These 15 Behaviors Will Make You Almost Irreplaceable At Your Workplace – Nina Angelovska

1.jpg

Probably at our workplaces we have all heard many times that “no one is irreplaceable”, though it is more likely to hear it more often in big corporations where people are still considered as “positions”. However it is not the technology, the product or the process that makes a company great, it is the people behind that great solution. And while some might think that “irreplaceable” is a very strong statement I think everyone would agree there are some people who make themselves very difficult to replace. These are the people who enjoy a competitive advantage because they are an invaluable asset to any company……..

Read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/ninaangelovska/2018/10/30/these-15-behaviors-will-make-you-almost-irreplaceable-at-your-workplace/#7e3cf4911a54

 

 

 

 

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

Advertisements

How To Avoid Hiring Toxic Employees – Tom Taulli

1.jpg

In the early stages of a company, hiring can be a make-or-break decision. Just one wrong hire can ultimately derail the venture. Unfortunately, hiring is extremely complicated and fraught with risk. This is especially the case with founders who may not have much experience with the process. So what to do? Well, I recently reached out to a variety of executives to get some advice.

Let’s take a look:

#1 – Establish Hiring Best Practices

“Cultivating a healthy and positive company culture starts with hiring best practices,” said Mehul Patel, who is the CEO of Hired. “Unfortunately, even the best hiring managers can miss red flags during the interview process that indicate a candidate is prone to toxic workplace behavior. However, there are a few ways to suss out the potential for toxic behavior that are critical for any hiring manager to follow.”

 Here are some of the things he recommends:
  • The more team members who interview a candidate, the better. Each candidate that begins the interview process with your company should be introduced to a well-rounded roster of current employees who will be calibrating the candidate for the role. In addition to the hiring manager, there should be 3-4 additional employees who are interviewing the candidate.
  • Of course, “toxicity” won’t be listed on a candidate’s resume. Yet past behavior in the face of real challenges can be a revealing indicator. Try the following questions and listen for signs of overt negativity: What was your least favorite thing about your past employer? Tell me about a time when your team let you down and you had to pick up the slack? What is the biggest mistake you’ve made in your career? How do you deal with an underperforming teammate?
  • Use reference checks. Following up with past employers for detailed references is essential to getting a better understanding of a candidate’s work style and interpersonal skills. Was the employee a team player? Were they curious and enthusiastic about new opportunities? What were some of their challenges and how do I set them up for success?

#2 – Interview for Skills, Hire for Personality

When it comes to the hiring process, there is often too much focus on skills. But this can easily lead to the wrong person. After all, you are not hiring a list of functions and duties – rather, you are bringing someone on who has a unique personality.

“The person you select, and their personality, will have a direct and immediate impact on your company culture, so surface level knowledge shouldn’t satisfy you,” said Samar Birwadker, who is the founder and CEO of Good&Co. “Merely paying lip service to culture fit– ignoring that daily interactions with his or her team and manager form the majority of the employee’s feeling about a job– does your company a massive disservice. Incorporating a new personality to your team is like adding a new ingredient midway through preparing dinner for your in-laws.”

The bottom line: When interviewing, you are looking at the skills. Then, when you make the hiring decision, it’s time to look at the fit. In other words, you need to pay attention to the interactions with your team. Is there some tension? Are there some bad vibes? Such things are certainly red flags, even if the person is highly skilled.

You can also use various apps to test a candidate’s personality (keep in mind that this is what Good&Co does and the company has a free app for iOS and Android).

#3 – Speaking Negatively About Their Past Employer

Jason Carney, who is a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and the HR Director of WorkSmart Systems, has over 20 years’ experience in staffing. His company is also a Professional Employer Organization (PEO) that serves over 200 client companies with employees in 37 states. Many of these are small to-medium-size employers.Image result for How To Avoid Hiring Toxic Employees

When doing interviews, one of the factors Jason looks for is a person’s reflections on his or her previous jobs. “Even if someone has had a truly horrifying experience in the previous industry or job they were in, they should still be able to talk about their past employers in a positive way,” said Jason. “If they rant about how much they hated their last job, this could indicate to me that the applicant may not take responsibility for his or her own actions. This shows a sign of immaturity if they can’t at least share what was learned from the experience, instead of placing blame on others. What might they say about you when they leave your employ one day?”

#4 – Recruit For Values

Panda Restaurant Group has over 35,000 employees. So yes, a key focus of the company is sourcing talent.

“For a values-driven and team-oriented organization like Panda Express, we find it important to assess employees in terms of a company culture fit to avoid creating an environment that jeopardizes not only the business but also the growth and development of other team members,” said Leonard Yip, who is the Chief People Officer. “Our focus is to evaluate candidates holistically, assessing not only the person’s skillset and experience, but also their mindset. An employee with a positive attitude who is willing to learn can prove to be invaluable.”

This means that – during the interview process – you need to listen for key words like “we” versus “I” or “me.” There must also be a focus on behavioral-based questions to assess whether an applicant shares the same set of values of the company.

For Panda Express, this is about using the P.R.O. questioning method. “It involves asking about past experiences, examining how the candidate responded and determining what the outcome was. By learning about an employee’s past behavior to predict their future behavior, we look for individuals who are energized by problem solving and learn from their experiences.”

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you

The 6 Worst Kinds of Late People (And The Message They’re Sending) – William Vanderbloemen

1.jpg

You know these people. The late people. They make you crazy. You may be one of these people. The truth is, I’ve been all of these people at one time or another. And all seven of these people make me crazy too.

What people don’t realize is how the simple mistake of being late carries big consequences. When I’m late, it sends unintended messages to the room about me, and it’s not good. If you’re in an interview with me and I get one these messages, you may put yourself in an unwinnable position.

Meet the six worst kinds of late people and the message they are sending:

1. The “Frantic”

Every one of us knows this person. They run in the room with hair on fire (actually, they usually run in the place with wet hair), and bustle in just as you’re getting started (and after you’ve already waited).

Message sent: “I am drama.”

This kind of lateness projects a life that is out of control. A life that stays in drama mode. In the thousands of searches I’ve done over the years, I’ve never had a client ask for someone that is drama. In fact, most people want team members who are calm.

Conversely, being on time reduces stress.

By some estimates, the stress relief industry (products, books, etc.) is an $11 billion industry in the US alone. Here’s a free way to achieve what people are paying to find: be on time.

2. The “Unaware” (aka The Self Absorbed)

Ever have someone walk into a meeting late and not even notice they’re late? “Oh, have you all been waiting?”

Message sent: “I’m more important than you.”

The old saying is true: we measure what matters (to us). If you take steps to be on time for our meeting, you are actively communicating that you respect my time. Conversely, an innocent oversight of time can project a really self-absorbed image. That’s tough to recover from.

3. The “Unapologetic”

Some people just walk into a meeting late and keep rolling as if nothing has happened.

Message sent: “I don’t care.”

Being on time shows you can execute on a promise. Interviewing, at its root, is an attempt to size up whether or not a candidate can do a job. Showing up on time means that one of our very first contracts (the appointment) is one you can execute on. Being late and not apologizing? That tells me not only that you cannot do the job, but also that you do not care.

4. The “Victim”

“You won’t believe what happened to me on the way to work…” Actually, you’re right; I don’t believe you.

Message sent: “I’m a victim.”

Nobody wants to hire someone that’s a constant victim. Far too often, people respond to an error with excuses, with stories of what happened to them that cause them to be late. Yes, things happen, but not time after time. And when they do happen, the rare and refreshing response is the person who finds a way to own their mistake and learn from it.

5. The “Considerate”

How many times have you gotten the email or text from someone right before the meeting telling you all of the reasons they’re going to be late? Sometimes, this is a good thing, but most of the time?

Message sent: “Don’t believe me.”

I appreciate the heads up, but when the heads up is a three-page email, and the person walks in late with a Starbucks in hand, things get suspicious. How you respond to an error makes all the difference in how it is received. But wasting time writing a long email because the line for coffee is too long? That diminishes credibility.

6. The “Chronically Late”

This one is the worst, and whether you realize it or not, it sends a very clear message:

Message sent: “Don’t count on me.”

Being on time shows you’re in control of your life. It’s a broken world, and people are sometimes late for reasons out of their control. Try to drive anywhere in Houston one day and you’ll understand. In the end, an appointment is an agreement. If you constantly break my trust by failing to fulfill our agreement, I’m at the least going to think you’re undependable, and at worst not going to trust any of your promises.

Now that we have done over 10,000 face-to-face interviews at Vanderbloemen, I realize it’s the simple things that separate great candidates from the rest of the field. This one tip may be the most valuable…..Be on time.

If everyone who reads our articles and likes it, helps fund it, our future would be much more secure. For as little as $5, you can donate us – Thank you.

 

5 Things You Need to Know Before Hiring Remote Employees – Jessica Thiefels

remote

Remote employees are no longer an anomaly. In a recent survey by Gallup, 43 percent of surveyed Americans said that they spent some time working remotely, a 4 percent increase from 2012. What’s more, the benefits of hiring remote workers are difficult to ignore, including decreased overhead costs and increased productivity.

Benefits aside, remote workers need to have a different set of skills than office employees, where there’s regular interaction with managers and leadership can see more clearly what everyone is doing.

If you’re ready to dip your toes into the remote workforce waters, keep these tips in mind to make sure you hire the best people for the job.

  1. They must be self-starters

Remote employees need to take initiative and keep themselves motivated without the chance for a manager to “pop by” to keep them working throughout the day. Monica Zent, founder and CEO of Foxwordy, suggests:

“You’re looking for a self-starter because people who are looking to be told what to do won’t do well in a work-from-home situation. Given the many temptations of a home office, a high level of motivation is imperative. This is where figuring out how the person thinks is important. I prefer to get at what makes a person tick, and have had great success with good hires the more I do this.”

How do you find out if your potential employee is a self-starter?Mark Murphy, Forbes contributor, suggests asking questions like:

  • Tell me about a time when work didn’t interest you very much, and how did you get past it?
  • What kind of management style do you prefer?

This should provide insight into what what your remote workers need to stay motivated, which is key.

  1. Asking candidates to complete a task is important

Asking interviewees to complete a task during the interview, which is presumably remote, gives you great insight into their skillset, as well as how they work. Sara Sutton Fell, Fast Company contributor, said:

“When people work remotely, the managerial focus shifts from how much time they spend in the office to what they’re getting done every day. During the hiring process, it’s smart to focus on skills and the candidate’s approach to the job by having candidates do small a test or a trial project, to see how well—or not—they follow instructions, ask questions and generally perform in a remote environment.”

Try to mimic their work environment as much as possible with this task. This may mean that you’re only available for questions via a messenger system or that they need to access resources via Google Docs that have previously been shared.

  1. The interview should be a little different

There’s a big difference between being down the hall from someone and being across the country (and for many, the world). A highly qualified candidate may work efficiently if they’re in the office with a team to keep them on track, but not well by themselves.

Thankfully, you can get ahead of this by asking the right questions in the interview. Focus your questions on organizational skills, career motivation and self-direction.

Josh Tolan, CEO of Spark Hire, recommends that managers, “ask for candidates to explain scenarios in which they worked independently and managed their own time. Look for more than canned answers, and seek out specific examples of organizational skills and internal motivation. Don’t focus wholly on productivity to the exclusion of everything else, though; it’s also important to make sure your top-notch candidates can work as a valuable member of your team.”  

  1. The right candidate values results

Micromanaging isn’t effective in any work environment. Not to mention, in a remote work environment, it’s next to impossible. When hiring, look for someone who values results.

“You as a manager have to be comfortable setting goals and then holding people accountable for those goals. They could be putting in long nights or they could be doing their laundry all day—but if you are managing correctly and getting the people who understand that results come first, you should be happy either way,” John Rood, author and Forbes contributor, said.

  1. Get crafty to retain and reward top talent 

Once you’ve hired your remote workforce, it’s time to focus on how you can keep them engaged and excited. Sarah Aboulhosn, marketing specialist and Pagely contributor, explains how to get creative in this regard:

“(Little benefits) can solidify an employer’s relationship with their staff and make the team feel appreciated, no matter where they are. If you’re working with a partially distributed team, take a look at what in-office perks your employees receive and figure out a few ways to provide them to your remote workers, ensuring that everyone has equal access to company perks.”

Make the right hire

Hiring the right remote staff is critical to ensuring work is getting done. Use these ideas to find the best people for your out-of-office staff and then keep them on board once they’re doing a great job.

Your kindly Donations would be so effective in order to fulfill our future research and endeavors – Thank you