Value Investing & Growth Investing – What Are They?

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Stock trading or investment is one of the most sought investment options for many investors. It does require some evaluation and lots of patience. Stock trading is not just about buying and selling stocks of different companies. However, it’s more about reading those companies, and there are two standard approaches – Value Investing and Growth Investing. There’s no need to panic if you have heard about them for the first time because our expert is here to help you out.

Our expert is none other than Malik Mullino, CEO of Jadeite Assets LLC and a retired-marine who’s been helping people for a long time.

According to Malik Mullino, ” value and growth investments are two fundamental approaches to stock investments “. Both have their perks and downs, but both seek to maximize the investment value to investors.”

To explain in it simple words, in value investing, investors go with undervalued stocks. In contrast, in growth investing, investors buy stocks of companies with the potential to outperform the market at the time.

Here’s a better breakdown of Value and Growth Investment to help you understand them in a better way.

Value Investment 

In the value investment approach, investors lookout for the companies which have fallen but still have strong fundamentals. These are the well established and big corporations, which have been trading below their worth.

There could be several reasons for a stock being undervalued. Public perceptions of these corporations matter a lot, which hinders the prices; chances could be that company or its central personnel could be caught in some scandal or some unethical practice. But at the same time, the company’s financials are still as strong it was, and that is why value investors opt for such stocks because the company’s finances will hold up, and after a while, the public will forget about these scandals, and the price will rise to where it should have been.

Consider a company X with a stock price of $20 a share, based on the number of shares outstanding divided by its capitalization. But, right now, it’s trading for $10 a share, which is quite a good deal considering that stocks’ price will be up after a while.

Here are some of the critical characteristics of the growth funds

  • Priced lower than the overall market: The idea behind value investing is that good companies’ stocks will bounce back in time if other investors recognize the actual value.
  • Priced below similar companies in the industry: Many value investors believe that most stocks are undervalued due to investors’ overreaction to recent company problems, such as low earnings, negative publicity, or it could be some legal issues, which might not matter in the long run.
  • Carry somewhat less risk than the market: There’s one good thing that these stocks take time to turn around so that value stocks may be more suited to longer-term investors.

Growth Investment

In the growth investment approach, the companies have registered more gains which have caught investors’ eyes since it is expected to continue with such a trend.

But what’s the reason behind such a good performance. Well, the gains might be unexpectedly high due to the company’s recent performance, or some of its product performing well enough in the market with a promise of ’emergence’ over the years.

Consider a company that’s been trading for $30 a share while its competitors are still at $18 a share and the price of stocks of the first company is rising steadily, then it will be considered as a growth stock or company.

Growth stocks can be found in small, mid or large-cap sectors as long as analysts conclude that they have achieved their potential.

Now, what’s the reason behind investors feeling confident about growth stock’s future. The main reason could be a company working on a product expected to excel in the coming years or minting more money than its competitors.

  • Higher priced than the market. Investors are willing to pay a high price with the expectation of selling them at even higher prices as the companies continue to grow over the years.
  • High earnings growth records: Growth companies potentially continue to achieve high earning regardless of economic conditions even if its not suitable for the market.
  • More volatile than the market. There’s a risk in buying a growth stock as its price could fall sharply any day, mainly if earnings don’t go well with big traders.

Well, there’s one more category, a blend of both; a stock can also be undervalued while performing better than the market standards at the same time.

Value Investing and Growth Investing – Which Is Better?

On comparing the historical trends, value stocks are considered to have a lower level of risk, atleast theoretically, since they are well established, and big-time corporations whose fate will turn around sometime in future, and investing in value stocks might not result in a capital loss since these stocks also pay dividends.

Meanwhile, growth stocks don’t offer dividends and reinvest the earnings back into the company. The probability of growth stocks going down is more than the value stocks if the company is unable to keep up with the market’s growth expectations. So overall, growth stocks come with the biggest reward and risk at the same time.

Some people opt for both value and growth stocks when investing for the long term since the risk will be reduced, and gains could be multiplied depending on how the market fares out in future. This approach enables investors to profit from the economic cycles, whether it’s beneficial for the value or growth stock.

As Malik Mullino says, the decision to invest is a personal choice. The same person can only decide whether to invest in growth or value stocks. It depends on their risk tolerance and investment goals. But it is essential to study the market and to evaluate the company before proceeding with the investment.

At last, it’s all about you. It’s only you who can decide where to put your money, but if you need help, you can reach out to our CEO Malik Mullino for any suggestions.

 

Source: Value Investing and Growth Investing – What Are They? – satPRnews

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6 Most Commonly Overlooked Cost Savings In Business

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In a quest to cut costs, many businesses inadvertently leave money on the table by overlooking legitimate savings or chasing false economies.

From paying more than necessary to cutting budgets on activities that bring home the bacon, here are some of the most commonly overlooked savings in business to look out for in 2021.

1. Marketing waste

Advisors warn against cutting marketing budgets at the risk of plunging into obscurity. However, that spend should deliver a decent return on investment (ROI).

Giving into Facebook’s prompts to boost a post might seem harmless, but it’s an easy way to burn through cash.

Not targeting ads effectively is akin to pouring good money down the drain. Determine who your ideal customer is, which media they consume and when they’re most likely to buy. Then tailor your ads accordingly.

Have a plan and a budget and stick to them.

2. In-house efficiencies

Efficiencies are the holy grail in business – doing the same thing (or better) for less money. Yet, some are less obvious than others.

Improving employee welfare and workplace culture can reduce staff turnover – saving on recruitment, training and exit payouts while stemming the loss of skills, experience and intellectual property.

Don’t confuse busyness with productivity: teams should work on revenue-driving activities, not administration. Look for ways to simplify operations, freeing staff to work on core tasks.

Avoid sacrificing existing clients for new ones. It’s more expensive to attract new customers than to give existing ones more attention and value.

Automate inventory control and staff rosters to reduce errors. Running out of stock or being short-staffed ultimately means lost sales.

Streamline business finances and develop strong financial foundations. Invoicing promptly means money coming in sooner, while paying bills and taxes on-time eliminates interest and penalties.

3. Risk mitigation

“Prevention is better than cure” typically applies to health, but the same goes in business.

Review your risk mitigation strategies and stress test them for weaknesses. Risk mitigation includes:

  • insurance against business interruption and loss/damage/theft
  • contingency plans for key staff absences
  • automatic back-ups of essential software and data
  • security protocols, password management and staff cyber training to avoid fraud and hacks
  • work-from-home capabilities should staff be unable to attend the business premises (as COVID-19 has demonstrated)

Insurances and staff hours spent on these are up-front costs, but they’ll save big bucks should disaster strike.

4. Misplaced cost-cutting

Why slash the stationery budget only to blow those savings elsewhere? It sounds silly, yet many businesses fall into this trap. It’s important to deliver real savings.

For instance, stop paying rent on unused space – downsize to smaller premises or sub-let surplus space to subsidise the cost.

Upskill employees in revenue-generating activities to boost income, rather than fire them and face hefty exit payouts.

Don’t overlook taxes when looking for cost savings. Claim legitimate depreciation of business fit-outs, office furniture, vehicles and equipment. Update vehicle logbooks to claim eligible mileage allowances. Apply for relevant tax concessions and COVID stimulus.

5. DIY

“It’s cheaper to do it myself”, many business leaders claim. But are you sacrificing your ability to earn more in the process?

Weigh up the cost of outsourcing against the additional revenues and cost-savings you could generate by spending your time elsewhere.

Outsourcing could involve delegating tasks to new or existing employees, hiring contractors or implementing new technologies.

6. Buying power

Consider how to get the best value for your money.

Interest rates are at record lows, making money cheaper to borrow to upgrade equipment or expand. Refinancing debts could also slash repayments. However, plan your finance needs ahead of time – cash flow quick-fixes like short-term loans typically cost more.

Could you buy the business premises in a self-managed super fund (SMSF)? That way, your retirement fund receives the rent rather than a third-party.

And avoid the “lazy tax”: annually reviewing subscriptions, utilities, loans and insurances can net substantial savings. Often, you don’t even need to change providers – just ask for a better rate or get them to price-match a competitor!


 

By: Helen Bakerhttps://onyourowntwofeet.com.au/

Helen Baker is a licensed Australian financial adviser and author of – On Your Own Two Feet Steady Steps to Women’s Financial Independence. Helen is among the 1% of financial planners who hold a master’s degree in the field.

Source: 6 most commonly overlooked cost savings in business – Dynamic Business

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14 ways to cut costs and save money in your small business. – http://selfmadesuccess.com Let’s Connect! Twitter – https://twitter.com/MrJustinBryant Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/justinbryant… Google+ – https://plus.google.com/+JustinBryant… In this video, you will learn how to cut costs and save money in your small business. I’ll talk about strategies that include making sure you use all the best tax deductions, use freelancers instead of hiring more employees for certain jobs, cutting out expensive software in favor of free online tools and much more. Enjoy the video! https://www.facebook.com/mrjustinbryant
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Toxic Signs Of A Multifamily Investment

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When investing in multifamily properties, there are other factors outside the cap rate, P&L, rent rolls and cash on cash that you should consider. In fact, the numbers, although highly critical in your analysis, are only a portion of what should dictate the decision to proceed. As you begin your due diligence period, you may want to consider these other potential pitfalls before you seal the deal.

What To Look For

The pulse of a multifamily investment doesn’t always come from what the books are saying. In fact, if you fail to investigate the day-to-day culture of tenants and demeanor of the current property, you could be in for a big surprise.

Unless you have the privilege of being one of the few investors that can walk into a new property and completely clean house and not worry about cash flow, these indicators may be warning signs of a much deeper-rooted problem that may not be worth the investment.

• Excessive wear of interior of units: Normal wear and tear is one thing, but severe deferred maintenance found amongst a higher percentage of units could be a telling sign of trouble. Outside issues found in inspections, walking each unit is by far one of the most effective ways to determine if this is an issue.

• Consistent negative feedback from tenants: The key here is listing any repetitive, serious issues that keep coming up and being able to discern from the minor issues. Talking to tenants is a great resource for information, and you should capitalize on the opportunity while you are walking each unit. Understanding that tenants have no real incentive to speak anything but the truth typically makes the feedback more reliable and genuine.

• High traffic at night: How a property operates at night is another piece of the puzzle you may want to consider when analyzing a multifamily investment. Typically, during the day, people are at work and there is not much activity. A visit at night can give you the insight you may need to see if the safety of the property is adequate or not. Extremely high traffic at night could be a potential indicator of crime, but, more importantly, it can be a deterrent for future tenants.

• The unhappiness of tenants: Are the tenants unhappy or happy? It might seem like a silly question at first; however, the crux of the sustainability and future of the investment can lie within the answer. Do you see more positive feedback than negative? If this answer is no, you may want to find out why and see if the solutions are in line with the budget and the vision of the investment. Solutions to these issues could be as simple as a more secure entry room door or better lighting outside the walkways. However, if it’s due to criminal behavior or domestic issues in the complex, this can help open your eyes to the entire picture and consider factors the numbers fail to disclose.

As investors scream through the numbers, it’s easy to bypass the human side of the transaction. Where the human component of multifamily should be considered just as crucial to the decision, it’s not uncommon to be an afterthought or one of the lower priorities of the analysis. Focusing solely on the bottom line and not taking this factor into consideration is a recipe for disaster.

The damage that a toxic culture in a property can do is much more impactful because it not only affects the individual, it can spread to the entire community. You can fix a leaky sink, a broken heater or clean up the landscaping, but not addressing these issues can take a major strain on the investment if you’re not prepared.

Forbes Real Estate Council is an invitation-only community for executives in the real estate industry. Do I qualify?

Owner and Qualifying Broker at Rhino Realty Property Management and Rhino Realty B&B, entrepreneur, investor, advisor, author and speaker. Read Alex Vasquez’ full executive profile here.

Source: Council Post: Toxic Signs Of A Multifamily Investment

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http://www.biggerpockets.com – The 50% Rule is a great tool for quickly estimating the potential cash flow from a real estate investment. This video will walk you step by step through the math and show you how quickly and easily a cash flow estimate can be – for any size real estate investment.

3 Purchases or Investments You Can Make to Save Money on Your Business Taxes

With a little over one month to go in 2019, small business owners should think about purchases or investments that make good business sense and will give them a break on their taxes.

Owners with available cash and a wish list should consider what equipment they need. Or, do they want to create a retirement plan or make a big contribution to an existing one? If they have home offices, are there repairs or improvements that can be done by Dec. 31? But owners should also remember the advice from tax professionals: Don’t make a decision based on saving on taxes. Any big expenditure should be made because it fits with your ongoing business strategy.

A look at some possible purchases or investments:

Need a PC or SUV?

Small businesses can deduct up-front as much as $1,020,000 in equipment, vehicles and many other types of property under what’s known as the Section 179 deduction. Named for part of the federal tax code, it’s aimed at helping small companies expand by accelerating their tax breaks. Larger businesses have to deduct property expenses under depreciation rules.

There is a wide range of property that can be deducted under Section 179 including computers, furniture, machinery, vehicles and building improvements like roofs and heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems. But to be deducted, the equipment has to be operational, or what the IRS calls in service, by Dec. 31. So a PC that’s up and running or an SUV that’s already in use can be deducted, but if that HVAC system has been ordered but not yet delivered or set up, it can’t be deducted.

It’s OK to buy the equipment and use it but not pay for it by year-end — even if a business buys the property on credit, the full purchase price can be deducted.

You can learn more on the IRS website, www.irs.gov. Search for Form 4562, Depreciation and Amortization, and the instructions for the form.

Home Office Repairs

Owners who run their businesses out of their homes and want to do some repairs, painting or redecorating may be able to get a deduction for the work. If the home office or work space itself is getting a makeover, those costs may be completely deductible. If the whole house is getting a new roof or furnace, then part of the costs can be deducted.

To claim the deduction, an owner can use a formula set by the IRS. The owner determines the percentage of a residence that is exclusively and regularly used for business. That percentage is applied to actual expenses on the home including repairs and renovation and costs such as mortgage or rent, taxes, insurance and maintenance.

There’s an alternate way to claim the deduction — the owner computes the number of square feet dedicated to the business, up to 300 square feet, and multiplies that number by $5 to arrive at the deductible amount. However, repairs or renovations cannot be included in this calculation.

Owners should remember that the home office deduction can only be taken if the office or work area is exclusively used for the business — setting up a desk in a corner of the family room doesn’t quality. And it must be your principal place of business. More information is available on www.irs.gov; search for Publication 587, Business Use of Your Home.

Retirement Plans

Owners actually have more than a month to set up or contribute to an employee retirement plans — while some can still be set up by Dec. 31, plans known as Simplified Employee Pensions, or SEPs, can be set up as late as the filing deadline for the owner’s return. If the owner gets a six-month extension of the April 15 filing deadline, a SEP can be set up as late as Oct. 15, 2020, and still qualify as a deduction for the 2019 tax year.

Similarly, contributions to any employee retirement plan can be made as late as Oct. 15, 2020, as long as the owner obtained an extension. This means owners can decide well into next year how much money they want to contribute, and in turn, how big a deduction they can take for the contribution.

You can learn more at www.irs.gov. Search for Publication 560, Retirement Plans for Small Business.

–The Associated Press

By Joyce M. Rosenberg AP Business Writer

Source: 3 Purchases or Investments You Can Make to Save Money on Your Business Taxes

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Now That Commissions Are Free, Here’s How To Avoid The Big Costs Of Investing

TRADE FOR FREE! NO COMMISSIONS! Sounds too good to be true? Well, it is and it isn’t. Allow me to explain.

Within the past few weeks, a slew of brokerage firms reduced the rate their customers pay for online stock and ETF trades. In fact, they reduced them to dust. Interactive Brokers (IB) started it. Schwab joined in. Then, the cavalry arrived. Many of the largest firms followed suit in different forms. They joined IB, Schwab and the many robo-advisors who have offered free trading for a while.

What does it all mean for you?

Let’s start with the simplest part. Whether you trade your own accounts, or a professional advisor manages your assets, there is a very good chance your costs to execute trades has been reduced. It might even be zero.

However, that does not mean that investing is now “free.” It never was. Now, I know what you are thinking. You don’t use mutual funds, and you don’t use ETFs. So, your returns are not reduced by those “expense ratios” that are embedded in managed funds. If you buy and sell individual stocks, that is true.

You may also point out that you have most of your assets in tax-deferred accounts, such as an IRA or your 401(k) plan. Again, you are correct in assuming that you will not be taxed on those assets until you take them out or reach age 70 1/2. So far, investing sounds pretty darn inexpensive to me!

Today In: Money

The real costs of investing

One of the most frustrating things to me after more than 3 decades in the investment business is how quickly people jump at the chance to get something for “free” without considering the whole picture. Zero commissions on stock and ETF trades is just the latest example.

Trading, execution (how good a price you get when you place an order with a brokerage firm), and expense ratios get all the hype in the “race to the bottom” that is today’s big Wall Street.

Taxes…and how Wall Street tries to make them exciting

Taxes get some respect as a cost to reckon with. However, here too, the industry (especially the Robo firms) has created unnecessary drama by touting something call “tax loss harvesting (TLH).” This is something many of us in the field have done religiously for taxable client accounts for years. And we have done so with a focus on each client’s specific tax situation.

Now, firms will put your account on an automated system that hyper-actively swaps you from one security to another similar one, in order to generate a constant stream of tax losses. These can be posted against gains to reduce your tax bill. Great in theory.

TLH does not mean TLC

However, from the live examples I have seen, these TLH programs crowd out some very good investment strategy work. This would take an entirely separate article to explain. Perhaps I will post one.

For now, suffice it to say that in some instances, investment firms are charging an extra fee for something that is potentially overkill. That same service can be done more carefully and inexpensively as custom work for each client. It is just one of those things that you need to be aware of.

In an era of zero commissions, these for-profit firms are not going to find other ways to profit. In no way am I saying they don’t provide a helpful service. Just don’t get caught up in the hype.

Money market rates…also going to zero?

For example, the interest rate paid on money market funds at brokerage firms is, shall we say, in a bear market. That is, the rates are plunging. This is because brokerages are returning to one of their most profitable business, now that short-term interest rates have popped up from 0%.

For example, if T-bills yield 1.50%, you would hope that the money market fund that is used to sweep cash in and out of when you trade would pay somewhere in that range. Check carefully. Many firms have dropped those rates so that they are way, way lower than T-bills.

Cash management: the new tool in your toolbox?

That does not mean that it is a bad deal for you. If you trade actively, and don’t hold a high cash balance anyway, your interest in dollar terms is quite tiny to begin with. But if this is not the case, perhaps you are better off sharpening your skills as a “cash manager.”

I know I have done this in the accounts I manage over the past year. There are ETFs that invest in short-term, high-quality bonds like Treasuries. And, now that there is no commission cost to trade them through many firms, they may be worth considering as a money market surrogate.

The BIG cost of investing that gets too little attention

Drum roll, please…its lousy performance in down markets. Or, as David Letterman said, its all fun and games until someone loses an eye. So, amid all of the excitement about how little it will cost you to “play the market” with no trading costs and low expense ratios, there is still an issue. If the stock market drops 20%, 30%, 40% or more, you had better have a plan.

And, the plan can’t be to figure it out on the fly. Ask the folks who were suddenly faced with that in 2000 and 2007, the winds shifted. We all want to get our “fair share” of the ups. But when markets freak out and $20 of every $100 you had in your portfolio can potentially vanish in a few weeks (as stock index funds did around this time last year), lack of risk-management becomes the only cost that matters.

To try to put a bow on this cost discussion, consider the following if you have $500,000 to invest, and you are not a day trader, nor a straight buy-and-hold investor:

* The cost of 40 trades a year used to be about $5 each. That’s $200 a year you saved, with commissions going to zero.

* You switched to index funds from active funds, and maybe mixed in some stocks. Let’s say that shaved your portfolio expense ratio from 1.00% to 0.20%. You saved $4,000 on that $500,000 portfolio.

* Taxes: you generated capital gains of $30,000, but used TLH to knock that down to $10,000. Assuming a 30% tax rate, you saved $6,000 in taxes. This is getting better and better!

Minimal risk-management: the market fell by 20%, and you escaped with “only” a 18% loss. But that’s still a $90,000 decline in the portfolio! If you had practiced risk-management using some of the techniques I discussed in recent articles (tactical positioning, options, inverse ETFs, etc.), you might have kept that loss to half that.

Naturally, everyone’s situation and objectives are different. However, the key is to recognize the relative impact of the different types of investment “cost.” In the examples above, the cost of trading was well under 1%. The impact of expense ratio was a bit under 1%. TLH helped (assuming you had gains to offset with losses), to the tune of just over 1%.

However, risk-management can be “worth” well over 1%. That’s the point, and what you should focus on when evaluating your total “cost” of investing.

Comments provided are informational only, not individual investment advice or recommendations. Sungarden provides Advisory Services through Dynamic Wealth Advisors

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I am an investment strategist and portfolio manager for high net worth families with over 30 years of industry experience. A thought-leader, book author and founder of a boutique investment advisory firm in South Florida. My work for Forbes.com aims to break investment myths and bring common sense analysis to my audience. Connect with me on Linked In, follow me on Twitter @robisbitts. Visit our website at http://www.SungardenInvestment.com.  What do you think? I welcome your questions and feedback at rob@sungardeninvestment.com. For more on this and related topics, click here.

Source: Now That Commissions Are Free, Here’s How To Avoid The Big Costs Of Investing

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