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George Gilder- Life After Google Blockstack Berlin 2018

George Franklin Gilder is an American investor, writer, economist, techno-utopian advocate, and co-founder of the Discovery Institute. His 1981 international bestseller Wealth and Poverty advanced a practical and moral case for supply-side economics and capitalism during the early months of the Reagan administration and made him Ronald Reagan‘s most quoted living author.[2] Married to Nini Gilder, he has four children.

In the 1970s, Gilder established himself as a critic of feminism and government welfare policies, arguing that they eroded the “sexual constitution” that civilized and socialized men in the roles of fathers and providers. In the 1990s, he became an enthusiastic evangelist of technology and the Internet by several books and his newsletter, the Gilder Technology Report. He is also known as the chairman of George Gilder Fund Management, LLC…….

 

 

 

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How To Succeed Without Data, In A Data Driven World – Chaka Booker

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There are some words that inspire confidence when you use them. “Data” is one of those words. Throw “data-driven” in front of “decision-making” and you’ll suddenly find yourself more credible. If someone is sharing an idea, ask about “the data” and your IQ shoots up several points. I believe in data. I understand how data can identify trends, minimize risk and lead to better decisions. Data comforts me. But the fixation on data has a drawback. It leads to the belief that decisions made without data – aren’t as strong. Never mind that bad decisions, based on data, get made all the time……

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/chakabooker/2018/10/06/how-to-make-decisions-without-data-in-a-data-driven-world/#5ba0f01e1d6e

 

 

 

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Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL) | Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path

After three years of development, two years of field testing, and countless hours of creative innovation and hard work, Carrick Enterprises is proud to announce the availability of the Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy!

The Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL) is a unique and useful tool to add to your assessment program. It will facilitate conversations on your campus and throughout the profession about what information literacy means to students today and into the future.

Inspired by the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, TATIL provides librarians and other educators information to better understand the information literacy capabilities of their students. These data-driven insights inform instructors of weak areas, guide course instruction, affirm growth following instruction, and prepare students to be successful in learning and life.

All TATIL modules are available now! Explore this site to learn more about the test and how to administer Module 1, Evaluating Process & Authority; Module 2, Strategic Searching; Module 3, Research & Scholarship; and Module 4, The Value of Information

 

Source: Threshold Achievement Test for Information Literacy (TATIL) | Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path

 

 

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Fake News – Resources for Learners and Educators | CristinaSkyBox | Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path

Digital literacies, Visual literacies, Social Media literacies.The skills and demands of today’s literacies change and so should educational practices by meeting learners in the world in which they live in.   Here are some resources for helping students understand the issue of fake news.

Source: Fake News – Resources for Learners and Educators | CristinaSkyBox | Information and digital literacy in education via the digital path

 

 

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6 Resources to Help Students With Information Literacy – Laura Ascione

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Information literacy skills top many lists of must-have abilities, especially in the age of fake news. Not all results in a Google search are legitimate–but how many of today’s students know this?

Children have access to devices at younger ages, which underscores the importance of teaching them how to look at news with a critical eye and to evaluate the information’s origin. Because today’s students are growing up in an age where information is easily accessed, they need to know how to apply critical evaluation skills when met with information purporting to be truthful.

Last year, a Stanford University study determined that students from middle school through college were not able to distinguish between reliable news sources and sponsored content or advertising.

“In every case and at every level, we were taken aback by students’ lack of preparation,” the study’s authors write. “Never have we had so much information at our fingertips. Whether this bounty will make us smarter and better informed or more ignorant and narrow-minded will depend on our awareness of this problem and our educational response to it.”

During the 2016 presidential election, fake news stories were more popular than legitimate media reports.

A BuzzFeed analysis found that in the last three months of the U.S. presidential campaign, the most-viewed fake election news stories on Facebook elicited more reader engagement than legitimate top stories from sources such as the Washington Post, the New York Times, and NBC News. In all, top-performing fake news stories received roughly 1.3 million more shares, reactions, and comments than did the legitimate top-performing news stories.

Here are some resources to help teachers and students navigate media and information literacy:

1. The American Association of School Librarians notes that the definition of information literacy has changed as technologies and resources have evolved, but critical thinking and evaluation skills will help students succeed in a tech-based global economy.

2. In Media Literacy: Where News Comes From, the American Press Institute explores how students can determine if news is reliable. They also participate in a mock press conference to experience the process and challenges of effectively communicating and disseminating information.

3. The National Association for Media Literacy Education offers resources, lesson plans, and member-submitted ideas to teach students about information literacy and how to critically evaluate news.

4. Common Sense Education’s News and Media Literacy is an educator toolkit, grouped by grade, to help teachers show students just how important critical thinking and evaluation skills are for today’s world.

5. PolitiFact, a nonpartisan, Pulitzer Prize-winning website, fact-checks news reports and aims for transparency, fairness, and thorough reporting. It also offers a section that exposes fake news and false claims reported in the media.

6. The CRAAP Test continues to be an educator favorite. It was developed by university librarians and focuses on currency, relevance, authority or source, accuracy, and purpose of a piece of information.

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