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Researchers Find A Web Of Factors Behind Multiple Sclerosis

As the story goes, nearly 80 years ago on the Faroe Islands — a stark North Atlantic archipelago 200 miles off the coast of Scotland — a neurologic epidemic may have washed, or rather convoyed, ashore. Before 1940 the incidence of multiple sclerosis on the Faroes was near, if not actually, zero, according to the tantalizing lore I recall from medical school. Yet in the years following British occupation of the islands during World War II, the rate of MS rose dramatically, leading many researchers to assume the outbreak was caused by some unknown germ transmitted by the foreign soldiers……..

Source: Researchers Find A Web Of Factors Behind Multiple Sclerosis

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6 Tips for Building Trust With Your Child’s Doctors – Beth Arky

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Find clinicians who get your kid.

“We have an exceptional relationship with our OT and a solid one with our developmental pediatrician,” Dana W. writes. “They value our kiddo in ways the regular world doesn’t. [The OT] had one 90-minute session with him and she spoke our language. In so many other situations, I feel like I’m my child’s translator. [The doctor] has ‘Great minds don’t all think alike’ on his business cards. Our child never feels broken or different to them. They make him laugh and work hard.”

Make your needs known.

“I vented about the initial pediatrician (who was very judgmental and rigid) and let the new pediatrician know what I needed from her so that my anxiety would be lower,” writes Dede W.

Keep your pediatrician in the loop.

Interview doctors before establishing a relationship,” Sonya S. writes. “Keep the pediatrician in the loop with all the other specialists. Visits are inherently rushed, but [keep] the conversation … focused and effective.”

Use your pediatrician as a resource.

“I love my children’s pediatrician,” Julie C. writes. “She trusts what mom says and will give great referrals. She and I have both learned over the years that she can help best by referring out to a specialist!”

Find someone you and your child trust.

“I’ve found that many doctors in the same area can be very opinionated [about] one another and have different methods and ideas [about] treatment,” Jenny K. writes. “You really need to shop around and find someone you and your child can trust.”

Collaboration is key.

“While stimulants can be helpful for focus, the side effects … can make the benefit not worth it,” Marilyn L. writes. “Luckily, there are different options. Find a doctor who can work with you to find a combination of behavioral, therapeutic, nutritional and pharmacologic interventions.” Kristin T adds, “It’s important to create a team that listens and works together. We connect with each provider and make sure [they all connect] in a collaborative space.”

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