Ways to Build Self-Esteem

Everybody experiences self-doubt from time to time. It’s a normal part of being human. When feelings of self-doubt last for long periods, however, you may have low self-esteem. “Low self-esteem is used to describe someone with a negative view of oneself, feelings of worthlessness and incompetence. Generally people fall on a continuum from low to high self-esteem, and this can vary from day to day and from situation to situation,” says Lori Ryland, a psychologist in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Fortunately, low self-esteem doesn’t have to be permanent. Recognizing symptoms of low self-esteem, understanding its causes and learning steps to thwart it can go a long way toward making you feeling worthy, valuable and confident.

What Causes Low Self-Esteem?

Low self-esteem can have many triggers and begin at any time in life. Some experts say low self-esteem is more the result of negative or traumatic experiences.

Others say low self-esteem stems from a critical inner voice. “Although it seems that our emotions and motivations result directly from the events and circumstances we encounter, they are instead reactions to our self-talk – the internal monologue that streams through our waking consciousness, interpreting whatever we experience and creating our perspective,” notes John Tholen, an author and retired psychologist who practiced in Southern California for more than 40 years.

Symptoms of Low Self-Esteem

The symptoms of low self-esteem may be hard to recognize or admit to yourself.

Ryland says signs can include:

Or perhaps you may recognize certain habits of low self-esteem, such as being unable to set boundaries. “Letting others have their way and failing to stand up for oneself can occur,” Ryland says.

Ways to Build Self-Esteem

You can build self-esteem with many techniques. Here are 17 to get you started.

  • Get some perspective. Realize that many people experience low self-esteem, and you’re not alone. “Self-esteem issues are much more common than you might think,” says Noam Dinovitz, a therapist in Philadelphia. “It’s one of those issues that frankly is easy to hide.”
  • Give yourself a break. “Maybe you are ‘just right’ how you are. Maybe this is a learning time. Maybe this is how it is all supposed to be. Be kind to others, and be kind to yourself. It is OK if you take a break today,” says Lynn Zakeri, a therapist in Chicago.
  • Be aware of self-criticism. “Take note of what you are saying to yourself,” says Alyssa Friedman-Yan, a therapist in Wilton, Connecticut. “Demand proof for these harsh statements.”
  • Get a second opinion. “First, list a few people in your life whom you value, and the reasons why you value them. Next, when appropriate, ask them why they value you. Then compare the list,” says Aaron Weiner, a psychologist in Chicago. “Is there any overlap? Do you agree with their judgment of you?”

  • Redirect negative thoughts.Reframe that critical voice into a more supportive one. Did you make a mistake? Well, instead of, ‘I’m so stupid,’ how about saying, ‘I learned what not to do,’” says Natalie Bernstein, a psychologist in Pittsburgh.
  • Change your expectations. “Unrealistic expectations can set one up for failure and diminish self-worth,” says Dr. Rahul Gupta, a psychiatrist in Atlanta. “It is important to tell oneself that not meeting certain goals and expectations is permissible.”
  • Write down your definition of worth. Be specific. “When we use general phrases, it’s easy to say we don’t feel good, because we can’t even truly define what we’re saying,” Dinovitz points out. “Furthermore, make sure that the worth is coming from a healthy place. If all of our worth is coming from a source like our jobs or how many followers we have on social media, that’s not healthy.”
  • Set realistic goals. “Start small and start simple. Be proud of even the smallest accomplishments. Change is best when it’s gradual and not abrupt. I like to tell my clients, ‘We cannot get from point A to Z without traveling through the alphabet, so please stop trying to skip B and C. Leave a trail of breadcrumbs so you can see your accomplishment and feel it and find pride in it,’” Friedman-Yan says.
  • Take control of negative experiences. “If we’re able to find purpose in the negative things that have happened to us, then we are able to use our negative experiences to our advantage and are able to feel like we have more control over what happened to us,” notes Brooke Aymes, a therapist in Haddon Township, New Jersey.
  • Take stock of successes. If you’ve succeeded before, you can do it again. “Make a list of all your accomplishments and keep this handy. Review it and add to it often, especially when you’re feeling low,” Ryland advises.
  • Try being assertive in conversation. “Say something that takes courage. It may just be chiming in or an opinion, but assertiveness can help you walk taller,” Zakeri suggests.

  • Challenge Yourself. “Maybe you’ve always wanted to hike a mountain, sleep in a tent or go kayaking, yet you’ve never made time for the experience. The more we challenge ourselves to try new things, the more we see what we are truly capable of and it helps us to build self confidence in ourselves,” Aymes says.
  • Surround yourself with healthy relationships. “Individuals that make up a social support system provide a mirror for one’s positive image. Healthy relationships and social support systems also provide an example of positive values that one can strive to embrace,” Gupta explains.
  • Avoid social media. Many studies suggest that social media is harmful to self-esteem. For example, a review of 49 studies of college students or teens, published online Aug. 27, 2019, by Media Psychology found that comparing oneself to others on social media was often associated with lower self-esteem. “Whether what we see is accurate or not, it’s very difficult to see what everybody else is up to or accomplishing and then not compare that to ourselves,” Dinovitz says.
  • Be in service to others. Aymes advises clients to volunteer or perform random acts of kindness, such as paying for the road or bridge toll of a person behind you in traffic. “Being in service to others helps us to naturally feel like good humans and also makes the world a better place,” she notes.
  • Use affirmations. “Think of how easily you believe critical ones of yourself. Instead, try to choose a phrase or two that you want to believe about yourself. Write it down on a piece of paper and keep it in your pocket, or note it on your phone. When saying it, try to tap into the feeling of the affirmation, imagine what your life would be like if this were to be true. Practice is important here, so set a timer on your phone if you need help remembering throughout the day,” Bernstein recommends.
  • Seek professional help. Consider reaching out to a professional such as a therapist, psychologist or psychiatrist. An expert can guide you through a number of types of talk therapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, which utilizes many of the same strategies in this article, including identifying dysfunctional thoughts and refocusing them to be more positive. “We can improve both our outcomes and our state of mind by identifying – and shifting our attention to – reasonable alternative ideas that are more likely to inspire constructive action or hope,” Tholen says.

Finally, don’t beat yourself up if change doesn’t happen overnight. “A path to self-acceptance is often a long one and has many peaks and valleys,” Friedman-Yan says. “It takes effort and adaptation, and requires us to be mindful in our interactions with self and our world around us.”

By

Heidi Godman reports on health for U.S. News, with a focus on middle and older age. She has over two decades of experience and her work has appeared in dozens of publications, including the Harvard Health Letter (where she serves as executive editor), the Chicago Tribune, Orlando Sentinel and Cleveland Clinic Heart Advisor.

Source: Ways to Build Self-Esteem | US News

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What It’s Like To Have Breakthrough COVID

The contagious nature of the Delta variant has meant breakthrough COVID cases are on the rise. Seven people tell us what it was like to have one.

In case you hadn’t already heard, COVID-19 numbers are ticking up again, even among people who are vaccinated. While unvaccinated people in the U.S. are contracting COVID at a much, much higher rate than those who’ve gotten the vaccine, the contagious nature of the Delta variant has meant breakthrough cases are on the rise, too.

Cities like Los Angeles have already reinstated mask mandates in response, while New York City has begun imposing vaccine mandates for people who wish to visit bars, restaurants, and gyms. Meanwhile, case numbers continue to climb. We spoke to seven people from around the United States about their breakthrough COVID experiences—the symptoms, the testing process, and how they’re feeling post-quarantine.

Do you know how you were exposed to COVID?

Brian Morgan, 48, Los Angeles, CA: I got my first dose of Moderna in January 2021 and my second February 2021. COVID symptoms started July 20th. I have an idea of where I think I may have gotten it, but it was definitely during the time where California’s government said it was safe to gather indoors without masks. I was at a few large indoor gatherings without a mask a week before the new mask mandates went into place.

Kyle O’Flaherty, 29, Brooklyn, NY: The weekend before I got sick, full admission, I had a bunch of social engagements kind of all stacked together: two birthday parties on Friday, a wedding on Saturday, and then like a day party on Sunday outdoors. Most of the things were in big spaces, I wouldn’t call anything necessarily “enclosed.” But they also kept me up late. I didn’t get a lot of sleep.

Daniel Merchant, 25, Brooklyn, NY/Portland, OR: I got vaccinated on April 7th at a public vaccination drive in Co-Op City, Bronx, right when the vaccine was made available to 18+ people. I got the J&J vaccine. I knew that I’d been exposed because three to four days before I started showing symptoms I was at a funeral, and then right after I started showing symptoms, I found out that my grandpa’s wife, who was there, tested positive (she’s a breakthrough case as well). Really unfortunate timing, because I went to another funeral the day before I found out I was exposed, so I had to text a ton of people that they’d been exposed too. Only one other person got it (also a breakthrough case!) which is a huge relief, but still a nightmare.

Jacob Hill, 42, Gonzales, LA: I was in meetings with one of the only other people who is vaccinated in my workplace, my boss. He got Johnson and Johnson, I had the Pfizer vaccine. We were in his office Tuesday and Wednesday, less than six feet apart and no masks;  he calls me Thursday morning and says, ‘Hey, man, I’m running a fever.’ I was like, ‘Oh my god, like, all right, I’ll kind of start watching myself for symptoms.’ Then he went to get a COVID test and he was like, ‘Look, I’m positive, you’re gonna have to isolate.’ The next day is when the headache started.

Marc Dweck, 30, Brooklyn, NY/Jersey Shore, NJ: For the summer, we live with family in New Jersey—there’s 16 of us in the house. We’re not sure who got it first. I was the first one to test positive, but a few people in the house weren’t feeling well before me. So who knows?

Silena Palazzola, 25, Los Angeles, CA: The first time I heard about a friend getting it was this last month—and I couldn’t tell you which one of my friends gave it to me, because two of them independently got it, and then I was exposed to both of them. They made the calls, that awkward, ‘Hey, she had a great time seeing you this weekend, but also you might want to go get tested and give people a wide berth for a few days.’

Chantal Smith, 38, Brooklyn, NY: I got vaccinated in April and I actually got Johnson&Johnson. My boyfriend was vaccinated in April, and he got Moderna. In mid July, I went to the US Virgin Islands in the Caribbean. You had to show a PCR test before you flew, and they had a mask mandate there. Flying back, we had an incident on the plane where someone wasn’t wearing a mask correctly and was sort of being belligerent. They actually got kicked off the plane—the police had to come on, and it was just a big pain in the ass. Two days later, my boyfriend started to complain that he felt like he had a summer cold.

What were your initial symptoms?

Smith: First, I had itchy eyes. The next night, I started to feel really sick—I had body aches and was feeling like I had a fever. I was like, this feels exactly what I felt like after I got vaccinated. I woke up the next day and said to my boyfriend, ‘Look, I think we should both go get tested.’

O’Flaherty: On the first day, I woke up tired and was tired at work. I had an ear infection and post-nasal drip on the left side, both of which are common for me. But later that night, my throat felt a little… interesting. The next day, I woke up tired again, but I still went into work. In the middle of the day, I started getting a headache and feeling that kind of hot, cold sensation. As soon as that happened, I just cancelled the rest of my day.

Merchant: I first started experiencing symptoms at the very end of July, maybe July 31st? I had a bit of a runny nose, some sneezing, and it felt like I had a minor sinus infection or allergies (not unusual when you’re in Oregon in the summertime). I realized I was fucked when I was making dinner with my mom, cooking something that involved garlic, lime, jalapeños and chili paste and I couldn’t smell a thing. Stuck my face in a bag of coffee, nada. Right after that, I told my parents to stay away from me.

Morgan: Mostly body aches, but later light sniffles and sore throat. After a week or so, I started developing a lack of smell and taste. I can taste basic sweet/sour/salty sensations now, but nuances of flavor are still diminished. Sense of smell is starting to come back, but still diminished.

Palazzola: I started feeling a tickle in my throat and then after three days of that, I was like, oh no, it’s getting worse.

What kind of test did you get, and where did you do it?

Merchant: I’ve had a few PCR tests post-vaccination. Another friend of mine was a super super early breakthrough case (like late April) so I got one at CityMD on Manhattan Ave in Greenpoint. My most recent PCR test (which confirmed that I had it) was OHSU in Portland.

Palazzola: I went into a Carbon Health urgent care center and did a rapid and it came back positive within an hour.

Dweck: I work in the wholesale industry; two weeks ago, I wasn’t feeling well, so I decided not to go to the office. I went to the doctor, the doctor said it was most likely an upper respiratory infection so there was no need to get tested, but if I wanted to, sure. So I got tested. The following morning, as I was waiting for results, I lost taste and smell. Then I knew that it was going to be a positive.

Morgan: Test was super easy here in LA. I got a nasal PCR test at a public testing site. Almost no wait on a Thursday morning.

Smith: I went to a CityMD urgent care in Williamsburg. There were a bunch of people outside.

O’Flaherty: I rode a bicycle to get tested at my doctor’s office, so it wasn’t like I was doing that badly. The irony is, I did have an ear infection. That’s one of the first things they found. It just happened to coincide with positive COVID.

Hill: We have a hospital here called Our Lady of the Lake Ascension. I called them, told them what my symptoms were, and they scheduled a test for me in the parking lot. I went there and I was like… number 170 in line. There were so many people there. And we’re not in a city—this is a small town.

What were your symptoms and how long did they last?

Morgan: All symptoms were pretty mild. In general, it felt like a very minor cold or flu. Body aches lasted maybe 4-5 days total. Sniffles and sore throat started a little later and lasted about 3-5 days. Lack of smell and taste is slowly coming back.

Palazzola: My symptoms got progressively worse for the next three or four days. I had a really bad sore throat—like, where swallowing anything hurts—and crazy fatigue. Then I got a little bit of congestion, but not much.

O’Flaherty: I was laid out for a bit. I quarantined for 10 days, but I was in a place where I would have called out sick from working for at least three if not four of those days, even in a world where there was no COVID. I was sweating through four or five t-shirts in a night,  massive headaches, massive sinus pressure, not really a cough but lots of post-nasal drip. There were a couple days when I got back to work after I was negative and everything was fine, but I was just working half days, and then I’d come home and take a nap. I required tons of sleep.

Merchant: I couldn’t smell a goddamn thing. Strangely enough, I didn’t lose my sense of taste at all. Fair amount of sneezing, and a runny nose + sinus pressure. A few times I felt a little out of breath, but I didn’t have any crazy coughing fits. A little bit achy here and there. I felt absolutely exhausted for a while. I slept like 12-14 hours for like 4 days straight, which is really unusual for me. I’d say I had symptoms for a week.

Smith: It was maybe five or six days of just feeling that achy, tired, fevery sort of feeling and then a cough and a runny nose—but it was more of a body thing.

Hill: The day after my boss called is when the headache started. It’s funny because like, on a scale of one to 10, it was probably a three—nothing too punishing, just nagging.  I think I ran a fever overnight once, because I woke up and I was sweating, but after that zero fever. Then I started getting a little bit stuffy in the nose, but that’s as far as it ever went with me. The stuffiness started to subside about four days into it, and that’s when I lost my taste and smell. That stayed gone for about another six days and then that came back. Nothing else for the entire duration.

Dweck: The first night I saw symptoms before I got tested, I had the chills, fevers, night sweats—exactly how I felt when I got vaccinated, which was sort of a red flag for me. And then I continued to have that and I wasn’t able to sleep for like four days in a row. I had body aches, congestion, fever throughout, just felt like garbage. As soon as I was able to sleep on the fourth night, I started to feel a little bit better and continually got better.

How are you feeling now?

Hill: I still feel a little bit foggy sometimes and I still feel pretty fatigued in the mornings—like my batteries are still a little bit lower than they should be. That’s got to be an after effect of COVID because I’m a real morning person.

Merchant: I’m finishing my isolation period today, and I feel pretty much completely normal, minus my smell, which has recovered maybe 20 percent? I can smell really strong odors, but it’s definitely not where it used to be. My guess is that it will come back with time (I really, really hope so).

Dweck: I still feel kind of weak and lethargic sometimes. My whole family got it, and we were all vaccinated, and our kids got it, who weren’t vaccinated unfortunately, because you can’t vaccinate babies. It’s annoying, but everyone’s doing good. Thank God.

Smith: For all intents and purposes, I’m better but I still feel kind of like shit. Every morning I wake up and I feel like I’m hungover even though I haven’t even had a drink. I’m coming into the third week of feeling like that—my boyfriend said he feels like he’s 60 percent better, and I’m maybe 80 to 90 percent better. We’re hoping that the next few days or the next couple of weeks, it’s going to go away, because it’s just been going off forever.

Morgan: Other than the lack of smell, I feel 100 percent recovered. Maybe even a little extra energy than before contracting COVID? I’ve heard of this effect with others, as well… increased energy post-recovery.

Any advice for people worried about breakthrough COVID?

Smith: If you have a scratchy throat or something that you’re not sure about, get tested. It is a pain but it’s free.

Morgan: On a spiritual level, just allow it and don’t resist that you have it. Don’t dwell on fear or negative effects. Have compassion for yourself and others during this challenging time. We’ve been given an opportunity to come together in a time when many forces are trying to divide us. Choose love and understanding and try to see yourself reflected in the people you encounter.

Hill: Wear the mask, take your precautions. But then again, if you’ve had the vaccine, go out and live your life. Take all the safety precautions, but if you’ve been vaccinated, you’re in pretty good shape. It’s just gonna take 10 days out of your life, that’s all.

Dweck: Trust the medical professionals that are recommending whatever care or procedures they’re recommending, for sure. And I’d definitely recommend getting vaccinated, because who knows—I could have been the person who ended up having to go to the hospital, instead of just being at home and not feeling well.

Merchant: I think it’s totally reasonable to reconsider how much we’ve been socializing, and that we’ve got a long way to go before things truly get back to normal, but I don’t think it’s helpful to freak out about it. The data shows that the vaccines are crazy effective at preventing serious illness, and we should rely on that rather than random anecdotes about people who got sick.

O’Flaherty: I have my own physical therapy practice, so I’m super active, and pretty fit. And I’m glad I had the vaccine—that was my biggest surprise, was being like, Oh, OK. This is what it’s like having it even with the vaccine.

Source: What It’s Like to Have Breakthrough COVID

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More Contents:

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How to Get the COVID-19 Vaccine Without Your Parents’ Permission

How to Meet Up with Online Friends From Quarantine Without Making It Weird

Get the Vaccine When You’re Eligible—Even if Some Older Folks Haven’t Yet

Unvaccinated Couple Died of COVID 3 Hours Apart and Left Behind 2 Teens

Stop Telling People Not to Get Vaccinated, Joe Rogan

Here’s What Convinced 19 Hesitant People to Get the COVID Vaccine

How New CDC Rules About Post-Vax Hangouts Affect You, Personally

I’m Worried About the Delta Variant—Should I Get a COVID Booster?

Essential Tools & ResourcesFeatured updates: COVID-19 resource center

COVID-19 Test Results: How Texting Makes it Easy for Patients to Access Lab Results from Epic

Since COVID-19 began affecting our communities in March, nearly 75 million tests for the viral infection have been reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). For the public health laboratories and clinics that are processing results, that’s a lot of tests to communicate to the patients following testing.

And, timely result delivery is especially important amidst the current public health crisis, as people who test positive for the virus should self-isolate as soon as possible in order to minimize the risk of spreading it to those around them. We don’t have days or weeks to wait for results.

That’s why healthcare organizations are relying on integrations with patient communication software and electronic health systems, like Epic Systems, to make it easier for patients to access COVID-19 test results and other labs. And, using HIPAA-compliant text messaging, healthcare professionals can automatically notify patients of test results, allowing them to quickly take action, whether positive or negative.

Faster, secure access to test results.

Epic Systems’ partnership with CVS Health‘s drive-thru testing sites spans more than 30 states where patients who are tested for COVID-19 can view their tests online via Epic Systems’ MyChart patient portal. Epic’s lead customer service executive for CVS Health, Wyatt Rose, explains, “The goal in offering convenient, online access to test results is to contribute to people’s peace of mind as they go back to work, take part in community events, and reconnect with friends and family.”

And with integrations to automated communication software, such as Providertech’s HIPAA-compliant texting platform, patients can receive text messages that notify them when their online test results are available. This ensures patients access their lab results as soon as possible without compromising the security of private health information (PHI).

HIPAA requires that all sensitive information that is stored and transmitted across any mobile device, such as a smartphone, needs to be encrypted. So, when text messages are encrypted, third parties who are not permitted access cannot use or read protected health information. This prevents unauthorized users from accessing PHI or other secure information on public Wi-Fi or open cell phone networks, or in the event a device is stolen or lost.

That’s why HIPAA-compliant messaging software requires patients to authenticate their identity upon receiving a text message. Once they’ve confirmed their identity, they can easily access their COVID-19 test results (and many other laboratory tests) via the link included in the text message. This can shorten the time it takes for your practice to deliver results from days to hours, depending on the test, thereby reducing any patient anxiety.

Less staff time spent on the phone.

Your staff is already swamped trying to deliver compassionate care to the patients who are already in your office or hospital beds. There’s not enough time to call each patient on the phone with their test results for COVID-19 or any other type of diagnostic test. Using technology to automate communication about laboratory results can reduce your outbound calls, freeing up your staff to focus on the patients in front of them who need care.

By leveraging automated patient communication software, your practice can easily scale delivery of COVID-19 test results without using up limited resources. As an Epic AppOrchard company, our secure messaging platform seamlessly integrates with Epic Systems’ health records software, which means you can establish protocols and workflows that automatically send text messages based on new updates to a patient’s medical records.

Messaging templates make it easy for you to launch and implement test results delivery via text, you can also customize your messages based on the needs of your practice, providing not only test results but also navigation for patients regarding important next steps. In addition, the integration helps automate steps in your workflow by marking off when test results have been delivered and opened by patients. 

By integrating into patient health records, healthcare professionals can automatically notify patients of test results via text, allowing them to quickly view their results and take action, whether positive or negative. This compliments portals by promoting portal use for patients who have active portal accounts but also provides additional access to the majority of patients who are not leveraging portals or do not have a need for continuous portal use.

Patients can quickly take action.

Some medical professionals may be hesitant to transition to electronic delivery of lab data for fear that it minimizes the personal touch that is an important aspect of compassionate care. However, when used correctly, automated technology can actually improve your ability to deliver a personalized interaction with your patients at the moment they most need you.

For example, if you’re delivering lab outcomes via text, you can include customized messages about next steps your patients can take to ensure they get the care they need based on the outcomes of their tests. Patients who test positive for COVID-19 may be directed to a webpage where they can schedule a virtual visit with a doctor to learn more, or for those without symptoms, it may suffice to direct them to a landing page with information about quarantining to minimize the spread. For those who receive negative tests, you can still prompt them to visit a page that educates them on how to minimize their risk of becoming infected.

HIPAA compliant texting truly is a tool to help you deliver compassionate care at scale.

“We believe leveraging technology can help improve both the experience and outcomes for patients everywhere,” said Chris Grasso, Associate Vice President for Informatics and Data Services for Fenway Health. Delivering results via text not only provides peace of mind to those experiencing symptoms, it also ensures patients receive timely treatment and the resources they need to stay healthy while limiting exposure to others within the community.”

Read how a FQHC decreased delivery time for COVID-19 test results from days to minutes.

Source: ProviderTeh

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Southern California Food Allergy Institute

What does a positive COVID test result mean, and what should you do next? In this video, TPIRC Founder and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Randhawa explains COVID-19 test results and what they mean for you and your family. He covers both the PCR and antibody tests that are currently available and what an individual should do if they receive a positive test result. Make sure to like, comment, and subscribe in order to stay up-to-date with all of our latest videos and start following us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tpircnow/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/tran… Twitter: https://twitter.com/rarecures

Tesla, Netflix Slammed As Stocks Fall On Weak Jobs Data, Trump Covid Case

The announcement that Donald Trump tested positive for coronavirus triggered a sell-off in early morning trading around the world on Friday that tapered off by day’s end. Tech stocks, however, failed to recover, as Wall Street investors prepare for increased volatility in the weeks leading up to the election.

Key Facts

The tech-heavy Nasdaq ended the day down 251 points, or 2.2%, while the Dow Jones Industrial Average shed 134 points, or 0.5%, and the S&P 500 fell 1%.

Tech stocks were among Friday’s biggest losers, with Tesla and Netflix falling 7% and 5%, respectively, while Apple and Microsoft were each down 3%.

Cboe’s VIX Index, which measures volatility expectations based on options contracts, at one point jumped up more than 7%, reaching its highest point since early September, when tech stocks corrected and the Nasdaq had its fastest 10% plunge in history.

U.S. airline stocks proved a bright spot in the Friday market after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said lawmakers were preparing relief for the industry through either a broad-based stimulus bill or standalone legislation.

The S&P 500 Airlines Industry Index ended the day up 2.3%.

Jobs data released before the market open revealed that U.S. employers added just 661,000 jobs in September, about 25% less than the 859,000 new jobs economists were forecasting and less than half of the nearly 1.5 million jobs the economy added back in August.

The unemployment rate of 7.9% was better than the forecast of 8.2%, but it’s still far below the 3.5% unemployment rate in February–before governments shut down businesses after a domestic spike in coronavirus cases.

Key Background

Donald Trump announced in a tweet shortly after midnight on Friday that he and First Lady Melania had tested positive for Covid-19, adding that they’d begin quarantining “immediately.” The announcement triggered an immediate sell-off in stock futures and initially rattled global equity markets, but losses have since pulled back: Japan’s Nikkei Index closed down about 0.7%, but France’s CAC 40 and the United Kingdom’s FTSE 100 managed to turn positive for the day, though their gains remained below 1%.

The Dow and S&P 500 each ended Thursday, the first day of fourth-quarter trading, virtually flat after stimulus negotiations between House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin reached a standstill. September was the worst month for U.S. stocks since May, and history has shown that October is generally a volatile month for stocks–even more so during election years.

Crucial Quote

“The news of Trump contracting Covid-19 could completely change the direction of the campaign and adds to our already cautious outlook on the stock market,” said James McDonald, the CEO of Los Angeles-based Hercules Investments. “[It] will elevate institutional money’s preparation for a Democratic White House and all the tax, trade and budget implications that go along with it. We expect institutional investors to start de-risking portfolios and increasing hedges in preparation for market volatility.”

Further Reading

Trump’s Covid Diagnosis Rattles Markets: Here’s What Wall Street Thinks Happens Next (Forbes)

Here’s What The Last Jobs Report Before The Presidential Election Means For Voters (Forbes)

U.S. Futures, European Stocks Drop Following Trump’s Covid-19 Diagnosis (Forbes)

Dow Futures Down 400 Points After Trump Tests Positive For Covid-19 (Forbes) Follow me on Twitter. Send me a secure tip.

Jonathan Ponciano

 Jonathan Ponciano

I’m a reporter at Forbes focusing on markets and finance. I graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I double-majored in business journalism and economics while working for UNC’s Kenan-Flagler Business School as a marketing and communications assistant. Before Forbes, I spent a summer reporting on the L.A. private sector for Los Angeles Business Journal and wrote about publicly traded North Carolina companies for NC Business News Wire. Reach out at jponciano@forbes.com.

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CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” watch how stocks perform as the market opens, and the team discusses how the White House is responding to President Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis. For access to live and exclusive video from CNBC subscribe to CNBC PRO: https://cnb.cx/2NGeIvi U.S. stocks fell in volatile trading on Friday after President Donald Trump’s coronavirus diagnosis fueled concerns about the election and a worsening pandemic. Major averages clawed back some of the steep losses after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi signaled aid for the airline industry could be coming soon, perhaps even as part of a much-anticipated broad relief bill. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed 134.09 points, or 0.5%, lower at 27,682.81 after dropping 430 points at its session low. The S&P 500 slid 1.0%, or 32.36 points, to 3,248.44 after falling as much as 1.7% earlier. The Nasdaq Composite declined 2.2%, or 251.49 points, to 11,075.02. Shares of airlines jumped higher in unison after Pelosi called on the industry to delay furloughs, saying relief for airline workers is “imminent.” American Airlines and United erased earlier losses and popped 3.3% and 2.4%, respectively. “We will either enact Chairman DeFazio’s bipartisan stand-alone legislation or achieve this as part of a comprehensive negotiated relief bill, extending for another six months the Payroll Support Program,” Pelosi said in a statement. Earlier Friday, Pelosi said Trump’s illness changed the dynamic of stimulus talks, adding lawmakers will find the “middle ground” and will “get the job done.” The House passed the $2.2 trillion Democratic coronavirus stimulus bill Thursday night, while Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin has offered a $1.6 trillion package. Still, the president’s diagnosis added more uncertainty to the election, an event that was already weighing on the market and keeping traders on edge as they attempted to evaluate the possible outcomes. It also raised concerns about a second wave of the virus and a slower reopening. » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC Classic: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCclassic Turn to CNBC TV for the latest stock market news and analysis. From market futures to live price updates CNBC is the leader in business news worldwide. The News with Shepard Smith is CNBC’s daily news podcast providing deep, non-partisan coverage and perspective on the day’s most important stories. Available to listen by 8:30pm ET / 5:30pm PT daily beginning September 30: https://www.cnbc.com/2020/09/29/the-n… Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: http://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on Twitter: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC

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Do I Need a Referral For a COVID-19 Test? What Happens If You Test Positive? Your Coronavirus

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As COVID-19 cases surge in Victoria and NSW, authorities have again urged anyone with symptoms, including cough, fever, or sore throat, to get tested. Most results should be available within a few days and people should self-isolate while they’re awaiting results.

Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews said today Victoria recorded 275 new COVID-19 cases. Mask-wearing whenever outside the home will be mandatory for residents of metropolitan Melbourne and Mitchell Shire from Wednesday at 11:59pm.

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian said there were 20 new cases in NSW today, and urged residents to avoid crowded places, consider wearing a mask when physical distancing wasn’t possible, and minimise any non-essential travel.

Here are the most important things to know about testing.


À lire aussi : Got a COVID-19 test in Victoria and still haven’t got your results? Here’s what may be happening — and what to do


Do I need a referral to get a COVID-19 test?

For the vast majority of people, no — you don’t need a referral to get tested at dedicated public COVID-19 testing clinic.

However, you will need a pathology request form if you plan to get tested at a private pathology clinic.

COVID-19-testing clinics in NSW are listed here, and Victorian testing sites (including pop-up clinics) are listed here. The Victorian Department of Health and Human Services says on it website:

Please call ahead before visiting a testing site, unless you choose to be tested at a pop-up testing site.

Testing locations are listed on each state or territory’s health departments, including for Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia, Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory.

Start by seeing if there is a pop-up drive-through or walk-through clinic near you. Some public sector fever clinics have a booking system to reduce wait times but many of the pop-up testing drive-through sites will allow you just to show up in your car.

Do not walk unannounced into a private pathology clinic, hospital emergency department or into your GP’s surgery.

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If you can’t get to a dedicated public COVID-19 testing clinic, call your GP and ask for a telehealth consult. The GP can organise a pathology request form to be sent electronically to a private pathology clinic and will advise you on how to get tested there.

While you’re waiting for your test results, it’s important to stay at home in case you are infectious.


À lire aussi : Explainer: what’s the new coronavirus saliva test, and how does it work?


What happens if I test positive?

You will be notified if you’ve tested positive to COVID-19. If you were tested at a private clinic, you may receive a call from your GP who ordered the test, or from the public health team.

If you were tested at a public testing site like a drive-through clinic, a state government public health official will contact you. They will usually do the contact tracing at the same time.

Their job is to find out about anyone else you may have given the virus to while you’ve been infectious. They will usually ask where you’ve been and who you’ve seen in the last few days before you became ill.

There are national guidelines for management of coronavirus, but how they are implement is usually a state decision. Generally, the facility where you got the test will tell you how long you need to isolate for.

It’s important to ask as many questions as possible when you’re informed of your result.

The Conversation, CC BY-ND

How can I get tested? Is there a blood test?

Most tests will usually be done by a swab around the back of the throat and the nose. Some sites will either just swab your throat, or just your nose, but the gold standard at the moment is to swab both.

There’s also a new saliva test, which tests a sample you spit into a small container. It’s used in limited circumstances where it’s not possible to take a nasal swab, such as with young children resisting a swab.

The problem is saliva seems to have less of the virus in it than sputum (which is collected from the back of the nose and throat), so a saliva test result may not be as reliable.

There are currently two types of blood tests. One is an antibody test, which can measure whether you’ve already had the virus and recovered. But it’s not very useful because health authorities are more concerned about finding out who has the virus now, so they can do contact tracing.

Mask-wearing outside the home will be mandatory in metropolitan Melbourne and Mitchell Shire from Wednesday at 11:59pm. DAVID CROSLING/AAP

Researchers from Monash University announced recently they’ve able to detect positive COVID-19 cases using blood samples in about 20 minutes, and identify whether someone has contracted the virus.

However, it’s very new research and likely won’t be rolled out on a large scale very soon. The researchers said last week they’re seeking commercial and government support to upscale production.

Despite problems with new types of tests, in a pandemic it’s important to research and trial novel testing methods that can help us fight the virus.

The most important thing you can do to help stop the spread is to try to maintain physical distancing as much as you can. Wash your hands frequently, and if you develop any symptoms — even very minor ones — err on the side of getting tested.

By: Infectious Diseases Physician, Senior Lecturer, James Cook University and, The University of Queensland

Source: https://theconversation.com

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