Whether it’s slathered in fun sauces or on kebabs, these are the tastiest recipes to start with. And the best part? The tofu prep is already done.

Pin It
Photo: Simple Vegan Blog

1. General Tso’s crispy tofu

For a healthier version of your favorite takeout, use this General Tso’s sauce that’s the perfect mix of sweet and spicy.

Pin It
Photo: Emilie Eats

2. BBQ tofu vegetable kebabs

Tofu makes for a seamless meat replacement in kebabs, especially when slathered in homemade BBQ sauce.

Pin It
Photo: Minimalist Baker

3. Almond butter crispy tofu stir-fry

Nothing improves a stir-fry like crispy tofu. This almond butter-based sauce will make you want to eat up all your veggies.

Pin It
Photo: I Love Vegan

4. Crispy chick’n Caesar salad

The Caesar salad gets a plant-based twist in this combo that features crispy tofu and a creamy vegan dressing made from cashews.

Pin It
Photo: Killing Thyme

5. Crispy buffalo tofu bites with garlicky yogurt dip

This meal will only take a few minutes to make since your crispy tofu is ready to go. The buffalo-style sauce goes great with the garlicky dip made from dairy-free yogurt.

Still hungry? You might want to grab some cucumbers, which—if you didn’t know—might just be a better salad base than kale. You can also try out these keto-approved recipes in your Instant Pot.

Source: How to make crispy tofu perfectly every time | Well+Good

Booze-infused pudding is the adult Jell-O shots we didn’t know we needed

 

(MORE: This ice cream shop satisfies our inner child’s fantasy)

The inspiration for these creamy spoonfuls of gelatinous booze came from founder Kelli Lipson’s college love of classic Jell-O shots, she told “GMA.”

“I was in college and I used to make Jello shots, and everyone really loved them, so the idea kind of always stayed with me,” Lipson said.

Lipson said she combined her heart for Jello shots with her love of cooking to create her original line of booze-infused pudding and Jello recipes that are sure to be a hit at any adult party.

“I went to go work for Food Network star Sandra Lee and from there I kind of just built on the idea ad I wanted to create something that adults could really enjoy and that was a treat made for them,” she said.

(MORE: Boozy ice cream cocktails and sundaes that will up your dessert game all summer)

The best part is the flavors — from Spike Cake to Nutella Latte to Cranberry Cosmo — there’s definitely something for everyone. Each shot contains 5% alcohol.

They also come in specially packaged, ridiculously Instagrammable mini jars, which is why you may have seen them popping up on your feed.

“We’ve done a lot of collaborations with different influencers,” Lipson said.

 

Source: Booze-infused pudding is the adult Jell-O shots we didn’t know we needed

Thailand Supermarket Ditches Plastic Packaging For Banana Leaves

Banana leaves used for packaging at a Thai supermarket

A Thailand supermarket came up with a genius way to reduce plastic packaging: wrap its produce in banana leaves instead.

The banana leaf packaging comes from the Rimping supermarket in Chiangmai, Thailand. A real estate company in Chiang Mai, Perfect Homes, posted photos of the banana leaf packaging to their Facebook page and it quickly gained widespread attention.

uncaptioned
Perfect Homes Chiangmai

Of the 9 billion tonnes of plastic ever produced, only 9% has been recycled. This, along with projections of rapidly increased plastic manufacturing, has led to global attention to single-use plastics.

The United Nations Environment Programme estimates that by 2050 there will be 12 billion tonnes of plastic in landfills, the environment, and oceans. Of this waste, cigarette butts, plastic drinking bottles, food wrappers, and plastic grocery bags are the biggest contributors.

Global plastic waste generation from 1950 to 2015.

Global plastic waste generation from 1950 to 2015.

United Nations Environment Programme

The use of banana leaves instead of plastic for packaging vegetables is a great way to reduce single-use plastic. While it looks like they use some plastic for adhering the label, this method significantly reduces the amount of plastic required. They are simply wrapped in a banana leaf and secured using a flexible piece of bamboo. Banana leaves are a great alternative to plastic as the leaf is large, thick and supple enough to be folded.

uncaptioned
Perfect Homes Chiangmai

One thing to consider is the relative cost of plastic versus banana leaves. In tropical locations, banana leaves are readily available locally and could be acquired for free depending on the quantity needed. In more temperate locations the use of banana leaves could be significantly more expensive than plastic. However, using local biodegradable products could be a good alternative in locations where bananas don’t grow.

The use of banana leaves to wrap food in has a long history. In some tropical regions of Mexico, tamales are wrapped in banana leaves. Hawaiians use banana leaves during pig roasts to protect the pig from the hot lava rocks. They are also used to wrap sticky rice in southeast Asia.

uncaptioned
Perfect Homes Chiangmai

Trevor Nace is a PhD geologist, founder of Science Trends, Forbes contributor, and explorer. Follow his journey @trevornace.

I am a geologist passionate about sharing Earth’s intricacies with you. I received my PhD from Duke University where I studied the geology and climate of the Amazon. I a…

Source: Thailand Supermarket Ditches Plastic Packaging For Banana Leaves

Top 10 Industry Secrets That Make You Buy More Food – Be Amazed

Be Amazed at these top 10 sneaky industry secrets that make you buy more food! Endorsement secrets – We all know that for years, food companies have paid celebrities to endorse their products. Think Justin Timberlake and McDonald’s, or Snoop Dogg and Hot Pockets. Fast food secrets – When it comes to using ingenious tricks to get you to buy more food, the fast food industry are the absolute masters.

They stop at nothing to make sure we’re always filling our faces with burgers, fries and nuggets. It’s a fact that sugar is addictive. Processing secrets – It’s not just sugar that’s addictive. There are all kinds of mysterious substances that we can get addicted to, and you can bet the food industry make sure our food is loaded with as much of them as possible. Restaurant secrets –

You probably think I’m being a bit harsh on the fast food industry here. Let me redress the balance. The guys at the other end of the spectrum, high-end restaurants, play tricks on us too. Why do you think they restaurants play classical music over the speakers? Research by the University of Leicester showed that classical music increases the amount of money people spend by more than 10%, compared to when there’s no music. Political secrets –

If they wanted to, governments could shut down a lot of the food industry’s murky practices. To stop that happening, big food companies spend a lot of money and effort playing politics. Health secrets – In today’s health-conscious times, food brands want you to think they’re good for you, so you’ll buy more of them. Unfortunately, when a food screams at you from the packet about how healthy it is, it isn’t always the case. Use-by date secrets

You’re hungry, but when you open the fridge, all that greets you are some random foodstuffs, and they look like they’ve been there a while. Colour secrets – Call me old-fashioned, but I like my food to be the right colour, and I’m not alone. Supermarket secrets – As much as the food industry likes to play with our food, its advertising and packaging to make sure we buy it, your supermarket is doing its best to manipulate you too. Brain manipulation secrets –

The food industry employs psychologists to work out how they can subliminally influence our minds, so we buy more product. Researchers in Belgium figured out that humans are drawn to glossy objects, because shiny and glossy surfaces make us think of water and our brains remind us that we need it to survive. As a result, soda companies make their bottles and cans glossy, with bubbles and dewy drips all over them.

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

America Is Drowning in Milk Nobody Wants – Deena Shanker & Lydia Mulvany

1

A decade ago, Greek yogurt was ascendant in America. In New York state, the hope among farmers and politicians was that their fortunes would benefit as well. In 2005, Hamdi Ulukaya spent less than $1 million buying an old Kraft yogurt processing plant in New Berlin, 150 miles northwest of New York City. Within two years, the native of Turkey was already a success. His yogurt brand, Chobani, was in supermarket refrigerators everywhere, pushing aside older, big-name brands while making Greek yogurt a staple of the American diet. Rich but also healthy, it made its way into recipes for everything from smoothies to muffins and even popsicles.

Read more: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-10-17/america-is-drowning-in-milk-nobody-wants

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

%d bloggers like this:
Skip to toolbar