Tag: hurricane

Storm/Hurricane Friederike With Up To 63 Knots Crosswind & 20 Go Arounds Or Touch & Go – HvdH-Plane-Spotter

For me it was the most spectacular filming of aircrafts during a hard and gusty storm with amazing crosswind landings. This storm/hurricane Friederike with up to 63 Knots crosswind at DUS Düsseldorf airport in Germany was the hardest storm after 11 years in Europe/Germany and many airports was closed. Düsseldorf was open all the time, but about 20 planes aborted the landing go around or did a touch and go. Some pilots did a great job and landed the aircraft during these extreme conditions with spectacular and skilled handling.

Used Equipment and Cooperation: – Video cutting software: Magix Video Deluxe “PRO X” http://www.magix.com/de/video-pro-x/ – Wind Statistic from Windfinder.com https://www.windfinder.com/report/due… http://www.hvdh-plane-spotter.de http://www.hvdh-film.de http://www.hvdh-sport.de http://www.hvdh.info Planes in the crosswind storm video: Emirates A380, Delta B767, ANA Boeing 787, Dash8, A320 … Overview of all aircrafts: 00:00 Wind-statistic Storm Friederike at DUS from Windfinder.com 00:05 Storm at Düsseldorf airport in time-lapse 00:10 Moving Eurowings Dash turboprop approach in gusty storm 00:44 Spectacular crosswind sideways Dash 8-Q400 D-ABQD landing 00:55 Touch down Eurowings flight EW9203 from Bologna 01:00 Go around A320 at RWY 23R 01:20 Crosswind landing Eurowings Dash 8 at Runway 23R 01:38 Go around Eurowings Dash 8 Q400 D-ABQ? 02:00 Touch and go Dash 8-Q400 in former Air Berlin design 02:30 Approach Eurowings A320 RWA 23R 02:36 Go around Eurowings A320 02:46 Approach flybe Dash 8-Q400 RWY 23R 03:00 Go around flybe Dash 8 G-PRPB LCY-DUS 03:11 Go around Germanwings A320 03:29 Gusty approach and go around Eurowings A320 03:48 Stormy landing flybe Dash 8 flight BE1401 from London 03:58 Go around Dash 8-Q400 in former Air Berlin design 04:11 Stormy landing Dash 8 D-ABQE EW9181 from FLR Florence 04:34 Bumpy landing EW 9413 A320-214 D-AEWK from Lyon LYS-DUS 04:48 Safety run at RWY 23R 04:53 Go around Eurowings A320-214 at RWY 23L 05:06 Go around Pegasus A320 05:27 Stormy take-off Condor 05:42 Extreme stormy landing Eurowings A320 06:02 Go around A320 at RWY 23L 06:22 Go around EW9001 MUC-DUS Dash 8 D-ABQH at RWY 23L 06:32 Approach Delta Airlines 06:53 Delta Go away to FRA Frankfurt 07:08 Lufthansa A320 goes around at RWY 23L 07:28 Amazing rainbow ended at runway 23R 07:37 ANA B787 JA-877A NH209 from Tokyo with water spray 07:54 Taxi ANA B787-9 flight NH 209 NRT-DUS 08:03 Landing Emirates A380-800 08:14 A380 flight EK 55 DXB-DUS touch down at runway 23L 08:18 A380 reverse thrust with amazing water spray 08:52 Timelapse from storm Friederike in Düsseldorf

 

 

 

 

 

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Hurricane Leslie Is Headed Toward Spain And Africa – Marshall Shepherd

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Before I discuss how weird that is, it is useful to explore Leslie’s history. Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski laid out a timeline of Leslie on Accuweather’s website. I have summarize his timeline:Leslie initially formed as a subtropical storm in the middle of the Atlantic, Leslie becomes tropical on October 3rd, Leslie weakens to tropical storm on October 4th and remains at that level until October 9th,Leslie becomes a hurricane on October 9th…When you look at the latest projected track of Leslie, places like Portugal, Spain, and Morocco appear on the map. If you want to know just how odd this track is, consider a social media post from my colleague Dr. Tom Gill at University of Texas – El Paso…..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/marshallshepherd/2018/10/12/you-are-not-hallucinating-hurricane-leslie-is-headed-toward-spain-and-africa/#33c5719a4453

 

 

 

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Beaches Getting Sand to Replace What Irma Washed Away – Larry Barszewski

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More sand is on the way for beaches in south Broward County that took a hit from Hurricane Irma last year. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to spend $9.7 million in January to truck in and replenish about 123,000 cubic yards of sand — enough to cover a football field with sand 57 feet high — lost during the storm on beaches south of Port Everglades. The project in January won’t make the south county beaches wider, but it will put more sand on dry sand areas away from the water…….

Read more: http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-ne-south-broward-beaches-more-sand-20180918-story.html

 

 

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Hurricane Florence Prompts Cruise Itinerary Changes, Delays One Ship’s Next Sailing – Gina Kramer

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Several cruise ships have been forced to either reroute or delay their next sailing to avoid the impact from Hurricane Florence, a massive hurricane zeroing in on the U.S. East Coast with maximum sustained wind speeds of 90 miles per hour. The Category 1 storm (downgraded from a Category 4 major hurricane) is now touching down in North Carolina, near the South Carolina border, with life-threatening swells, high winds, heavy rains and tornadoes. A State of Emergency has been declared for South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Maryland and Virgina. No cruise ships are sailing from Virginia, this year. Below is a breakdown of the affected cruise ships……..

Read more: https://www.cruisecritic.com/news/news.cfm?ID=8848

 

 

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Hurricane Florence Triggers Coal Ash Spill, Cuts Power to Millions – Gavin Bade

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The amount of coal ash released from the Sutton plant is relatively small compared to major spills, but it underscores the inherent risks of storing the waste product in close proximity to waterways and local communities. Coal ash, created by burning coal for electricity generation, contains heavy metals like mercury and lead known to be harmful to humans. Duke said enough ash was released to fill two-thirds of an Olympic-sized swimming pool, but most of it was caught in a ditch surrounding the storage facility……

Read more: https://www.utilitydive.com/news/hurricane-florence-triggers-coal-ash-spill-cuts-power-to-millions/532491/

 

 

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Inside the National Weather Service, the Digital Eye of Hurricane Florence – Doug Bock Clark

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A little after 7 P.M. on Thursday, Phil Badgett, a lead forecaster for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), monitored Hurricane Florence from a field office in Raleigh, North Carolina’s inland capital. Depicted across his four computer screens by the region’s Doppler radar, the storm looked like a colossal sawblade, its green and yellow outer teeth just beginning to chew into the purple continent. “It’s beautiful and fascinating,” he told me, “but also horrifying. As the outer bands come in, what I’m watching for is tornadoes……

Read more: https://www.newyorker.com/news/dispatch/inside-the-national-weather-service-the-digital-eye-of-hurricane-florence

 

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Stunning Space Photos Show Nightmare Hurricane Florence Swirling Over the Atlantic

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Incredible images captured from the International Space Station show Hurricane Florence barreling toward the U.S. East Coast. European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst tweeted pictures taken 249 miles above the eye of the storm. “Watch out, America! #HurricaneFlorence is so enormous, we could only capture her with a super wide-angle lens from the @Space_Station, 400 km directly above the eye,” he wrote. “Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you…..

Read more: https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/832257c1-6b8e-307f-ab02-74eec1bbc1fb/ss_stunning-space-photos-show.html

 

 

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Hurricane Florence begins lashing North Carolina : Dont risk your life riding out a monster storm

Via: https://www.yahoo.com/gma/hurricane-florence-deliver-life-threatening-surges-rain-despite-092306390–abc-news-topstories.html?soc_src=newsroom&soc_trk=com.apple.UIKit.activity.CopyToPasteboard&.tsrc=newsroom

 

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With massive Hurricane Florence Approaching, a million People are Urged to Evacuate – Reuters

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South Carolina on Monday ordered an estimated 1 million people to evacuate its coast as the state and neighboring North Carolina brace for a hit from Hurricane Florence, the most powerful storm to take aim at the US mainland this year. The storm had winds of 130 miles per hour and was due to gain strength before making landfall, which the US National Hurricane Center said was likely to occur early Thursday in the Carolinas, bringing heavy rain that could cause severe flooding through the region.

Reda more: https://www.pri.org/stories/2018-09-10/massive-hurricane-florence-approaching-million-people-are-urged-evacuate

 

 

 

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A Tale of Two Communities – People & Fish – Recovering from Harvey By Larry McKinney

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One year after Hurricane Harvey hammered the Texas coast, divergent pictures of recovery and resilience have emerged. The coastal marine communities of fish, shrimp and crabs that thrive along our Gulf coast, are dynamic, resilient and on the mend. The coastal human communities are also dynamic but their resilience is being challenged.

The coastal marine community has an important advantage over coastal human communities — millions of years of evolution driven by hurricanes. Hundreds of hurricanes have entered the Gulf of Mexico since we started keeping track of them, and the Coastal Bend has seen its share. The plants, animals and even the physical landscape of the coast are shaped by hurricanes. It’s survival of the fittest, as the animals so fundamental to ecosystem health — the shrimps, crabs and fish such as red drum and spotted seatrout — all have life cycles that respond well to hurricane-induced stress.

Hurricanes are the giant cement mixer: nutrients and sediments are resuspended, mixed up and flushed from inland reaches into bays and estuaries. Freshwater mingles with saltwater and vice versa. The physical environment also changes; some habitats, like oyster reefs and seagrass meadows, can be buried. Deep pockets scattered across otherwise shallow coastal flats fill in, new ones form, and as the hurricane passes, barrier island passes open and close.

Harvey was different from most hurricanes in that it hit the Texas coast twice. It stalled after landfall, hung around Victoria, then went back into the Gulf over San Antonio Bay, where it sucked up more water, heat and power, moved northeast and slammed into Houston, dumping unforeseen amounts of water over the metropolitan and neighboring areas. The result was really two storms: South Texas had to deal with wind, waves and storm surge, especially from the bayside, but northeast Texas had to deal with massive floods.

The combination of winds, storm surge, low salinity, and low dissolved oxygen had devastating effects on coastal habitats up and down the Texas coast. Floods dumped unprecedented freshwater carrying huge quantities of organics into bays, causing extensive hypoxia. Despite the stress, coastal habitats showed signs of recovery by spring 2018, followed by a genuine bloom through summer.

We saw a burst of new life, particularly in South Texas, as the bays filled with huge schools of juvenile fish. Spotted seatrout grew fat and lazy with so much bounty. Over the next several years the marine ecosystem, as well as anglers and seafood lovers, will reap that bounty. The renewal is reminiscent of a forest fire, which is initially devastating, but recovery brings back a boom of new life.

Our coastal communities also respond with immediacy to hurricanes. While we have not been around so long as the fish and shrimp, we have learned how to survive on the edge of the sea. Our abilities to predict a hurricane’s course and energy has increased impressively, and the emergency responses of coastal leaders and communities are nothing short of heroic. The rush to aid by all after Harvey was inspiring, renewing faith in our neighbors both near and far.

However, as Texas communities continue to recover, our human systems for social support, economic recovery and governance of public resources have faltered. This is particularly evident in South Texas, where we lack the capacity of large cities like Houston. Even there, some neighborhoods are failing to recover from this unprecedented natural disaster.

Our political leadership can muster funding, both short term and for the long haul, but when they leave the coast for their various seats of government and bureaucracy takes over, recovery efforts can break down. Judges, mayors, county commissioners and local leaders have their hands full meeting the immediate needs of their citizens. Adding another “job” to a long list simply does not work.

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The sheer complexity of recovery is mind-boggling. There are dozens of federal, state, philanthropic and private programs offering assistance. However, there is no one-stop shop spanning very different recovery issues. Tough issues persist, such as renters who lost housing; individuals struggling with mental health through recovery; communities trying to rebuild schools and bring back families that have moved away; small businesses that need a jumpstart to rebuild local economies on a shrinking tax base; and what to do when critical infrastructure is privately owned and does not qualify for federal assistance.

Acquiring the planning capacity needed to navigate this complexity while making sure communities are building back in a safer, more resilient way adds further burden. Even in a community like Rockport, which has invested in dedicated staff to address these issues, recovery will be hard-fought for years to come. For those communities that could not make such an investment, the road is hard indeed.

To build long-term resilience, we must better understand the complexities of recovery programs and resources; link them with coastal communities through careful planning that addresses future risks; and integrate these efforts with the environment of which we are a part.

Hurricanes are a reality of coastal life, and people are now part of that coastal ecosystem. If we are to live and thrive on our coastal margins we have understand and adapt to that reality and secure the capital needed to plan for our resilient future. We have a lot to learn from the fishes.

 

 

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