A Crypto Bankruptsy Could be Investors Nightmare

Source: https://vigourtimes.com

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Women are Far Less Financially Prepared For Retirement Than Men

Many women aren’t financially prepared for retirement, according to a recent report from TransAmerica. Men have about twice as much money saved for retirement ($118,000) than women do ($57,000). Of concern, nearly a quarter (24%) of women currently have less than $10,000 saved for retirement, compared to just 14% of men.

Seventy-nine percent of men are confident in their ability to fully retire with a comfortable lifestyle, compared to just 64% of women. Both men and women think that they’ll need to have saved $500,000 in order to retire comfortably. A third (33%) of women do not have any retirement strategy at all, which is significantly more than the 18% of men. Women are also far less likely than men to be currently saving for retirement, at 77% and 86%, respectively.

Financial preparedness for retirement, women vs. men

Despite the fact that the vast majority of both men and women worry that Social Security will run out before they retire, 27% of women and 17% of men expect to rely on Social Security payments as their primary source of income during retirement.Keep reading to learn the challenges women face when saving for retirement, as well as how women can better financially prepare to retire. If you’re searching for ways to improve your financial situation ahead of retirement, visit Credible to compare a variety of financial products from debt consolidation loans to high-yield savings accounts.

Women face unique challenges when preparing for retirement

There are a number of obstacles that women must overcome when saving money for retirement — starting with the gender wage gap, according to Stacy J. Miller, a Tampa, Fla.-based certified financial planner (CFP). Women typically earn less money than men, which results in lower retirement savings.

Miller said that because “women are often the caretakers in the family,” they may have to leave the workforce to care for children and aging parents. Missing periods of work can result in lower earnings over time and “fewer opportunities for pay raises and promotions.”Most woman caregivers have had to make work adjustments, such as missing days of work (36%), working an alternative schedule (28%), reducing their hours (27%) and even quitting their jobs (10%), TransAmerica reports.

Work adjustments due to caregiving, men vs. women

“Additionally, women statistically live longer than men, and therefore their retirement portfolio would need to be larger than men to last longer,” Miller said. Without proper financial planning and adequate retirement savings, some retirees may become reliant on credit card spending to cover basic expenses. If you’re struggling to pay down high-interest credit card balances, you may be able to save money through debt consolidation. You can learn more about credit card consolidation on Credible to determine if this is the right financial strategy for you.

How women can better prepare for retirement

If you’re one of the many women with an insufficient retirement nest egg, there’s still time to save. Consider these tips from female financial advisors on how women can be more financially prepared for retirement:

Maximize your retirement contributions

Both working women and self-employed caretakers should find a way to contribute the maximum amount to retirement plans, according to Kimberly Foss, a CFP in Roseville, Calif. — “especially in older women’s peak earning years, which often occur as they are nearing retirement.” In 2022, employees can defer up to $20,500 of their annual income into their workplace retirement plan or 401(k). The current contribution limit across all individual retirement accounts (IRAs) is $6,000 per year.

Women who are near retirement age should take advantage of catch-up provisions to grow their account balances, Foss said. This allows individuals ages 50 and up to contribute an additional $6,500 annually to their 401(k) plans and an added $1,000 to their traditional IRAs and Roth IRAs.

Allocate your investments

Besides maximizing their contributions, women should also consider their how their retirement investments are allocated, according to Joyce Streithorst, a CFP in Melville, N.Y. “Default investments make an impact on one’s long-term growth and returns,” Streithorst said. “Lifecycle or target date funds can help provide an allocation to equities and fixed income to attempt to align risk to your age and anticipated retirement year.”

Retirement savings accounts are typically invested in bonds as well as the stock market in the form of index funds and mutual funds. Investment allocations range between conservative, moderately conservative and moderate, depending on the risk tolerance. An investor’s retirement portfolio will typically vary based on market conditions. Since consumers have their own unique financial goals and obligations, it’s important to determine the right asset allocation strategy for your needs.

Reach out to a financial advisor

TransAmerica reports that while 43% of men use a financial advisor to help them manage their savings and investments, just 34% of women do. This could be due to a lack of female advisors, said Tess Zigo, a CFP in Palm Harbor, Fla.

“Because we don’t see many women in finance and as financial advisors, it doesn’t feel approachable or accessible,” Zigo said. “Many women feel more comfortable working with someone relatable.”Retirement planning can at times be overwhelming, so you might consider enlisting a professional to help guide you through the process. You can search for advisory services in your area on the CFP website.

And if you’re searching for the right financial products to set yourself up for success in retirement, it’s important to shop around. You can visit Credible to compare interest rates on everything from personal loans to mortgages for free without impacting your credit score.

Source: Women are far less financially prepared for retirement than men: TransAmerica study | Fox Business

Critics by : Mallika Mitra

For women, the salary gap they face in their working years eventually turns into a retirement savings gap. Only about 6 in 10 women have a plan to keep them from outliving their savings once they retire, according to a recent study by Nationwide Advisory Solutions. Among men, it’s more than 3 out of 4.

The firm polled about 1,021 financial advisors and 824 investors in February and March. “We’re in an industry that is inherently addressing the issues of men,” said Kristi Rodriguez, leader of the Nationwide Retirement Institute at Columbus, Ohio-based Nationwide. “We have to instill confidence in female investors.”

Women face unique challenges when saving for retirement. For one, they live longer than men — on average by six to eight years, according to the World Health Organization. They’re also subject to higher health-care costs. A woman retiring at age 65 in 2019 is likely to pay around $150,000 in health-care costs throughout retirement, while the number drops to $135,000 for men, according to an annual analysis by Fidelity Investments released earlier this year.

Women also tend to spend more time away from work to care for children. Once they return, they can fall behind in rank and miss out on opportunities for promotion. This “motherhood penalty” costs women $16,000 a year in lost wages, according to an analysis of Census data by the nonprofit advocacy organization National Women’s Law Center in 2018. Financial advisors must address these obstacles and ensure women feel comfortable discussing these challenges.

“You can find an advisor that meet the needs of both you and your spouse,” Rodriguez said. “But what is important is to find someone who creates that environment to make you feel welcome.”

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Performance Management vs Disciplinary Action: The Differences Explained

Many employers find performance management, or instigating disciplinary action against employees for misconduct, difficult and emotionally challenging. It can be hard for an employer to distinguish between misconduct and underperformance; it’s harder still managing an employee through either a disciplinary or a performance management process with confidence.

If you are required to take management action, to help you gain confidence in your processes which in turn may help you to build a better business, we have set out some differences between performance management and disciplinary action below.

What is Disciplinary Action?

If an employee is behaving improperly in the workplace, an employer may need to raise and address concerns regarding the employee’s conduct by means of a formal disciplinary process.

Employers should introduce and implement policies and procedures in line with the expected standards of behaviour in the workplace, so employees know what is considered acceptable conduct. These policies should be made available to all employees and the employer should be consistent in applying and enforcing these policies.

Disciplinary action is usually taken to address misconduct, which is defined as behaviour in the workplace which is generally unacceptable, or contrary to the employment contract, or breaches policies and procedures of a company.

What Are Some Examples of Misconduct?

Misconduct is behaviour that is considered unacceptable and inconsistent with employee obligations or duties, i.e., a breach of company policy or procedure.

Examples include:

  • unauthorised absences (including ‘sickies’)
  • lateness
  • bad language
  • poor presentation
  • misuse of company equipment

Serious Misconduct

Serious misconduct is defined as wilful and deliberate behaviour that is inconsistent with the continuation of the employment contract or causes serious and imminent risk to the reputation, viability or profitability of the business, or health and safety of a person. Examples includes theft, fraud, and assault.

Provided a fair process is followed, serious misconduct may give an employer grounds for instant, or summary, dismissal which means the employee is not provided with notice, or payment of notice in lieu.

Employsure is here for business owners and are committed to giving every business free initial advice. If this is a topic of concern and you need to get more from your staff, call us on 1300 207 182.

Appropriate Standards of Behaviour

It needs to be noted that not all misconduct is clear and obvious. For example, getting into a fight at work is clearly and obviously inappropriate behaviour in any workplace, however, expected behaviour when using company equipment may vary from business to business. It’s important to ensure that you’ve implemented – and consistently applied – a thorough code of conduct or standards of behaviour policy in your workplace in case an employee disputes an allegation of misconduct.

What is Performance Management?

Performance management is used to address poor performance. Poor performance is where an employee is not meeting the essential requirements of their role. If an employee is underperforming – for example failing to hit KPIs or unable to meet their remit due to lack of skills an employer may consider entering the employee into a performance management process.

As part of a fair process, the employer should identify the issue e.g., where skills are lacking, inform the employee and provide further training where appropriate. The employer should put in place a plan of action to address the performance issues and to give the employee an opportunity to improve to the required standard. Performance management should only address the requirements of the role, not behaviour in the workplace; it should be clear that misconduct is not poor performance.

While part of the performance management process is similar to disciplinary procedures, it is important for employers to not conflate the two concepts. If you’d like to know more about performance management, download Employsure’s free guide. For a more confidential chat, call Employsure’s Employer Helpline for free initial advice: 1300 207 182.

What’s the Difference?

A performance management process may result in further training or a performance management plan (PMP), or performance improvement plan (PIP), an opportunity to improve their performance.

A disciplinary procedure may not result in a behavioral management plan as it is not an employer’s responsibility to ensure their employees act reasonably and appropriately in the workplace. An employer’s duty is only to remind them of their expected behaviour in the workplace and ensure they abide by it.

By : Employsure

Source: Performance Management vs Disciplinary Action: The Differences Explained – Dynamic Business

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Amid Chaos, IRS Attempts A Return To Normal

E-filing of individual tax returns for the 2022 filing season opens on January 24. The start of e-filing and the April tax filing deadline return to an almost normal schedule while ongoing issues make filing season realities hard to predict.

In 2021 individual e-filing didn’t open until February 12. In 2020 it opened on January 27. This year’s opening appears to be moving the needle back toward the more normal mid-January opening. The April 18th filing deadline is also a return to normal after the July 17, 2020 and May 17, 2021 extended deadlines. Friday, April 15, 2022 is the Emancipation Day holiday in Washington, D.C. which is why the deadline has been moved forward to Monday April 18. It almost seems normal. Almost.

While the start and finish lines to filing season 2022 have a whiff of normalcy about them, everything in between stinks. It stinks of expectations bordering on the delusional and it stinks of IRS rot. When it comes to considering “known unknowns” such as the effects of reconciling economic impact payments (stimulus money) and advance payments of the Child Tax Credit (CTC), the IRS doesn’t seem delusional.

The Commissioner is taking every chance he is offered to urge taxpayers and tax practitioners to file accurately and electronically. The IRS is using every channel it has to remind taxpayers to watch for Letters 6419 and 6475 (which provide the amounts of the advance CTC payments and EIPs, respectively). It’s the Commissioner’s apparent failure to consider the “unknown unknowns” that reeks of delusion.

While the IRS Commissioner (in a recent statement) and the National Taxpayer Advocate (in her most recent report) have been open about anticipating another difficult filing season, they have not seemed to consider the potential for natural disasters to create yet another patchwork of filing deadlines. In 2021 the May 17th deadline wasn’t the deadline for Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana due to winter storms.

Louisiana’s deadline was re-adjusted after Hurricane Ida. In late April 2021 the May 17, 2021 deadline was extended for some Kentucky counties due to storm effects and the list of affected counties continued to be adjusted until June 28, 2021 (two days before the extended June 30 filing deadline). At the end of April 2021 Alabama taxpayers got an extension until August 2. In September New York and New Jersey got their deadline extended because of Hurricane Ida. That’s just a sample; the list goes on.

The other unknown unknown the Commissioner has failed to consider is the ongoing effects of the pandemic. His statement was issued January 10, 2022 amid the omicron variant surge. At this time it is unclear if that surge has peaked and it is even more unclear what effects the current surge will have on IRS staffing levels during filing season. Whatever the effects are, it is unlikely they will improve return processing or response times.

It’s early January 2022. It’s unlikely that the pace of natural disasters will abate and predicting pandemic surges has proved elusive, so why not plan for the worst and issue a pre-emptive extension of the filing deadline until July? Early filers will still file early. Procrastinators will still procrastinate. Extending the deadline until mid-year would simply mitigate some of the confusion resulting from yet another reactive patchwork of federal deadlines due to yet another bad weather year or more Covid-related staffing issues.

And then there’s the rot. Yes, the IRS has been underfunded for years. Yes, experienced people retired and because of funding cuts, they were never replaced. Yes Congress continues to ask the IRS to do more with less. But at some point the IRS needs to acknowledge certain systemic failures in its procedures and possibly its culture.

One such systemic failure was the continuation of automated notice processing despite the mail and phone backlog. Taxpayers and tax practitioners continue to receive second and third notices, each more aggressive than the last, about issues that were addressed by a mailed response to the first notice that has remained either unopened or unprocessed by the IRS. That’s a procedural failure.

The cultural failure is the idea that temporarily stopping automated notices or providing some sort of blanket penalty relief or temporarily giving more experienced customer service reps (or their supervisors) more autonomy to abate penalties until the IRS clears its mail backlog is some sort of abject moral failing that will result in massive taxpayer noncompliance. It’s the idea that cutting taxpayers some slack in the middle of yet another chaotic filing season will turn otherwise law abiding taxpayers into tax protesting scofflaws.

It’s the idea that their kindness will be considered weakness. Perhaps that is the case, but the fact of the matter is that our tax system is based on voluntary compliance and the complete inability to get assistance when trying to comply voluntarily with one’s tax obligations or exercise one’s rights under the tax laws could be as much (or more) of a disincentive to compliance as lack of enforcement. Unfortunately, heading into the third filing season under pandemic rules it seems we have yet to find rock bottom and a path out of this abyss.

Follow me on Twitter.

I own Tax Therapy, LLC, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. I am an Enrolled Agent and non-attorney practitioner admitted to the bar of the U.S. Tax Court. I work as a tax general practitioner preparing returns for individuals and (really) small businesses as well as representing individuals before the IRS and, occasionally, the U.S. Tax Court. My passion is translating “taxspeak” into English for taxpayers and tax practitioners. I write to dispel myths with facts and to explain “the fine print” behind seemingly simple tax concepts. I cover individual tax issues and IRS developments with a focus on items of interest to taxpayers and retail tax practitioners. Follow me on Twitter @taxtherapist505

Source: Amid Chaos, IRS Attempts A Return To Normal

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Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Publication 15, which includes withholding tables for income tax. State requirements vary by state; for an example, see the New York state portal for withholding tax.

Canada Revenue Agency Publication T4001. Canada Revenue Agency also provides significant online guidance accessible through a web index, including an online payroll tax calculator.

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Stablecoin Friendly Policies Can Help Make 2022 A Breakout Year For The Sector

Stablecoins increasingly are the form of cryptoassets most commonly used for transactional purposes, and as 2022 gets underway the importance of these cryptoassets will only increase.

From a business and marketplace point of view the upsides and opportunities linked to stablecoins are clear, and have been reinforced over the last several years. As should be self-evident by the moniker, the primary benefit of stablecoins is the reduced price volatility that often characterizes other cryptoassets.

A simple statement of fact, but one whose importance cannot be overstated. In order to achieve mainstream adoption and utilization as a medium of exchange rather than simply a speculative investment, users and consumers must have confidence in the value of whatever is being utilized for this purpose.

The appetite and interest in stablecoins has been demonstrated by the billions in transactions taking place using these assets, the regulatory focus highlighted by the President’s Working Group report on the matter, and the fact that several major payment processers now allow customers to send and receive payments denominated in stablecoins.

In other words, the functionality of these tools and market interest has been proven and established; the technology works and fills a need. Policy, or lack thereof, still remains a looming threat to broader adoption and utilization, and is an area that will need to be addressed as the sector continues to mature.

Obviously the conversations linked to cryptoasset regulation is beyond the scope of any singular article. Rather, the factors listed below are explicitly connected to stablecoins, and how commonsense policies can not only help accelerate adoption of stablecoins, and also create a regulatory environment that allows for further maturation and development of the space.

Let’s take a look at a few policy items that could – and hopefully will – accelerate the already rapid adoption of stablecoins.

Differentiate stablecoins. This point cannot be overstated; in order to further develop and expand the opportunities for stablecoin utilization, there needs to be a differentiation between stablecoins and other cryptoassets. While it is true that the cryptoasset space at large has become much busier during the last year or so – non-fungible tokens (NFTs), decentralized finance (DeFi), and the rise of central bank digital currencies (CBDCs) – the importance of this singular difference is paramount.

Even now as regulators seek to implement policies to monetize and capture the benefits connected to cryptoassets, stablecoins are routinely lumped in with more volatility counterparts. This not only misses the bigger point regarding the value case of stablecoins, but muddies the water around how to best integrate cryptoassets into financial markets.

Monetary competition is good. Recent comments and conversations have focused on, notably around the different CityCoin projects that have launched during the last several months, is that developing this array of options might not be the best use of resources. The thinking goes, why not instead invest these resources in developing other technologies or addressing other economic or societal issues versus introducing yet another cryptoasset? This line of thinking, as appealing as it might appear upon first review, misses the broader point.

Every economic sector, be it connected to technology or not, is improved by the introduction of competitive options for consumers, investors, and users alike. Many of the same proponents of more standardized and centralized cryptoasset options, namely CBDCs, should be encouraging new and innovative stablecoin options. Lessons learned in the private sector can – and have – been integrated into the development of newer and more mainstream cryptoasset options.

Competition is a good thing, and the best components of different tools will be integrated into whatever options do eventually achieve mainstream status.

Simpler reporting requirements. The tax, compliance, and reporting obligations that accompany cryptoassets are a burden that have been discussed in multiple outlets, and the issues that exist are nothing new. Building on the first point mentioned above, this is also an opportunity for policymakers to demonstrate that more sophisticated public commentary is also working its way into more nuanced regulation and rule-making. One of the best ways to communicate that policy is evolving alongside the sector would be to ease the compliance burden on the issuers and users of stablecoins.

Clearly there is always a role for well-informed and thought out regulation and rules, but the current reporting obligations seem more appropriate for cryptoassets with higher volatility than stablecoins. This subset of cryptoassets were developed, and have been explicitly designed, to function as a medium of exchange; how can this happen if potential tax obligations need to be recorded and reported for every transaction?

Understandably, government authorities wish to collect taxes when appropriate; that is not the problem in this context. The issue is when the rules that have been implemented seem to specifically and artificially undermine the primary use case of the instrument (stablecoins) in question.

Stablecoins have quickly rocketed from an interesting cryptoasset that might have struck some market participants as a boring alternative to bitcoin to an integral link in the adoption journey for many individuals and organizations. Despite this rapid growth and acceptance, however, work remains in order to fully realize the potential of these cryptoassets for transactional purposes.

As the calendar rolls forward into 2022, this is the perfect time to revisit, revise, and improve rules and policies around stablecoins. Serving a bridge and on-ramp for market actors at varying levels of expertise, stablecoins have a critical role to play; effective policy can go a long way to making this a reality.

Follow me on Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out some of my other work here.

Source: Stablecoin Friendly Policies Can Help Make 2022 A Breakout Year For The Sector

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